Treat Your Own Back Info

Which weight loss plan works best? What are the best books on health and nutrition - What is the best free weight loss app? Discover the best Health, Fitness & Dieting books and ebooks. Check our what others have to say about Robin A. McKenzie books. Read over #reviewcount# reviews on Treat Your Own Back before downloading. Read&Download Treat Your Own Back by Robin A. McKenzie Online


Help yourself to a pain-free back. This easy-to-follow book
presents over 80 pages of education and clinically-proven exercises. The
simple and effective self-help exercises in Robin McKenzie's Treat Your
Own Back have helped thousands worldwide find relief from common low
back and neck pain. This book helps you understand the causes and
treatments, along with a system of exercises that can help you relieve
pain and prevent recurrence.

Average Ratings and Reviews
review-bg

4.35

1102 Ratings

5

4

3

2

1


Ratings and Reviews From Market


client-img 4.5
149
27
19
6
6
client-img 4.4
5
6
3
2
0
client-img 4.15
372
363
111
5
1

Reviews for Treat Your Own Back:

3

May 29, 2015

Be Careful.
Be careful.

While the McKenzie Press-up is a tried and true technique in the treatment of back pain and back injury, this book can be dangerous to someone who is not doing the techniques under the supervision of a Physical Therapist. I've been living with a severe lower back injury for the last 5 years, and I've been to many different doctors and PTs. My injury can be debilitating at times, and has without question been the bane of my existence for a really long time. I've been forced out of teaching and practicing martial arts, lifting weights, and basically spending every evening in a gym. Anyone who has ever had a serious back injury can attest to the daily challenges, both physically and mentally, of trying to live a full life while constantly being pulled down by seemingly interminable pain and discomfort.

I've seen a few Physical Therapists, and for the most part they've helped, but the only person who can truly prescribe the intensity and frequency of rehabilitation exercises for a patient is . . the patient. You have to listen to your own body and determine, on your own, how far you can go and how frequently you should exercise. I've re-injured myself over 20 times over the last two years while following the advice of my Chiropractors, Doctors, and various PTs. Each time I thought I was fully healed, I would go back to the gym and pick up weights or put on my Gi and try to get back into training. I was wrong every single time, and undid all of the healing and rehabilitation and had to start right back from the beginning. What this does to the confidence and mindset of someone who is used to getting thrown around a dojo or lifting weights is beyond frustrating. But, I'm dealing with it.

Anyway, because of this, I decided to approach a self-therapy program along with my regular treatment. I've read almost every article on the internet I could find about Physical Therapy as it pertains to back and spinal injuries, and I've pored through countless medical journals and Physical Therapy blogs. I even keep a dated back/spine log on my PC with a weekly log of what I eat, how I train and how I feel, any setbacks, and whether I feel I'm progressing in my rehabilitation.

In my research, I came across this book. Before buying it, I read many reviews from people on Amazon and a few other places, and, for the most part, the reviews were good, so I decided to add it to my rehabilitation and physical therapy bookshelf at home. The book is easy is to read, and the techniques are pretty straightforward and simple. They break it to down a few different variations of the McKenzie Press-up. Like I said, the McKenzie Press-up is a tried and true technique when it comes to dealing with back injuries. Of the myriad exercises I've learned over the last few years from the various PTs and doctors I've been to, the McKenzie Press-up seems to be the best one. If you're into Yoga, you'll recognize the McKenzie Press-up is also called The Cobra pose. It reverses the forward bending of the spine (which is the root of many spinal problems) and reduces the stress and tension in the vertebrae in the lower spine. It forces lower discs in the spine to go back into place, and it also keeps flexibility and mobility in the Spine as a whole. The first time I tried doing a McKenzie Press-up (probably about 3 years ago), I immediately felt popping, cracking, and movement in my lower spine. At first it was a little frightening, but after a few sets, I could feel most of the tightness and stress going away from my lower spine. So I've kept using the technique since then. From my research and experience, it's best to do 3 or 4 sets of press-ups every day if you experience back pain or are trying to heal a back injury - unless your injury was caused by that exact same motion, then you need to pursue techniques that bend the spine the other way. Confirm the techniques with a Spine Doctor first, of course.

