The Wrong Side of Goodbye (A Harry Bosch Novel) Info

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In this #1 New York Times bestseller,
California's newest private investigator, Detective Harry Bosch, must
track down a missing heir while helping a police department connect the
dots on a dangerous cold case.

Harry Bosch is California's
newest private investigator. He doesn't advertise, he doesn't have an
office, and he's picky about who he works for, but it doesn't matter.
His chops from thirty years with the LAPD speak for
themselves.
Soon one of Southern California's biggest moguls
comes calling. The reclusive billionaire is nearing the end of his life
and is haunted by one regret. When he was young, he had a relationship
with a Mexican girl, his great love. But soon after becoming pregnant,
she disappeared. Did she have the baby? And if so, what happened to
it?
Desperate to know whether he has an heir, the dying magnate
hires Bosch, the only person he can trust. With such a vast fortune at
stake, Harry realizes that his mission could be risky not only for
himself but for the one he's seeking. But as he begins to uncover the
haunting story--and finds uncanny links to his own past--he knows he
cannot rest until he finds the truth.
Swift, unpredictable, and
thrilling, The Wrong Side of Goodbye shows that Michael Connelly
"continues to amaze with his consistent skill and sizzle" (Cleveland
Plain Dealer
).

#1 NEW YORK TIMES
BESTSELLER
#1 USA TODAY BESTSELLER
10 BEST MYSTERIES OF
2016, SEATTLE TIMES
NOTABLE BOOK OF 2016, WASHINGTON
POST

Average Ratings and Reviews
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56749 Ratings

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Reviews for The Wrong Side of Goodbye (A Harry Bosch Novel):

5

Oct 25, 2016

I don’t think Connelly is the most literary crime fiction scribbler out there – in my view that honour goes to either James Lee Burke or Ian Rankin – but I do think he may just be the best story teller. He doesn’t allow his readers to get lost in the complexities of the plot because he keeps it simple, logical and linear. That’s not to say there aren’t twists, surprises and red herrings in his books, Connelly uses all the tricks, yet he still manages to keep the story ‘clean’. I always know I don’t think Connelly is the most literary crime fiction scribbler out there – in my view that honour goes to either James Lee Burke or Ian Rankin – but I do think he may just be the best story teller. He doesn’t allow his readers to get lost in the complexities of the plot because he keeps it simple, logical and linear. That’s not to say there aren’t twists, surprises and red herrings in his books, Connelly uses all the tricks, yet he still manages to keep the story ‘clean’. I always know where I am and I never doubt or have to double-guess a step taken by Bosch or Haller (his major protagonists) because the logic behind the decisions is there for all to see. It just feels right. It just feels real.

In this episode Harry Bosch has signed up with the San Fernando Police Department – he has his badge back, albeit on an an unpaid ‘reserve’ basis. But he’s also got a Private Investigator ticket which allows him to pull in some cash to help fund his daughters ongoing education. He’s identified links between some old (cold) cases which point to the existence of a serial rapist, who may still be active. At the same time, he has been hired by a reclusive billionaire to search for a living heir to his fortune. Both cases are given detailed coverage, as Harry – sometimes uneasily - attempts juggles his time and his responsibilities.

The thing about Bosch is that he is a dedicated professional but he’s also a bit of a curmudgeon, with no visible sense of humour. He’s also been known to cross the line in terms of what is permitted by using access he is granted as a serving police officer to aid his efforts to progress his private case. This is a risky business, particularly as his direct boss isn’t a big fan of his and is keeping a close eye on him. The exchanges between the two are terse and, in my view, provide another useful vehicle to maintain the tension of the piece throughout.

It’s all brilliantly done and for fans of Connelly’s books there’s the additional bonus of Mickey Haller (AKA the Lincoln Lawyer) making a cameo appearance. Is this the best book this author has written? That’s hard to say - there have been many brilliant offerings – but in my view this one is right up there with the very best. That is, not just the best Connelly has written but the best crime fiction has to offer. For all current and aspiring writers in this genre, read it and weep: to get to the top of the pile you’ll have to beat your way past this man. ...more
4

Dec 30, 2016


This is the 21st book in the Harry Bosch Series. I just really love this series and now I have to wait patiently for the next book.
Bosch is now retired from the Los Angles police department where he
worked as a detective. He did not go quietly into retirement but sued the city as he left. This has made him persona non grata in his old stomping grounds but Harry could care less. He is working part time for the San Fernando Police Department and taking some private gigs on the side. THE WRONG
This is the 21st book in the Harry Bosch Series. I just really love this series and now I have to wait patiently for the next book.
Bosch is now retired from the Los Angles police department where he
worked as a detective. He did not go quietly into retirement but sued the city as he left. This has made him persona non grata in his old stomping grounds but Harry could care less. He is working part time for the San Fernando Police Department and taking some private gigs on the side. THE WRONG SIDE OF GOODBYE is about one of each.

The “private” job has Harry tracing down a possible heir for one of the richest men in the country. Whitney Vance is eighty-five years old and sixty-something years earlier he had a romance that might have produced an heir. It is up to Harry to dig into the past and find out whether or not this is true.

Meanwhile Harry is also working the “screen cutter” case for the San Fernando Police Department. This case involves a serial rapist and Harry is digging up every clue possible so he can get this guy off the streets. The rapist is labeled the “screen cutter” because he gains entry into various homes by cutting the houses’ screens.

