Warrior's Woman (Ly-San-Ter Family) Info

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Average Ratings and Reviews
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4.30

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Ratings and Reviews From Market


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Reviews for Warrior's Woman (Ly-San-Ter Family):

5

Feb 12, 2016

I was chatting to some fellow long-time romance readers last night and this book came up and we all made that "OMGitwassoawesome" noise. If you haven't read it, you must! It's sf romance written back when there was hardly any sf romance. But if you read it, go into it with it knowing you're going to get a barbarian alien hero who drags the heroine off to his lair.

It's fun, has a great world, and the romance gets me every time. I saw Meljean Brook's review in which she said it's a guilty I was chatting to some fellow long-time romance readers last night and this book came up and we all made that "OMGitwassoawesome" noise. If you haven't read it, you must! It's sf romance written back when there was hardly any sf romance. But if you read it, go into it with it knowing you're going to get a barbarian alien hero who drags the heroine off to his lair.

It's fun, has a great world, and the romance gets me every time. I saw Meljean Brook's review in which she said it's a guilty pleasure book but that she has no guilt reading it. Yeah, me too.

Now I want to reread it.
p.s. I have the original Fabiotastic cover! It's totally awesome. ...more
4

Oct 01, 2015

*** 3.60 ***

A buddy read with the ladies at Abtastic Ab Loving Geishas who research books with abs on the cover for science!!!

We wanted barbarians in space, we got them!!! And look at this cover drawn by the artist Elaine Duillo - how can we pass on a book with Fabiolicious on it???

I decided to do some research and read the reviews of my fellow readers on GR. Wow! Not very flattering, many complaining of this and other books of its ilk singlehandedly reversing every centimeter gained by any of *** 3.60 ***

A buddy read with the ladies at Abtastic Ab Loving Geishas who research books with abs on the cover for science!!!

We wanted barbarians in space, we got them!!! And look at this cover drawn by the artist Elaine Duillo - how can we pass on a book with Fabiolicious on it???

I decided to do some research and read the reviews of my fellow readers on GR. Wow! Not very flattering, many complaining of this and other books of its ilk singlehandedly reversing every centimeter gained by any of the women's rights movements of all times. ... Heavy burden on the shoulders of a Barbarian-Romance-in-Space book... With Fabio on the cover... Who are we kidding, ladies?

When we pick up a book with this visual as its advertising, do we realy expect a book of enlightenment and feminist propaganda? No, we do not! Those of us who choose to read these books know that we are going to get a mostly implausible romance, which usually starts with insta-lust/love, between an alpha male, possibly a brute, with a woman, most likely a virgin or a courtesan, who go trough ridiculous, unrealistic and at times absurd hurdles in order to rip each-others clothes off and get to sexy times, after which something tragic and once more unlikely trifle will separate them, they will both be total jerks, and somehow, against all logic and human comprehension, they will get back together and live happily ever after!!! Does this sound like something that any of us take seriously at all? We are not idiots, we read it for the fun and hilarity, even for the total ridiculousness of the barely existing plot, and to run away from the reality, which is full of real hassles, real responsibilities, and real issues, from which we desperately need a break!!!

To pick on this book as being over the accepted limit for women is just lazy! The author could not make it any more clear that this book is for entertainment and humor only, and if you went into it with other expectations, now that is sad for you wasting your time.

We are in a world where a bad guy takes over and proclaims the age of lawfully remaining a virgin is going from 25 to 18!!! Because not being "bridged" is detrimental to the woman's health! And it legalizes said woman's proper punishment if she is still a virgin after that age limit for the good of the community!!! Also, on this planet they have clinics which provide sex on daily basis for tension reducer! And if the citizens are denied their gods given right to their daily sex, they participate in riots.... The female MC takes off on a spaceship with her trusty and very humorous super-computer Maria, so they can find allies in order to return to her world and fight the bad guy. She lands on a Barbarian, almost cave-man type of planet and meets the man of her dreams - one of the biggest cave-men there:-) Wow! How can anyone think that a premise like this would be anything but for entertainment? We are obviously going to have the battle of the cultures and sexes, and the brutish barbarian is going to have to win the ladies heart! It is just how it is, no rights for women, but no true humiliation or rape situations either, so we can root for their mutual surrender!

I found the story entertaining, although the plot started in one direction and then got lost in naked times, then it never realy returned on point... I am only glad I did not have to wait on this MC to ever come back and save me, or I will be dust wayyy before she remembers me:):):)!!!

If you can live with this premise and don't get your hackles up in the presence of an alpha male, this is for all the Romance genre lovers, in space:) I laughed and it kept me smiling. Hope you all have good times with a book as well!!! Happy reading! ...more
4

Oct 17, 2008

I have mixed feelings about this book. I was impressed that Johanna Lindsey wrote this futuristic, science fiction romance when she was a historical romance author, but at the same time, I felt that the hero Challen was very much a caveman, moreso than her heroes in even her most bodice-rippery romances.

I loved Tedra. She was pretty awesome: independent, upbeat, fashionable, intelligent. I found it hard to believe she would be happy being the 'little woman' for Old School Macho Guy Challen. I I have mixed feelings about this book. I was impressed that Johanna Lindsey wrote this futuristic, science fiction romance when she was a historical romance author, but at the same time, I felt that the hero Challen was very much a caveman, moreso than her heroes in even her most bodice-rippery romances.

I loved Tedra. She was pretty awesome: independent, upbeat, fashionable, intelligent. I found it hard to believe she would be happy being the 'little woman' for Old School Macho Guy Challen. I know, opposites attract. But still it was a little difficult to suspend my disbelief. I have a few feminist leanings. I'm not hardcore, but I believe in gender equality. I don't believe in a woman being under her husband's yoke. And I was born and raised in the 20th century. Here is a woman that was born far into the future, used to living in a progressive society, and she falls for a man from a culture where women are subordinates in every way. Not sure I bought that. Sure he was a big, hot, buff stud-muffin. But his attitudes (I know it was due to his culture) were way psycho when it came to women. I had major an issue with the hero spanking the heroine. What the Frell? That is so paternalistic and not sexy to me. I know I can tolerate some questionable hero practices (depending on the execution and the circumstances), but putting a woman over one's knee and spanking her like a child is not one of them.

