What's Up Down There?: Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend Info

Which weight loss plan works best? What are the best books on health and nutrition - What is the best free weight loss app? Discover the best Health, Fitness & Dieting books and ebooks. Check our what others have to say about Rankin MD,Lissa,Northrup MD,Christiane books. Read over #reviewcount# reviews on What's Up Down There?: Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend before downloading. Read&Download What's Up Down There?: Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend by Rankin MD,Lissa,Northrup MD,Christiane Online


In this funny, outrageous and empowering book, Dr. Lissa
Rankin answers all the secret gynecological questions that most women
wonder about, but have always been afraid to ask.

Suppose you
had a wise, warm, funny best friend-who just happened to be a
gynecologist. You're out with the girls for cocktails and the
conversation turns to sex, and then to girly parts. One by one, you
start asking her all the questions you've secretly wondered about-and
discover that you have a lot in common. If you were to write those
questions down, then you'd have What's Up Down There?, a
life-changing little book that answers:

- Do old ladies have saggy
vaginas?
- How do male gynecologists have a sex life without feeling
like they're stuck at the office?
- Is it normal for your inner
labia to hang out of your outer labia?
- Can the baby feel its mom
having sex during pregnancy?
- How common is it for one's boobs to be
two totally different sizes?

And so much more! As outrageously
funny as it is empowering, this book reveals how to love yourself and
your body-and will have you recommending it to every woman you know.
From off-the wall sex questions to serious topics of women's sexual
health, What's Up Down There? provides answers to women of all
ages and stages.


Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for What's Up Down There?: Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend:

2

Apr 24, 2017

This could be an incredibly empowering book for a young woman as long as she was white, cisgender, heteronormative, and middle-to-upper class. It definitely wouldn't hurt for her to be slightly mystically-inclined and down with pink and sparkly femininity. There is some good information in here. There is even a brief, poorly phrased though well-intended, acknowledgment of trans-women as women as well as a short recognition of the equality and legitimacy of a child-free life. Lesbians are This could be an incredibly empowering book for a young woman as long as she was white, cisgender, heteronormative, and middle-to-upper class. It definitely wouldn't hurt for her to be slightly mystically-inclined and down with pink and sparkly femininity. There is some good information in here. There is even a brief, poorly phrased though well-intended, acknowledgment of trans-women as women as well as a short recognition of the equality and legitimacy of a child-free life. Lesbians are mentioned in a positive tone. But . . .

Too many of her solutions can only be implemented with lots of disposable income. Gardening, sex toys, sex therapy, lingerie, marriage counseling, doulas etc. all take money. That stuff is great, and would doubtless work, if you can afford it, but such heavy reliance on those solutions is exclusionary to women in less economically sound positions.

In one part, Dr. Rankin refers to all sex with someone other than your primary partner, regardless of honesty and open relationship status, as infidelity. She also states "Don't forget that the ultimate goal of sex is intimacy." The first calls into question the very legitimacy of polyamorous relationships, and the latter marginalizes anyone who likes to have sex for the sake of sex.

Last, and oh so not least, why's it gotta be the Pretty Pink Pussy Tour? I have read that the vaginal canal of all women is some shade, light to dark, of pink; however, the Tour includes the mons pubis, the vulva, the labia majora and minora, etc. That's not all pink on all women. Empowering white women by excluding women of color is a standard practice that white feminists must stop.

It really did have some great and interesting information, and I certainly love the goal of helping women to feel comfortable with their own bodies. However, I just can't get over the fact that it seemed written only for one specific sort of woman. ...more
5

Dec 23, 2010

For a guy picking up this book, it's like listening in on girlie talk, with one major exception. Dr. Lissa Rankin not only knows her material better than most ObGyn's, but also explains it in down-to-earth terms. There is much more in What's Up Down There than "sex" or simple sexual physiology. Dr. Rankin reassures women they are "normal" regardless, and helps women pooh-pooh the modern myth of "homogeneous beauty" regarding their genitalia. They are all beautiful. But don't believe me. Believe For a guy picking up this book, it's like listening in on girlie talk, with one major exception. Dr. Lissa Rankin not only knows her material better than most ObGyn's, but also explains it in down-to-earth terms. There is much more in What's Up Down There than "sex" or simple sexual physiology. Dr. Rankin reassures women they are "normal" regardless, and helps women pooh-pooh the modern myth of "homogeneous beauty" regarding their genitalia. They are all beautiful. But don't believe me. Believe her!

