Without a Doubt Info

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This #1 New York Times bestseller is not just a book about a
trial. It's a book about a woman. Marcia Clark takes us inside her head
and her heart. Her voice is raw, incisive, disarming, unmistakable. Her
story is both sweeping and deeply personal. It is the story of a woman
who, when caught up in an event that galvanized an entire country, rose
to that occasion with singular integrity, drive, honesty and grace. In a
case that tore America apart, and that continues to haunt us as few
events of history have, Marcia Clark emerged as the only true heroine,
because she stood for justice, fought the good fight, and fought it
well.

Average Ratings and Reviews
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4.43

4316 Ratings

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Ratings and Reviews From Market


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Reviews for Without a Doubt:

5

Oct 22, 2015

After her (in)famous time in the headlines and being beamed across televisions the world over, Clark took the time to put together this short piece to give her side of the story, a refreshing look at things for the interested reader. While she pulled no punches and tossed many key players in the OJ Simpson murder trial under the proverbial bus, Clark supported her arguments with first-hand knowledge that might significantly shape the views of readers who may remember the circus that inundated After her (in)famous time in the headlines and being beamed across televisions the world over, Clark took the time to put together this short piece to give her side of the story, a refreshing look at things for the interested reader. While she pulled no punches and tossed many key players in the OJ Simpson murder trial under the proverbial bus, Clark supported her arguments with first-hand knowledge that might significantly shape the views of readers who may remember the circus that inundated the airwaves in 1994 and 1995. Taking the reader along the chronological happenings from the discovery of the bodies to her role in the trial, Clark offered up a succinct and heartfelt look into the case. When her opposition began waltzing into the courtroom, Clark editorialised on these bumbling fools more interested in the spotlight than arguing for justice. She also repeatedly showed how Lance Ito was one of the worst people ever to don a judge's robe and how out of his league the Honourable gentleman might have been. Even the Fuhrman testimony blunders, which some say cost the prosecution the case, are dissected and their role placed in the larger context of the case. Clark effectively showed how she fought tooth and nail for justice, but got only a major shaft from Ito and the clowns opposite her, with rulings, motions, and objections that could not have been concocted for a Hollywood script. In the end, it was a miscarriage of justice, plain and simple, though I am sure no reader who picked up this book thought otherwise before sinking their teeth into the prose before them.

I have much admiration for Marcia Clark in her new-found career as a legal thriller writer. I find her work as blunt and succinct as this piece ended up being. While some may feel that it is a collection of soapbox comments marinaded in sour grapes, I could not disagree any stronger. I remember the trial, the circus, and the shock of the verdict. I was firmly convinced that Simpson was giving the world a gigantic 'screw you' through his Hollywood 'Dream Team' who were anything but effective legal scholars, trumped only in their ineptness by Ito, who was a dunderhead of the highest order. It is these, the true legal trials that saw money trump justice, that get to me; where the spotlight overtakes the law of the land. Clark showed all the major gaffes before she offers an explanation (if she can) and lets the reader determine if justice might have been set aside. It is a refreshing (albeit brief) look into the Trial of the '90s and the soap opera of the century, which even a simultaneous return from the dead of both Victor Newman and Stefano DiMera could not have trumped. Written in such a way not to dwell on the numerous issues, Clark narrated effectively, giving highlights where needed and segueing from point to point with relative ease

Kudos, Madam Clark for this wonderful piece of insight. I do love your fictional work, which I hope you pepper with your real-life cases.

Like/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at:
http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/ ...more
0

May 04, 2016

I'm dnf-ing this book at 60% but not because of the way it's written. (Although it did get go off track in places) This is going to be a bit of an emotional, rambling review so be forewarned if you continue on.

I can't read another minute of this because it's just too depressing. I lived in Los Angeles during the murders and then the trial and it was an every day part of our lives. I was young while this was going on and I, as many others, focused more on the racial aspects of the case than I'm dnf-ing this book at 60% but not because of the way it's written. (Although it did get go off track in places) This is going to be a bit of an emotional, rambling review so be forewarned if you continue on.

