What's Up Down There?: Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend Info

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In this funny, outrageous and empowering book, Dr. Lissa
Rankin answers all the secret gynecological questions that most women
wonder about, but have always been afraid to ask.

Suppose you
had a wise, warm, funny best friend-who just happened to be a
gynecologist. You're out with the girls for cocktails and the
conversation turns to sex, and then to girly parts. One by one, you
start asking her all the questions you've secretly wondered about-and
discover that you have a lot in common. If you were to write those
questions down, then you'd have What's Up Down There?, a
life-changing little book that answers:

- Do old ladies have saggy
vaginas?
- How do male gynecologists have a sex life without feeling
like they're stuck at the office?
- Is it normal for your inner
labia to hang out of your outer labia?
- Can the baby feel its mom
having sex during pregnancy?
- How common is it for one's boobs to be
two totally different sizes?

And so much more! As outrageously
funny as it is empowering, this book reveals how to love yourself and
your body-and will have you recommending it to every woman you know.
From off-the wall sex questions to serious topics of women's sexual
health, What's Up Down There? provides answers to women of all
ages and stages.


Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for What's Up Down There?: Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend:

4

July 18, 2011

Good book for women, young and old
I just finished reading this book, and I quite like it.

I am a sex-educator, and I am happy to report that I did know most of what I read in this book (phew! I've been doing my job just fine), but I am also happy to report that I learned a few things, some of them surprising (you can have two vaginas? Is that vaginae?), some of them disturbing and upsetting (a potato in a vagina?!), some of them hilarious (a POTATO! In a VAGINA!) Some of the things I learned made me look at sex in an entirely different way (tantra!), and some made me think about transitions we never really talk about (menopause).

This is a very body-positive, sex-positive, matter-of-fact, nurturing, informative book. I have a daughter. I'll put this in a special place in our family book shelf for her to discover when she's full of questions like these but to embarrassed to ask her old mother. It's exactly the straight-forward and affirming tone I'd like for her to hear when learning about her body and about sex. Above all, the author encourages all of us to treat ourselves kindly and to hold ourselves up, to demand the very best for ourselves and to learn to live well and happily in our own bodies.

The only reason I gave it 4 instead of 5 stars is that I have a whole lot of questions of my own that I'd like to ask my GYN if she was my BFF that went unanswered here... and that I am too embarrassed to ask on Amazon. Maybe we need a sequel! Or maybe I just need to make friends with the author. I like her already!
2

October 5, 2010

Lots of good info but...
There is quite a lot of good info in here there's some misinformation in the area of childbirth. It's not entirely the authors fault as it's what she was taught by her teachers and peers, but it's still unfortunate that she didn't continue her education in that area. She compares not getting an epidural to not getting novocaine for a tooth extraction. This is preposterous and she, without being direct about it, categorically writes off natural childbirth as something only for fools, because who other than a fool would opt not to have novocaine for a tooth extraction. Though the author claims to "understand" why some women would go the route of natural childbirth. The correlation she makes is wrong for the following reason, the body has no system in place to successfully deal with pain caused by a tooth extraction. Childbirth on the other hand is an entirely different mechanism. The pain and trauma a woman goes through in childbirth stimulates a flood of pain relieving oxytocin in the body that allows the woman to "endure" such a "horrifying" experience. (sarcasm) But this release of oxytocin will not come on it's own, the woman has to be allowed to have all the comforts she needs during labor in order for the oxytocin to flow. And once it does, as it's the chemical in the body called the love hormone, it allows mother and baby to fall in love as they see each other for the first time in the moments following birth. And not only does the mother receive the oxytocin, but the baby too. So I really can't stomach the author, as a trained medical professional, making the argument that childbirth and a tooth extraction are equivalent experiences.
4

June 20, 2013

Be one with your girl parts
This is not a book I would have chosen for myself... a friend bought it for me, almost like a dare, to see how I would react and if I would actually read it. So I did.

On one hand, I feel like the author accomplished exactly what she set out to do. She answered some potentially controversial and embarrassing questions that most women, myself included, would be too ashamed to ask. Each chapter starts with an introduction of general information and perhaps an anecdote from the author, with the rest of the chapter in a Q&A format with real questions asked by real women, such as, "Is it safe to have sex during your period," "Can an abortion cause infertility," and "If I have breast implants, can I still breast-feed?" The author gives a truthful answer in a way that is understandable to those of us who have never taken a reproductive biology course. In that light, I can see why this book has been, and can continue to be, profoundly helpful for women everywhere.