This book goes beyond things sexual into childbirth and menopause, yet retaining information on the subject of sex. The biggest blockbuster is her statement, referring specifically to menopause, "...hormones play a relatively small role in the total picture of sexual satisfaction." This just might be a simple truism.

Dr. Rankin also talks about the spiritual nature of the sex act and how this is more fulfilling for a woman. What she doesn't say is how this can also be empowering for a man. But, this is a book to women, about women and for women. No, this is a WONDERFUL book to, about and for women.
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5

Apr 12, 2011

This book is very interesting, amusing, depressing, comforting, encouraging, disgusting, empowering, and honestly, at times it can be quite embarrassing! I highly recommend this book to any woman even remotely interested--although, I wouldn't give it to a teenager since it explains how to do some "stuff". More innocent topics include anatomy, infections, PMS, relationships, pregnancy, giving birth and menopause.
This book is so readable--just one question after another that gets answered in This book is very interesting, amusing, depressing, comforting, encouraging, disgusting, empowering, and honestly, at times it can be quite embarrassing! I highly recommend this book to any woman even remotely interested--although, I wouldn't give it to a teenager since it explains how to do some "stuff". More innocent topics include anatomy, infections, PMS, relationships, pregnancy, giving birth and menopause.
This book is so readable--just one question after another that gets answered in detail. Many questions were ones that I've had before, some were things I've never thought of. The answers were highly informative and the most interesting to me were the personal experiences of the author. She responds to questions like, "What is the scariest birth you've ever witnessed?" or "Do male gynecologists ever get turned on during an exam?".
I gave 5 stars, not because I agree with every point in the book--I don't--but because the information is given and it's easy for you to make a choice about what is right and your body. I never felt persuaded, only enlightened. ...more
3

Feb 28, 2011

I loved most of this book, but the last chapter and a half made me want to scream.
Full-length review: http://bit.ly/14Kd7ZZ
2

Jan 29, 2015

I would rate this book higher if I could get passed the hetero& cisnormativity and outright transphobia. Not a queer friendly book at all. Good information, but nah. In 2010 you really should know that a trans man is someone assigned female at birth, not someone assigned male at birth. It's just embarrassing.
5

Oct 19, 2010

I think every OB/GYN office should have copies of this book in their waiting room.

When I first got this book my fear was that it may be too clinical and boring. Let’s face it ladies our bodies are crazy and complex and go through some pretty funky changes throughout our lifetimes. This book could have been dull and could have read like an encyclopedia. Instead, Dr. Rankin has written a clever and laugh out loud hilarious book that proves to be both highly educational and thoroughly I think every OB/GYN office should have copies of this book in their waiting room.

When I first got this book my fear was that it may be too clinical and boring. Let’s face it ladies our bodies are crazy and complex and go through some pretty funky changes throughout our lifetimes. This book could have been dull and could have read like an encyclopedia. Instead, Dr. Rankin has written a clever and laugh out loud hilarious book that proves to be both highly educational and thoroughly entertaining.

She covers topics from pubic hair cuts to back door lovin’. Every story is told masterfully and expertly. I can’t remember the last time I learned so much while laughing so hard. Every woman who has been to my house in the past month or so, has picked up this book read a couple of pages, laughed, and then demanded they be able to borrow it as soon as I am done.

Even if you think you know everything and anything about your body, I guarantee you will find something in this book that will teach you something. And even if you know all, you can read this for purely entertainment value. It’s brilliant!