I can't read another minute of this because it's just too depressing. I lived in Los Angeles during the murders and then the trial and it was an every day part of our lives. I was young while this was going on and I, as many others, focused more on the racial aspects of the case than anything. We were still reeling from the Rodney King case and that combined with the media frenzy really consumed everything. I'm not sure why I decided to read this. Much of it I remember. But what stood out to me now that I'm older (and hopefully wiser) was the horrible misogyny that was such a giant part but never addressed. In reading this I was horrified at the abuse Nicole Brown suffered at the hands of this man. She was repeatedly beaten and raped and NO ONE did anything to help her. Not her family, not her friends and most sadly not the police. Officers went on domestic violence calls and ended up joking around with OJ and then got his autograph and left her there to be beaten again. As I read this I couldn't imagine how terrifying that must felt. When OJ is arrested for the murders you read parts of the interview police did with him and it made me sick to my stomach. It's a fricking double murder and the male officers are laughing and joking around with him and he makes "you know how women can be" jokes. No real interviewing was done. No hard questions were asked. As the book goes on you see over and over again how almost no one involved in this case really cared about the victims. Everyone had their own agendas.

I also didn't realize how badly Marcia Clark was treated at the time. I mean I saw all the reports that focused on her hair or her clothes and the topless photes instead of the case but I didn't recognize this for what it was at the time. I do now and it sickens me. None of the men were treated this way. The judge did nothing to stop this. The DA's office did nothing to stop this. No one said this isn't ok. And the women jurors who had no problem letting him go despite all of the evidence blow my mind.

I remember at the time feeling bad for Ronald Goldman's parents but I didn't have children then. I do now. I have sons. And I could not get my head around how horrible this must have been for this family. Not only did they lose their son, but they lost him due to a situation that never should have happened. They then had to sit through the nightmare that was this trial and still had no justice in the end. My heart broke for them.

I was so disgusted with people as a whole while reading this that I just couldn't finish it. (Do you know people order glasses of OJ and send them to her table while she's eating out?? Cuz you know, domestic violence and double homicide is SO funny).

So.......the book is fairly well written. As I mentioned before it goes off track in some places and she weaves some of her personal life into the story and while I see the point she's making I didn't like the way in was interspersed into the case. She was pretty candid about things that went on and how she felt about other people involved in it. For me though it was just so depressing. Two people lost their lives here. One who was tortured for years previously and one who was barely acknowledged in any of this because he wasn't part of the circus. And there were two small children (ages 5 & 8) who would've discovered their mother nearly decapitated and a horrific bloody scene if the dog wouldn't have gotten out. And seriously, no one really cared, except Ron Goldman's parents and a few members of the prosecution. Everyone else was out for prestige or money or tv time or whatever. The book is just page after page of this and I just couldn't push myself into reading another minute of it. ...more
5

Jun 27, 2011

This book was fascinating. She begins the book with stating how painful it still is to her to remember the O.J. trial. Ironically, the day I'm writing this review is the very day that Casey Anthony was found not guilty (O.J. Trial part 2). I can only imagine how completely empty Marcia Clark felt when her verdict was read, and they had enough forensic evidence to convict O.J. 5 times over. I know how disgusted I feel right now (and how disgusted I felt back in 1995), and I'm just an "armchair This book was fascinating. She begins the book with stating how painful it still is to her to remember the O.J. trial. Ironically, the day I'm writing this review is the very day that Casey Anthony was found not guilty (O.J. Trial part 2). I can only imagine how completely empty Marcia Clark felt when her verdict was read, and they had enough forensic evidence to convict O.J. 5 times over. I know how disgusted I feel right now (and how disgusted I felt back in 1995), and I'm just an "armchair warrior" as Marcia says. She put her blood, sweat, and tears into that case.

This book made me so angry so many times, not because of the writing but because of how much of a circus it was allowed to become. Everything that could have gone against the prosecution, did. I watched the O.J. trial on TV. I don't remember it all vividly, but I think a lot of us remember where we were when that verdict was read.

I've become very interested in the workings of the law after this Casey Anthony trial. I liked going behind the scenes with Marcia in this trial. I learned a lot.


I'd suggest this to anyone interested in either the O.J. trial or law in general. ...more
4

Apr 30, 2016

Since the FX series, The People Vs OJ Simpson blew my mind - I have been unable to stop thinking about this case, in particular about Marcia Clark. This book is compelling and enraging all at the same time. Obviously Clark is of the opinion that Simpson was guilty and having seen the mountain of evidence laid out in this book, I defy anyone to think otherwise. This was one of the most disgusting miscarriages of justice ever carried out.

