Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism Info

Which weight loss plan works best? What are the best books on health and nutrition - What is the best free weight loss app? Discover the best Health, Fitness & Dieting books and ebooks. Check our what others have to say about Barry M. Prizant books. Read over #reviewcount# reviews on Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism before downloading. Read&Download Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism by Barry M. Prizant Online


Winner of the Autism Society of America’s Dr. Temple
Grandin Award for the Outstanding Literary Work in Autism


A
groundbreaking book on autism, by one of the world’s leading
experts, who portrays autism as a unique way of being human—this
is “required reading....Breathtakingly simple and profoundly
positive” (Chicago Tribune).

Autism therapy
typically focuses on ridding individuals of “autistic”
symptoms such as difficulties interacting socially, problems in
communicating, sensory challenges, and repetitive behavior patterns. Now
Dr. Barry M. Prizant offers a new and compelling paradigm: the most
successful approaches to autism don’t aim at fixing a person by
eliminating symptoms, but rather seeking to understand the
individual’s experience and what underlies the behavior.


“A must-read for anyone touched by autism... Dr.
Prizant’s Uniquely Human is a crucial step in promoting
better understanding and a more humane approach” (Associated
Press). Instead of classifying “autistic” behaviors as signs
of pathology, Dr. Prizant sees them as part of a range of strategies to
cope with a world that feels chaotic and overwhelming. Rather than curb
these behaviors, it’s better to enhance abilities, build on
strengths, and offer supports that will lead to more desirable behavior
and a better quality of life.

“A remarkable approach to
autism....A truly impactful, necessary book” (Kirkus
Reviews
, starred review), Uniquely Human offers inspiration
and practical advice drawn from Dr. Prizant’s four-decade career.
It conveys a deep respect for people with autism and their own unique
qualities. Filled with humanity and wisdom, Uniquely Human
“should reassure parents and caregivers of kids with autism and
any other disability that their kids are not broken, but, indeed,
special” (Booklist, starred review).

Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism:

3

Sep 08, 2016

This book had One Good Idea and exploited it from every angle. Maybe that works for a text book and maybe it reads well as positive enforcement for someone dealing with a child with autism but it didn't work for me.

The One Good Idea was that obsessions should be viewed as Enthusiasms. Encouraging these enthusiasms, such as being obsessive about train timetables can be used as behaviour modifiers both by bribery, 'if you don't talk to anyone about trains but go along with them for the next hour This book had One Good Idea and exploited it from every angle. Maybe that works for a text book and maybe it reads well as positive enforcement for someone dealing with a child with autism but it didn't work for me.

The One Good Idea was that obsessions should be viewed as Enthusiasms. Encouraging these enthusiasms, such as being obsessive about train timetables can be used as behaviour modifiers both by bribery, 'if you don't talk to anyone about trains but go along with them for the next hour we will look up timetables for the Great Northern after that' etc. Also, the timetables could be used to foster an interest or at least an ability with reading, maths, communications etc. It was a very good idea. The child who was train-obsessed later got a job advising customers on train travel and did very well.

All the children mentioned in the book who had obsessions that were treated as enthusiams did very well in life, and I feel that's unrealistic but I can see why parents with children with autism would love this book. It is at least positive. But I wonder how many children with autism and enthusiams and are unable to fit into school will ever really achieve even a semi-independent life and career? I wonder how many of these children are really one's with fairly extreme Asperger's Syndrome?

From everything I've read and seen from children who come into the shop there are three 'classes' of diagnoses. Those with autism who really do have their own worlds and don't have any desire to communicate anything outside of what they want. All education is towards developing their communication and interpersonal skills.

The second group are those with Asperger's syndrome who really do want to communicate but only what they want to and have no idea that other people are turned off by their endless communication of their enthusiasms. They are quite educable but need a lot of behavioural modification and they do come across as odd. (These are the majority of these sort of kids who come to the shop because they like books on their enthusiams). As adults they are a bit odd but so what?

The third group (of which I was supposedly part) have no enthusiams, aren't weird but don't get along with other kids in ways that are expected. They don't seem to quite get other people or put their foot in it a lot and they will quite happily shut up about their enthusiams if requested. I don't think these people are Aspergers at all, it's just a different personality type. Silicon Valley is supposedly populated with people with this personality type. They should just stop diagnosing this as a disorder and accept we are all different and many of us need help in some area or another (dyslexia, unco-ordinated, can't do maths etc).