Cherise Everhard, November 2010
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3

Dec 16, 2010

Dr. Rankin shares a wealth of information about the health, appearance, maintenance, and life history of one’s girl parts via a friendly question-answer format. Providing both medical and personal insight into topics many women would be hesitant to get into with their doctors (unless they were their best friends) without a surfeit of medical terminology – any (and every) woman should be able to get something out of this book. If you’ve ever had a question about your lady bits or have a burning Dr. Rankin shares a wealth of information about the health, appearance, maintenance, and life history of one’s girl parts via a friendly question-answer format. Providing both medical and personal insight into topics many women would be hesitant to get into with their doctors (unless they were their best friends) without a surfeit of medical terminology – any (and every) woman should be able to get something out of this book. If you’ve ever had a question about your lady bits or have a burning curiosity (you should probably get that checked out) about what it’s like to be a gynecologist, you should read this. I found myself fascinated (and in some cases horrified) by some of Lissa Rankin’s stories (you may not want to know what some women have used as birth control!), but there’s also a lot of good/helpful information about all things gynecological. At some points the “I’m your best friend” language was a little much, but on the whole, this was a useful and interesting resource. ...more
4

Nov 20, 2010

I was hoping for funnier, but this book was informative, easy to read...and filled with valuable take care of yourself information. It will look great on the shelf at the back of the math classroom.
5

Nov 17, 2010

In What's Up Down There?, Lissa Rankin, M.D. answers "Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend". She uses her personal experiences and stories about her patients to answer those questions you've secretly been wondering about.

I loved this book. Rankin has a great sense of humour and is very personable. Reading this book really did feel like I was talking to my BFF. She answers the questions as a friend would and only puts on her M.D. hat when it's necessary. In In What's Up Down There?, Lissa Rankin, M.D. answers "Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend". She uses her personal experiences and stories about her patients to answer those questions you've secretly been wondering about.

I loved this book. Rankin has a great sense of humour and is very personable. Reading this book really did feel like I was talking to my BFF. She answers the questions as a friend would and only puts on her M.D. hat when it's necessary. In answering the questions, Rankin relates stories from her personal life and the lives of her patients. Don't worry, she has changed the names to protect everyone. While her personal stories are perhaps a bit too-much-information at times, it's really what makes this book great. Also, she doesn't appear to shy away from any question. The questions are diverse and plentiful. A few of them made me blush.

The range of topics covered is varied. She answers questions on: being a gynecologist, how coochies look, smell and taste; sex, masturbation and orgasm; discharge and itching; periods; fertility, pregnancy and childbirth; menopause; and others. She even covers other female parts like: Boobs, Pee and Butts.

Some of the stories are absolutely heartbreaking; some are hilarious; most of them lie somewhere in-between. One thing they have in common is that they are educational. For me, the saddest (and strangest) stories were the ones that involved misinformation (the girl who used a potato as birth control), abuse (the woman who used her vagina as a purse) and mental illness (the woman who accused Rankin of stealing her genitals). Some of questions dealt with stuff I've been wondering about myself, while others dealt with things quite new to me. I won't get into specifics because that would really be TMI.

I even learned some new words for my girly parts: yoni and coochie. Rankin uses the proper names in some places, but these euphemisms make the book less clinical and more fun. One fun addition to the book might be a list of all of the euphemisms we use to describe our most intimate parts.

Highly recommended. I think it's a must read for every woman. Some men might also benefit from parts of it.

For more information about this book, please visit the St. Martin's Press website.

For more information about the author and her work, please visit the Owning Pink website.

Thanks to Dana Kaye from Kaye Publicity for this review copy.

What's Up Down There? by Lissa Rankin, M.D., St. Martin's Press, ©2010. ISBN 9780312644369(Trade Paperback), 381p.

This review is also available on my blog, Daisy's Book Journal.
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4

Oct 26, 2010


Picked this up from the library and went through it last night. It's educational, and entertaining, and blunt - sometimes brutally so - and sometimes a bit gag-worthy (her 'most disgusting' story, pretty much capped it!)