Connelly gives us a double shot of Harry as we get to see how he operates on the job and also privately. There is also the double pleasure of having Harry’s half-brother Mickey Haller assist him with the legal side of the private case. Yes the “Lincoln Lawyer” is still around and more fun than ever.

If you have not read Michael Connelly in the past then you can not know how much enjoyment you are missing. Nobody writes like Connelly, nobody. He is unique in his style and also in the character of Harry Bosch he has created. If you read one page about Harry Bosch as written by Michael Connelly you will be hooked for life.

It may be Connelly’s twenty-first Harry Bosch book but it is fresh and innovative from the first page till the last. When it comes to crime procedurals it is step by step detecting that is page by page enthralling. You just can’t go wrong with reading Michael Connelly. He will make you wild about Harry Bosch. ...more
4

Nov 01, 2016

Connelly and Bosch have done it again. Written a novel that kept me turning the pages, a tightly plotted novel filled with the special insights that one my my favorite detectives seems to have been gifted. Now working a part time, unpaid gig with a police department that had to make drastic cuts, he continues on investigating cold cases while being allowed to work on his own side cases for some real money. He becomes embroiled in two separate cases, one a serial rapist, the other a hunt for Connelly and Bosch have done it again. Written a novel that kept me turning the pages, a tightly plotted novel filled with the special insights that one my my favorite detectives seems to have been gifted. Now working a part time, unpaid gig with a police department that had to make drastic cuts, he continues on investigating cold cases while being allowed to work on his own side cases for some real money. He becomes embroiled in two separate cases, one a serial rapist, the other a hunt for legitimate issue of an aging billionaire feeling his own mortality is getting closer.

Good police work, and while this is not a stunner, the cases not terribly flashy, Bosch with the occasional help from his brother from another mother, Heller, keeps the story moving. Just a solid, well thought out entry in the Bosch cannon. I always look forward to a new one in this series and I was not disappointed. Another long running series that manages to maintain my interest.

ARC from publisher. ...more
5

Nov 10, 2016

Harry Bosch is one of my favorite characters, and it was great to read this newest adventure.

Harry is managing two investigations. As a part time officer with the San Fernando Police Department, he's working a serial rapist case. As a PI, he's been asked by a rich 85 year old man to try to find an heir. Both cases were interesting, but I especially enjoyed the search for an heir. It involved a character who served in Vietnam, where Harry also served. I thought it was well researched and well Harry Bosch is one of my favorite characters, and it was great to read this newest adventure.

Harry is managing two investigations. As a part time officer with the San Fernando Police Department, he's working a serial rapist case. As a PI, he's been asked by a rich 85 year old man to try to find an heir. Both cases were interesting, but I especially enjoyed the search for an heir. It involved a character who served in Vietnam, where Harry also served. I thought it was well researched and well written, yet did not overwhelm the storyline.

One of the strengths of Connelly's books is how he doles out clues and has Harry put the pieces together, and that is true for this book. One constant irritation for me in these books is Harry's daughter, Maddie. She was a bit snotty again, but she did apologize to her father. Maybe she's growing up finally; after all, she is in college now. There were new bosses and co-workers in this book which made it feel "fresh." Mickey Haller also helps Harry out again with some legalities.

And now the wait begins anew for the next Bosch book. I hope Michael Connelly has lots of ideas for the future! ...more
4

Jul 22, 2017

Harry Bosch has finally left the L.A.P.D. behind for good, but his mission as a homicide detective remains in his blood--it still defines who he is. Accordingly, while he's now working as a P.I., he's also volunteering as a reserve officer in the small, understaffed and underfunded police department in San Fernando. Harry is basically the department's Cold Case unit, investigating still unsolved crimes. There's no paycheck, but Harry still gets to carry a detective's badge and he still gets to Harry Bosch has finally left the L.A.P.D. behind for good, but his mission as a homicide detective remains in his blood--it still defines who he is. Accordingly, while he's now working as a P.I., he's also volunteering as a reserve officer in the small, understaffed and underfunded police department in San Fernando. Harry is basically the department's Cold Case unit, investigating still unsolved crimes. There's no paycheck, but Harry still gets to carry a detective's badge and he still gets to do the work that gives meaning to his life.

In his capacity as a P.I., Harry is summoned to the mansion of an elderly tycoon named Whitney Vance. Vance is now a billionaire in charge of a huge company. But when he was a young college student in Southern California, he had a brief affair with a Mexican girl who became pregnant. But Vance's father drove the young woman away and Vance never saw her again. He also never knew whether she had his baby and if so, what might have happened to it.

Now on the verge of his death, Vance is embarrassed by the cowardice of his youth and wants, at long last, to make amends if at all possible. He hires Harry to find out if he does have an heir. He warns Bosch that powerful forces would be upset if this should turn out to be the case. If he has no heir, his board of directors effectively inherits his company, and the board members would not look kindly on any competition to their claim. Vance swears Bosch to secrecy and sends him on his way.

At the same time, in his capacity as a reserve detective in San Fernando, Harry has discovered a disturbing pattern in some old case files, suggesting that a serial rapist was working in the area and may, in fact, still be attacking women there. The attacker becomes known as the "Screen Cutter" because of the way in which he gains entry into the women's homes. And finding the man and getting him off the streets is a must.

As the novel progresses, Harry bounces back and forth between the two cases and each is extremely urgent. The rapist must be caught before any more women are victimized, but Vance's heir--if, indeed, there is one--must be found before the old man dies.