What drove me insane, however, was the author's tone. She constantly addressed the reader as "sweetie" and "honey," made references to frilly sparkly things and pink skirts, and kept encouraging the reader to giggle. Very, very rarely do I dislike a book because of the author's tone, but this was just too over-the-top. Almost every chapter ended with a speech about "embracing" this or that about our "coochies" and "yonis," and the entire final chapter was about finding sisterhood everywhere because we all have life-giving girl parts. Gag.

For my personal tastes, this would be a one-star book; but in the interest of fairness and what the author accomplished in this work, I give it four stars.
2

Apr 24, 2017

This could be an incredibly empowering book for a young woman as long as she was white, cisgender, heteronormative, and middle-to-upper class. It definitely wouldn't hurt for her to be slightly mystically-inclined and down with pink and sparkly femininity. There is some good information in here. There is even a brief, poorly phrased though well-intended, acknowledgment of trans-women as women as well as a short recognition of the equality and legitimacy of a child-free life. Lesbians are This could be an incredibly empowering book for a young woman as long as she was white, cisgender, heteronormative, and middle-to-upper class. It definitely wouldn't hurt for her to be slightly mystically-inclined and down with pink and sparkly femininity. There is some good information in here. There is even a brief, poorly phrased though well-intended, acknowledgment of trans-women as women as well as a short recognition of the equality and legitimacy of a child-free life. Lesbians are mentioned in a positive tone. But . . .

Too many of her solutions can only be implemented with lots of disposable income. Gardening, sex toys, sex therapy, lingerie, marriage counseling, doulas etc. all take money. That stuff is great, and would doubtless work, if you can afford it, but such heavy reliance on those solutions is exclusionary to women in less economically sound positions.

In one part, Dr. Rankin refers to all sex with someone other than your primary partner, regardless of honesty and open relationship status, as infidelity. She also states "Don't forget that the ultimate goal of sex is intimacy." The first calls into question the very legitimacy of polyamorous relationships, and the latter marginalizes anyone who likes to have sex for the sake of sex.

Last, and oh so not least, why's it gotta be the Pretty Pink Pussy Tour? I have read that the vaginal canal of all women is some shade, light to dark, of pink; however, the Tour includes the mons pubis, the vulva, the labia majora and minora, etc. That's not all pink on all women. Empowering white women by excluding women of color is a standard practice that white feminists must stop.

It really did have some great and interesting information, and I certainly love the goal of helping women to feel comfortable with their own bodies. However, I just can't get over the fact that it seemed written only for one specific sort of woman. ...more
5

Dec 23, 2010

For a guy picking up this book, it's like listening in on girlie talk, with one major exception. Dr. Lissa Rankin not only knows her material better than most ObGyn's, but also explains it in down-to-earth terms. There is much more in What's Up Down There than "sex" or simple sexual physiology. Dr. Rankin reassures women they are "normal" regardless, and helps women pooh-pooh the modern myth of "homogeneous beauty" regarding their genitalia. They are all beautiful. But don't believe me. Believe For a guy picking up this book, it's like listening in on girlie talk, with one major exception. Dr. Lissa Rankin not only knows her material better than most ObGyn's, but also explains it in down-to-earth terms. There is much more in What's Up Down There than "sex" or simple sexual physiology. Dr. Rankin reassures women they are "normal" regardless, and helps women pooh-pooh the modern myth of "homogeneous beauty" regarding their genitalia. They are all beautiful. But don't believe me. Believe her!

This book goes beyond things sexual into childbirth and menopause, yet retaining information on the subject of sex. The biggest blockbuster is her statement, referring specifically to menopause, "...hormones play a relatively small role in the total picture of sexual satisfaction." This just might be a simple truism.

Dr. Rankin also talks about the spiritual nature of the sex act and how this is more fulfilling for a woman. What she doesn't say is how this can also be empowering for a man. But, this is a book to women, about women and for women. No, this is a WONDERFUL book to, about and for women.
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5

February 17, 2011

Love this book!
This book is so incredibly helpful! So many of my questions have been answered, I wish my mom would have given me this book when I was 17 (she couldn't because it is just out)I am 22, but none the less I have learned a lot and have come to feel much better about insecurities I once had.What I love most is that everything is right here, no more surfing the web to find answers that I only so-so trust. Thanks Dr. Rankin you finally came out and answered so many questions that most books tip-toe around. I recommend this book for every female!
5

October 18, 2010

A Loving Ode to the Intimacies of the Female Body
What a delightfully wonderful book this is. Lissa Rankin, M.D. has written a book about the female sexual organs, especially the vagina, and sings its praises. As a gynecologist, she has an authoritative voice which she uses in a whimsical and cutesy way when necessary. Her point is to get the point across - the vagina is a good word, a wonderful part of the female body and something to be knowledgeable about and proud of having and loving. She also informs the reader about labia, orgasm, clitoris, vulva, breasts, fertility, menopause, and childbirth, to name just a few of the topics she covers. Think of a question and I can bet that it is answered in this book. In fact, this book is based on questions she solicited and then addressed.