The Yoni stuff, I don't get and relate to, but if it helps women have a more positive perspective of their femininity, then great. And, if brutal honesty is called for, I think most, if not all, women should read the chapter on orgasms. You may know everything in there. You may
Picked this up from the library and went through it last night. It's educational, and entertaining, and blunt - sometimes brutally so - and sometimes a bit gag-worthy (her 'most disgusting' story, pretty much capped it!)

The Yoni stuff, I don't get and relate to, but if it helps women have a more positive perspective of their femininity, then great. And, if brutal honesty is called for, I think most, if not all, women should read the chapter on orgasms. You may know everything in there. You may not. If you don't, don't you want to? I wish I could say I've never met anyone who had no idea women could even have orgasms, but that's not true. In modern American culture, this should no longer be a hangup, much less a question mark!

Some of the stories are hilarious, if a bit traumatizing, and sometimes disgusting. Her friends are kinda nuts. So are some of the questions. But, that said, it is educational. A few of the questions in there, I hadn't thought of or heard before and I was entertained by the "what it's like to be a gynecologist" chapter. She has a good perspective to share about clinical vs. romantic, and what makes a person sexually attractive. That, I really liked.

I think it's worth a library check out and a flip through for adults. It might make a good gift for a teen daughter, but make sure you read it through first. She covers territory that I'm pretty sure many parents are not willing to talk to their daughters about, much less passively advocate.

I would honestly really like to see this book in a young adult edition that trims out some of the more nitty gritty sexual content, but covers a lot of the difficult questions that teens are unlikely to ask their parents. Because, really, if you're going to pick someone to educate your teen on sex ed and get them through some of those 'am I normal?" questions, an OB/GYN isn't a bad choice to do the talking!

So, if you have a nagging question about your body or want to find some questions you never thought to ask, then give it a look!
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4

Jan 24, 2011

Just a quick glance at the table of contents was enough to make me want to read this book--I mean seriously, the introduction is called "Let's Talk About Coochies and Boobs." The rest of the text follows with a similarly down-to-earth tone and deals frankly with any and just about every issue related to women's bodies. Dr. Rankin mixes her significant expertise with her vibrant sense of humor to compile a frequently-asked-questions sort of book dealing with everything from anatomy to sex to Just a quick glance at the table of contents was enough to make me want to read this book--I mean seriously, the introduction is called "Let's Talk About Coochies and Boobs." The rest of the text follows with a similarly down-to-earth tone and deals frankly with any and just about every issue related to women's bodies. Dr. Rankin mixes her significant expertise with her vibrant sense of humor to compile a frequently-asked-questions sort of book dealing with everything from anatomy to sex to childbirth to menopause.

While I did appreciate how much emphasis she put on working to maintain a positive self-image, my only problem with the book was the last two chapters, which got a little too New Age/Self-Help for my tastes. If you want to refer to your girlparts as if its/their/her name is "Yoni," more power to you, but I can't quite take it seriously. Still, her overall message--that women should not be ashamed of their bodies and should own their identity, sexuality, and womanhood--is commendable.

I found What's Up Down There? to be hilarious, fun, and informative--it's exactly the kind of book I'd give to my teenage daughter. That is, if the honest discussion of what happens before, during, and after childbirth hadn't put me off the idea of having kids even more than I already was. ...more
2

Nov 14, 2013

This book was okay. I picked it up at my library because I am interested in going into medicine, and have a special love and passion for women's health and encouraging women to better understand their bodies.

I appreciate the author's intentions, but she came across as very New Age-y and almost too informal. I almost thought it was more awkward to hear female genitalia described as "yoni", etc. vs. the actual anatomic names.

I think she alienates a lot of women readers by assuming femininity = This book was okay. I picked it up at my library because I am interested in going into medicine, and have a special love and passion for women's health and encouraging women to better understand their bodies.

I appreciate the author's intentions, but she came across as very New Age-y and almost too informal. I almost thought it was more awkward to hear female genitalia described as "yoni", etc. vs. the actual anatomic names.

