Wilderness: The Lost Writings of Jim Morrison, Volume 1 Info

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Compiled from the literary estate of the singer who brought a
wildly lyrical poetry of the damned to the world of rock 'n' roll.
Includes unpublished poems, drawings, photos, and a candid
self-interview.

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Reviews for Wilderness: The Lost Writings of Jim Morrison, Volume 1:

2

Sep 08, 2012

I rate Jim Morrison's poetry the way I do John Lennon's famous doodles. Technically they're borderline atrocious to fair with the occasional flicker of craft and insight. However, it's their creator that makes them so intriguing.

Replete with copies of Morrison's handwritten work and photos, Wilderness: The Lost Writings is a collection of simple-but-enigmatic phrasings made more interesting due to the writer's fame and infamy. This is best read by Morrison fans, especially if they're still I rate Jim Morrison's poetry the way I do John Lennon's famous doodles. Technically they're borderline atrocious to fair with the occasional flicker of craft and insight. However, it's their creator that makes them so intriguing.

Replete with copies of Morrison's handwritten work and photos, Wilderness: The Lost Writings is a collection of simple-but-enigmatic phrasings made more interesting due to the writer's fame and infamy. This is best read by Morrison fans, especially if they're still young and still open to basic couplets about the various facets of love, lust and elementary existentialism.

What are you doing here?
What do you want?
Is it music?
We can play music.
But you want more.
You want something & someone new.
Am I right?
Of course I am.
I know what you want.
You want ecstasy
Desire & dreams.
Things not exactly what they seem.
I lead you this way, he pulls that way.
I'm not singing to an imaginary girl.
I'm talking to you, my self.
Let's recreate the world.
The palace of conception is burning.

Look. See it burn.
Bask in the warm hot coals.

You're too young to be old
You don't need to be told
You want to see things as they are.
You know exactly what I do
Everything


When I was a teenaged, diehard Doors fan I gobbled this up. Now, not so much. ...more
4

Jan 03, 2009

Jim Morrison changed my life in college. Ironically, he was dead at the time, but it's true. I love so many of the poems in this volume but one stands out right now, after I've experienced fall and am experiencing winter for the first time in years:

A man rakes leaves into
a heap in his yard, a pile,
& leans on his rake &
burns them utterly.
The fragrance fills the forest
children pause & heed the
smell, which will become
nostalgia in several years
5

Dec 17, 2012

While flipping though the pages of Wilderness at a local book store, I found these lines:

I am troubled, immeasurably
by your eyes.
I am struck by the feather
of your soft reply.
The sound of glass
speaks quick, disdain
and conceals
what your eyes fight
to explain.

Morrison is an amazing poet, a legend, a rascal, a prophet. While flipping though the pages of Wilderness at a local book store, I found these lines:

“I am troubled, immeasurably
by your eyes.
I am struck by the feather
of your soft reply.
The sound of glass
speaks quick, disdain
and conceals
what your eyes fight
to explain.”

Morrison is an amazing poet, a legend, a rascal, a prophet. ...more
4

Dec 13, 2019

He's the only one (so far) I can respect as a poet. I can see the effect of film and theater on his poetry: it's like he's directing our collective unconsciousness, marching out these archetypes and letting them act out his scenarios while simultaneously allowing for the influence of the Old Man, the Joker, the Shaman and the Whore. It's all about coniunctio oppositorum, baby. Atmosphere, inside the magic circle... (It's all lost in translation.) He was a conjurer. But is it the words or the He's the only one (so far) I can respect as a poet. I can see the effect of film and theater on his poetry: it's like he's directing our collective unconsciousness, marching out these archetypes and letting them act out his scenarios while simultaneously allowing for the influence of the Old Man, the Joker, the Shaman and the Whore. It's all about coniunctio oppositorum, baby. Atmosphere, inside the magic circle... (It's all lost in translation.) He was a conjurer. But is it the words or the rhythm? With his eyes I could see.