I read the book in two days. It is filled with fascinating information and there isn't a boring page. Despite my being old enough to know, I learned a heck of a lot. For anyone who wants to learn about the intimacies of the female body in a loving, fun, knowledgeable and welcoming way, and wants to be charmed while learning about it, I can think of no better place to go than Lissa Rankin's book.
1

August 24, 2013

rude
dont like how the author makes fun of women she has had in her office and she is extremely immature, and i dont like how she sits in a room with guys, gets drunk and makes fun of the woman part. Way to go....not.
5

Apr 12, 2011

This book is very interesting, amusing, depressing, comforting, encouraging, disgusting, empowering, and honestly, at times it can be quite embarrassing! I highly recommend this book to any woman even remotely interested--although, I wouldn't give it to a teenager since it explains how to do some "stuff". More innocent topics include anatomy, infections, PMS, relationships, pregnancy, giving birth and menopause.
This book is so readable--just one question after another that gets answered in This book is very interesting, amusing, depressing, comforting, encouraging, disgusting, empowering, and honestly, at times it can be quite embarrassing! I highly recommend this book to any woman even remotely interested--although, I wouldn't give it to a teenager since it explains how to do some "stuff". More innocent topics include anatomy, infections, PMS, relationships, pregnancy, giving birth and menopause.
This book is so readable--just one question after another that gets answered in detail. Many questions were ones that I've had before, some were things I've never thought of. The answers were highly informative and the most interesting to me were the personal experiences of the author. She responds to questions like, "What is the scariest birth you've ever witnessed?" or "Do male gynecologists ever get turned on during an exam?".
I gave 5 stars, not because I agree with every point in the book--I don't--but because the information is given and it's easy for you to make a choice about what is right and your body. I never felt persuaded, only enlightened. ...more
3

Feb 28, 2011

I loved most of this book, but the last chapter and a half made me want to scream.
Full-length review: http://bit.ly/14Kd7ZZ
5

March 4, 2015

A MUST READ book and author. For Women and their man. Seriously!
First, I am a 64 yr old man. I am on male HRT. I don't remember how I came across this book but bought the ebook for my eReader (Sorry Jeff, not a Kindle) and was fascinated by the book's information. The author was, at the time she wrote the book, an OB/GYN. She has since moved on to Integrative Medicine. But when she wrote this book it covers almost every thing a person might want to know or should want to know about a woman's body as it progresses though life that involves reproductive health. I found it so fascinating that I bought three hard copies of the book to give to women I thought could get something out of it: my wife, my holistic Christian counselor and my sister-in-law a midwife. If I find other women who I think could get something out of it I will order copies for them. I consider this an IMPORTANT BOOK and I am _giving_ this book to women I feel need it this year of 2015. In the past I have said you need to read this book. This year, 2015, if I feel it is an important book, I am buying and then giving the book away. This is a book I am giving away. Lissa Rankin has written two more books related to Integrative Medicine. I am giving away copies of these books to friends of mine as well. This writer is a MUST READ! If you have chronic pain and depression I highly recommend that get and read Gary Kaplan's Total Recovery available here on Amazon as well. He is another Integrative Medicine doctor. Integrative Medicine is the PRESENT-FUTURE if you have more than one medical problem!
5

December 13, 2010

Excellent Guide
This book had me laughing and wincing in horror at the same time. It's amazing how women still don't respect the physical parts that makes them women. Dr. Rankin actually told me things I didn't want to know in this book! Like bananas can do a lot of damage to women's organs, or that potatoes can grown in my vagina.

But I'm glad I purchased and read this book.

If you are a reader who is easily offended, this book is not for you. She discusses *everything* from front to back, and she doesn't hide the information behind formal language. I was surprised when I got to the anal section of the book, assuming it was going to be all about the vagina.

I think teenagers need to know the information in this book, but I can see parents having a problem with their teenagers reading it. Suggest moms--and dads--give it a read and share. Men need to know this stuff, too.