So why the warning? Well, there is a variation of the McKenzie Press-up in this book where you stand up and, while placing your hands on your hips, bend backward as far as you can a few times. This version is recommended especially if you work all day in an office and are seated for most of your work day, which I do and am. Sitting, by the way, is the enemy of the spine. Anyway, about two months ago, after I finished reading the book, I decided to implement the standing version of the McKenzie Press-up at work. Throughout my day, I stood up about 10-15 times and did the standing press-ups. At first, I felt good. I was very happy because I usually have to find an empty office or a clean bathroom so that I could lay on the ground and do a few sets of the standard McKenzie Press-ups. That's how serious my injury is; if I can't do a few sets every day, even at work, my pain becomes so unbearable that I have to literally inhale NSAIDS just to make it through the day until I can go home and lie down. So, as I was saying, that day I did a good amount of standing press-ups. Toward the end of the day, I decided to go take a walk outside to get some air. I didn't walk for more than a block before I felt either a disc or vertebrae in my lower back move. Then the pain started. I had to go back upstairs into the office and take a few Advil and just take the pain until the end of the day. The next day I went to my Chiropractor and had him adjust me, and I was back to square one. Apparently I aggravated my lower back by doing the standing press-ups, so I've never done them again. After talking to my PT, I learned that the standing variation is more advanced version, and should only be done by people who are further along in their Spine injury recovery.

Now, will everyone have this same experience? Of course not. Maybe every single exercise in this book will yield great results for some people. I just wanted to warn people to be careful, and to also run these exercises by a Spine Doctor or Physical Therapist before doing any of them. When it comes to your body, especially your Spine, you need to be very careful about self-therapy. It's still a good book to add to your bookshelf, but, like I said, be careful with the exercises contained within - especially the standing version of the McKenzie Press-up.
1

August 16, 2003

A total quack
I used Robin's technique to help my sciatica when I was in my 20s. Now, 20 years later, a physical therapist asks how I messed up my posture so badly. When she heard that I used Robin's techniques she said it was too bad. That Robin has messed up many people's backs. Now I have severe arthritis between my shoulder blades from having such horrible posture for the past 20 years. Save yourself and get a recommendation to a respected physical therapist instead.
5

Jun 03, 2019

I threw my back out and had a coworker (Thanks Libby) and my new PT recommend this same book on the same day. I read it, and 2 days later, I am on the right path! Assuming that trend continues, this book is magic!

It basically says that many of us who work sitting down all day have bad posture and lose our lordosis (the curvature of the lower back). If this happens it puts strain on your disks while can easily lead to a strain and thus throwing out your back. The fix is simple - to do stretches I threw my back out and had a coworker (Thanks Libby) and my new PT recommend this same book on the same day. I read it, and 2 days later, I am on the right path! Assuming that trend continues, this book is magic!

It basically says that many of us who work sitting down all day have bad posture and lose our lordosis (the curvature of the lower back). If this happens it puts strain on your disks while can easily lead to a strain and thus throwing out your back. The fix is simple - to do stretches that push the back to have lordosis again.

So far so good, but have a ways to go! ...more
1

November 3, 2006

Disappointment
I bought this book with a lot of hope and enthusiasm but unfortunately found that the recommended exercises were not right for me. In fact they hurt and made my back worse. I did find a therapist who gave me massages and exercises which worked and I'm now without any pain.
5