As it turned out, I don't have Asperger's in any form, I have Prosopagnosia. The majority of people don't know about it, including those who happily diagnose Aspergers. (When my son was in school it was ADHD, now it's Aspergers). Lots of people with it have no idea at all until they grow up, me an d Heather Sellers, the author of You Don't Look Like Anyone I Know.

Was the book worth reading? Yes, for the one good idea. But if you dnf'd it after a couple of chapters, you wouldn't miss anything.

...more
5

Aug 10, 2015

If I could give this book six stars, I would. Every parent of a newly diagnosed child should be given this book to read. This book is wonderful and I wish I had it to read nine years ago, when my son was diagnosed as autistic.

I love how the author delves into the reasons why people with autism do some of the things that they do- echolalia, "stims", having a "fidget" object they carry around with them, or needing to stick to a routine, and having what to us NT's seem like unusual or illogical If I could give this book six stars, I would. Every parent of a newly diagnosed child should be given this book to read. This book is wonderful and I wish I had it to read nine years ago, when my son was diagnosed as autistic.

I love how the author delves into the reasons why people with autism do some of the things that they do- echolalia, "stims", having a "fidget" object they carry around with them, or needing to stick to a routine, and having what to us NT's seem like unusual or illogical fears (as I write this, my son is walking around expressing deep worry that a tornado will hit the spray park where he is going to swim- tornadoes are a fear of his. We will show him, several times, the forecast that says it will only rain, no tornadoes). He gives the reader advice and insights from adults on the spectrum, which is a real treat, and he treats parents with respect instead of talking to us like we are stupid. The best thing for a child with autism (or a teenager, or an adult) is to have a team of individuals- parents, extended family, faith community, schools, employers, therapists- he or she can trust- trust is a huge theme of the book, and an insight that blew me away because it made so much sense- and who are all committed to his or her success in self-determination and in living as independently as possible.

I quit reading "autism" books a long time ago, with the exception of Temple Grandin's books. I got so incredibly frustrated at how much contradictory or flat out bad advice was out there, and how so many "therapies" claim to cure or dramatically reduce "symptoms" of autism, if only you are willing to cough up the big bucks and huge amounts of time in the hope that your child might be "cured". As a parent of an adolescent with autism, I have probably heard it all at this point. The author gets it- I don't want my son "cured"; I want him to acquire the skills he needs to live a fulfilling life in the community. Instead of the wild and controversial claims of Jenny McCarthy et al, the author of this book offers real insight into the way my child views the world, which helps me find real ways to advocate for him, guide him and teach him how to navigate through his life.

Finally, I love how the author encourages families to get out into the world and give their child new experiences. I have met so many families who never leave the house because they are afraid of what other people will think and/or how their child will respond. This is advice families need to hear. ...more
5

Oct 05, 2015

Definitely one of the best books I've read on Autism and Asperger's. Prizant takes a very inclusive, whole-child approach. He emphasizes observation and listening in order to understand individuals with autism. I love his focus on asking "why" in the face of puzzling behaviors. He looks for underlying stressors and is always searching for ways to communicate and help. A very positive approach.
5

Jul 22, 2015

Necessary book offering alternative philosophies to ABA and other rigid ASD therapies. Stresses the importance of imprinting positive emotional memories and fostering general happiness in kids to both enrich their lives and - incidentally - promote learning growth. Well-written and structured by someone with over forty years of field work. Recommended for parents, therapists, and teachers.
5

Nov 15, 2015

I would like to thank Simon & Schuster for providing me with a free ARC of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an open and honest review.

If you haven’t guessed from my rating – this is a fantastic book! Everyone – and I do mean EVERYONE – who interacts with children and teens on the spectrum should have a copy of (and read) this book.

How wonderful to see such an excellent mind set about how to approach and interact with those on the spectrum. As a mum to a newly diagnosed HFASD son I I would like to thank Simon & Schuster for providing me with a free ARC of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an open and honest review.

If you haven’t guessed from my rating – this is a fantastic book! Everyone – and I do mean EVERYONE – who interacts with children and teens on the spectrum should have a copy of (and read) this book.

How wonderful to see such an excellent mind set about how to approach and interact with those on the spectrum. As a mum to a newly diagnosed HFASD son I have approached reading books on the subject with trepidation. Mostly due to feedback from adult friends on the spectrum as to how WRONG books on ASD can be. Some of that trepidation is due to me reading books that treat ASD as a traumatic loss to you, the parent, and other stupid mindsets that go against my grain and concepts of how I want to help raise my son.