She doesn't, as one reviewer states, argue against natural childbirth. She does say that there are alternatives and it's a personal choice. Hers was to do it with drugs, while a friend *tried* to do it naturally.

So if you are looking for a frank but informative book about "down there", I highly recommend this book.
3

October 27, 2010

Nothing new-
I really didn't think there was much information in the book that I didn't know- and I'm an average consumer.
4

January 15, 2011

Lots of Laughs and an Education, Too
I've been following Lissa Rankin on Twitter for awhile now. She's fun and has a colorful personality. All of it has come through in her book, What's Up Down There?. So many women today are unfamiliar or uncomfortable with their bodies. Dr. Rankin has found a way to talk to women about their bodies that makes them seem more familiar. She doesn't hesitate to use pet names like coochie and va-jay-jay. She tells some hilarious stories of what she's seen in her years as a gynecologist. And she feels like she's your best friend.

I loved her chapters on vaginas, sex, orgasm, fluids, periods and menopause. Her chapters on other parts of the body were equally good. I will admit that I'll just have to agree to disagree with her on pregnancy and birth. She can't help it; she was trained to be an obstetrician. Since I am a proponent of homebirth and extended breastfeeding, I'll just pass on those topics. It almost seemed like the answer to most of the questions in those chapters included weaning the baby. While that may be the mainstream opinion, it is one I cannot share. Breasts are for feeding babies in my book. My only other criticism with the book is the editorial errors. C'mon, St. Martin's... put more editors back on your staff so they can do their job.

Anyway, in my opinion, the rest of the book is fully worth the purchase price even if you agree with me about birth and breastfeeding. The author's sense of humor is wonderful and it feels like you're just having a chat with a good friend about all that private stuff.

If you've never been comfortable with your body parts and how they function, this is a nice introduction. The author encourages you to spend time getting to know your body. This is a concept I heartily endorse. How can you know something is wrong if you don't know what it is like when it is going right?

Do yourself a favor and read this. Even if you are on good terms with your body, you might still learn something.
2

Jan 29, 2015

I would rate this book higher if I could get passed the hetero& cisnormativity and outright transphobia. Not a queer friendly book at all. Good information, but nah. In 2010 you really should know that a trans man is someone assigned female at birth, not someone assigned male at birth. It's just embarrassing.
5

Oct 19, 2010

I think every OB/GYN office should have copies of this book in their waiting room.

When I first got this book my fear was that it may be too clinical and boring. Let’s face it ladies our bodies are crazy and complex and go through some pretty funky changes throughout our lifetimes. This book could have been dull and could have read like an encyclopedia. Instead, Dr. Rankin has written a clever and laugh out loud hilarious book that proves to be both highly educational and thoroughly I think every OB/GYN office should have copies of this book in their waiting room.

When I first got this book my fear was that it may be too clinical and boring. Let’s face it ladies our bodies are crazy and complex and go through some pretty funky changes throughout our lifetimes. This book could have been dull and could have read like an encyclopedia. Instead, Dr. Rankin has written a clever and laugh out loud hilarious book that proves to be both highly educational and thoroughly entertaining.

She covers topics from pubic hair cuts to back door lovin’. Every story is told masterfully and expertly. I can’t remember the last time I learned so much while laughing so hard. Every woman who has been to my house in the past month or so, has picked up this book read a couple of pages, laughed, and then demanded they be able to borrow it as soon as I am done.

Even if you think you know everything and anything about your body, I guarantee you will find something in this book that will teach you something. And even if you know all, you can read this for purely entertainment value. It’s brilliant!

Cherise Everhard, November 2010
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3

Dec 16, 2010

Dr. Rankin shares a wealth of information about the health, appearance, maintenance, and life history of one’s girl parts via a friendly question-answer format. Providing both medical and personal insight into topics many women would be hesitant to get into with their doctors (unless they were their best friends) without a surfeit of medical terminology – any (and every) woman should be able to get something out of this book. If you’ve ever had a question about your lady bits or have a burning Dr. Rankin shares a wealth of information about the health, appearance, maintenance, and life history of one’s girl parts via a friendly question-answer format. Providing both medical and personal insight into topics many women would be hesitant to get into with their doctors (unless they were their best friends) without a surfeit of medical terminology – any (and every) woman should be able to get something out of this book. If you’ve ever had a question about your lady bits or have a burning curiosity (you should probably get that checked out) about what it’s like to be a gynecologist, you should read this. I found myself fascinated (and in some cases horrified) by some of Lissa Rankin’s stories (you may not want to know what some women have used as birth control!), but there’s also a lot of good/helpful information about all things gynecological. At some points the “I’m your best friend” language was a little much, but on the whole, this was a useful and interesting resource. ...more
4

Nov 20, 2010

I was hoping for funnier, but this book was informative, easy to read...and filled with valuable take care of yourself information. It will look great on the shelf at the back of the math classroom.
5

Nov 17, 2010

In What's Up Down There?, Lissa Rankin, M.D. answers "Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend". She uses her personal experiences and stories about her patients to answer those questions you've secretly been wondering about.