People need Connectors
Writers, heroes, stars,
leaders
To give life form.
A child’s sand boat facing
the sun.
Plastic soldiers in the miniature
dirt war. Forts.
Garage Rocket Ships

Ceremonies, theatre, dances
To reassert Tribal needs & memories
a call to worship, uniting
above all, a reversion,
a longing for family & the
safety magic of childhood. ...more
4

Nov 13, 2016

JIM!!!!! Why do all the good guys have to croak? I love this man so much. He writes like a drugged-out god, which is exactly what it is. Some might interpret this as the ramblings of some freak high off his ass, but it is only obvious to the faithful that it is much more than that, this is the writing of a man, in touch with a high intelligence, whether that connection was found in drugs or just Jim's sheer intellect is inconsequential, it is simply the state of being with Morrison, he knows JIM!!!!! Why do all the good guys have to croak? I love this man so much. He writes like a drugged-out god, which is exactly what it is. Some might interpret this as the ramblings of some freak high off his ass, but it is only obvious to the faithful that it is much more than that, this is the writing of a man, in touch with a high intelligence, whether that connection was found in drugs or just Jim's sheer intellect is inconsequential, it is simply the state of being with Morrison, he knows what he's doing and every word is a poem in itself, everything is something and nothing at the same time, and he was genius enough to see it.
...more
0

Nov 15, 2011

Like The American Night: The Writings of Jim Morrison Volume 2, Wilderness provides readers with the inspiring, albeit often confusing, hallucinatory poetry of Morrison. The rhythm of the pieces often themselves intoxicating, one can almost feel as if the phonemic structure of Morrison's work has an underlying pattern that the average person just cannot quite articulate. For aspiring poets, this collection of poems is an extraordinary example of the affects of sound on poetry and how important Like The American Night: The Writings of Jim Morrison Volume 2, Wilderness provides readers with the inspiring, albeit often confusing, hallucinatory poetry of Morrison. The rhythm of the pieces often themselves intoxicating, one can almost feel as if the phonemic structure of Morrison's work has an underlying pattern that the average person just cannot quite articulate. For aspiring poets, this collection of poems is an extraordinary example of the affects of sound on poetry and how important it is for a word's sound to make an impact on the reader. ...more
4

May 16, 2018

I enjoyed this book for the most part and it was a quick read. There were good things here, as well as some not so good things - but I think a lot of it was left unfinished and may have been presented in a way Jim might not have put forth publicly himself. I think those behind the book seemed honest about that, though.

That said, unless you like poetry and/or are a Jim Morrison fan, this may not be for you.
4

Mar 30, 2008

I have been a fan of the Doors since watching Oliver Stone's biopic and I've since been intrigued by the persona of Jim Morrison. While Stone's film and other critics often view Morrison as a drunken buffoon, I could see there was more to him. I've read a handful of biographies and it has only helped increase my awe and respect of the 60's music icon. The man was a genius and had great appreciation for art, hoping to segue his music career into that as a writer/poet/filmmaker. Wilderness is the I have been a fan of the Doors since watching Oliver Stone's biopic and I've since been intrigued by the persona of Jim Morrison. While Stone's film and other critics often view Morrison as a drunken buffoon, I could see there was more to him. I've read a handful of biographies and it has only helped increase my awe and respect of the 60's music icon. The man was a genius and had great appreciation for art, hoping to segue his music career into that as a writer/poet/filmmaker. Wilderness is the first volume in a collection from Morrison's personal notebooks with poetry collected throughout the years.

Reading through Morrison's poetry, it was easy to spot the common themes attributed to his writing/music: life in Los Angeles, death, Native Americans and shamanism, and his experiences on the road touring with the Doors. There were some great pieces included though there were also a great bit where I couldn't quite follow what Morrison was feeling. Some of the included poems struck me as word association exercises he may have happened to jot down in his notebooks. Morrison had, in interviews, mentioned he had hoped there would be points where he would write "automatically", in which he puts pen to paper and lets his subconscious guide it, though he admitted it never worked that way; I felt a couple of the poems in the collection seemed to be possible attempts at "automatic" writing and were merely his flow of consciousness at the time of writing.

Part insight, part mystery. While I may not had understood Morrison's poetry in it's entirety, there was enough in the collection that could sense what he was feeling that it gave me a deeper understanding of the man behind the lyrics. If you've ever been intrigued by the self-proclaimed "Lizard King" and the autobiographies don't cut it, I strongly suggest your take a moment to glance over some of his poetry and let Morrison invite you into his mind in his own words. ...more
4

Oct 04, 2007

I guess I'm a biased reviewer here. I am a passionate Doors fan. If you're a casual Doors listener, you'll find Morrison's writing rough sledding. But if you're like me, you'll love this collection of previously unpublished poems and ephemera.