I think she alienates a lot of women readers by assuming femininity = pink, frilly, girliness. I am a very feminine woman, but I'm not so much into the "give birth to your true self while wearing a pink sparkly tutu" stuff.

Overall, I thought the book could have been much more informative and less cheesy, without losing its heart. ...more
4

Jul 16, 2015

First sentence: All women have straddled the stirrups, but few have the opportunity to see things from the other side.

Favorite quote: When we approach our bodies with love, acceptance, and nurturing kindness, we pave the way for magic to unfold, the kind of magic I'm blessed to witness every day.

This book is filled to the brim with great information and most of it we are afraid to ask. Lissa Rankin is bold, blunt, honest, compassionate and wants all women to love themselves and their bodies. First sentence: All women have straddled the stirrups, but few have the opportunity to see things from the other side.

Favorite quote: When we approach our bodies with love, acceptance, and nurturing kindness, we pave the way for magic to unfold, the kind of magic I'm blessed to witness every day.

This book is filled to the brim with great information and most of it we are afraid to ask. Lissa Rankin is bold, blunt, honest, compassionate and wants all women to love themselves and their bodies. This is a great book. ...more
5

Jan 16, 2011

The person in charge of ordering non-fiction at our library caused a stir when he ordered this book. I caused another stir when I checked it out. Yes, adults of varying ages were giggling like middle schoolers when they saw this in my book pile. I'm glad I checked it out though. This book is a great mixture of being entertaining yet informative.Rankin's disastrous home bikini wax adventure will leave you howling, yet other stories will make you cry or cry out, "OMG!"
5

Oct 05, 2010

Dr. Lissa Rankin Ob/Gyn writes a funny no-holds-barred guide subtitled "Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend". This book is for women of any age and the men who love them! Dr Rankin "has picked up the torch that I struggled to light back in the 1980s and '90s", says Dr. Christiane Northrup.
4

Sep 20, 2011

This book was fascinating, though sometimes a bit much. I loved Dr. Rankin's writing style, and for such a thick book it went really quickly. Great reading if you're a girl (or even if you're not a girl) who's not easily grossed out. *grin* Although... not something to leave lying accidentally on the kitchen table, because then people get embarrassed and cover it with newspapers (true story).
4

Aug 02, 2011

I think I found out about this book because Evan and I were snickering at the title, but in reality, it's excellent and informative. Knowledge is power!
0

Nov 13, 2011

Oh, my! This isn’t your mother’s book discussing feminine health. This excerpt (about 225 pages) from What's Up Down There? ($9.99) isn’t for everyone. If you want your medical education to be clinical, don’t buy this book.

The sub-title of the longer book is Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend. That pretty well describes this book. You probably wouldn’t ask these questions if you were sitting on an exam table and your white-coated doctor had just said, “Do you Oh, my! This isn’t your mother’s book discussing feminine health. This excerpt (about 225 pages) from What's Up Down There? ($9.99) isn’t for everyone. If you want your medical education to be clinical, don’t buy this book.

The sub-title of the longer book is Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend. That pretty well describes this book. You probably wouldn’t ask these questions if you were sitting on an exam table and your white-coated doctor had just said, “Do you have any questions?” You just wouldn’t.

Dr. Rankin gets down to the business at hand, using street names for body parts and openly discussing intimate details of intimacy. Through all of this, she keeps the conversation light and engaging. This isn't a biology lesson, but more like a roadmap of the female anatomy; how it functions alone and, um, with someone; and how to take care of things. Dr. Rankin tells of her personal experiences and sometimes the tone of the book is humorous.

Dr. Rankin doesn't pass judgment in this book. Her goal is to educate women to keep them healthy – physically and mentally. A common theme throughout the chapters is that every woman should accept herself as she is and be happy in that.

I recommend this book for all women, especially young women. However, if you are easily offended by candid, no-holds-barred conversation of women’s health issues, take a pass on this book. Sex, Orgasm, and Coochies is selling today for only $1.99.