This was a very imaginative romance, and at the time, I liked to keep science fiction/fantasy very separate from romance, but I ended up really enjoying it. Although I did want to do an intervention for Tedra. Come on, girl. The galaxy is a big place. You need to find yourself a man who's not living in the BC Era where he tries to drag women off to his caves. ...more
3

Feb 17, 2016

First of all, let us appreciate the glory that is the (original) cover.



Look at it. Just stunning. The hair floating unnaturally in the background is an added bonus.



I'm kind of torn on this one. In a way, I really liked it, but then there was a lot of in-between stuff that was kind of boring. Oh, let me just say that some people will not like this. It takes place on a barbarian world where women do not have equal rights and are submissive and expected to obey the men (warriors) and they have First of all, let us appreciate the glory that is the (original) cover.



Look at it. Just stunning. The hair floating unnaturally in the background is an added bonus.



I'm kind of torn on this one. In a way, I really liked it, but then there was a lot of in-between stuff that was kind of boring. Oh, let me just say that some people will not like this. It takes place on a barbarian world where women do not have equal rights and are submissive and expected to obey the men (warriors) and they have slaves and it's just generally offensive. But what I liked about it is that the female MC, Tedra, gets even a lot and there is a decent balance between Challen being an uber-alpha jerkface and Tedra challenging him and fighting his antiquated ways.

Tedra was awesome. On her planet, she worked in security and was generally pretty bad-ass. Plus, the woman can banter like a pro. Of course, she's a virgin, but it's by choice. They call losing your virginity being "breached" in this and sex is "sex sharing." There are lots of other made up sci-fi words and that side of the world-building was actually really good. The book was written well.

I know Challen was an ass, but somehow I still liked him. You have to view this as silly escapism. Instalove abounds and there's one drama after another.

However, I think this was a little too long to keep my interest and I started skimming toward the end. It was entertaining, but felt a little padded. The scenes with Tedra and Challen were great, though. Very funny and snarky.

Yep, this is happening. Buddy read with Abtastic Ab Loving Geishas starting February 15, 2016! This gem is ONLY $1.99 on US Amazon. How can you refuse?! ...more
3

Aug 17, 2015

What a strange book this was.

Don't get me wrong, I found it quite enjoyable? I think?

But I feel like it suffered from not knowing quite what it wanted to be.

It started off as a call to arms, with Tedra fighting to free the females of her planet from slavery. But the way she went about getting their freedom seemed... ludicrous. Submitting to and obeying a warrior on a planet in another galaxy? Who willfully and knowingly uses her lack of knowledge about his customs to his advantage? Makes total What a strange book this was.

Don't get me wrong, I found it quite enjoyable? I think?

But I feel like it suffered from not knowing quite what it wanted to be.

It started off as a call to arms, with Tedra fighting to free the females of her planet from slavery. But the way she went about getting their freedom seemed... ludicrous. Submitting to and obeying a warrior on a planet in another galaxy? Who willfully and knowingly uses her lack of knowledge about his customs to his advantage? Makes total sense, right? Right.

But having made my derision clear.... I still found this an enjoyable ride. And while I mentioned that Tedra submits and obeys, she does it with a strength and power behind her every action that challenges Challen's will and authority, crumbles his ironclad control and makes him fall for her.

The drama-llama is hard at work in this. It was like watching a soap opera! The games, the betrayal, the scheming, it was wonderfully cheesy and over the top and I enjoyed it, even if I was rolling my eyes at times.

The sexytimes in this.... Were okay. Not my favorite. Too many closed door scenes and not enough description when we did actually get to read about the deed. I'm a smut lover and this didn't set my loins aflame, as they say.

There was a lot of nothing going on here, too. Basically all that happened in the middle section of the book was that they had sexytimes, she broke rules, was punished for breaking rules, she sooked, they reconciled, rinse and repeat.

Challen was a stubborn ox of a man. I liked seeing him floundering with the guilt of punishing Tedra too severely in the middle there. But I liked him the best when he was saying swoon worthy things like:

"I give to you my life, yours to keep until the day I die."

and

"Warriors do not love... they should not... but here is one who does."

Tedra was a perfect stubborn match for Challen. Really, they are two stubborn peas in a pod and belong together. She was irritatingly bound by her honor at the start which I found quite vexing, but she grew on me and by the time the story was winding down I was pleased for her to be getting her happily ever after. I wish she wouldn't have called everyone "babe" though, that was quite annoying.

This was an entertaining, but bizarre read. I will probably read the sequels at some stage, but alien lurve week is coming to a close and I think I'll cool it for a bit on this genre.

Oh! And can I just put it out there that you have to be really careful what you do and say around aliens? Because all of these women seem to be getting engaged and/or married to them without even realizing it! Watch your words, everyone!

3 i-give-you-my-life Stars

Thanks for the alien lurve week buddy read my lovelyAbtastic Ab Loving Geishas ...more
2

May 06, 2017

Commence rolling those eyes!



Gonna get me some of that misogynistic barbarian man!

Read for the URR 2017 challenge Bodice Ripper category - which I will probably leave out next year! (I totes own it)

Setting / Time / Genre: Future, off planet, somewhere out there....

Series: Apparently.

Sexy times: This is the 80s or 90s or whatever. Tame. Even though the two of them were schtupping left and right.

Plan on reading more by the author: Unknown

Synopsis SEC level 1, rare for a woman in case you were Commence rolling those eyes!



Gonna get me some of that misogynistic barbarian man!

Read for the URR 2017 challenge Bodice Ripper category - which I will probably leave out next year! (I totes own it)

Setting / Time / Genre: Future, off planet, somewhere out there....