Aug 25, 2010

I suffered a herniated disk playing basketball and consequently experienced debilitating lower back pain. I was confined to bed for months, had sciatica, and gradually lost strength and feeling in my left leg. The pain was continual and it was hard to think clearly. I tried many things to heal my back but this is the one that worked (in conjunction with physical therapy). The thesis of this book is that much lower back pain is caused by a loss of lordosis (the curve in your lower back), and the I suffered a herniated disk playing basketball and consequently experienced debilitating lower back pain. I was confined to bed for months, had sciatica, and gradually lost strength and feeling in my left leg. The pain was continual and it was hard to think clearly. I tried many things to heal my back but this is the one that worked (in conjunction with physical therapy). The thesis of this book is that much lower back pain is caused by a loss of lordosis (the curve in your lower back), and the solution is to restore lower back strength and flexibility through a combination of basic exercises and stretches. I distilled this book down to two exercises (situps and reverse situps) and three stretches (knees to chest, yoga cobra, and hamstring stretch) that I continue to practice whenever my lower back pain returns. It works. ...more
5

April 25, 2008

eye opening
I am an architect and always wrongfully thought that a spine disk fails as a result of compressive force at the location where it is "squeezed" the most. I could not understand why all problems seemed arised from frontal bending while by logic I could only injure my back by bending backward. It seemed that all the exercises I've done so far were moving me in the opposite direction. Well, now I read this book and I found out why I was wrong.

So far I found myself to be a perfect target audience of this book: I tried everything so far: chiropractors, accupuncture, massage, oral anti-inflammatory drugs, epidural injections, etc. Only injections helped, chiropractor and massage bring a very short-term relieve. Now I am experimenting with an inversion table.

One thing that I think should be added to this book is about a seat. I noticed that horse riding helps me alleviate my back pain (back in the old days when I had time for extravagances like that). I remeber having a terrible pain while on the road for many days, and a horse owner allowed me to jump on back of one of his horses; ten minutes of slow ride worked as a best therapy ever, while he watched me horrified that I will fall down, injure myself and sue him.
The point is that a chair seat should resemble a horse saddle, so that a person can sit on it, maintaining a large (e.g. 270 degrees) angle between thighs and a trunk. I bought a ballchair, threw away its instruction (which inappropriately asks me to sit at 90 degree angle) and sit on it with my knees almost touching the floor. The chair is too wide for that, so I cannot maintain the position for long, but it helps anyway.

Well, like other readers said: I wish that doctors, chiropractors, and other "professionals" provided me with the simple knowledge contained in this book. They did not.
1

November 16, 2009

Back Exercises
Again, as with the book on neck problems, I did not find this book particularly helpful either. I either have been doing the same exercises or am prohibited from doing certain ones because of the nature of my back problem. Again, it might help someone who has not had physical therapy and want to know some general exercises to help their back.
4

Apr 09, 2012

I have a herniated disc in the lower part of my spine and I recently suffered from a bout of lower back pain followed by intense sciatica running down my left leg. After about seven weeks of rest, medications and most of all, physical therapy, I am able to resume normal activity. And I have been pain free for a few weeks now. I received this book as a present from my physical therapists as I graduated from working with them to doing the exercises on my own.

This book has all the pictures and I have a herniated disc in the lower part of my spine and I recently suffered from a bout of lower back pain followed by intense sciatica running down my left leg. After about seven weeks of rest, medications and most of all, physical therapy, I am able to resume normal activity. And I have been pain free for a few weeks now. I received this book as a present from my physical therapists as I graduated from working with them to doing the exercises on my own.

This book has all the pictures and guidance I need (cross my fingers) to continue doing the stretches and exercises I need to do to stay pain free. A microdiscectomy may still be in my future, but I'm tying to hold off as long as I can.

This is a quick read - I read it in bits over the course of three days and then straight through again in about two hours. I refer to the different exercises throughout the day, especially right now that I'm traveling and I'm concerned about a relapse. I found the book to be simply laid out and concise, but it still pretty much covers all my questions and concerns. I really enjoyed reading this book and I know that I'll be keeping it handy for awhile. ...more
4

Apr 03, 2008

It really works. The exercises and approach here are very simple, logical and all about common sense practices that gradually get you back to full movement and strength- without pain. I don't want this review to sound like a testimonial, but the information was very useful, and I enjoyed the Australian word usage of Dr. McKenzie.