Connelly tells this story as only he can, and the reader is engrossed in both cases practically from the opening paragraph of the book. Bosh remains one of the most compelling characters in modern crime fiction, and no living crime writer captures the city of Los Angeles as well as his creator. Twenty-six books into the world of Harry Bosch, Michael Connelly has solidified his claim as the logical heir of Raymond Chandler, and this is a book that will certainly appeal to anyone who loves great crime fiction. ...more
4

Jan 12, 2017

There's a lot to be said about crackin' open the latest Michael Connelly series with ol' Harry Bosch behind the wheel. And this one just doesn't disappoint.

Harry is splitting his time between private investigations and volunteer time with the San Fernando Police Department. Our guy will never fully retire and just drink pina coladas under a palm tree on the beach.

Bosch is following a two-prong set of investigations this time. The first entails a billionaire (Yes, that's billionaire with a There's a lot to be said about crackin' open the latest Michael Connelly series with ol' Harry Bosch behind the wheel. And this one just doesn't disappoint.

Harry is splitting his time between private investigations and volunteer time with the San Fernando Police Department. Our guy will never fully retire and just drink pina coladas under a palm tree on the beach.

Bosch is following a two-prong set of investigations this time. The first entails a billionaire (Yes, that's billionaire with a "b".) whose life is heading for a sunset without an apparent heir. Way back in 1951 he had a youthful love affair with a lovely Mexican girl who became pregnant. Mr. Rich Man wasn't allowed to see her and never knew if she had the baby or not. He hires Harry to track down the woman and her child. And those memories seem to fade with time. Harry follows the trail through the tall grass and rice paddies of Vietnam and its aftermath.

The current flipside of these cases takes Harry through one of his most frustrating investigative experiences in a long time. There's a serial rapist on the loose who has become more and more elusive. The clues just don't seem to add up. And the number of women living in fear of his return keeps escalating.

Both cases are spiked with Connelly's easy writing style. There's just enough tension and unanswered questions to lead the way. Another satisfying read that delivers like extra toppings on your favorite pizza. Ah! ...more
4

Jun 10, 2018

4.5 stars
This is the 29th book that I have read by Michael Connelly and I have enjoyed every single one. Reading a Connelly book is like sitting down with old friends. In this book, Harry Bosch is now retired and splitting his time between private detective work and volunteering for the San Fernando PD. In his job with the SFPD, he tries to close cold cases. He starts working on a serial rapist, called "The screen cutter" because he gains entrance to a home by cutting a screen.
The second thread 4.5 stars
This is the 29th book that I have read by Michael Connelly and I have enjoyed every single one. Reading a Connelly book is like sitting down with old friends. In this book, Harry Bosch is now retired and splitting his time between private detective work and volunteering for the San Fernando PD. In his job with the SFPD, he tries to close cold cases. He starts working on a serial rapist, called "The screen cutter" because he gains entrance to a home by cutting a screen.
The second thread involves a case that he takes on on behalf of Whitney Vance, a billionaire who wants Bosch to track down a possible heir/lost love.
The two cases do get resolved in a very satisfying ending, with Mickey Haller, Bosch's half brother and lawyer, involved in one of the two cases. I highly recommend this book to police procedural fans. You should probably read these books in order, as the characters do develop over the course of the series. This was a library book.
One quote on Vance's lost love: "Vance had left her on the wrong side of good-bye, and what happened in June brought about what happened in February.." ...more
4

Nov 08, 2016

Michael Connelly has done it again, with a stellar novel that follows the ever-evolving travails and work options of Harry Bosch. Out of the LAPD, Bosch is always on the lookout for something new and exciting to bide his time. An acquaintance reaches out to him, running a private security firm and has a favour to ask. Bosch learns that he has personally been requested to meet with billionaire Whitney Vance, though the specifics remains veiled in secrecy. Bosch hesitates, but is intrigued enough Michael Connelly has done it again, with a stellar novel that follows the ever-evolving travails and work options of Harry Bosch. Out of the LAPD, Bosch is always on the lookout for something new and exciting to bide his time. An acquaintance reaches out to him, running a private security firm and has a favour to ask. Bosch learns that he has personally been requested to meet with billionaire Whitney Vance, though the specifics remains veiled in secrecy. Bosch hesitates, but is intrigued enough to head out to see the man and find out what this business magnate might want with him. During their meeting, Vance recounts the story of impregnating his Mexican girlfriend back in 1950, before his father ushered her away. With no knowledge of what happened and no living heirs, Vance would like to know if his bloodline continued over sixty years ago. Having lived a full life, Vance admits that, at eighty-five, he has started to think about his death and would like to leave the company to family and not the vultures on the board. Bosch begins poking around using old records and with little on which to base his investigation. His intuitive abilities lead him to a former home for unwed mothers, where the mystery thickens and Bosch is left with more questions than answers. The reader also learns that after his major run-ins with the LAPD, Bosch is now working for the San Fernando Police Department (the other SFPD) in their cold case squad. Due to significant budget cuts, Bosch is working without pay, on a reserve basis. As he juggles the Vance investigation, he is neck-deep into a serial rape case involving a perp called the Screen Cutter. Victims are attacked while in their homes and at the height of their monthly fertility. This baffles Bosch on many levels and he works angles as best he can, unsure of much and with only a few insights. While trying to dig further into the Vance case, Bosch finds himself surrounded with memories of his time in Vietnam and the struggles young men across the country had with strict army rules and loved ones left stateside. A old foot locker proves to be a treasure trove of information and helps Bosch learn about a potential heir that could put Vance's mind to rest, but there is still much work to accomplish. As the Screen Cutter case heats up, Bosch is certain he has a suspect in mind, sending his partner out to add the final pieces to the puzzle. When she falls captive, Bosch's guilt and desire to see the suspect caught propels him to break rules in ways only he can and bring some form of justice to those who need it the most. Just when he feels he might be able to relax, there is a twist in the Vance case and Bosch is forced to reexamine the truths he's used throughout the investigation. Connelly does not stop with the action, pulling Mickey Haller in for a small role in this electrifying Bosch novel. Not to be missed by those who love the unconventional nature of Harry Bosch.