Clark's recollection of this time is highly charged stuff. Since the FX series, The People Vs OJ Simpson blew my mind - I have been unable to stop thinking about this case, in particular about Marcia Clark. This book is compelling and enraging all at the same time. Obviously Clark is of the opinion that Simpson was guilty and having seen the mountain of evidence laid out in this book, I defy anyone to think otherwise. This was one of the most disgusting miscarriages of justice ever carried out.

Clark's recollection of this time is highly charged stuff. She decisively captures the atmosphere of tension in a post-race riot LA, but she refuses to let the reader forget that this case was about the brutal killing of two people - one of whom was a woman who was terrorised by the man she married. Clark forces the reader to do what the jury wouldn't do and that's look the issue of domestic violence head on.

Clark's treatment at the hands of the media and by the American public was nothing short of disgraceful. The column inches given over to her hair, dress sense and whether or not she was a 'bitch' would never have been written about any of her male colleagues. Without delving into self pity, Clark fiercely calls this out as wrong. This case brought many issues to the forefront but perhaps the one that has remained buried in the mountain of analysis since has been the issue of feminism. Clark is an unassuming feminist hero in her refusal to accept the treatment she received and her vociferous advocacy for a woman who was no longer able to speak for herself, Nicole Brown-Simpson.

This book captures a moment when things went so horribly wrong, looks at the reasons why and asks for change. A book about the cult of celebrity, what wealth can buy and two people who were utterly failed by the American justice system. ...more
5

Nov 06, 2012

Riveting book. After almost 20 years, the fascinating cast of characters remains: Kato Kaelan, the Brown sisters, the howling of the bloodied dog, the racist cop, the bumbling blood experts, etc. The author's ghost writer does an exceptional job of keeping the narrative moving. Marcia Clark is a 41-year-old Jewish girl, raped when young, two broken marriages behind her, living in a dump with two young children to raise when suddenly she gets the Simpson case. The stress often threatens to Riveting book. After almost 20 years, the fascinating cast of characters remains: Kato Kaelan, the Brown sisters, the howling of the bloodied dog, the racist cop, the bumbling blood experts, etc. The author's ghost writer does an exceptional job of keeping the narrative moving. Marcia Clark is a 41-year-old Jewish girl, raped when young, two broken marriages behind her, living in a dump with two young children to raise when suddenly she gets the Simpson case. The stress often threatens to overwhelm her. She and her staff are up against an array of the legal profession's highest paid practitioners, the client is rich, and the judge is afraid to offend and tries too often to play it down the middle. In addition, the defense has stripped the jury pool of the bright and educated, leaving as jurors the least bright and predominantly black middle aged women who don't want to see one of their race's superstars humbled in court and convicted. Plus, still within recent memory at the time the Simpson trial took place, a white jury unconscionably let the policemen who beat Rodney King free. The Simpson jury's middle aged black women aim to 'right the balance. Clark introduces evidence of Simpson beating his wife constantly, parades witness before the jury that in Clark's words just stares back with hatred. She produces hair, blood and clothing with Simpson's and his victims' blood intertwined. Clark and the other public servants do their best against insurmountable odds, knowing in advance that they will lose. A sad story, in many ways, that highlights the racial divide that lives within us and how hard it is for decently paid but not rich public servants to convict and rich and powerful man. ...more
2

Mar 22, 2009

It brought back the whole context of the Simpson trial to me. At the time, I paid little attention to it because I knew from the beginning that he would get off, and it was too painful, so I minimized my exposure. One of my friends at work used to vent about it to me, so I began using our daily newspaper in a creative manner. I'd find the picture of OJ in the paper, and lay it down every morning for our elderly poodle to pee on. I'd tell her every day, "Linda, Spunky peed on OJ today," and that It brought back the whole context of the Simpson trial to me. At the time, I paid little attention to it because I knew from the beginning that he would get off, and it was too painful, so I minimized my exposure. One of my friends at work used to vent about it to me, so I began using our daily newspaper in a creative manner. I'd find the picture of OJ in the paper, and lay it down every morning for our elderly poodle to pee on. I'd tell her every day, "Linda, Spunky peed on OJ today," and that seemed to make her happy.

This book was really good. I don't think I would have read it, though, if OJ wasn't in jail right now. This book really brings home just what a big deal it was that so many respectable people (Barry Scheck, Alan Dershowitz, for example) jumped on the flimsiest pretexts to prostitute themselves for him.