Series: Apparently.

Sexy times: This is the 80s or 90s or whatever. Tame. Even though the two of them were schtupping left and right.

Plan on reading more by the author: Unknown

Synopsis SEC level 1, rare for a woman in case you were wondering, whatshername has to go off planet and in hiding due to a hostile takeover of her planet by an icky dude. Enter a lippy computer with personality and a planet full of Conan men. Women on said planet are both revered and marginalized in only the way a bodice ripper can make it so. Yea, yea, whatevs. Get your slavey looking clothes on, lady, and take it like you want it because apparently, you do.



Why it did or didn't work for me: It's a BR written in an age where the rape culture was at its finest, apparently. I know. I know. Take it with a grain of salt and all. Be proud of where we have come from and look at how our heroine's have their own agency these days. Yeah, yeah, intellectually, that is fine. But I do not enjoy it and therefore will probably not do it again.

Signed,
So meh, I can't even

...more
4

Sep 07, 2016

Rating was almost a 4.
This was a spur of the moment read from raiding the MacHalo's dungeon yesterday. I have to say I thoroughly enjoyed this barbarian prose in all its glory! Tedra was a super fun, smart-mouthed, take-no-shit female and Challen was the ultimate "I am a barbarian hear me roar" do what I say kinda warrior! But I think my favorite character was Martha, Tedra's all knowing computer best friend who would stop at nothing to get Tedra laid! HaHa! The plot was minimal, and any Rating was almost a 4.
This was a spur of the moment read from raiding the MacHalo's dungeon yesterday. I have to say I thoroughly enjoyed this barbarian prose in all its glory! Tedra was a super fun, smart-mouthed, take-no-shit female and Challen was the ultimate "I am a barbarian hear me roar" do what I say kinda warrior! But I think my favorite character was Martha, Tedra's all knowing computer best friend who would stop at nothing to get Tedra laid! HaHa! The plot was minimal, and any adversaries were easily defeated. I thought the author was creative in exploring the vast differences between Tedra and Challen's planets, from artificial wombs, food, landscape, and energy. The overall tone was light and fun with just enough emotional sentiment between characters to keep you connected. ...more
1

Aug 27, 2018

I suppose if it didnt have such a creepy, rapey vibe---not to mention the actual rape scenes---Johanna Lindseys 1990 novel Warriors Woman might actually be decent. But, no, now that I think about it, no, it would still suck.

The one good thing about this book is the Avon paperback book cover. Its a gorgeously painted Boris Vallejo-style romance cover with a shirtless muscular man with flowing blonde locks (clearly modeled after Fabio) holding a voluptuous brunette in a skimpy purple dress tight I suppose if it didn’t have such a creepy, rapey vibe---not to mention the actual rape scenes---Johanna Lindsey’s 1990 novel “Warrior’s Woman” might actually be decent. But, no, now that I think about it, no, it would still suck.

The one good thing about this book is the Avon paperback book cover. It’s a gorgeously painted Boris Vallejo-style romance cover with a shirtless muscular man with flowing blonde locks (clearly modeled after Fabio) holding a voluptuous brunette in a skimpy purple dress tight to his chest, a starry night sky in the background. Awesome.

The book itself? Not so much.

Maybe it’s the fact that it is an attempt by a romance author to write in a science fiction setting, and it fails miserably, mainly because the story is practically non-existent and what little story there is is subsumed by endless sex scenes.

It’s quite befuddling to me that I even wrote that sentence. I’m the last person to be annoyed by a proliferation of sex scenes. I love sex scenes. I think just about every single piece of classic literature---from “The Scarlet Letter” to “The Great Gatsby” to “Frankenstein”---would be improved with the addition of more sex scenes. The more the merrier, I say. Here’s the key, though: they have to be well-written sex scenes.

Having read several romance novels in the past six months, my one pet peeve is a poorly-written sex scene. What makes it poorly-written? When the author prudishly and illogically fails to use basic words like “penis”, “cock”, “rod”, “vagina”, “pussy”, “quim”, or any of the hundred creative euphemisms for them. There is nothing more annoying to me than when an author simply writes “...and then he was inside her.”

No! This isn’t transporter sex, where the man’s loins are magically or scientifically teleported into the woman’s nether regions. It’s sex. Dirty, nasty, fun, funky, sexy sex. These authors have forgotten, or never learned, the number one rule of creative writing: Show, don’t tell. If you aren’t going to have the decency to be as graphic as possible when depicting a good old-fashioned fuck, then why the hell write a sex scene in the first place?

Well, anyway, thanks for letting me rant. Now, back to the review:

“Warrior’s Woman” is set in the far future, when humans have spread throughout the galaxy to populate new worlds. On one of those worlds is a tough-as-nails security officer named Tedra, whose planet has just experienced a political coup. An army of warriors from another planet, working for a disgruntled politician, has taken over the seat of government. They have also captured all the women they could find to be sex slaves. Tedra manages to escape in her ship with her smart computer, Martha.

Tedra manages to arrive at the home-world of these warriors. In her attempt to work out some kind of deal with them, she is taken captive by a warrior named Challen. She is immediately stripped of her weapons and her clothes. She’s rather embarrassed because her breasts are so large. (I’m not making this shit up, people, I swear.)

Tedra, it turns out, is a virgin, and she’s never even been with a naked man. When Challen takes advantage of her sexually, and against her will, numerous times, she starts to like it. This, of course, is by no means a forgivable way of hiding behind the fact that Challen is continuously raping her. It’s still rape, even if he’s really hot.

Holy shit, do I really have to explain that?

Anyway, this book is shit. Other than an amazing book cover, I wouldn’t recommend this to anyone. Well, maybe rapists... ...more
5

Apr 24, 2017

I would like to introduce you all to my very first romance novel...imagine if you will, a naive 10 year old girl...
Heading into a new section at the library, likely on a dare, but no bother I would hand this novel (a la over the top cover) to my kind librarian and check this puppy out. THEN imagine that I re-checked this out about 5 times...
This my friends, started my romance addiction and I haven't looked back since.