While some authors tend to lose the momentum when series go on for too long, Connelly has been able to keep Harry Bosch alive and always pushing the envelope. No matter the mystery or things going on in his personal life, Bosch finds new ways to entice readers with his rule-breaking and unique sense of justice. Connelly surrounds his protagonist with strong supporting characters and references to those from his past, enough to bridge the old Bosch with yet another version of the man who is tackling police work from different angles. Of particular interest to me was another glimpse into the life of Bosch as a Vietnam soldier, memories of his time there and how it has made him into the man he is now. With a daughter away in college, Bosch is forced to live life on his own, not shackled down but also somewhat adrift. Connelly spins to his advantage as he continues to develop the Bosch character and adds his other great protagonist, Mickey Haller (half-brother to Bosch) to keep things light and somewhat legal. If I could offer a single issue that arose in my listening to this novel, it would be Connelly's lack of literary flair when describing dialogue. Peppering the page like a errant cap gun the word 'said' sticks out like a sore thumb. I only noticed this in the latter few chapters, but it is as if Connelly can find no way to bridge lines of dialogue, which lessens the colourful nature of the narrative. Minute in its importance, true, but when you are working with such a great novel, it is the tiniest things that one grasps when looking for a flaw. Will readers ever tire of Bosch? Not likely, as long as Connelly continues to step up and produce gems like this.

Kudos, Mr. Connelly for another wonderful novel. I was hooked from the opening chapter and cannot say enough about your abilities.

Like/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at:
http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/ ...more
4

Jan 01, 2017

I love Michael Connelly's Harry Bosch series. I've read every book in the series. I know what to expect and I'm rarely disappointed. And this goes for his latest The Wrong Side of Goodbye, which had all of the usual good stuff:
-Harry is a great character: dedicated, a bit gruff, not perfect, but not over the top in his flaws.
-Connelly knows how to keep the continuity of Harry's personal and professional life going without taking away the focus from the mystery or plot.
-The book has Harry working I love Michael Connelly's Harry Bosch series. I've read every book in the series. I know what to expect and I'm rarely disappointed. And this goes for his latest The Wrong Side of Goodbye, which had all of the usual good stuff:
-Harry is a great character: dedicated, a bit gruff, not perfect, but not over the top in his flaws.
-Connelly knows how to keep the continuity of Harry's personal and professional life going without taking away the focus from the mystery or plot.
-The book has Harry working two separate interesting cases. They are unrelated but work nicely together. One case involves a serial rapist that Harry is working on as a reserve retired officer. The other involves chasing missing heirs to a huge estate, which he is doing as a private PI. What makes both cases interesting is the richness of the personal details Connelly throws in, including Harry's interactions with other officers and characters.
-Mickey Halley -- Harry's half brother who is featured in a parallel Connelly series -- makes a good cameo appearance.
Great read for the holidays. Looking forward to the next one in the series.
I usually thank whoever gave me or recommended each book I review. In this case, I'll thank my daughter for encouraging me to order a copy online as I was buying other Christmas presents, and for then wrapping it and placing it under the Christmas tree after it arrived in the mail. Surprises are great, but it's also just as lovely to make sure you get some treats you're really pining for.
...more
4

Feb 25, 2018

Harry Bosch is now a detective in the reserve unit of the San Fernando Police Department, having permanently severed his ties with the LAPD following his settlement. His current case involves what looks to be a serial rapist, referred to as the Screen Cutter because of his method of entry. Meanwhile, he still takes on private assignments and his latest engagement is mysterious. He’s hired by billionaire Whitney Vance to track down a woman he impregnated over 60 years ago and determine if he has Harry Bosch is now a detective in the reserve unit of the San Fernando Police Department, having permanently severed his ties with the LAPD following his settlement. His current case involves what looks to be a serial rapist, referred to as the Screen Cutter because of his method of entry. Meanwhile, he still takes on private assignments and his latest engagement is mysterious. He’s hired by billionaire Whitney Vance to track down a woman he impregnated over 60 years ago and determine if he has an heir, having never married in the intervening years. Vance’s health is failing and now he’d like to do the right thing.

Following the two investigations was extremely interesting, especially seeing Harry try to juggle both while respecting the boundaries set by the police department. Connelly’s writing continues to be nimble, moving the story at a very satisfying pace without sacrificing crucial elements and character development. I really liked that Mickey Haller had a role and hope this trend continues. I’m also loving Titus Welliver as the narrator of this book series, especially since I’ve become a big fan of the TV series. (It also helps to have a visual reference.)