Perhaps Jim wasn't the most polished poet in the world. His work often smacks of the high school English star drunk on words. But he's got some wonderful imagery in here, and seems to be aware of the wonderful SOUND words can make when they're played off I guess I'm a biased reviewer here. I am a passionate Doors fan. If you're a casual Doors listener, you'll find Morrison's writing rough sledding. But if you're like me, you'll love this collection of previously unpublished poems and ephemera.

Perhaps Jim wasn't the most polished poet in the world. His work often smacks of the high school English star drunk on words. But he's got some wonderful imagery in here, and seems to be aware of the wonderful SOUND words can make when they're played off each other. "Winter photography---our love's in jeopardy..." He was a songwriter, after all.

The "Self-Interview" is also a highlight. It gives the reader an idea of what was going on between Morrison's ears, what he was striving for in his writing.

Of course, WILDERNESS does not provide the satisfaction of a finished book, like THE LORDS AND THE NEW CREATURES does. But it does yield some fine, fascinating writing by a well-read man who valued words. That alone makes WILDERNESS worthwhile.

...more
5

Mar 27, 2018

'The Voice of the Serpent
dry hiss of age and steam
& leaves of gold
old book in ruined
Temples
The pages break like ash

I will not disturb
I will not go

Come, he says softly

an old man appears &
moves in tired dance
amid the scattered dead
gently they stir'


'No wise men now
each on his own
Grab your daughter and run'

'Where'd you learn about
Satan-out of a book
Love?-out of a box'
5

Sep 24, 2016

Raw poems that give you a glimpse of the creative process of JM. A talent that left us too soon.
4

Aug 06, 2010

If you think you know Jim Morrison from the classic rock station and the Oliver Stone movie, think again. Some deep stuff here.
5

Sep 11, 2016

I bought this volume of Jim Morrisons poetry at Starrlight Books, a great shop in Flagstaff, Arizona. Ive been fascinated with Morrison since I first started listened to the Doors back in high school in the 80s. This is a wonderful collection that goes, in my opinion, far beyond his writings with that band. Im so glad to have picked it up and will place it among my other treasured books.

I read this volume straight through it on the plane ride home a few days later. A few of my recent reading I bought this volume of Jim Morrison’s poetry at Starrlight Books, a great shop in Flagstaff, Arizona. I’ve been fascinated with Morrison since I first started listened to the Doors back in high school in the 80s. This is a wonderful collection that goes, in my opinion, far beyond his writings with that band. I’m so glad to have picked it up and will place it among my other treasured books.

I read this volume straight through it on the plane ride home a few days later. A few of my recent reading selections haven’t grabbed my interest. I’ve even resorted to skimming through parts. That wasn’t the case with this work. I read every word of each poem, sometimes flipping back a few pages to reread one that was echoing in the back of my mind. I scribbled a quick note saying that he wasn’t like most modern poets I’ve read. Morrison reminded me more of 18th and 19th century poets. Perhaps that’s because of what I mostly read nowadays, but I think it’s also since he drew a lot of inspiration from poets of that era, such as Blake and Rimbaud.

While everything resonated with me, there were a few lines that stood out. Echoing the second generation of Romantics (e.g. Shelley and Keats), Morrison writes: “Shrill demented sparrows bark / The sun into being. They rule / dawn’s Kingdom” (p. 35). In a poignant commentary on social relationships, he saysActors must make us think
they’re real
Our friends must not
make us think we’re acting
(p. 117)Reminding me of my own youth, when we didn’t have 24-hour radio or online streaming: “When radio dark night existed / & assumed control, & we rocked in its web / consumed by static, & stroked with fear / we were drawn down long from / a deep sleep” (p. 135). Finally, from his poem “As I Look Back” (p. 201): As I look back
over my life
I am struck by post
cards
Ruined Snap shots

faded posters
Of a time, I can’t recall ...more
4

Jun 23, 2014

Though it may be difficult for some readers to understand where Jim was coming from in his poems, they were overall visionary and beautiful in their own right. Some poems were purely observation, but that was what he saw in society from his perspective. While some may shudder at the grotesque and scoff at the pedestrian poems, that is his artistic expression in its rawest form. I feel his poems are the lyrics that didn't quite cut it for the rest of the doors. A marvelous read for any Doors or Though it may be difficult for some readers to understand where Jim was coming from in his poems, they were overall visionary and beautiful in their own right. Some poems were purely observation, but that was what he saw in society from his perspective. While some may shudder at the grotesque and scoff at the pedestrian poems, that is his artistic expression in its rawest form. I feel his poems are the lyrics that didn't quite cut it for the rest of the doors. A marvelous read for any Doors or modern poetry fanatic. ...more
5