RE-reading this now, at a slightly older and much less naive age, this was I would like to introduce you all to my very first romance novel...imagine if you will, a naive 10 year old girl...
Heading into a new section at the library, likely on a dare, but no bother I would hand this novel (a la over the top cover) to my kind librarian and check this puppy out. THEN imagine that I re-checked this out about 5 times...
This my friends, started my romance addiction and I haven't looked back since.

RE-reading this now, at a slightly older and much less naive age, this was funny and lighthearted. Romance novels have come a LONG way since then, but I must say I still loved it. Now that I know that it's part of a series, I think we all know I must continue on with the series.

***Five Nostalgic stars*** ...more
4

Feb 06, 2011

This book was first published in 1990 and I read it several years later, when I was in high school. Ive been recently re-reading old books on my Nook and this one popped into my head.

Warriors Woman is pure, fantasy silliness and its almost embarrassing that I like it. Then again, my favorite movie of all time is Seven Brides for Seven Brothers and I feel the same way about it, so Ill describe it the same way: its like loving a big, dumb jock.

All right, heres the plotline: Tedra De Arr is a This book was first published in 1990 and I read it several years later, when I was in high school. I’ve been recently re-reading old books on my Nook and this one popped into my head.

Warrior’s Woman is pure, fantasy silliness and it’s almost embarrassing that I like it. Then again, my favorite movie of all time is Seven Brides for Seven Brothers and I feel the same way about it, so I’ll describe it the same way: it’s like loving a big, dumb jock.

All right, here’s the plotline: Tedra De Arr is a virgin warrior from a technically advanced planet. She’s Sec 1, the crème de la crème of the police. However, when a put-out, misogynistic politician hires a large group of warriors to take over the planet’s government, she’s now an outlaw in a police state. Women can no longer have jobs and the age of ‘breaching,’ that is, losing your virginity, is now legally eighteen. That’s right people, in this society sex is considered the cure for many ills and if you hadn’t had sex by age twenty-five, the government will send someone around to make sure you have sex. Only now the age is eighteen so Tedra, who is in her mid twenties, is an illegal virgin.

So she does what any self-respecting virgin warrior would do, she absconds with a spaceship in hopes of finding warriors she can hire to help she and her ilk take back the planet.

In a classic case of ‘out of the frying pan, into a different kind of frying pan’ she ends up landing on a planet of barbarian warriors. The first one she encounters is Challen Ly-San-Ter who is quite incensed to find a woman who is wearing pants, doesn’t give him the deference women are supposed to, and not only that, she offers to challenge him. Challenging, which until Tedra was only between two men, means that you fight and whoever loses spends the next thirty days doing a job for the winner.

When Tedra loses, she’s told that she’ll be spending the next thirty days obeying whatever commands he gives in a place where he sleeps. Now just to ease everyone’s mind – rape doesn’t happen. Tedra thinks Challen is very hot and is more than ready to have sex with him when the time comes.

Much of Tedra's grief comes from her tendency to assume things and to charge into situations without asking questions. Challen relies heavily on sematics to get his way.

The planet is, on the surface, barbaric and backwards, but the men are very protective of women. A woman who asks a warrior for protection cannot be forced into a sexual relationship unless she offers. Women are punished with either chores or if they have a man, by orgasm-denial. Yes I am serious – a woman is literally punished by being brought to the edge of orgasm and then denied release.

There are so many jokes that could go along with this system that my brain may explode.

This book is pure, silly fun, but only if you go in with the attitude that it’s just a fantasy romance novel. Otherwise it is a feminist nightmare. My four-star rating is for the amount of time I spent laughing, not the manner in which it was written.
...more
5

October 17, 2014

A fun and easy read that will have you laugh ing out loud and waiting for the next turn in this adventure.
3

Sep 03, 2010

3 ½ stars. Enjoyable, pleasant story about a space traveling futuristic woman falling in love with a sword wielding barbarian.

STORY BRIEF:
Tedra is a top level government security police person on the planet Kystran. People have sex sharing for pleasure not to procreate. The government creates humans by taking cells from the most desirable subjects, grows them in test tubes, and then raises the children in group centers and schools. There are no parents, families, etc. Machines create all food. 3 ½ stars. Enjoyable, pleasant story about a space traveling futuristic woman falling in love with a sword wielding barbarian.

STORY BRIEF:
Tedra is a top level government security police person on the planet Kystran. People have sex sharing for pleasure not to procreate. The government creates humans by taking cells from the most desirable subjects, grows them in test tubes, and then raises the children in group centers and schools. There are no parents, families, etc. Machines create all food. There is a shortage of water, so people take solaray baths. Tedra has a computer named Martha. Martha can fly spaceships and transport people (Star Trek style). Martha wants what’s best for Tedra, and they argue frequently. Tedra is a virgin. Martha wants to change that because she knows it would be good for Tedra.

Bad guy Crad hires mercenaries from the planet Sha-Ka’ar who help him take over the government. These mercenaries are 7 feet tall and carry swords and shields which are impenetrable by Kystran’s modern weapons. The former Kystran ruler is kept in prison. One of the payments to the Sha-Ka’ari warriors is Kystran women being sent to the Sha-Ka’an planet as slaves. Tedra was away during the military takeover. Her friend Rourk helps her get away from Kystran using a trading ship. Tedra’s computer Martha is onboard and flies the ship for Tedra. Martha locates the planet Sha-Ka’an which has barbarian style warriors similar to the Sha-Ka’ar. Tedra transports down to the planet and meets Challen. She challenges him to a fight, Tedra loses, and as a result she must be his slave for a month, fulfilling his every wish. She learns that women have no rights and cannot walk around unescorted by a male. All women must be either under the protection of a male or married/mated to him.