Both cases had interesting twists but not beyond the pale. It was classic Harry learning to navigate in a different environment, adding a freshness to the series. It’s evolving in a really good way. ...more
5

Mar 29, 2017

Another strong entry in the Harry Bosch series. Two storylines are both are equally engaging. A must read for fans of police procedurals.
4

Oct 23, 2016

Michael Connelly's Harry Bosch Series is most of all about Harry Bosch. Since introduced in The Black Echo, the 1st book in the series, published in 1992, we have been part of his life. We have taken rides with this character, learnt more about him with each book and watched him solve mysteries seen the passion he has for justice. His character has developed throughout the series and he has become like a friend. Harry Bosch is not too perfect - he has emotional scars just like most of us. A Michael Connelly's Harry Bosch Series is most of all about Harry Bosch. Since introduced in The Black Echo, the 1st book in the series, published in 1992, we have been part of his life. We have taken rides with this character, learnt more about him with each book and watched him solve mysteries seen the passion he has for justice. His character has developed throughout the series and he has become like a friend. Harry Bosch is not too perfect - he has emotional scars just like most of us. A maverick, who will bend the rules to solve his cases, a passion of justice for the victims, hard-assed but with a softer side that loves Miles Davis and Sonny Rollins and Chet Baker and his daughter, Maddie. He also gets to live in the most fabulous house in LA...
The Wrong Side of Goodbye is the 21st book in the series and it does not disappoint.

Harry, having been forced to retire in the previous book, The Drop, is now a private investigator and working for free as a part-time reserve detective for the small city of San Fernando Police Dept.
The storyline revolves around two cases. The one is a cold case of a serial rapist that he's working on finding the culprit for the SFPD. The other case that he's working on his private time deals with finding a missing heir of an old and reclusive billionaire.

Both cases are fantastically woven together as Harry uses all his skills in finding answers for both his cases.

Good pacing, nail-biting twists and turns and some unexpected revelations.

Loved seeing characters from previous books - Harry's half-brother, Mickey Haller, his daughter, Maddie and also some new characters that are introduced.

The author intertwines interesting insights into the history of Los Angeles and it's changing face of the past to present. You really get a sense of place - you are taken on a trip through the City of Angels and it's many nearby and far-flung neighbourhoods and through Harry's eyes, you see the angelic and less parts of this fascinating city. A must read for Harry Bosch fans and non-fans too. ...more
5

Dec 06, 2016

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Michael Connelly does not disappoint; this is a welcome addition to the Harry Bosch series and includes plenty of appearances by Mickey Haller. Indeed, their dialogue yields my favorite two lines in the book:
"Are you pulling my d---, broheim?"
"No, broheim. I'm not pulling your d---."

While this novel leans a bit more than some readers will like toward making political points (helicopter manufacture bad/ immigration good/ corporations bad, artists good), Connelly's writing is as reader-friendly as Michael Connelly does not disappoint; this is a welcome addition to the Harry Bosch series and includes plenty of appearances by Mickey Haller. Indeed, their dialogue yields my favorite two lines in the book:
"Are you pulling my d---, broheim?"
"No, broheim. I'm not pulling your d---."

While this novel leans a bit more than some readers will like toward making political points (helicopter manufacture bad/ immigration good/ corporations bad, artists good), Connelly's writing is as reader-friendly as ever. The level of suspense is superb when a fellow police officer must be rescued, and sleuthing by Harry to find the officer crosses into the realm of super-hero.

Connelly keeps the Los Angeles-area settings fresh, as always.

Highly recommended for mystery and thriller readers. ...more
3

Feb 16, 2017


3.5 stars

In this 19th book in the 'Harry Bosch' series, the detective is investigating two cases: he's searching for a possible heir and looking for a serial killer. The book can be read as a standalone.

*****

In this addition to the Harry Bosch series the detective has left the LAPD in difficult circumstances. He's now a private investigator and also works for the tiny San Fernando Police Department as a reservist (unpaid volunteer).



As the book opens Harry is hired by octogenarian billionaire
3.5 stars

In this 19th book in the 'Harry Bosch' series, the detective is investigating two cases: he's searching for a possible heir and looking for a serial killer. The book can be read as a standalone.

*****

In this addition to the Harry Bosch series the detective has left the LAPD in difficult circumstances. He's now a private investigator and also works for the tiny San Fernando Police Department as a reservist (unpaid volunteer).



As the book opens Harry is hired by octogenarian billionaire Whitney Vance, who's frail and ill. Vance never married but thinks he may have fathered a child during a youthful affair with a Mexican girl.



Vance wants Harry to search for this offspring, who would be heir to the mogul's fortune. Vance warns Harry that the investigation has to be hush hush because the directors of Vance's company - who are looking forward to taking power themselves - would resent a legatee (to put it mildly).....and the heir's life might be in danger.

Harry uses his considerable resources and contacts, and soon makes progress with the case. Harry is sure Vance's people are monitoring him, so he's careful to take evasive measures.....but are they enough? At one point a holographic will shows up and Harry brings in his half-brother, attorney Mickey Haller, to provide legal assistance. The half-siblings pull off some sneaky moves, and it's fun to see them working together again.



Meanwhile, Harry is also working on a case for the San Fernando PD. Harry and his partner, Detective Bella Lourdes, are trying to nab the 'Screen Cutter' - a serial rapist who wears masks, doesn't use condoms, and targets Latina women. Harry has connected previous unsolved rapes with more recent Screen Cutter assaults, and discovers there's a pattern to the timing of the crimes.



Harry, always careful, keeps his Screen Cutter files in a locked drawer. When his papers are rearranged Harry is sure someone - maybe even the Captain of the SFPD - is secretly monitoring his investigation. But why?

While Harry works on the two inquiries a murder occurs in one case and a kidnapping in the other - which leads to a frantic police search. In between all the detective work Harry visits his daughter at college, takes her out to eat, and so on.....which provides a nice domestic touch to the story.