Anyway, it cost me a buck, so if you can find a copy for that kind of money, then go for it. Read it in small doses, though, because it's depressing to see the overwhelming evidence and know what the outcome was going to be. I note that none of OJ's attorneys have come out with books with this kind of detail - perhaps because they really couldn't find anything to exonerate him.

Thank goodness he's in jail and I hope he stays there the rest of his life. I hope he's really, really miserable. Still, that's small comfort for the two families of the victims.


...more
4

Feb 12, 2017

"Sausage Party Vs. Clark" would have been a fine title for this work: our heroine is surrounded by testosterone fueled barrages: even her change of hairstyle drew inexplicable ire from the media circus and obvious visual ridicule inside the court. Even Judge Ito seemed to join in on the overt sexism leading me to the aforesaid alternative title. I watched the trial and the media coverage relentlessly (I worked out of my home at the time) and Marcia was literally raked over the coals for every "Sausage Party Vs. Clark" would have been a fine title for this work: our heroine is surrounded by testosterone fueled barrages: even her change of hairstyle drew inexplicable ire from the media circus and obvious visual ridicule inside the court. Even Judge Ito seemed to join in on the overt sexism leading me to the aforesaid alternative title. I watched the trial and the media coverage relentlessly (I worked out of my home at the time) and Marcia was literally raked over the coals for every move she made, every word she said. And even though the 'Sausage Party' won, Marcia Clark stood tall, hard, and firm (along with Darden): she walked into that courtroom everyday with her head held high, her heroism a true inspiration. Congratulations to Marcia Clark! And now, she has put it all behind (I hope) and has become a successful writer. It's so true: revenge is a dish best served cold and Clark is now relishing her new life. Of all the books I read of the 'Trial of the Century' this is my favorite. I am a lifetime fan of this amazing person. ...more
5

Dec 14, 2016

What an absolute stunning book and must read for anyone interested in the case. It is heartbreaking, infuriating, sad and confusing at times. There is little joy in the book and the theme is quite morose. Yet, the book is very well written. She holds nothing back, the wins, the losses and the raw emotions and relationships. She gets a bit personal at time and though some of it isn't necessary, it wasn't in 94-95 either and I think that's part of the lesson. The media never should have pried as What an absolute stunning book and must read for anyone interested in the case. It is heartbreaking, infuriating, sad and confusing at times. There is little joy in the book and the theme is quite morose. Yet, the book is very well written. She holds nothing back, the wins, the losses and the raw emotions and relationships. She gets a bit personal at time and though some of it isn't necessary, it wasn't in 94-95 either and I think that's part of the lesson. The media never should have pried as they did. It's shameful.

What continues to baffle me is the ability of the defense to live with themselves knowing what they know about the hard irrefutable evidence of the crime and yet serve for the almighty dollar. It's baffling to this day.

The conclusions from this book are easily drawn and anyone with the ability to read and dissect evidence can easily come to the correct conclusion that jury nullification occurred here. There are many terms used that will require research, but everything in the book points in the same direction that anyone that has objectively studied the evidence points. No only did he do it, but he flaunted about getting off doing it. The greatest injustice we all have done as a society is to gloss over the abuse the women in this case have suffered to "right a wrong" and "send a message" because of the alleged racism. The racism never occurred. Never. The fault in the case is easy to see as well, it rests with the LAPD, the criminalists being sloppy, the incompetent judge (and the people that continued to allow him to serve) and the immoral defense attorneys. Furthermore, the jury is at fault. They ignored and cast off the irrefutable evidence given in the case because they would not be able to go back to their houses in downtown LA and face their neighbors with a guilty verdict. In fact, they would be fearful of their lives. I almost feel sorry for them, but as a person, you do the right thing regardless of consequences. The right thing is justice and in this case it was not served at any level. ...more
4

Jan 26, 2020

I had read several books after the OJ trial, all of which only reinforced the ridiculousness of his acquittal in the face of all of the evidence but this is by far one of the best that really lays out the case, the evidence, and of course with an extremely intimate view given Marcia Clark's role as prosecutor.

Her story is one that is difficult to put down. You get a clear picture of Los Angeles at the time - the tension with the race riots following Rodney King, the deference of the police to I had read several books after the OJ trial, all of which only reinforced the ridiculousness of his acquittal in the face of all of the evidence but this is by far one of the best that really lays out the case, the evidence, and of course with an extremely intimate view given Marcia Clark's role as prosecutor.