This was referred to me by a physical therapist who is trained in the method, and I gained a lot more talking to him than just reading the book- and like I said, after It really works. The exercises and approach here are very simple, logical and all about common sense practices that gradually get you back to full movement and strength- without pain. I don't want this review to sound like a testimonial, but the information was very useful, and I enjoyed the Australian word usage of Dr. McKenzie.

This was referred to me by a physical therapist who is trained in the method, and I gained a lot more talking to him than just reading the book- and like I said, after over 6 months of intense sciatic pain I'm pain-free (most days) and getting stronger. ...more
5

Jun 25, 2015

My physical therapist started me on these exercises and recommended the book as a support when I put my back out twice in the space of 3 months. 30 years ago, I'd rejected the option of spinal fusion in the lumbar area and opted for alternatives. I haven't had much trouble until a year ago. After 6 months of referring to this clearly written book to fine tune my use of the exercises, I'm stronger than ever and looking forward to another 30 trouble-free years.
5

Aug 14, 2010

For any that have chronic back pain or just a sore back I highly recommend this book!! Easy to read with simple but frequent excercises which really work. I have only been doing these excercises for 3 days and my back which over the last 12 months has been treated by both physiotherapists and chiropracters which has given some relief but never felt as good as it does now.
I cannot recommend this book highly enough to those that suffer from any of the above.
5

July 26, 2019

This Last Resort Was A Lifesaver
After trying physical therapy, epidurals, and other treatments to help me deal with my 3 herniated discs, I was running out of options. Saw this book as a last resort, and it changed my life. Educated me on how to strengthen my core & surrounding area, posture habits, and exercises to treat and prevent back pain. I'd recommend this to anyone dealing with chronic back pain. Good luck!
4

Sep 17, 2019

Came recommended from a friend who is a sports doctor. My back has been out for three days and I just did a round of the rescue exercises and almost feel normal again. The change was instant, though probably won't be lasting if I don't keep up the exercises. We'll see how it fares over time, but for now I'm very impressed.
4

Jun 01, 2017

This book was urged on me by a physical therapist who was treating me for lower back pain and sciatica. I've dealt with this condition intermittently for 30 years. The book systematizes an exercise regime for overcoming the pain and managing on-going lower (lumbar) back health. Its a short and easily understood book. One could pick it up and follow its instructions with no professional guidance, although depending on your condition, that might not be wise.
I don't have long-term testimony to This book was urged on me by a physical therapist who was treating me for lower back pain and sciatica. I've dealt with this condition intermittently for 30 years. The book systematizes an exercise regime for overcoming the pain and managing on-going lower (lumbar) back health. Its a short and easily understood book. One could pick it up and follow its instructions with no professional guidance, although depending on your condition, that might not be wise.
I don't have long-term testimony to present. But in the very short time I've been following this plan, I've seen significant improvement. If you try this method, you should pay close attention to the warnings, timing of exercises, and your body's feedback. And if there's any doubt about how you respond, you should back off and consult medical help. But given those caveats, I can recommend this book as very worthwhile. ...more
3

Jun 03, 2017

He encourages a particular kind of stretching that supplements what my physical therapist at Kaiser encouraged me to do. I don't trust the approach that insists one must use only practitioners who are certified by a narrowly defined approach to remedying back problems. But, it is helpful
5

Oct 17, 2012

Very informative. Lots of reminders on how important posture is. The exercises are simple! After doing them for just a couple of days I am staring to feel better.
Worth reading and defiantly worth giving it a try!
5

Jun 13, 2016

This book was recommended by my osteopath after an acute bout of back pain. I've been struggling with back issues for 2 years, since I was 4 months pregnant. This is info my previous physiotherapist and current osteopath were attempting to impart, presented in way that finally clicked for me.
3

Jun 09, 2014

had some exercises but unfortunately i am already doing them. was hoping for something new and different that would help.
5

February 8, 2019

The simplicity
We always tend to make things harder than they are, so consequetialy we make the solution harder than it needs to be or worse no solution at all. Easy read a bit repetitive but i would guess the whole program is.