Two other books on the topic of women’s sexual health excerpted from larger publications are available for purchase for supercheap prices:
Fertility, Pregnancy, and Childbirth: ($1.99) Written by Dr. Lissa Rankin and excerpted from What's Up Down There?, this is a life-changing little ebook that answers:
- How late is too late to get pregnant?
- Is it true that sex can stimulate labor? Is so, will having sex make me deliver early?
- Is natural childbirth really worth it? I mean, I’m sure it hurts like the dickens, so why would you do it? Is it really that much better for you and your baby?
And so much more! As outrageously funny as it is empowering, this book reveals how to love yourself and your body—and will have you recommending it to every woman you know.

Myths About Sex & Pregnancy: (99 cents) People have more access to medical information than ever before, and yet we still believe “facts” about our bodies and health that are just plain wrong.
- Men with big feet have bigger penises
- If you shave your hair, it will grow back faster, darker, and thicker
-The average person swallows eight spiders in a year
- You are more likely to have a boy if you have sex in the middle of your cycle
- Flying on a plane is dangerous to your unborn baby
With the perfect blend of authoritative research and a breezy, accessible tone, Myths about Sex and Pregnancy is full of enlightening, practical, and quirky facts that will debunk some of the most perennial misconceptions about out bodies. This book is excerpted from Don't Swallow Your Gum! ( ...more
5

Dec 08, 2010

I come from an extremely sheltered and religious background where all issues of sexuality were linked to "sin." Therefore acknowledging your body, your sexual self or even posing questions were suppressed...sometimes at the expense of your health. Through Dr. Rankin's book, I learned more about my body than I ever knew before. Sure I could have googled some of this and perhaps there are tons of other books speaking on similar topics but her book is different.

What sets her apart is her gracious, I come from an extremely sheltered and religious background where all issues of sexuality were linked to "sin." Therefore acknowledging your body, your sexual self or even posing questions were suppressed...sometimes at the expense of your health. Through Dr. Rankin's book, I learned more about my body than I ever knew before. Sure I could have googled some of this and perhaps there are tons of other books speaking on similar topics but her book is different.

What sets her apart is her gracious, sweet tone. It even seemed like she smiled with joy as she wrote every word. Her writing style is also engaging, witty and light-hearted yet filled with much depth. You feel like a good friend is talking to you one on one. It doesn't come across like a doctor is spouting off facts and statistics. There seemed to be no judgment or agendas being pushed.

I find that its rare you are given the opportunities to express your questions, doubts and concerns especially as it relates to your self. We stifle our voices in an effort to be "appropriate" and yet with her encouraging tone, you are able to relax as you navigate the complex wonderful world of the woman's body via the questions and explanations in her book. Now I have a deeper understanding. Now I have even more questions. Now I know I'm not alone, abnormal or crazy. I am OK. I am ENOUGH. My body is as it should be.

Also, between the lines of honest, raw, gross and fun & silly questions, what you find is a "friend" empowering you to own yourself. EVERY BIT! The message that I received was that I was to live my life. THRIVE. Make informed decisions. Know myself. Know my body. BE PRESENT. Acknowledge where I am at. And enjoy every bit there is to me. I even loved that topics or questions that had nothing to do with where I am in my life could still be applied to me. One question about childbirth, that has nothing to do with my life was answered with..."The sooner you can process the change in your life, the sooner you ... will thrive" I love that specific topical answers could be applicable in other areas as well.

Did she ansswer every questions you'll ever have? Probably not. But I suppose that's what the Owning Pink community is for!

Read the book. Will it change your life? Yeah, actually. It will assist in changing the way you view your body and your SELF. And even if you already know it all and are the goddess of your world living your authentic self, you'll still learn a thing or too.

It's a must read. And despite what one critic said, I did read this book on a crowded train. There was no shame associated with it. And I was hoping someone would notice! ...more
4

Jun 17, 2013

This is not a book I would have chosen for myself... a friend bought it for me, almost like a dare, to see how I would react and if I would actually read it. So I did.