Her story is one that is difficult to put down. You get a clear picture of Los Angeles at the time - the tension with the race riots following Rodney King, the deference of the police to the celebrity of OJ, and probably more of the story that wasn't told or told enough about the 66 or so times that Nicole Brown Simpson was assaulted in some way by her husband before he murdered her. Clark explains why the domestic violence angle was downplayed in the trial, as well as the challenges they faced with Lance Ito as a judge who seemed willing to take guidance from the "dream team" of OJ's defense attornies. Or at the very least, not take a stronger stand on areas of law where he should have.

Clark also reminds us that this was not about race, it was about brutal murder of two people - however, the defense played the card early on and Mark Furhman quickly became the focus and it became a case ABOUT race.

I also thought she did a nice job of bringing forth her observations about her treatment by the media - the obvious sexism without coming across as defensive or self-pitying. It's disgraceful really, and unfortunately, not enough has changed in this regard with respect to women in positions of power. (They still receive comments on their appearance that you'd never see for a man).

It's still unbelievable that OJ Simpson was not found guilty in the face of so much evidence. Clark says that perhaps the trial was lost months before the closing arguments were presented, the jury wanting to find the celebrity of OJ innocent, of wanting to use the trial as Johnnie Cochran suggested to "make a statement" against racism. It's unfortunate that it was a career-ending case for her, as clearly the judicial system needs the kind of insight and experience she can bring to the table.
...more
5

Nov 12, 2013

Without a doubt (pun intended) Marcia Clark is a woman with fortitude, perseverance and a lot of pluck. For many of us who were bombarded with the murder trial of OJ Simpson, and likewise blindsided by the acquittal, the lead prosecutor shares insight and detail into the trial that was never revealed by the news media of the 90's. I actually read this book shortly after it was published, and I wanted to re-read it now, nearly 20 years later.

Her analysis of how so much incriminating evidence Without a doubt (pun intended) Marcia Clark is a woman with fortitude, perseverance and a lot of pluck. For many of us who were bombarded with the murder trial of OJ Simpson, and likewise blindsided by the acquittal, the lead prosecutor shares insight and detail into the trial that was never revealed by the news media of the 90's. I actually read this book shortly after it was published, and I wanted to re-read it now, nearly 20 years later.

Her analysis of how so much incriminating evidence against the defendant resulted instead in a verdict of "not guilty" reflects more on society as a whole. I think she portrayed it accurately and fairly. (I don't want to give too much away!) The judge, the defense "dream team", race relations and celebrity status all worked against justice for the murder victims, plus mistakes made by the LAPD.

If you like true crime stories, this is one you will have to read. If you like to read about working women and their fight for equality in a male-dominated work environment, read this book. I truly admired Marcia Clark's strength and determination to do the job she had been assigned in the midst of personal tribulations. Some day it would be cool to meet her. I would tell her face to face, "Well done!" ...more
4

Jun 10, 2017

I was interested to hear about the trial from Marcia Clark's point of view (more than any other person involved in the trial). I am so glad I chose to read this. Not only does it talk about what is going on from her perspective, but it waters down difficult forensic terminology so anyone can understand it. It also talks about and debunks theories on what the prosecution should have done differently. It never loses sight of the fact that this case was still about two people being murdered, and I was interested to hear about the trial from Marcia Clark's point of view (more than any other person involved in the trial). I am so glad I chose to read this. Not only does it talk about what is going on from her perspective, but it waters down difficult forensic terminology so anyone can understand it. It also talks about and debunks theories on what the prosecution should have done differently. It never loses sight of the fact that this case was still about two people being murdered, and not the circus it ended up becoming.
If you are interested in the case from Marcia Clark's point of view I would definitely give this a try. ...more
5

Feb 27, 2016

Kept me interested

This is a very comprehensive book written by the one person who was always there. I have long admired Marcia Clark as she was thrust into chaos and maintained her integrity throughout the ordeal.
5

Sep 22, 2019

Marcia Clark takes us inside her head and her heart. Her voice is raw, incisive, disarming, unmistakable. Her story is both sweeping and deeply personal. It is the story of a woman who, when caught up in an event that galvanized an entire country, rose to that occasion with singular integrity, drive, honesty and grace.