Simple and easy and i have to say as a person who has herniated 2 discs that it was the only thing i ended up doing that helped.

Plus the advice in the book goes farther than back pain it talks about good practices that we should remember to do in other areas of our life.

Read it.
5

September 13, 2018

Time To Get Well
If you wish to be out of pain and avoid back surgery, then get the book and do what it says. Be patient. It took a few decades to get fouled up, and it will take a few months to get right again, maybe a year. In the long run studies show that doing the book vs surgery is the way to go. There’s a plethora of back books out there. This is the original and best. My opinion.
5

Aug 17, 2017

A little under a year ago, I hurt my lower back. I followed all the advice I could find online, expecting that it would heal in a few months. I was taking 800 mg of Ibuprofen a day, which helped reduce the pain a bit, but I was in pain every day.

The pain lessened after a few months, but I was still in pain every single day.

About two weeks ago, I bought this book. I read it in an evening, and did the set of stretches twice a day. They took under five minutes each time, and within a few days I was A little under a year ago, I hurt my lower back. I followed all the advice I could find online, expecting that it would heal in a few months. I was taking 800 mg of Ibuprofen a day, which helped reduce the pain a bit, but I was in pain every day.

The pain lessened after a few months, but I was still in pain every single day.

About two weeks ago, I bought this book. I read it in an evening, and did the set of stretches twice a day. They took under five minutes each time, and within a few days I was down to pain every other day or so, and two weeks in, it's been a few days since I've had any back pain at all.

I don't even notice my back! ...more
4

Apr 12, 2019

This a a short, simple, straightforward book with plenty of photographs. It's easy to get started right away if you are in the midst of a back issue. I get the impression the methods are popular among physical therapists; a library book was a lot cheaper and more convenient for me, so I'm happy that it is available. If you want to look into factors like diet or stress or develop a more thorough exercise plan, look elsewhere, but I think this book is a good starting point.
4

Aug 18, 2014

Treat Your Own Back

Many people suffer from acute or chronic back pain and have tried holistic adjustment approaches through chiropractic care, physical therapy, and osteopaths. Yet relief still eludes those suffering with pain, even for some who have had invasive surgery. In his book, Treat Your Own Back, Robin McKenzie, a physical therapist and president of The McKenzie Institute, a not-for-profit organization with its headquarters in New Zealand, claims to provide you with the INs and OUTs of Treat Your Own Back

Many people suffer from acute or chronic back pain and have tried holistic adjustment approaches through chiropractic care, physical therapy, and osteopaths. Yet relief still eludes those suffering with pain, even for some who have had invasive surgery. In his book, Treat Your Own Back, Robin McKenzie, a physical therapist and president of The McKenzie Institute, a not-for-profit organization with its headquarters in New Zealand, claims to provide you with the INs and OUTs of back pain and the knowledge necessary to prevent and reverse back pain. McKenzie’s method was first published in 1980 and over 20 years later McKenzie was voted as the most influential physical therapist in a survey conducted by Advance Journal.

Treat Your Own Back talks directly to you, the reader, and immediately addresses your skepticism. How is it possible to treat your own back? Can you believe the hubbub? McKenzie claims that he has the answers. Before you jump ahead to these exercises, McKenzie encourages you to read from the beginning in order to fully grasp how the back works and where back pain begins – your posture. If you live a sedentary life, work at a desk or stand on your feet all day leaning with your shoulders hunched over trying to get your job done, your posture is affected to its detriment. McKenzie shows you through photos and detailed descriptions how to treat your own back. McKenzie uses both scientific studies and analogies as evidence to support his claims. Additionally, he explains the truths behind many common myths about back pain, including if weather conditions affect pain and the idea that we should avoid rigorous activities in order to avoid pain.