Jul 29, 2013

Gorgeous, inspiring, filled with the beauty of destruction and creation. Limitless. A milestone in my life.
3

Oct 24, 2019

Many things have been said about Jim Morrison. The truth is that most of them are bullshit.

This volume doesnt give us the whole. It doesnt even give us the half. Nor does it contain a fraction of his greatest works. But whereas the music gave us the Dionysian scream; these poems give us the bare bones of the butterfly itself.

At the time of his untimely death (still largely unexplained), he was already one of the greatest American poets and thinkers to have ever existed. If he had lived beyond Many things have been said about Jim Morrison. The truth is that most of them are bullshit.

This volume doesn’t give us the whole. It doesn’t even give us the half. Nor does it contain a fraction of his greatest works. But whereas the music gave us the Dionysian scream; these poems give us the bare bones of the butterfly itself.

At the time of his untimely death (still largely unexplained), he was already one of the greatest American poets and thinkers to have ever existed. If he had lived beyond that point one can only imagine just how great he would have become.

Listen to him. Read him. Recite him. ...more
2

Jul 06, 2017

I had high expections on this poetry book and was disappointed that it wasn't that great. I love Jim Morrison and the Doors but a lot of his poetry and writings in this book didn't quite make sense to me and seemed boring to me. I am disappointed that I wasted my money on this.
5

Jan 23, 2015

The grand highway is crowded with lovers & searchers & leavers so eager to please & forget. Wilderness.

How to rate someones poetry and quotes other than five stars? I loved every page and every words and every feeling that it gaved me.

Come
for all the world lies hushed & fallen
green ships dangle
on the surface of
Ocean & sky- birds
glide smugly among
the planes
Gaunt crippled houses
Strangle the cliffs
In the East, in the cities
a hum of life
begins, now come.

Morrison <3
3

Feb 04, 2014

I grew up listening to a lot of classic rock thanks to my parents so listening to The Doors is pretty nostalgic for me. Some of the poetry in this book is very 'out there' but there are also quite a few beautiful and philosophical entries.
4

May 30, 2014

This isn't poetry in the traditional sense of the word. This is like beat poetry mixed with Rock n' Roll. I enjoy a lot of the imagery that is used. I wish American Prayer was available without the background music. Anyone know if that is available?
5

May 24, 2016

His poetry: W.B. Yeats meets Frank O'Hara.
All of them need reading over and over again.
Another favorite book of poetry!
2

Jan 17, 2020

Indians, people knocking on doors, and telephones. These seem to be the bulk images of Morrison's poetry. The man could carry a verse, for sure, but most of these "poems" were nothing more than vignettes, like images conjured up in a daydream, or that hazy time when you are falling asleep or first awaken.

Interesting little read, but nothing profound here. I believe Morrison was a better musician/lyricist than he was a poet.
4