‘Uniquely Human’, on the other hand, is brilliant. The author Mr Prizant shares very similar outlooks on how to interact with those on the spectrum and I have gained a lot of positive information and insight from his book.

It allows the reader to learn more about ‘the spectrum’ without pigeonholing our children to specifics. Not all ON the spectrum will act in a text book fashion, and ‘Uniquely Human’ explains this, embraces this and tries to help you realise that it’s perfectly fine. Who needs text book children? Either on the spectrum or off! I just want happy and healthy children who I can help learn to grow, function and achieve their own goals in life. And I really do feel this book will help me find some of the best methods to use to help aide my son on his journey.

A really insightful and helpful book.

Would I recommend this book to others? Yes I would. In fact, as I’ve been reading it I’ve already been talking about it with my son’s teachers and other ‘helpers’. As I’ve said already, anyone who interacts regularly with children on the spectrum should read this book. It’s not a manual to ‘Autistic children’ – it’s a guide to help you be a better person when working with those on the spectrum. The book is there to help you, the reader, understand the spectrum better, rather than try and manipulate a child on the spectrum away from their natural behaviour to something you would prefer.

Would I buy this book for myself? Yes I would. And by the time you read this review it will probably be on my book buying wish list! I want to own a copy I can to turn when needed to help me remember there might be a better way to approach certain situations. I want my husband to read it so that when I send him a text saying ‘dysregulation moment’ he knows what I mean and is as prepared to help as I am! I want my whole family and friends to read it to realise I’m not teaching my son weird and quirky habits… I’m simply working along and encouraging his own growth and self-worth through his own naturally quirky habits. Weird is good in our house. We embrace weird and are proud of it.

In summary: Not a manual on how to raise a child or teen on the spectrum. ‘Uniquely Human’ is more a helpful guide for you (the non-spectrum person) to get a glimpse onto the spectrum and to learn to adapt to and respect your child’s outlook on life. I cannot sing praises high enough for this book!
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5

Sep 12, 2015

Finally, we have a truly humanistic perspective on autism. If everyone read this book, there would be a lot more tolerance and understanding of neurodiversity in the world. Prizant provides readers with a deep understanding of the strengths, challenges, and coping efforts of individuals with autism. He carefully balances an understanding of autism as a difference in neurological wiring with an understanding that the word autism does not limit or wholly define an individual. All autistic Finally, we have a truly humanistic perspective on autism. If everyone read this book, there would be a lot more tolerance and understanding of neurodiversity in the world. Prizant provides readers with a deep understanding of the strengths, challenges, and coping efforts of individuals with autism. He carefully balances an understanding of autism as a difference in neurological wiring with an understanding that the word autism does not limit or wholly define an individual. All autistic behaviors are human behaviors, first and foremost, and Prizant points out how the behaviorists have been focusing on "deficits" a bit too much. He emphasises the importance of emotional regulation and the importance of parents and therapists who have an intuitive sense of how to connect with a child with autism. The only thing missing from this book is a reference to nonviolent communication (NVC), which would be a natural complement to Prizant's SCERTS model. Otherwise, I applaud Prizant for going against the behaviorist stream, and helping society embrace neurodiversity. ...more
5

Aug 29, 2015

Everyone that lives or works with a person with ASD has to read this book.

As a professional working in various educational programs for students with ASD, I often felt as if there was something more we can be doing to benefit these kids. Dr. Prizant has given a voice to the various strategies, thoughts and responses I've used in my career I just viewed as gut reactions while working in the field. There are times I have felt criticized by colleagues in the field for not following a popularly Everyone that lives or works with a person with ASD has to read this book.

As a professional working in various educational programs for students with ASD, I often felt as if there was something more we can be doing to benefit these kids. Dr. Prizant has given a voice to the various strategies, thoughts and responses I've used in my career I just viewed as gut reactions while working in the field. There are times I have felt criticized by colleagues in the field for not following a popularly accepted approach as closely as I should, it is nice to know there is a niche for me out there and my thoughts are validated by research in child development and in the field of autism. Thank you for sharing your approach Dr. Prizant, this is a resource I will refer to a hundred times over. ...more
5