On one hand, I feel like the author accomplished exactly what she set out to do. She answered some potentially controversial and embarrassing questions that most women, myself included, would be too ashamed to ask. Each chapter starts with an introduction of general information and perhaps an anecdote from the author, with the rest This is not a book I would have chosen for myself... a friend bought it for me, almost like a dare, to see how I would react and if I would actually read it. So I did.

On one hand, I feel like the author accomplished exactly what she set out to do. She answered some potentially controversial and embarrassing questions that most women, myself included, would be too ashamed to ask. Each chapter starts with an introduction of general information and perhaps an anecdote from the author, with the rest of the chapter in a Q&A format with real questions asked by real women, such as, "Is it safe to have sex during your period," "Can an abortion cause infertility," and "If I have breast implants, can I still breast-feed?" The author gives a truthful answer in a way that is understandable to those of us who have never taken a reproductive biology course. In that light, I can see why this book has been, and can continue to be, profoundly helpful for women everywhere.

What drove me insane, however, was the author's tone. She constantly addressed the reader as "sweetie" and "honey," made references to frilly sparkly things and pink skirts, and kept encouraging the reader to giggle. Very, very rarely do I dislike a book because of the author's tone, but this was just too over-the-top. Almost every chapter ended with a speech about "embracing" this or that about our "coochies" and "yonis," and the entire final chapter was about finding sisterhood everywhere because we all have life-giving girl parts. Gag.

For my personal tastes, this would be a one-star book; but in the interest of fairness and what the author accomplished in this work, I give it four stars. ...more
4

Dec 28, 2010

What's Up Down There?: Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend is exactly that -- a book of questions on subjects ranging from vaginas, to sex, to fertility and pregnancy, to menopause, to breasts, to pee, and then-some. The book is written in a very informal format, as if the doctor is a friend of yours with expert advice, and seems to have the goal of both empowering women to love themselves (and not think negatively about their bodies, etc.), and also has the What's Up Down There?: Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend is exactly that -- a book of questions on subjects ranging from vaginas, to sex, to fertility and pregnancy, to menopause, to breasts, to pee, and then-some. The book is written in a very informal format, as if the doctor is a friend of yours with expert advice, and seems to have the goal of both empowering women to love themselves (and not think negatively about their bodies, etc.), and also has the goal of reassuring women that they're normal.

I found myself interested in this book because even if I had a mom (mine died when I was in high school), I'm not sure I'd have the courage to ask her some of these very personal questions in the book. I've found that we women really don't discuss much about our reproductive parts -- it is a taboo subject. What I liked about this book is that I feel reassured that I am normal, something that I question from time to time because wacky stuff happens from time to time. The book is very informative about lots of subjects, including about questions I never thought to ask, or haven't experienced yet (eg, menopause, which I even more don't look forward to). What I didn't like about this book was that sometimes I felt it got too "Oh, sweetie..." Whereas on the one hand I think it's good to have an air of informality, on the other hand, the overuse of that phrase made me roll my eyes a lot. I also didn't like that the book got fairly new-agey, with sections of discourse like, "You and your yoni are one." I know that for some people that talk is very empowering -- to me, it totally turns me off. ...more
5

Dec 14, 2016

Dr. Lissa is one of the most--if not the most-- personal, down-to-earth Gynecologist you will ever hear and/or read about. She makes me want to schedule the next available appointment at the Gynecologist's office! Her humor and compassion for people --especially women-- is clearly revealed in her writing. When I was at the end of the book I almost teared up, having bittersweet feelings about the book reaching its conclusion. I wanted to keep reading. It felt like I was having a heart-to-heart Dr. Lissa is one of the most--if not the most-- personal, down-to-earth Gynecologist you will ever hear and/or read about. She makes me want to schedule the next available appointment at the Gynecologist's office! Her humor and compassion for people --especially women-- is clearly revealed in her writing. When I was at the end of the book I almost teared up, having bittersweet feelings about the book reaching its conclusion. I wanted to keep reading. It felt like I was having a heart-to-heart conversation with this lovely woman and it saddened me that it had come to an end. Yet, at the same time I was overwhelmed with joy after learning so much more not only physically but spiritually as well. I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to laugh at some of the gynecologistic stories and be filled with happiness upon hearing others. But also, be saddened upon finding out how women are treated in misogynistic countries like Somalia that perform female genital mutilation which --contrary to some beliefs-- is quite different from circumcision and is not the female equivalent of such. This book is filled with empowering and beautiful stories from women who tell their tales of love, loss and awakening. It's a must-read. ...more
5