REVIEWER’S OPINION:
Although she is his sex slave for a month, he is good to her. She is so in lust with him, she can’t resist him and is willing to live caveman style to be with him. His punishments for her were a little odd, sexually arousing her but not letting her finish. It was written twenty years ago and reflects romance writing of that time. There were no sexual words. Instead, phrases like he entered her were used.

OTHER THOUGHTS:
My mind went on a tangent at one part of the book - to the point that I had to reread several pages. Challen took a drug which affected his judgment. As a result he caused Tedra to suffer a punishment much longer than she should have. The next day when Challen regained his senses, he felt regret and guilt. He asked the computer Martha for advice. Martha said to let Tedra rant, rave, and hit him to get rid of her anger – without Challen stopping the assault. Martha said if Tedra did this, it was a good sign that Tedra still cared for Challen and needed time to forgive him. If Tedra was silent, showing “no anger” and “wanting his blood,” that meant she no longer cared for him, there was no hope for the relationship, and he should return her to the ship. This portion of the story had me thinking about abusive spouses and the question of “if or when to forgive.” I think women should not forgive men who repeatedly abuse them and ask for forgiveness the next day. Those women should leave the abusive relationship. My first reaction was for Tedra to leave Challen, but I had to remind myself that this was the first time Challen abused her, he was under the influence of a drug, he was truly sorry, and it probably would not happen again. In that case, it was ok to forgive, but I had to think about it for a while to accept it. In addition, the idea of women having no rights and forced to obey men, added to my discomfort. I’m confused. I’ve read a number of books with the subjects of abuse or women as slaves which did not bother me the way this book did. I don’t know why. I still liked the story but only after the forced adjusting of my mental attitude.

COVER PICTURE:
I love the cover picture guy drawn by the artist Elaine Duillo. She also drew the same guy for the cover of Gentle Rogue by the same author. I don’t think a guy like this has ever existed, although, there is a slight resemblance to Fabio. I bought both books in their original hardback editions just for the pictures. Please note the picture you see may be different from mine. Amazon and Goodreads may be linking this review to other editions of the book. The picture I see is a shirtless guy with long blond hair and a sword, standing on the right side of the cover. The girl is wearing a light pink fabric dress (of sorts) and has long wavy black hair.

DATA:
Story length: 282 pages. Swearing language: mild. Sexual language: none. Number of sex scenes: 6. Total number of sex scene pages: 11. Setting: 2139 AC (After Colonization) on the planets Kystran and Sh-Ka’an. Copyright: 1990. Genre: science fiction romance.

OTHER BOOKS:
For a list of my reviews of other Johanna Lindsey books, see my 5 star review of “Gentle Rogue” posted 6/14/08. ...more
1

Jul 22, 2010

I saw this listed on some list of romances, and remembered that I read this back when I was a teenager, I think. This was one of the stupidest romances I've read. Start with a supposedly self-sufficient and capable woman who learns that what she really wants is a primitive warrior who will abuse her to keep her safe. (He punishes her for getting in danger by arousing her and not letting her come.) Then add in a stupid artificial intelligence who keeps telling the woman that this is what she I saw this listed on some list of romances, and remembered that I read this back when I was a teenager, I think. This was one of the stupidest romances I've read. Start with a supposedly self-sufficient and capable woman who learns that what she really wants is a primitive warrior who will abuse her to keep her safe. (He punishes her for getting in danger by arousing her and not letting her come.) Then add in a stupid artificial intelligence who keeps telling the woman that this is what she needs -- and can't even use proper terminology. The AI keeps referring to "probables" when it really means "probability." If the author can't even be bothered to look up to see if there's a real word instead of one she made up, why should I bother reading it? Definitely avoid this book! Stupid, stupid, stupid. ...more
3

Jul 10, 2016

Half the time i did not understand what was going on. I was thrust into a new world . When it comes to space travels and intergalactic missions, i don't really care for it so i struggle to say i enjoyed it. Johanna Lindsey's writing is excellent as usual but this book was not for me. Still good enough to wile away time.
4

Jun 18, 2016

Just as enjoyable this time around. Fantasy romance that isn't dark, just a fun sexy story with good world building and a bit of humor.
1

Feb 03, 2016

This book was awful, and it made my feminist self feel awful for her being a total dumbass and him being a giant misogynist. It huuuurt. Half star?
4

Feb 02, 2019

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Tedra is a Sec 1 on her planet. She is trained in combat, security, holds power, is respected by her peers and a complete workaholic. Her companion is Martha, a supercomputer from the future. Martha is programmed to be compatible with Tedra and take care of her. Martha is a snarky, wicked, fairy godmother.

All is well with Tedra except her lacklustre romantic life but she has no complaints. Till her planet is invaded by primitive giants determined to capture women as slaves. Tedra and Martha kick Tedra is a Sec 1 on her planet. She is trained in combat, security, holds power, is respected by her peers and a complete workaholic. Her companion is Martha, a supercomputer from the future. Martha is programmed to be compatible with Tedra and take care of her. Martha is a snarky, wicked, fairy godmother.

All is well with Tedra except her lacklustre romantic life but she has no complaints. Till her planet is invaded by primitive giants determined to capture women as slaves. Tedra and Martha kick ass, make a daring escape and plot to overthrow the invaders. Finding love was not part of the agenda.

Tedra and Challen's are incredibly attracted to each other and that's the starting point of their relationship. It's a clash of two strong personalities and their courtship is explosive.

Tedra is challenging and blunt, Challen is the Master of Calm. Challen struggles for routine and the familiar, Tedra is determined to surprise him at every turn. He is possessive, protective, fixed in his beliefs. Tedra is flexible, wily and alters her plans with every new development.

This book makes me love the dual pov. You need it to understand Challen and the moves he makes. Being in his head helps you understand the depth of his feelings for her. Tedra is an open book, she doesn't brood, simply moves on to something else.

Despite their cultural differences, both of them experience the same emotions. Worry about hurting or losing each other, fear and uncertainty over their future together and impatience over their differences.