In a case that tore America apart, and that continues to haunt us as few events of history have, Marcia Clark emerged as the only true heroine, because she stood for justice, Marcia Clark takes us inside her head and her heart. Her voice is raw, incisive, disarming, unmistakable. Her story is both sweeping and deeply personal. It is the story of a woman who, when caught up in an event that galvanized an entire country, rose to that occasion with singular integrity, drive, honesty and grace.

In a case that tore America apart, and that continues to haunt us as few events of history have, Marcia Clark emerged as the only true heroine, because she stood for justice, fought the good fight, and fought it well.

My Thoughts: I eagerly approached this book, having seen portions of the trial and the miniseries based on the trial; I have also read Marcia Clark’s mystery fiction, so I already knew that I could connect to her voice.

Her account of the trial and its preparation was presented intelligently and with a touch of personal drama, which gave her story a special appeal to me. Even as I knew how it all turned out, I was eager to watch it unfold through her revelations of the long months leading up to the verdict.

I could feel how personally affected Clark was as the defense Dream Team twisted events, focused on their conspiracy theories, and played the race card over and over. The inability of Judge Lance Ito to take control of the defense attorneys added to the frustration I felt on behalf of the prosecution attorneys. Marcia Clark wrote: “We lost because American justice is distorted by race. We lost because American justice is corrupted by celebrity. Any lawyer willing to exploit those weaknesses can convince a jury predisposed to acquittal of just about anything.” In the OJ case, “a handful of expensive attorneys were allowed to manipulate the system by invoking the wholly irrelevant, yet provocative issue of racism.”

Time has revealed the error of those touting Simpson’s innocence in that his numerous poor choices afterwards have lent credence to the guilt many believed in. A compelling book that earned 5 stars for me.

...more
3

Feb 04, 2019

3.5 stars. I was in high school during the OJ trial. I remember news clips of him trying on the glove, and I remember word spreading around school of the not guilty verdict on the day it came in. Thats about all I remembered. Interesting to get all this background and hear what went wrong. Its amazing that with rock solid DNA evidence, no alibi, and a history of domestic violence that he wasnt convicted. 3.5 stars. I was in high school during the OJ trial. I remember news clips of him trying on the glove, and I remember word spreading around school of the not guilty verdict on the day it came in. That’s about all I remembered. Interesting to get all this background and hear what went wrong. It’s amazing that with rock solid DNA evidence, no alibi, and a history of domestic violence that he wasn’t convicted. ...more
5

May 14, 2017

Excellent read for anyone, like me, who is fascinated by all of the complexities of the OJ Simpson case. Marcia gives you her firsthand account of what when on behind the scenes and in front of the camera during the Trial of the Century. Highly recommended!
5

Aug 29, 2019

TURNS OUT MY FAVORITE THING IS GETTING DETAILED INTEL ON THE TRIAL OF THE CENTURY FROM THE BADASS WOMAN WHO PROSECUTED IT HERSELF
5

Mar 17, 2017

I was five when the murder trial of O.J. Simpson started and, being a Brit, heard very little about the case growing up. Everything I had heard indicated that Simpson quite literally got away with murder. As I got older, the case piqued my interest and so I read up a bit about it online. I felt pretty certain that he had committed the murders but there were a few fleeting moments where I wondered if there was any chance he could have been innocent.

The reason I read this book was due to the 2016 I was five when the murder trial of O.J. Simpson started and, being a Brit, heard very little about the case growing up. Everything I had heard indicated that Simpson quite literally got away with murder. As I got older, the case piqued my interest and so I read up a bit about it online. I felt pretty certain that he had committed the murders but there were a few fleeting moments where I wondered if there was any chance he could have been innocent.

The reason I read this book was due to the 2016 documentary, 'O.J. Simpson: Made in America.' Although it's 7.5 hours long, and encompasses much more than the infamous trial, I would definitely recommend it for anyone interested. I was glued. I was more certain of his guilt than ever before. However, call me naive or in denial, but I still couldn't wrap my head around the fact that the jury could have even considered acquitting a guy who'd left practically every scrap of evidence there could possibly be in his wake. I honestly thought I'd somehow missed some crucial part of the documentary that could offer an adequate explanation. With my interest yet again snared, I researched some more and that led me to 'Without a Doubt.'