Apr 30, 2014

The self-interview, right at the beginning of the book, gives us a glimpse of what to expect. Jim was not only a singer but a writer or, as he prefers to define himself, a poet actually. He read great writers (I'm kinda jealous of the amount of stuff he read and owned) and has been influenced by them. The rebellious Jim was highly influenced by poets like Rimbaud and his poetry is portrayed with critics to institutions as church, society and family, and to himself, as well. He depicts himself in The self-interview, right at the beginning of the book, gives us a glimpse of what to expect. Jim was not only a singer but a writer or, as he prefers to define himself, a poet actually. He read great writers (I'm kinda jealous of the amount of stuff he read and owned) and has been influenced by them. The rebellious Jim was highly influenced by poets like Rimbaud and his poetry is portrayed with critics to institutions as church, society and family, and to himself, as well. He depicts himself in a negative way. I find a tone of regret and guilty, especially by the end of the book, which is believed to compile his last poems. He was also highly influenced by Nietzsche and Blake. Blake says that "the road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom" and it seems Jim is aware of that; that's why there's so much excess in his life ("why do I drink? So that I can write poetry"). Among the many references to Blake's poetry I find in Jim's, I especially like it when he makes use of religious themes as a inversion of what have been said. In "Forgive me Father for I know what I do. I want to hear the last Poem of the last Poet", there's clearly an inversion of Jesus' biblical words. His close connection to nature is also very present throughout his poems, and the way he portraits nature and personalizes it intrigues me. I've read works that classifies Jim as a shaman, which I don't really know if makes sense, but this link between him and nature, among other things, would fit here. The accident he witnessed in Albuquerque at the age of four, in which he believed he was possessed by the spirit of an Indian, is mentioned more than once, as the way his "hallucinations" also are - here, they can all be a result of his "shaman soul" and his body being possessed, but they can be also a consequence of his use of LSD and other drugs, or due to his drinking. The way he felt himself out of his body and inhabiting other words during his shows, as in a trance, can also be identified in what he wrote. The more I read his poetry, the more interpretations it allows me to have. The songs he wrote sound poetry, and his poetry is like a song to my ears. ...more
5

Jan 04, 2015

This book was amazing. It was the first poetry book by Jim Morrison that I have read and it really was an enjoyable read. The book was appropriately titled "Wilderness" because Jim often used the word in his poems, and allot of his poems featured themes of the wild. Most the poems focused on his opinions of life, Death, Music, and modern America (from 1968-71). Because this book was released after his death there are a few unfinished poems in the book. Allot of the poems are also not titled, but This book was amazing. It was the first poetry book by Jim Morrison that I have read and it really was an enjoyable read. The book was appropriately titled "Wilderness" because Jim often used the word in his poems, and allot of his poems featured themes of the wild. Most the poems focused on his opinions of life, Death, Music, and modern America (from 1968-71). Because this book was released after his death there are a few unfinished poems in the book. Allot of the poems are also not titled, but many poets did this and in some cases I feel this added to the effect of the poem. I found many different poems were titled "LAmerica". This brought me interest. It seems as if he wrote about the same subject many times under the same title. Each poem under this title shared his thoughts on America and most specifically Los-Angeles. Each different poem had a different thought on this subject and I found my self being very interested every time I would see that title again. I thought that the book was arranged very well. Poems with similar or the same subject were some times placed together but common themes were spread out amongst the book. This kept the book following the same themes and I thought it worked well to show Jim Morrison's train of thought. I also like the different styles of poems in the book. Jim didn't stick to one form of writing poetry he was very versatile in his poem structure. I found his view points on life and death very interesting in the diction he word use to describe it. I found those to be my favorite of all of the poems in the book and I found my self understanding his view points on these topics.

I would recommend this book to any one 16 and up that has love for poetry or The Doors; No one under sixteen because of the occasional language and the themes of sex and drugs. Over all I think this is a great book and I could find my self reading it several times more. ...more
4

May 23, 2015

Jim Morrison was, above all else, a writer. During his short 27 years, he wrote a little of everything; poetry, prose, song lyrics, film scripts, plays, you name it. Here we have a collection of his poetry.

This is a book that I picked up in Raleigh back when I was a student at NCSU. I can't quite remember, but I think this might have been the first book I ever purchased from Edward McCay's (the first of so, so many). It fell into my stacks of unread books until just recently.

Even before reading Jim Morrison was, above all else, a writer. During his short 27 years, he wrote a little of everything; poetry, prose, song lyrics, film scripts, plays, you name it. Here we have a collection of his poetry.

This is a book that I picked up in Raleigh back when I was a student at NCSU. I can't quite remember, but I think this might have been the first book I ever purchased from Edward McCay's (the first of so, so many). It fell into my stacks of unread books until just recently.

Even before reading the afterword, you can tell that this particular collection is taken directly from Morrison's notebooks and journals, and that probably a vast majority of the work is unfinished. The editors even include photocopies of pages featuring the rough original in Jim's handwriting.

Where they could, the editors have tried to keep the work in chronological order, even though Jim apparently didn't date much of his work (probably thinking that he would wait and date the final version of the poem once he was satisfied with it). It is definitely an interesting read. ...more

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