I would have loved to see a debate over who stays where but sadly that didn't happen.

Tedra is gifted and I was a little uncertain about her potential being squandered post the end. But books 2 and 3 put my mind at ease. She contributes, builds her family from ground one and is a revolutionary of sorts.

Where it lost a star?
Martha has no way of locating of helping Tedra if she is in real trouble. She could have sent Corth as a spy to look into things but there are no rescue attempts. This is the only thing that bothered me in the storyline.

This is one of my favorite books by this author and I hope there are more books in the series at some point.

“Arrogance in a woman is not allowed.”
“Why don’t you see if it’s deserved first before you disallow it?”

“You’re worrying over nothing, doll,” Martha said, able to guess her thoughts accurately as usual. “You won’t lose him. He wouldn’t allow it.” ...more
5

Jun 16, 2013

*Reread Review*
One of my very first SF/Fantasy romance experiences. I was amazed at the amount of world building, details, and super high tech gadgets involved in this world back in the day, and crazily enough with all the wonders we have seen in the last 100 years, during my reread I was still sucked right in and amazed again.

Tedra our FMC is as bad A as they come, for her world anyways.. but during a political takeover in which a hostile political figure brought in off world "giants" to *Reread Review*
One of my very first SF/Fantasy romance experiences. I was amazed at the amount of world building, details, and super high tech gadgets involved in this world back in the day, and crazily enough with all the wonders we have seen in the last 100 years, during my reread I was still sucked right in and amazed again.

Tedra our FMC is as bad A as they come, for her world anyways.. but during a political takeover in which a hostile political figure brought in off world "giants" to secure his new spot, Tedra must escape with her super computer Martha until things die down or else end up in slavery to the giant Warrior class men. The back and forth between Martha and Tedra throughout this entire series is so funny but also irritating because its constant arguing. Tedra ends up on a different world with Warrior Class giants in an attempt to negotiate their cooperation to free her own world. Only Tedra quickly realizes she is way out of her element and ends up a challenge looser and having to serve one of the very warrior's she had attempted to run from.

I have loved this book in the past and I continue to stand by my love for it. I haven't ever read anything anywhere near like the details and thoughts put down for this story even with my love of historical romance turning into love for high fantasy and paranormal romance. 30 years after this book was written and thousands of fantasy books under my belt and still haven't found anything like this. I agree with every review that Challen our MC is almost unbearable in his warrior tendencies to dominate, be overbearing, and just plain irritating. However, this doesn't lessen my enjoyment of the story. While I myself love the culture I was born into and my ability to be free as a human and as a woman I know that isn't the case world wide. I love how this book really calls to the forefront the embracing of other cultures even if they are different. Yes they may seem barbaric but who is complaining? Just the person who isn't from there? This makes sense to me and calls alot of attention to not judging a culture based on their practices especially when the "victims" of said practices aren't unhappy with said practices. It really brings a lot of much deeper thought into play.

I will just go ahead and say that the "punishment" used by warrior's for their women is absofreakinlutely absurd. In what freaking world would a woman not just finish the job themselves lol. I can't even fathom how that never occurs to any of them but maybe at the time this was actually written, women being in charge of their own sexual needs wasn't a hot topic to write about. But lets just be real. This punishment would not be effective.. we all know it.. you would think with all of Tedra's high tech gadgets that something would have already been invented to take care of this problem so to speak lol. Either way Still love this series and can't wait to continue my reread! ...more
1

Dec 06, 2012

Lost me at: 65%

I don't know if the author wanted to be ironical. Sure as hell she should have stuck with the bodice-rippers. At least in a so called historical setting some things do have a (warped) sense.

Why writing about a warrior woman, a woman in the secret service, good enough to defend presidents and the like and then, a few chapters later, transform her in to a useless, weak, dumb "prisoner". If strength was all that jazz, martial arts wouldn't exist. She is supposed to be expert in Lost me at: 65%

I don't know if the author wanted to be ironical. Sure as hell she should have stuck with the bodice-rippers. At least in a so called historical setting some things do have a (warped) sense.

Why writing about a warrior woman, a woman in the secret service, good enough to defend presidents and the like and then, a few chapters later, transform her in to a useless, weak, dumb "prisoner". If strength was all that jazz, martial arts wouldn't exist. She is supposed to be expert in them, but alas, she can't defeat anyone else. She is really goofy, clumsy. And I hated the Martha. Is she supposed to be witty or fun? It was absolutely awful the way she is supposed to know the heroine better than herself. This books oozes misogyny. And Martha is the epitome of a woman enforcing another to conform.

Yes, the heroine has sarcasm (which I like) honed to a blade. But I really dislike the idea that women are nothing but walking hormones. They simply can't think, can't control their sexual urge because a man is with them. Sorry, pure, unadultrated trash.

...more
5

May 4, 2015

I adore Challen and Tedra. I have had the hard copy since it was first published. The futuristic and primitive differences between the two lovers cause all the expected and hilarious moments. I mean, who wouldn't love their own Corth and a big kitty too.
2

Sep 02, 2018

Meh, I didn't hate it but it wasn't that great either. Its like a Conan the Barbarian meets Barbarella but not nearly as fun as those movies.

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The constant use of the word "woman" and "kiddo" is extremely irritating, demeaning, degrading and humiliating. There are moments where Tedra is strong and fearless but most of the time she seemed just fine with her forced submission.



Challen is oppressive, obnoxious and chauvinist. Plus all Challen and Tedra did was Meh, I didn't hate it but it wasn't that great either. Its like a Conan the Barbarian meets Barbarella but not nearly as fun as those movies.

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The constant use of the word "woman" and "kiddo" is extremely irritating, demeaning, degrading and humiliating. There are moments where Tedra is strong and fearless but most of the time she seemed just fine with her forced submission.



Challen is oppressive, obnoxious and chauvinist. Plus all Challen and Tedra did was fight and fuck. It was really annoying.