I enjoyed the book, though a couple of revelations at the climax seem rather unlikely. Still this is an engaging, well-written mystery, recommened to fans of the genre.

You can follow my reviews at http://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot.com/ ...more
5

Nov 06, 2016

It doesn't matter which of the author's series it is - the one with "Lincoln Lawyer" Mickey Haller or this one with private investigator Hieronymous "Harry" Bosch - when the latest edition is released, I want it - and I want it now. This one is no exception, and my 5-star rating says Mr. Connelly remains solidly on his A-game.

Of course, one might argue that with one, you get the other; in an earlier book, they - and readers - learned they're half-brothers. Ever since then, one has made at least It doesn't matter which of the author's series it is - the one with "Lincoln Lawyer" Mickey Haller or this one with private investigator Hieronymous "Harry" Bosch - when the latest edition is released, I want it - and I want it now. This one is no exception, and my 5-star rating says Mr. Connelly remains solidly on his A-game.

Of course, one might argue that with one, you get the other; in an earlier book, they - and readers - learned they're half-brothers. Ever since then, one has made at least a cameo appearance in the other's books, as is the case here. But there's no question that it's Bosch at center stage - and working two parallel story lines, no less.

The first story begins as Bosch, a former Los Angeles Police Department 30-year police detective turned PI who now works part-time (think: free) for the budget-challenged San Fernando Police Department, is asked by a former LAPD supervisor that one of the supervisor's clients wants a meeting with Bosch. The elderly client has written Bosch a check for $10,000 for the meeting - regardless of whether Bosch agrees to take on the job. As it turns out, the 85-year-old Whitney Vance is filthy rich (Howard Hughes is his godfather, for gosh sake), not in the best of health and, as far as the rest of the world knows, will pass on to the great beyond with no heirs. That last point, however, is in question; it seems a long-ago encounter with an older Mexican girl may have resulted in a child, and Vance wants Bosch to find out for sure before the old guy, well, croaks.

In Bosch's other life as a part-time detective, a serial rapist dubbed the Screen Cutter is on the loose and racking up victims. Never one to pass up a challenge, Bosch throws himself smack in the middle of that investigation, hoping to find the perp before he strikes again and - if profilers got it right - escalates to murder. Meantime, the premise is that no female in the San Fernando area is safe, perhaps including Bosch's own daughter.

Needless to say, with two cases moving along at the near-speed of light, the action doesn't let up much. The often irascible Bosch has the expected run-ins with other law enforcement characters who don't quite see things his way, and his part-time job is threatened when he goes against orders to use SFPD resources on the case he's working on as a PI. But never fear. Bosch will prevail - with more than a little help from his half-brother. And at the end, readers get a glimpse into what the future holds for Bosch (well, at least the immediate future; with a guy like him, that's about as far ahead as anyone - including Bosch himself - can predict. And that's just fine with me.
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5

Aug 18, 2017

The 21st book in the Harry Bosch series by my favourite author Michael Connelly. Having read and thoroughly enjoyed every book this talented author has ever written it is no surprise that I jump at the chance to read any new books. I really enjoy reading book series as it allows you to really get to know the main characters and you get a really good experience from not only the plot but all the sub plots etc. This is typical of that situation and I loved every page.

In this latest book Harry is The 21st book in the Harry Bosch series by my favourite author Michael Connelly. Having read and thoroughly enjoyed every book this talented author has ever written it is no surprise that I jump at the chance to read any new books. I really enjoy reading book series as it allows you to really get to know the main characters and you get a really good experience from not only the plot but all the sub plots etc. This is typical of that situation and I loved every page.

In this latest book Harry is running with two investigations, a rape case under his guise of a part time officer with the San Fernando Police Department and as a PI he's been asked by a very wealthy 85 year old man to try to find an heir. While running the two cases side by side the book is well paced and Connelly manages to keep both cases interesting, and well paced.

A great writing style and I love how the author feeds hints to the reader, certainly in the running for my favourite read of 2017.

I highly recommend this book, series and the author to any avid reader of police procedural books and crime thrillers in general.



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5

Mar 28, 2019

Harry Bosch, ex LAPD turned private investigator, was working voluntarily at San Fernando Police Department and his current case was the Screen Cutter, a brutal serial rapist they were desperate to put behind bars. Meantime he was called to the side of an elderly reclusive billionaire, and was hired to discover where the woman he’d loved many years prior had vanished to when she’d told him she was pregnant. Bosch signed a confidentiality agreement and set to work, sure he could discover an heir, Harry Bosch, ex LAPD turned private investigator, was working voluntarily at San Fernando Police Department and his current case was the Screen Cutter, a brutal serial rapist they were desperate to put behind bars. Meantime he was called to the side of an elderly reclusive billionaire, and was hired to discover where the woman he’d loved many years prior had vanished to when she’d told him she was pregnant. Bosch signed a confidentiality agreement and set to work, sure he could discover an heir, if indeed there was one to be found.

With two cases running side by side, he knew the search for the rapist was priority. But Bosch managed both and discovered the uncanny parallels from his own time in Vietnam. He needed to find the answers for the old man who had hired him before it was too late.

Would Bosch and the small team at SFPD find the rapist before he attacked again? And would Bosch also find an heir to a fortune?