I loved this book. Rankin has a great sense of humour and is very personable. Reading this book really did feel like I was talking to my BFF. She answers the questions as a friend would and only puts on her M.D. hat when it's necessary. In In What's Up Down There?, Lissa Rankin, M.D. answers "Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend". She uses her personal experiences and stories about her patients to answer those questions you've secretly been wondering about.

I loved this book. Rankin has a great sense of humour and is very personable. Reading this book really did feel like I was talking to my BFF. She answers the questions as a friend would and only puts on her M.D. hat when it's necessary. In answering the questions, Rankin relates stories from her personal life and the lives of her patients. Don't worry, she has changed the names to protect everyone. While her personal stories are perhaps a bit too-much-information at times, it's really what makes this book great. Also, she doesn't appear to shy away from any question. The questions are diverse and plentiful. A few of them made me blush.

The range of topics covered is varied. She answers questions on: being a gynecologist, how coochies look, smell and taste; sex, masturbation and orgasm; discharge and itching; periods; fertility, pregnancy and childbirth; menopause; and others. She even covers other female parts like: Boobs, Pee and Butts.

Some of the stories are absolutely heartbreaking; some are hilarious; most of them lie somewhere in-between. One thing they have in common is that they are educational. For me, the saddest (and strangest) stories were the ones that involved misinformation (the girl who used a potato as birth control), abuse (the woman who used her vagina as a purse) and mental illness (the woman who accused Rankin of stealing her genitals). Some of questions dealt with stuff I've been wondering about myself, while others dealt with things quite new to me. I won't get into specifics because that would really be TMI.

I even learned some new words for my girly parts: yoni and coochie. Rankin uses the proper names in some places, but these euphemisms make the book less clinical and more fun. One fun addition to the book might be a list of all of the euphemisms we use to describe our most intimate parts.

Highly recommended. I think it's a must read for every woman. Some men might also benefit from parts of it.

For more information about this book, please visit the St. Martin's Press website.

For more information about the author and her work, please visit the Owning Pink website.

Thanks to Dana Kaye from Kaye Publicity for this review copy.

What's Up Down There? by Lissa Rankin, M.D., St. Martin's Press, ©2010. ISBN 9780312644369(Trade Paperback), 381p.

This review is also available on my blog, Daisy's Book Journal.
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4

Oct 26, 2010


Picked this up from the library and went through it last night. It's educational, and entertaining, and blunt - sometimes brutally so - and sometimes a bit gag-worthy (her 'most disgusting' story, pretty much capped it!)

The Yoni stuff, I don't get and relate to, but if it helps women have a more positive perspective of their femininity, then great. And, if brutal honesty is called for, I think most, if not all, women should read the chapter on orgasms. You may know everything in there. You may
Picked this up from the library and went through it last night. It's educational, and entertaining, and blunt - sometimes brutally so - and sometimes a bit gag-worthy (her 'most disgusting' story, pretty much capped it!)

The Yoni stuff, I don't get and relate to, but if it helps women have a more positive perspective of their femininity, then great. And, if brutal honesty is called for, I think most, if not all, women should read the chapter on orgasms. You may know everything in there. You may not. If you don't, don't you want to? I wish I could say I've never met anyone who had no idea women could even have orgasms, but that's not true. In modern American culture, this should no longer be a hangup, much less a question mark!

Some of the stories are hilarious, if a bit traumatizing, and sometimes disgusting. Her friends are kinda nuts. So are some of the questions. But, that said, it is educational. A few of the questions in there, I hadn't thought of or heard before and I was entertained by the "what it's like to be a gynecologist" chapter. She has a good perspective to share about clinical vs. romantic, and what makes a person sexually attractive. That, I really liked.

I think it's worth a library check out and a flip through for adults. It might make a good gift for a teen daughter, but make sure you read it through first. She covers territory that I'm pretty sure many parents are not willing to talk to their daughters about, much less passively advocate.