Aug 20, 2015

Absolutely wonderful book about being a positive influence in an autistic child's life. I found myself marking and highlighting so many passages. The stories shared cover all age ranges- Into adulthood- and I found that particularly helpful. Mostly this book is an affirmation that as a parent I have a say in my child's life and I can trust my instincts. Prizant must be a deeply empathetic human being and his philosophy on autism can be applied and used to better parent and teach all human Absolutely wonderful book about being a positive influence in an autistic child's life. I found myself marking and highlighting so many passages. The stories shared cover all age ranges- Into adulthood- and I found that particularly helpful. Mostly this book is an affirmation that as a parent I have a say in my child's life and I can trust my instincts. Prizant must be a deeply empathetic human being and his philosophy on autism can be applied and used to better parent and teach all human beings! ...more
5

Jan 07, 2016

Quick, brilliant read for ANYONE... everyone.... all of you. :-)
5

Jan 23, 2016

As an autistic individual, this book cannot be more amazing! Every parent, teacher, relative, and professional must read this book! Dr. Barry Prizant finally puts into words what I and many others as autistic individuals already knew but could not say.
5

Sep 07, 2015

The best book I have read on autism. Truly allows you to move into the mind of a person with autism and try to understand.
5

Sep 24, 2015

This book is truly groundbreaking. I work with kids on the spectrum (and have one of my own) and read tons about autism, and I learned new things from this book. It's definitely one of the best books of the year.
5

Aug 24, 2015

One of my favorite books for helping families and staff to understand and truly support children and adults on the spectrum. Very respectful, full of appreciation for the beauty of diversity, and a fairly easy read. Recommend for anyone new to autism, especially, but really anyone who has someone with autism in their life.
5

Sep 12, 2015

MUST-READ! Absolutely a must read for every parent, family member, educator, provider of care, and even those who want educate themselves with Autism. Finally a book with such deep understanding of Autism Spectrum for what it is: ..."Autism isn't an illness. It's a different way of being human..." Indeed! Truer words have never been written. Highly recommend reading this wonderful, compassionate book.
3

Aug 07, 2015

There were a lot of good thoughts and good advice in this book but I was put off by some of the language and Prizant's surprising lack of familiarity with autistic culture - specifically that he is either not aware or doesn't respect that autistic people have reclaimed words like "autistic" and "stimming." I think it is still an excellent read for professionals, parents, teachers, and anyone else who needs to have explained to them that autistic people have thoughts and feelings just like any There were a lot of good thoughts and good advice in this book but I was put off by some of the language and Prizant's surprising lack of familiarity with autistic culture - specifically that he is either not aware or doesn't respect that autistic people have reclaimed words like "autistic" and "stimming." I think it is still an excellent read for professionals, parents, teachers, and anyone else who needs to have explained to them that autistic people have thoughts and feelings just like any other human being. ...more
5

Sep 20, 2015

In addition to giving fantastic information on Autism, this author gives first hand knowledge of how to handle different situations that might occur with a child. He has gone into homes, schools, institutions and after studying different children in their environment, has discovered some unique ways to empower the child and enlighten the teachers. Teachers who have studied these behaviors need to listen to the child and then be able to access the situation based on the childs In addition to giving fantastic information on Autism, this author gives first hand knowledge of how to handle different situations that might occur with a child. He has gone into homes, schools, institutions and after studying different children in their environment, has discovered some unique ways to empower the child and enlighten the teachers. Teachers who have studied these behaviors need to listen to the child and then be able to access the situation based on the childs needs/experiences/language and other communicable techniques. The author is brillant in this book to give examples of his own observations and how issues might best be handled. Loved the book....recommend to every teacher/parent who might suspect that they have an autistic child. It is certainly a book that a parent of an autistic child needs to read. ...more
5

Sep 24, 2019

A great book. If your life is touched by someone who lives with autistic characteristics, this will help you find a positive perspective on and positive responses towards that person. Well worth reading.
5

May 26, 2019

BEST book I’ve read about ASD and I’ve read a lot of books about ASD:)
5

Jan 04, 2016

What a phenomenal book! As a parent of 2 children on the spectrum, I received a wealth of knowledge from Barry Prizant and found myself regularly highlighting passages to share with my husband. Prizant has such a wonderful, respectful approach to understanding autism. It was very refreshing to read! One thing that stuck in my head is his use of the term "Enthusiasms" to replace the oft-used negative term "Obsessions" to refer to current interests of an individual on the spectrum. I will What a phenomenal book! As a parent of 2 children on the spectrum, I received a wealth of knowledge from Barry Prizant and found myself regularly highlighting passages to share with my husband. Prizant has such a wonderful, respectful approach to understanding autism. It was very refreshing to read! One thing that stuck in my head is his use of the term "Enthusiasms" to replace the oft-used negative term "Obsessions" to refer to current interests of an individual on the spectrum. I will definitely be recommending this to other parents in my local AS support group. Thank you, Dr. Prizant! I really needed this. ...more
5