It is honestly one of the most riveting, unbelievable books I've ever read. It took me a good few days to read (a long time for me) because it was almost too much. Too much pain, too much disbelief, too much anger, too much yearning to somehow turn back the clock and give the judge/the 'dream team' defence/the media/the jury a good shake to find out what the hell they were all thinking.

The families of Nicole Brown and Ron Goldman were so severely let down that it is heartbreaking, but Marcia Clark, Chris Darden ... almost the entire prosecution team were let down, too. This book starts right at the very beginning and takes the reader by the hand, showing us again and again how numerous mistakes, lies, and incompetence led to such a result.

The lengths the defence team went to in a somehow successful attempt to circumnavigate the law are both astonishing and disgraceful. The lack of courage, thirst for favourable media coverage and Lance Ito's outright failing to seriously undertake - and adhere to - the responsibilities of his job as a judge is revealed repeatedly and shows, in my opinion, that he might as well have been on the defence's payroll. The jurors, most of whom were still reeling after the Rodney King trial, seem to have refused - pretty much from the offset - to listen to the prosecution and their sound reasoning. The media, far more interested in stalking Marcia (more so than any other member on the prosecution - or defence - team ... sucks to be a woman, huh?) than running with credible stories about the actual case, only fuelled the fire in the utter mess that trial became.

I don't know how Marcia didn't have a full breakdown throughout all of this. The media running stories and debates about her appearance, her temperament, those shamelessly sold topless photographs. Facing misogyny at every level, from the media, to the judge, and far too many people in between. The divorce. The custody battle threatening to take her kids away from her. The criticism she received every day from almost everywhere she turned. Mark bloody Fuhrman. That woman is an inspiration. And my heart aches when I think of how she, Chris, the rest of the team, the families of Nicole and Ron, and the majority of the world must have felt when that verdict came in after only two hours of deliberation by the jury. Over 20 years on, and I feel the same way.

I came to this book expecting Marcia to spell out to me exactly what I'd missed to lead to an acquittal. I came away from this book sad, angry, and feeling somewhat helpless. I didn't miss anything, apparently. There wasn't some piece of huge, jaw-dropping evidence from the defence that proved Simpson's innocence. In fact, there was no evidence whatsoever from the defence, just a complete lack of moral compass and dignity coupled with nonsensical and potentially dangerous claims from a group of fantasists. I honestly don't know how the members of that so-called dream team managed to hold their heads high and sleep at night after that trial.

In all, this book is interesting, engaging, eye-opening, and a must-read to anyone interested in law, racial tensions, feminism, and/or how a man who was black and a celebrity fought the law ... and miraculously won. The good guys did not come out on top in this story but Marcia Clark has earned my eternal respect. ...more
5

Mar 13, 2016

This book is outstanding. I really appreciate Marcia Clark's 'to the point' delivery in this book. No muss, no fuss. I was 10 or so when the OJ Simpson trial was happening, so it's been interesting to revisit The Trial OfThe Century as an adult. Years later when I was a genetics major in college, the questionable testimonies by "expert witnesses" the defense called came up multiple times in my higher level science courses. While it is difficult to read Marcia's story because of the ultimate This book is outstanding. I really appreciate Marcia Clark's 'to the point' delivery in this book. No muss, no fuss. I was 10 or so when the OJ Simpson trial was happening, so it's been interesting to revisit The Trial OfThe Century as an adult. Years later when I was a genetics major in college, the questionable testimonies by "expert witnesses" the defense called came up multiple times in my higher level science courses. While it is difficult to read Marcia's story because of the ultimate verdict as well as all the crap she was put through for being a woman, in the end Marcia has a good message about the importance of diverse juries and the importance of seeing jury duty as a civic duty and not a chore as necessary means to improve the legal system. I appreciated one of her closing thoughts on this topic to the effect of: if a CEO ever complains about the verdict in the OJ Simpson case or the incompetence of the jury members, you should ask the CEO why they won't pay their employees to serve as jurors on long term commitment cases such as The People vs OJ Simpson. As Marcia says, the justice system is as good as the jury you're willing to pay for. ...more
4