I would honestly really like to see this book in a young adult edition that trims out some of the more nitty gritty sexual content, but covers a lot of the difficult questions that teens are unlikely to ask their parents. Because, really, if you're going to pick someone to educate your teen on sex ed and get them through some of those 'am I normal?" questions, an OB/GYN isn't a bad choice to do the talking!

So, if you have a nagging question about your body or want to find some questions you never thought to ask, then give it a look!
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4

Jan 24, 2011

Just a quick glance at the table of contents was enough to make me want to read this book--I mean seriously, the introduction is called "Let's Talk About Coochies and Boobs." The rest of the text follows with a similarly down-to-earth tone and deals frankly with any and just about every issue related to women's bodies. Dr. Rankin mixes her significant expertise with her vibrant sense of humor to compile a frequently-asked-questions sort of book dealing with everything from anatomy to sex to Just a quick glance at the table of contents was enough to make me want to read this book--I mean seriously, the introduction is called "Let's Talk About Coochies and Boobs." The rest of the text follows with a similarly down-to-earth tone and deals frankly with any and just about every issue related to women's bodies. Dr. Rankin mixes her significant expertise with her vibrant sense of humor to compile a frequently-asked-questions sort of book dealing with everything from anatomy to sex to childbirth to menopause.

While I did appreciate how much emphasis she put on working to maintain a positive self-image, my only problem with the book was the last two chapters, which got a little too New Age/Self-Help for my tastes. If you want to refer to your girlparts as if its/their/her name is "Yoni," more power to you, but I can't quite take it seriously. Still, her overall message--that women should not be ashamed of their bodies and should own their identity, sexuality, and womanhood--is commendable.

I found What's Up Down There? to be hilarious, fun, and informative--it's exactly the kind of book I'd give to my teenage daughter. That is, if the honest discussion of what happens before, during, and after childbirth hadn't put me off the idea of having kids even more than I already was. ...more
2

Nov 14, 2013

This book was okay. I picked it up at my library because I am interested in going into medicine, and have a special love and passion for women's health and encouraging women to better understand their bodies.

I appreciate the author's intentions, but she came across as very New Age-y and almost too informal. I almost thought it was more awkward to hear female genitalia described as "yoni", etc. vs. the actual anatomic names.

I think she alienates a lot of women readers by assuming femininity = This book was okay. I picked it up at my library because I am interested in going into medicine, and have a special love and passion for women's health and encouraging women to better understand their bodies.

I appreciate the author's intentions, but she came across as very New Age-y and almost too informal. I almost thought it was more awkward to hear female genitalia described as "yoni", etc. vs. the actual anatomic names.

I think she alienates a lot of women readers by assuming femininity = pink, frilly, girliness. I am a very feminine woman, but I'm not so much into the "give birth to your true self while wearing a pink sparkly tutu" stuff.

Overall, I thought the book could have been much more informative and less cheesy, without losing its heart. ...more
4

Jul 16, 2015

First sentence: All women have straddled the stirrups, but few have the opportunity to see things from the other side.

Favorite quote: When we approach our bodies with love, acceptance, and nurturing kindness, we pave the way for magic to unfold, the kind of magic I'm blessed to witness every day.

This book is filled to the brim with great information and most of it we are afraid to ask. Lissa Rankin is bold, blunt, honest, compassionate and wants all women to love themselves and their bodies. First sentence: All women have straddled the stirrups, but few have the opportunity to see things from the other side.

Favorite quote: When we approach our bodies with love, acceptance, and nurturing kindness, we pave the way for magic to unfold, the kind of magic I'm blessed to witness every day.

This book is filled to the brim with great information and most of it we are afraid to ask. Lissa Rankin is bold, blunt, honest, compassionate and wants all women to love themselves and their bodies. This is a great book. ...more
5

Jan 16, 2011

The person in charge of ordering non-fiction at our library caused a stir when he ordered this book. I caused another stir when I checked it out. Yes, adults of varying ages were giggling like middle schoolers when they saw this in my book pile. I'm glad I checked it out though. This book is a great mixture of being entertaining yet informative.Rankin's disastrous home bikini wax adventure will leave you howling, yet other stories will make you cry or cry out, "OMG!"
5

Oct 05, 2010

Dr. Lissa Rankin Ob/Gyn writes a funny no-holds-barred guide subtitled "Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend". This book is for women of any age and the men who love them! Dr Rankin "has picked up the torch that I struggled to light back in the 1980s and '90s", says Dr. Christiane Northrup.

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