Dec 23, 2017

This is a nonpathologizing, normalizing look at autism that explores the reasons that people who are autistic behave the way that they do. And when explained through their eyes, a lot of the behavior that seems so baffling starts to make sense. This book is easy to read, and is good for parents, teachers, and anyone who interacts with someone who is on the spectrum. I was really touched by the empathy that Dr. Prizant showed to people who are different. I had a few quibbles, but overall this is This is a nonpathologizing, normalizing look at autism that explores the reasons that people who are autistic behave the way that they do. And when explained through their eyes, a lot of the behavior that seems so baffling starts to make sense. This book is easy to read, and is good for parents, teachers, and anyone who interacts with someone who is on the spectrum. I was really touched by the empathy that Dr. Prizant showed to people who are different. I had a few quibbles, but overall this is a definite recommend. ...more
5

Dec 27, 2015

This is the book I wish I could have read when my son was diagnosed with PDD-NOS almost 6 years ago (of course, it wasn't written then). While I did not find many answers in this book, I found a whole lot of hope, and a wonderfully person-centered approach to dealing with behavior issues. I highly recommend this book not only for parents, teachers, and caregivers, but also for grandparents and others who might not understand that the autistic child's behaviors are not the result of stubbornness This is the book I wish I could have read when my son was diagnosed with PDD-NOS almost 6 years ago (of course, it wasn't written then). While I did not find many answers in this book, I found a whole lot of hope, and a wonderfully person-centered approach to dealing with behavior issues. I highly recommend this book not only for parents, teachers, and caregivers, but also for grandparents and others who might not understand that the autistic child's behaviors are not the result of stubbornness or maliciousness but are instead an attempt at communicating their needs. ...more
5

Aug 19, 2015

Absolutely outstanding! A must read for parents, teachers, therapists, and anyone else that knows and loves an individual with autism.
5

Jul 04, 2017

Yes, yes, yes! As a person with Autism I highly recommend this book to all parents and educators, even if you don't have a special needs kid. This man gets it.
2

Dec 19, 2016

I read Uniquely Human, and I went through it chapter by chapter, plus all that material that's not in a chapter. At the end of it all, here are my thoughts:


This book is still pathology paradigm/behaviorist model. It's just considering that there is, in fact, some rhyme or reason to the behavior and focusing on the cause of the behavior as a way to reduce it. (Same bad model, just using it to say better things.)
The descriptions of how and why we act are definitely behaviorizing, or at best I read Uniquely Human, and I went through it chapter by chapter, plus all that material that's not in a chapter. At the end of it all, here are my thoughts:


This book is still pathology paradigm/behaviorist model. It's just considering that there is, in fact, some rhyme or reason to the behavior and focusing on the cause of the behavior as a way to reduce it. (Same bad model, just using it to say better things.)
The descriptions of how and why we act are definitely behaviorizing, or at best partially behaviorizing. See Disability in Kidlit here for the explanation of what I mean by that.

For calling autistic people experts, he really doesn't pull much that's credited as being learned from "an autistic adult said this."
What crediting of autistic adults happens leans very white, cisgender, heterosexual, educated, and middle to upper class.
Even the chapter called "The Real Experts" has very little content that is what we say or how we say it. Most of it is anecdotes in which he shows our behavior.

He occasionally conflates tantrums and meltdowns. There is, in fact, a difference.

Dr. Prizant is far more trusting of therapies and professionals in general/by default than I can trust or endorse. He may have shared a parents quote about not being able to trust professionals as far as you can throw them, but his writing indicates that he himself does trust professionals.

I do not even vaguely trust the reader (or really trust Dr. Prizant) on what the "successes" we celebrate are. The goals described read too much like "acting less autistic" (but by reducing anxiety!) in ways that conflate "acting autistic" with "showing distress in autistic-typical ways."

This book minimizes some major problems: electric shock and other painful punishments are depicted as a thing of the past, Lovaas as one of the first autism experts (never mind that he's one of the people who used shock,) and similar.

There are times where a trait he mentions is relevant and makes a "lack of social X" argument redundant or unneeded, but he makes the "lack of social X" argument anyways.
One case here is a students refusal to complete an assignment that he can't make sense of being explained with not understanding that he should make an attempt anyways to please the teacher, rather than "Ok but this is so inaccessible that there is no attempt I can make."
Also there's the bit where we have a communication disability, and we're pretty explicitly taught not to express discomfort or displeasure, but apparently our not communicating when things are bothering us is because we lack this social instinct?