McKenzie gets right to the point, poor posture is the cause of back pain and in order end this pain you have to readjust yourself. Treat Your Own Back has seven key exercises (and variations) that are paramount in readjusting your posture. The only problem is that this book only discusses the lumbar region. To familiarize you with the lumbar region, it is the lower part of your spine that is connected to the pelvis. While lower back pain is a problem with many people, it does not encompass everyone and many people with lower back pain also have neck pain. So, to learn how to treat your own neck, you have to purchase another book. Despite this fact, the book provides exercises that are extremely beneficial for lower back pain.

Another reason that makes this book beneficial is that McKenzie also discusses activities for special situations for those suffering from pregnancy pains, athletes, or for those aged 50 and older. He also gives you exercises to do if you have no initial response or benefit from his method. More importantly, Treat Your Own Back tells you what to do when acute back pain strikes and how to avoid it in the future. McKenzie constantly reminds you of what to do if your pain increases during these exercises. If your pain persists, he provides the contact information for The McKenzie Institute.

This book is a nice, quick read – it provides you with some tools that could change your life. It also informs you of some quick fixes like the lumbar roll to use while you are at work or traveling and also the wrap around lumbar roll to help protect your back while you sleep. McKenzie can open your eyes to alternative methods to invasive surgery with the information provided in Treat Your Own Back. You will learn how your activities affect your posture, and what you can do to fix it to ultimately live pain free. ...more
5

Jul 07, 2017

So grateful to Debbie Glett, my physical therapist at the Lewis Aquatic Center for giving me this book. It, along with aquatic therapy and an epidural injection, has been a life-saver. In this little gem of a book, the author provides a clear explanation of what contributes to lower back pain, in my case a combination of a herniated disc and an impinged sciatic nerve. The result was that I experienced pain in my right foot comparable to standing in a red-hot frying pan. McKenzie also clearly So grateful to Debbie Glett, my physical therapist at the Lewis Aquatic Center for giving me this book. It, along with aquatic therapy and an epidural injection, has been a life-saver. In this little gem of a book, the author provides a clear explanation of what contributes to lower back pain, in my case a combination of a herniated disc and an impinged sciatic nerve. The result was that I experienced pain in my right foot comparable to standing in a red-hot frying pan. McKenzie also clearly illustrates basic exercises to relieve pain, promote healing and to prevent future injury and pain. The book tied in so neatly with the physical therapy I received at the Lewis Aquatic Center as well as the "land-based" therapy from my Cleveland Clinic physical therapists. ...more
4

Jan 23, 2019

Interesting theories and ways of explaining back problems. I have started to apply recommendations of this book and let's see how my pain changes.
Good part is that it improved my awareness A LOT, which will make me to have different behavior.
I have bought the roll and will start to use it in order to assess if it will make a difference.

Edit: I liked the roll because it forces me to keep my posture while sitting and as it is there, it brings even more awareness.

What I realized in the past weeks Interesting theories and ways of explaining back problems. I have started to apply recommendations of this book and let's see how my pain changes.
Good part is that it improved my awareness A LOT, which will make me to have different behavior.
I have bought the roll and will start to use it in order to assess if it will make a difference.

Edit: I liked the roll because it forces me to keep my posture while sitting and as it is there, it brings even more awareness.

What I realized in the past weeks is that sitting in very soft couch is TERRIBLE for my lower back pain and I definitely need a roll or pillow to put me in the right position. ...more

Best Books from your Favorite Authors & Publishers

compare-icon compare-icon
Thousands of books

Take your time and choose the perfect book.

review-icon review-icon
Read Reviews

Read ratings and reviews to make sure you are on the right path.

vendor-icon vendor-icon
Multiple Stores

Check price from multiple stores for a better shopping experience.

gift-icon

Enjoy Result