Maybe Im being overly critical. There was a couple small and interesting moments in the book which kept me reading. The book has a fantastic premise and great potential, but in my opinion it wasn't executed that great. I seriously doubt I'll continue the series.



BUY THE BOOK ...more
3

Dec 28, 2014

Tedra is a tough combat lady, and when her planet is invaded by unstoppable Conans, she flies to the Conan origin planet to get her own Conans to stop the invader Conans. This is never a good plan its like when you have a bug or something that eats sugar cane and you introduce a cane toad to kill it, and then the cane toad has no natural predators and suddenly your country is just completely overrun by these things. They are ugly and noisy and they eat everything, and sure, sometimes people get Tedra is a tough combat lady, and when her planet is invaded by unstoppable Conans, she flies to the Conan origin planet to get her own Conans to stop the invader Conans. This is never a good plan – it’s like when you have a bug or something that eats sugar cane and you introduce a cane toad to kill it, and then the cane toad has no natural predators and suddenly your country is just completely overrun by these things. They are ugly and noisy and they eat everything, and sure, sometimes people get high from licking them, but introduced species just seems bad ecological practice.

This is also the kind of book where you can play ‘if they had that tech, why didn’t they do this thing?’ For example: on Tedra’s planet they make super strong and durable androids, and laser guns. If you combined androids with laser guns, you could fairly easily destroy all the Conans, although then there is a certain obligation to tell a Terminator story, so maybe it’s just as well.

Amongst Tedra’s many nifty gadgets is a free-thinking computer called Martha. Martha can do everything, but will not become Sky-Net, because Martha’s top priority is getting Tedra some sexy times. Tedra is a virgin and every guy on her planet is weedy, and she wants herself some Conan hugs. On the Conan origin planet, Tedra meets Challen, and they play a game of conquered but defiant slave girl and her barbarian king.

I first read this book when I was a teenager, and either I’ve mellowed heaps in the intervening years, or it’s not nearly as gloomy as I remembered it. In my memory Tedra had fun at first, but then there is the Spanking, and then she’s really sad for the second half of the book because Challen is sexist, his planet is sexist, and she feels pretty interchangeable and marginalised as a sexy sort-of slave girl. Then it’s all solved because he tells her he loves her and she decides that everything else will probably be fine.

The Conan planet has a set of rules where it’s illegal for women to wear pants or to live without male ‘protection’ or to take on paid work for a salary that might allow them to be financially independent.

The planet is dumb, but that’s not a new complaint in SF romance. A heap of SF romance is all about getting fertile Earth brides for alpha warrior alien men, because for some reason all the aliens have run out of women and can build space ships and perfectly awesome medical units, but have never thought up fertility treatments.

Tedra’s planet is no paradise either – women are legally obliged to register for regular sex before they are 25, and it seems fairly clear that this planet, and the galaxy, is hetero all the way. Plus, the Conan’s boss fires all women in managerial positions, and gives all the women in law enforcement to the Conans, along with a whole lot of other women too. That the Dark Ages for women can be returned to so easily is upsetting.

The saving grace of this book is that Challen and Tedra do share some laughs and both of them are ready to kind of giggle about how ridiculous they’re being at times. The Spanking is not at all what I remembered. The Punishment is – that’s indelibly carved into my memory. Possibly this was my first encounter with romance spanking, and while I’m still not terribly keen, I recognise it as a thing that will sometimes happen and is intended to be sexy. I realise at times that I have an unrealistic expectation that the characters will stop and have a serious conversation beforehand about how this or that is the kink that they both want, and that there are safe words, and that this act doesn’t mean that they respect each other any the less. I’ve taken to assuming that this conversation is in a footnote hidden somewhere in the book and that only readers who want it will find it, and readers who are perfectly happy to see it as a fantasy without the need for the serious talk can just get on with enjoying it.

There’s some interesting thinking from Tedra going into the Spank, about what it’s going to do to her relationship with Challen. I think my younger self took it a bit more seriously than I do now. I’m more willing to accept that she saw and understood Challen as a warrior because that was how she saw and understood herself, and that what really grated was that she could not see how she could live with him not seeing her the way she saw herself.

I still could not accept the culture. I could say that I get that the ‘Punishment’ is also intended to be erotic, but given I still hated it, it’s demeaning, and I don’t really get it. I still think that Tedra’s tolerance of the Conan culture was only because as Challen’s wife she would hold a position among the elite, she could see some small ways that she could influence change, and, of course, because accepting it was the only way she could continue to be with the man she loved.
...more
1

May 28, 2016

I have completely backpedaled when it comes to these covers. Get it, girl.

Do I still think they rob the story of its dignity? Yep. Do I think they perpetuate unfair gender stereotypes while discouraging greater legitimacy in the genre? Oh yeah. Sure. I just don't give a good goddamn. I adore what I see, and I think the artists that create(d) them deserve a bit 'o credit. It's hard to contain that much glory in one picture, but someone they manage(d).

(I'm not being ironic, btw.)

That said, this I have completely backpedaled when it comes to these covers. Get it, girl.

Do I still think they rob the story of its dignity? Yep. Do I think they perpetuate unfair gender stereotypes while discouraging greater legitimacy in the genre? Oh yeah. Sure. I just don't give a good goddamn. I adore what I see, and I think the artists that create(d) them deserve a bit 'o credit. It's hard to contain that much glory in one picture, but someone they manage(d).

(I'm not being ironic, btw.)

That said, this is a head-in-the-hands kind of story. Supremely cringe-worthy.

- This is set in the distant, unspecified future where the author feels it pertinent to tell you exactly why some of the new technology is awesome, and never fails to take delight in exposing the protagonist to ridiculous and ancient things like cleaning yourself with water. Or the idea of babies that aren't fake-uterus born. This gets old super fast. It feels gimmicky, thrown in just so this could be labeled a "fantasy" novel. I'd say it's more sci-fi, though.