The Wrong Side of Goodbye is the 19th in the Harry Bosch series by Michael Connelly and once again, it was an excellent addition to the series. Bosch certainly gets himself into scrapes; he’s a loner and doesn’t play well in a team – he’s always in trouble for that. The inclusion of Bosch’s brother, Mickey Haller was great too. A thoroughly enjoyable crime/mystery novel which I recommend.
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5

Nov 06, 2016

Michael Connelly manages a feat few authors can pull off successfully. The Wrong Side of Goodbye is the 21st book in the Harry Bosch series, and each installment further develops the Bosch character while involving him in yet another fascinating and unique crime that he has to solve. I just absolutely love this series, and The Wrong Side of Goodbye is fantastic.

Bosch is now working part-time (and uncompensated) as an investigator for the tiny San Fernando Police Department. He is working his Michael Connelly manages a feat few authors can pull off successfully. The Wrong Side of Goodbye is the 21st book in the Harry Bosch series, and each installment further develops the Bosch character while involving him in yet another fascinating and unique crime that he has to solve. I just absolutely love this series, and The Wrong Side of Goodbye is fantastic.

Bosch is now working part-time (and uncompensated) as an investigator for the tiny San Fernando Police Department. He is working his way through the department’s cold case files and is currently focused on solving the Screen Cutter rapes. As he gets close to solving the case, one of his coworkers disappears. Meanwhile, Harry has also been hired by a wealthy tycoon to determine if the old man has any heirs. Due to his wealth, there are a number of people who don’t want any potential heirs located. Between the two cases, Bosch has his hands full.

Michael Connelly writes a fabulous mystery time and time again. One of my favorite parts of his stories is that he includes a number of interesting stories about the L.A. area and the other locales Harry visits. This time around a portion of the story takes place in Vietnam, and Connelly includes the show performed there in December 1969 by Bob Hope, Connie Stevens, Neil Armstrong, and a jazz saxophonist named Quentin McKinzie. I was not familiar with the details regarding this event and truly enjoyed learning about it. I also loved the way he incorporated Harry into a subsequent portion of that story. I was fascinated too to learn that tip lines create more work for police officers frequently because so many people call in trying to settle scores or payback an enemy. Who would do that?!

I highly, highly recommend this book and the entire series. Anyone who reads this book is in for a wonderful treat.
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5

Oct 28, 2016

Brilliant- always!

My View:
Michael Connelly never disappoints!

Harry Bosch is one of my favourite characters- I have loved learning his history, following his career, his relationships and seeing his dedication to his craft – solving mysteries and crimes, writing wrongs. I do not want this series to ever end. I am invested in the life this character. Keep on keeping on Michael Connelly.

Fan moment over

In this narrative we are taken back to Harry’s time in the “tunnels” as we compare Harry’s Brilliant- always!

My View:
Michael Connelly never disappoints!

Harry Bosch is one of my favourite characters- I have loved learning his history, following his career, his relationships and seeing his dedication to his craft – solving mysteries and crimes, writing wrongs. I do not want this series to ever end. I am invested in the life this character. Keep on keeping on Michael Connelly.

Fan moment over 

In this narrative we are taken back to Harry’s time in the “tunnels” as we compare Harry’s service history/time in the army with that of one of the people Harry is trying to identify. I loved hearing more of this time – a history I know little about. A tiny red herring is fed to the reader – did you swallow this bait? I did and kept hoping for a twist till there was no room for hope. Well done – I loved the subtleness.

This is a duel narrative that explores Harrys’ working relationships and responsibilities – his role as a private investigator – tracking down a lost heir and that of part time cop – solving cold cases - a job he does best - this time a serial rapist. In both strands of the narrative there are plenty of plot twists and turns, tension and some great secondary characters.

As a bonus Connelly weaves the Lincoln Lawyer into the script. Brilliant! As always.

A question for you Michael Connelly - will there be an album of Harry’s Favourite Songs? Readers do you check out the musicians/the tracks Harry listens to?

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4

Jan 26, 2017


“There were people who would have no sympathy for her, Bosch knew. People who would argue that her remaining silent about the attack allowed the rapist to move on to the net victim without concern about police attention. Bosch could find some validity in that but he was more sympathetic to the plight of the silent victim. Without even knowing the details of how she had gotten to this country, Bosch knew her path here had not been easy and her desire to stay no matter what the consequences – even
“There were people who would have no sympathy for her, Bosch knew. People who would argue that her remaining silent about the attack allowed the rapist to move on to the net victim without concern about police attention. Bosch could find some validity in that but he was more sympathetic to the plight of the silent victim. Without even knowing the details of how she had gotten to this country, Bosch knew her path here had not been easy and her desire to stay no matter what the consequences – even to be silent about a rape – was what touched him. Politicians could talk about building walls and changing laws to keep people out, but in the end, they were just symbols. Neither would stop the tide any more than the rock jetties at the mouth of the port did. Neither could stop the tide of hope and desire.” (The Wrong Side of Goodbye, page 167)

Michael Connelly’s twenty-first Harry Bosch detective novel is not a political thriller, but it does not ignore the present-day political climate. Cultural, racial, gender, and sexual orientation issues are all rolled into the plot of The Wrong Side of Goodbye. Bosch, a long-time detective with LAPD, is now retired – under protest. He has filed a lawsuit against his former employer; he now works for free as a part-time detective for the San Fernando Police Department. He is also self-employed, taking on cases as a private investigator. We get to see Harry in action wearing both hats in this one. He’s not supposed to cross the line by working on his private cases when on duty as a police detective, but sometimes he just can’t help but take advantage of some of the computer resources, a small misdeed that eventually was easy for me to overlook since he seems quite open-minded in his overall view of women and minorities, Hispanics in particular.