Apr 15, 2012

When it comes to going to see the “lady doctor”, most of us try to get through the process as quick and painlessly as possible. Yes, of course, there are questions we’d love to ask the doctor. However, since most of these topics are too embarrassing to speak aloud, we tend to stick to the basics.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if our OB/GYN could be as easy to talk to as our best friend? To be able to ask and get answers for all those things we always wondered about. No embarrassment. No need to feel When it comes to going to see the “lady doctor”, most of us try to get through the process as quick and painlessly as possible. Yes, of course, there are questions we’d love to ask the doctor. However, since most of these topics are too embarrassing to speak aloud, we tend to stick to the basics.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if our OB/GYN could be as easy to talk to as our best friend? To be able to ask and get answers for all those things we always wondered about. No embarrassment. No need to feel silly or stupid. Just straight answers.

What’s Up Down There? is the next best thing. Dr. Rankin knows that women have questions that they won’t ask until it’s too late. She’s seen a lot of cases where women underwent a lot of physical and emotional pain simply because they didn’t ask. So she seeks to empower women with the answers. Nothing is taboo. Straightforward answers to the questions that none of us would have the guts to ask. It’s a book that every woman should read and then pass on to her sister, daughter, or best friend.
...more
4

Feb 22, 2011

There is a lot of good information on women's health presented in this book. Information you truly would be afraid to ask a doctor face-to-face or even ask a research librarian where to begin accessing it.

It is presented in a friendly, chatty, non-judgmental way. The author does not get bogged down in medical jargon. She states things in a simple, straightforward manner.

Some have said, and I agree, that there is too much slang in the book. In fact, I probably would have recognized more of the There is a lot of good information on women's health presented in this book. Information you truly would be afraid to ask a doctor face-to-face or even ask a research librarian where to begin accessing it.

It is presented in a friendly, chatty, non-judgmental way. The author does not get bogged down in medical jargon. She states things in a simple, straightforward manner.

Some have said, and I agree, that there is too much slang in the book. In fact, I probably would have recognized more of the medical terms (had she used them) than the slang. However, I can see where the author and editor felt the slang terms for reproductive function, women's anatomy, etc. may be a better fit for the "girlfriend" atmosphere they were trying to achieved. Don't know what I mean? Here's an example. I doubt the word "breast" appears anywhere in the book, except as a modified to "cancer." However the term "boobs" appears everywhere. I was willing to make the trade off in order to gain the knowledge in what turned out to be an easy reading experience. ...more
4

Aug 13, 2012

First thing first. The author, Lissa Rankin, writes this book "What's Up Down There?: Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend" in a very crass, vulgar language. If you're the type to be easily offended by that type of language, don't read the book. Don't complain about it; just don't read it.

With that being said, "What's Up Down There?: Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend" was a very good book in my opinion. Lissa Rankin covers First thing first. The author, Lissa Rankin, writes this book "What's Up Down There?: Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend" in a very crass, vulgar language. If you're the type to be easily offended by that type of language, don't read the book. Don't complain about it; just don't read it.

With that being said, "What's Up Down There?: Questions You'd Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend" was a very good book in my opinion. Lissa Rankin covers many things about the woman's reproductive organs, writing the questions and answers in a variety of topics. Very refreshing. Very informative. I learned a lot through this book.

I also would like to mention my ex-husband does not like to read books. Whenever he tries to pick up and read a book, he never finishes it. It would just end up sitting there with a bookmark in it to mark his last page. But, when I showed him this book, it perked his interest and he actually read the book from cover to cover. Good book for men and women alike. ...more

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