- The story opens with people getting ready to riot over something silly. Why are they so riled up? They've been denied their weekly visit to the sex clinic. :/

- Home girl protagonist has been a virgin for 24 years because (she says this), she's not interested in sleeping with a dude that couldn't physically overpower her. The men on her planet are typically smaller and weaker than her, and meh. She's not about that life. Which, cool! I don't care if that's your hang up. So the minute her planet is overtaken by SUPER HUNKY TALL MASCULINE MEN WITH SWORDS, she's like, "Yasss, them. I want one of them. Do me. Do my body." The minute.

- I could not stomach how self-righteous the love-interest was. He punishes her (not physically harming her, but by making her do/participate in things she does not particularly enjoy) for breaking rules that she has no idea existed. Worse, she actually feels guilt for breaking said rules that she should have known.

- After a particularly cruel "punishment," the love interest realizes he's been too harsh and is filled with guilt. Protag is furious with him, decides that she hates him (rightfully, I think) and vows to leave as soon as possible. He returns, they START to have a conversation about what happened, and golly gee, she just can't deny that she wants that body. :/ So he's all smiles and "I knew you wanted me; your body cannot deny!" and I'm pulling my hair out because no. I hate it when authors do this. The last thing he deserves to be is self-righteous.

- Your characters are adults. I'm not denying that angry sex exists, but it shouldn't replace having a conversation. You have enough control over your body to hit the pause button and specify why it is you're feeling pissed off and how you've been wronged.

- The overuse of endearments. Martha, the computer, ends almost every sentence with "doll." The protag ends almost every sentence she shares with the love interest with "babe." Authors in romance do this so ridiculously often and I don't know why. I don't know anyone who talks like that, and if they did, I'd have to leave the room.

Anyway, good cover aside, this is a steaming pile of poop. ...more
4

Aug 10, 2015

Guilty Pleasure Sorta Sci-Fi Romance

"She was waiting for the man she wouldn't walk all over to come along. She'd been waiting a long time."

FINAL DECISION: Over the top and literally out of this world, WARRIOR'S WOMAN was before its time with a woman who is willing to have sex and enjoy it without worrying about love, but ends up falling for the hero anyways. Guilty pleasure read.

THE STORY: Tedra De Arr is strong and has not found a man to have sex with because she can beat most of the men of her Guilty Pleasure Sorta Sci-Fi Romance

"She was waiting for the man she wouldn't walk all over to come along. She'd been waiting a long time."

FINAL DECISION: Over the top and literally out of this world, WARRIOR'S WOMAN was before its time with a woman who is willing to have sex and enjoy it without worrying about love, but ends up falling for the hero anyways. Guilty pleasure read.

THE STORY: Tedra De Arr is strong and has not found a man to have sex with because she can beat most of the men of her planet. Part of the security forces, Tedra is forced to flee when a coup puts all the women on the planet at risk. Tedra ends up exploring space and on one of her explorations meets up with Challen Ly-San-Ter, a barbarian warrior who defeats her in a challenge battle. As a result, Tedra must serve Challen in the manner he chooses.

OPINION: Over the top, this romance is big and bold and unapologetic. The story only has a gloss of sci-fi, but I love the larger than life storyline. Lindsey is well known for her historical romances but this book begins her short series where she experiments with sci-fi/fantasy romance.

I first read this book years ago when it first came out and I remember being struck by how kick-ass the heroine is. Yes, she is looking for a man who can defeat her before she has sex with a man, but she is not an ignorant innocent. What is remarkable is that for a book written in this era, Tedra is perfectly willing to have sex as a physical activity and not require love before she is willing to engage in it. Tedra is perfectly willing to like engaging in sex without feeling guilty about it.

Challen is definitely on the alpha male side -- almost caveman like (he does come from a planet of barbarians), but he is definitely sexy and he comes to love Tedra very much and is willing to ultimately respect her as being a warrior like himself.

This book is a guilty pleasure and an enjoyable read.

WORTH MENTIONING: I loved the comic relief given by Martha the computer.

CONNECTED BOOKS: WARRIOR'S WOMAN is the first book in the Ly-San-Ter series.

STAR RATING: I give this book 4 stars. ...more
5

Sep 28, 2011

Johanna Lindsey is at her best in this rollicking, rough-and-tumble romance with a sci-fi twist.

Picture a fiercely independent uber-feminist, forced to flee her home, taking refuge in an apparently-friendly port -- only to discover that her "safe haven" is a place where men rule and women obey, and where she is quickly captured by the first man she has ever encountered who cannot be overpowered by her.

Tedra has never met the man she cannot beat in a fair fight... until now. And when she Johanna Lindsey is at her best in this rollicking, rough-and-tumble romance with a sci-fi twist.

Picture a fiercely independent uber-feminist, forced to flee her home, taking refuge in an apparently-friendly port -- only to discover that her "safe haven" is a place where men rule and women obey, and where she is quickly captured by the first man she has ever encountered who cannot be overpowered by her.

Tedra has never met the man she cannot beat in a fair fight... until now. And when she challenges Challen to a fight, and loses, she is required by local custom to "serve" him for thirty days. Feisty and defiant, she does not go down easily (she kicks him in the balls at one point), but her sense of honor and her need for his help to free her homeland are enough to convince her to keep her bargain. And in the process, she discovers that she needs exactly what he offers: a strength and power equal to her own, in a man whose own sense of honor wins her respect and trust, and whose protective instincts inspire her love.

Warning: This book is DEFINITELY not for everyone!! Many romance novels have a dominant male/submissive female motif, but this one pushes that envelope further than most... up to and including a few punishment scenes and one (explicitly non-painful) spanking scene. Some readers may be disturbed by the premise, which is accepted by all characters within the novel (including Tedra herself!), that men have the right and responsibility to discipline "their" women. Although, in Lindsey's defense, she does make it clear that this dynamic is mutually consensual, and at no point in the story is Tedra physically hurt -- and in fact, Challen's dominance is part of what attracts her. However, if you are offended by this premise, you might want to leave this one on the shelf. ...more

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