Dec 09, 2015

This probably took me longer to read than any other book I've read in awhile. It's not that it wasn't interesting, because it was. There's just so much going on. and legal terms which I didn't understand, and would look up on the computer. (I'm not going to take the time and effort to read a book and just skim over things I don't understand, so I look them up.)
Everyone has an Opinion on O.J. Simpson. I always thought, "guilty". Yet I couldn't help but wonder..."Could he be innocent?" After This probably took me longer to read than any other book I've read in awhile. It's not that it wasn't interesting, because it was. There's just so much going on. and legal terms which I didn't understand, and would look up on the computer. (I'm not going to take the time and effort to read a book and just skim over things I don't understand, so I look them up.)
Everyone has an Opinion on O.J. Simpson. I always thought, "guilty". Yet I couldn't help but wonder..."Could he be innocent?" After reading this, "my opinion" is a definite no. There was way too much evidence pointing in the guilty direction.
Marcia Clark's tale of the O.J. trial is interesting and very detailed. I really don't think she left anything out. After taking this book out I discovered she also writes fiction novels which I'm looking forward to checking out. ...more
4

Mar 22, 2011

Being in my earlier ages during the Simpson trial, I've since been intrigued by the case that gripped the nation. Where else can you find such an intimate look inside the case than the prosecuting attorney? Marcia Clark throughout the book is smart, witty, and at her best. Providing a view point really nobody saw and showed feelings the nation neglected it see. We see how the case effected her personally, professionally, and emotionally. Even more important she lays out the truths of the case Being in my earlier ages during the Simpson trial, I've since been intrigued by the case that gripped the nation. Where else can you find such an intimate look inside the case than the prosecuting attorney? Marcia Clark throughout the book is smart, witty, and at her best. Providing a view point really nobody saw and showed feelings the nation neglected it see. We see how the case effected her personally, professionally, and emotionally. Even more important she lays out the truths of the case from racism of the defense to the incompetent, ego-drive Judge Ito.

Not only is this book point on about the case, its entertaining. It turns out that Marcia isn't just a great lawyer, shes an entertaining, thoughtful writer as well. Well the worth the read for anyone who is interested in lawyer novels and cases. ...more
5

Oct 19, 2016

Growing up I had heard of OJ Simpson and vague references to a trial, having said that I was around 4 or 5 during the murders and trial so I had little knowledge on the subject. After getting the DVD series The people vs OJ, its safe to say I wanted to find out a lot more about the case.

This book was an interesting read for me, from the prosecutions side of the case sharing a lot of things that I think went unreported (to my knowledge!)
I would say this is worth a read if you are interested in Growing up I had heard of OJ Simpson and vague references to a trial, having said that I was around 4 or 5 during the murders and trial so I had little knowledge on the subject. After getting the DVD series The people vs OJ, its safe to say I wanted to find out a lot more about the case.

This book was an interesting read for me, from the prosecutions side of the case sharing a lot of things that I think went unreported (to my knowledge!)
I would say this is worth a read if you are interested in the OJ case specifically or how large scale court cases work as a whole.

Favourite quote: Why leave the fate of our nation in the hands of these moon rocks? ...more
5

Jul 12, 2014

This case, with its unbelievable innocent verdict, has been fascinating for years. At the time of the trial I was stunned at the verdict. Still am, in fact. Ms. Clark's book does a great job of laying out what happened and what went wrong. At times she may not take her share of the blame, but her frustrations are very understandable. How sad that justice could not be properly served by those who, for so many reasons, felt it more important to protect a famous man who happened to have black skin This case, with its unbelievable innocent verdict, has been fascinating for years. At the time of the trial I was stunned at the verdict. Still am, in fact. Ms. Clark's book does a great job of laying out what happened and what went wrong. At times she may not take her share of the blame, but her frustrations are very understandable. How sad that justice could not be properly served by those who, for so many reasons, felt it more important to protect a famous man who happened to have black skin but neither connections or real interest in black people and their issues. ...more
4

Aug 30, 2007

I read this book shortly after she wrote it. It served again as a way to get a glimpse of the personal as well as professional lives of the lead prosecutor in the OJ Simpson trial. As a woman, it was interesting to hear how Ms. Clark defined herself both professionally and personally and how the OJ trial impacted both definitions.
4

Mar 16, 2016

Celebrity, racism, and sexism combined to defeat justice in the 1994 Los Angeles trial of O.J. Simpson for the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman. The lead prosecutor explains why. She throws in the occasional f-word, but provides a good account of the case and its impact on her life.
3

Feb 02, 2018

I found this book in a Little Free Library and now Marcia is my friend.

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