There is an overarching pattern where Dr. Prizant comes up with a good point but doesn't follow his own logic fully.
He writes his dissertation on functions of echolalia (and does research on functions of scripting,) finding that they have all the same functions as spontaneous language, but then aims to reduce scripted speech. His SCERTS model privileges "spontaneous" speech over echolalic and scripted speech.
He points out some issues with intervention "for autism" in the introduction but still supports plenty of things that are "for autism" later.
He points out that "unpredictable behavior" usually means that the person describing or observing us doesn't understand the pattern, but still describes things as unpredictable.
He points out that we might find different things challenging than neurotypical children. He misses that running out of gas faster under higher stress doesn't imply a lower threshold or a smaller tank.
He argues against portraying autism as a checklist of behaviors, but then tends to start anecdotes about children by... listing behaviors.
He talks about trauma but also says that our trauma and flashbacks are not PTSD for reasons that he never explains. (If it walks, talks, and quacks like PTSD... it's probably PTSD.)
He points out that there are good days and bad days, that abilities aren't static. He still treats selective mutism as if it's definitely not a "can't" talk in the anecdotes where it is mentioned, because the person can talk. I can generally speak, but when I stop it's because I can't flipping talk. Though to be fair, if I were to have a conversation with this guy I'd probably type for reasons other than "can't speak."

At the end of it all, there aren't too many people I'd suggest the book for. I wouldn't give it to a parent whose kid was recently diagnosed and who hadn't learned to be all behaviorist yet. I wouldn't give it to someone who knew nothing about autism and knew it. I wouldn't give it to an autistic person, OMG NO WHY.

I would, however, consider suggesting it to an educator or professional (or maybe parent) who had already learned to view autism as a checklist of behaviors and deficits, and who I didn't think was going to stop doing that any time soon. Maybe. Still iffy because of essentially the difference between 1984 and Brave New World: Yes, only one of these is torturing people to control them, the other is quite a bit more subtle in its control and using what people like (along with many other signs of dystopia), but these are both dystopias. One gets into a wrestling match to force eye contact while the other holds a desired toy between the eyes to induce it. Both are pushing for a neurotypical performance at the end of the day. The first is obvious in its abuse, while the second... it's not as immediately and obviously traumatizing but that could make it harder for people to realize the problems and can lead to trauma that others won't believe even was trauma. Both are still dystopias.

Dr. Prizant is teaching people to make a nicer-seeming dystopia and call it accepting autism. It's not neurodiversity, and it's not accepting autism. It is sometimes doing things that make us more comfortable and less anxious, but with the idea that this will make us appear less autistic because autism gets conflated with autistic ways of showing distress.

For folks who'd like to go back and read my more specific thoughts, here's the rest of the series. Note that the part number within my reading is always 1 more than the chapter number because I started with everything not in a chapter.

Everything not in a chapter 
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 12 ...more
5

Nov 08, 2017

This is a must read book for those that are curious about Autism to those that come into contact with Autistic individuals whether they be doctors, teachers, parents or siblings.

This book goes behind the behaviors that define the autistic person and explain very well the need to understand the causes of those behaviors and the benefit in doing so.

Just the introduction alone was worth getting the book for. The part that stands out is:

"Autism isn't an illness. It's a different way of being This is a must read book for those that are curious about Autism to those that come into contact with Autistic individuals whether they be doctors, teachers, parents or siblings.

This book goes behind the behaviors that define the autistic person and explain very well the need to understand the causes of those behaviors and the benefit in doing so.

Just the introduction alone was worth getting the book for. The part that stands out is:

"Autism isn't an illness. It's a different way of being human. Children with autism aren't sick; they are progressing through developmental stages as we all do. To help them, we don't need to change them or fix them. We need to work to understand them, and then change what *we* do.

In other words, the best way to help a person with autism change for the better is to change ourselves - our attitudes, our behaviors, and the types of support we provide."

For autistic individuals, I imagine what is said may seem obvious. This book is a continuation of autism awareness saying things that autistic people might not have been able to explain themselves. It's certainly a necessary tool to help professionals meet the autistic person where they are. It reminds me of the Christian hymn song title "Just As I Am."

For me this is a must own book. I tend to collect books on Autism and this is certainly in my top 5 and maybe even in my top 3 (there are more books on the subject from all points of view than you may realize). ...more

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