As mysteries go, each story was quite engaging. An elderly, wealthy recluse, Whitney Vance, hires Harry to find out if he has an heir – with a condition: he must tell no one why he’s been hired, and he must report only to Vance. The trail could be dangerous, and it takes Bosch back to places in his own past that he has been reluctant to face. Not able to leave professional police work behind him, Bosch is working a serial rape case as part of a team with SFPD. Called the “Screen Cutter” because of the method used to gain access to women’s homes, the attacker apparently stalks mostly Hispanic women and assaults them in their homes. There’s a lot of down-and-dirty police work in this one. Tip lines, dead ends, and long hours until late in the book when the real excitement begins.

Connelly fans, you may be happy to know that Mickey Haller, “the Lincoln Lawyer”, has a role as Harry’s legal advisor in the inheritance case. Harry’s feeling especially protective now that he’s working the San Fernando rape case, so he checks in from time-to-time with daughter Maddie, who’s now a busy college student. But my favorite character has to be Bella Lourde. She’s a smart, hard-working detective who has a good working relationship with Bosch. Oh, and she’s Hispanic and lesbian. She turns out to be a very key player in this one.

This is mostly a steady-as-she-goes police procedural with some excellent characterization. It helps to have read some of the Bosch novels previously to have an idea of who this guy is and how he operates. There’s really nothing fancy here – just some clever deduction. I like that Harry isn’t afraid to admit when he’s wrong. Boy, does he backtrack in a hurry and push the pedal to the metal when he figures things out! The guy’s got heart! He doesn’t take “No” for an answer, and he keeps going until he gets where he needs to go. If you’re a Michael Connelly reader and a fan of Harry Bosch, I recommend The Wrong Side of Goodbye.

4 stars






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4

Apr 21, 2019

"Politicians could talk about building walls and changing laws to keep people out, but in the end they were just symbols. Neither would stop the tide any more than the rock jetties at the mouth of the port did. Nothing could stop the tide of hope and desire."

Harry Bosch has retired from the L.A.P.D. but he is not ready for sitting on a rocking chair. He is working as a private investigator. He is also a reserve officer for the San Fernando Police Department. As a reserve officer there is no "Politicians could talk about building walls and changing laws to keep people out, but in the end they were just symbols. Neither would stop the tide any more than the rock jetties at the mouth of the port did. Nothing could stop the tide of hope and desire."

Harry Bosch has retired from the L.A.P.D. but he is not ready for sitting on a rocking chair. He is working as a private investigator. He is also a reserve officer for the San Fernando Police Department. As a reserve officer there is no paycheck but he gets to carry a badge and do what he loves and what is in his blood. He has been brought on to mostly work the cold cases, investigating unsolved crimes. He is also assisting with the investigation into a serial rapist who is attacking women in their homes. The rapist has been dubbed the "Screen Cutter" because of the way he gains entry into the victims homes. Catching him before he can attack again and there is another victim has become high priority.

At the same time Harry has been summoned to the mansion of billionaire Whitney Vance, in his capacity as a private investigator. Vance is in charge of very large aviation company but when he was an eighteen year old college student he had an affair with a Mexican girl named Vibiana Duarte. She disappeared shortly after she became pregnant. Driven away by Vance's father. Now at the end of his life Vance wants to learn what happened to her and whether he has a heir. He wants to hire Bosch to find out. There are billions at stake. If Vance does not have a heir the board of directors inherits. If suddenly a long lost heir shows up they are left out.

The story weaves between the search for the "Screen Cutter" and the hunt for Vance's heir. Bosch is feeling the urgency and pressure in both cases. He wants to find the heir before Vance dies and he wants to find and stop the "Screen Cutter" before there is another attack. The novel delivers everything I expect from Michael Connelly and does not disappoint. Both stories are engaging and will keep you engrossed. Compelling characters that the reader can identify with. I am happy to see that although Harry has retired from the L.A.P.D. Michael Connelly appears to have plans to keep Harry Bosch around for our reading pleasure! ...more
2

Dec 11, 2016

I’ve written reviews for probably hundreds of books. But never before has one hurt so much to write.

I’ve always said there are two types of authors: 1) Michael Connelly and 2) everyone else.

What I mean by that is he stands apart from the rest of the pack. Some of my favorites are CJ Box, James Grippando, Brad Thor, Tess Gerritsen and Barry Eisler. But Connelly gets his own category.
It’s like when someone asks me what bands do I like. I mention several but never include The Beatles. Why? Well, I’ve written reviews for probably hundreds of books. But never before has one hurt so much to write.

I’ve always said there are two types of authors: 1) Michael Connelly and 2) everyone else.

What I mean by that is he stands apart from the rest of the pack. Some of my favorites are CJ Box, James Grippando, Brad Thor, Tess Gerritsen and Barry Eisler. But Connelly gets his own category.
It’s like when someone asks me what bands do I like. I mention several but never include The Beatles. Why? Well, they’re the Beatles. They stand apart from everyone else.

Every generation has that one author who is head and shoulders above the rest. And this generation has Connelly. He is a literary genius. A master of words, a wordsmith. His writing is terrific, his phraseology is perfect. His characters are real, dialogue rings true, his stories exciting and engaging and you’re always hit with both exciting realism and unforeseen plot twists.

The Wrong Side of Good-Bye sucked.

I always read his novels slow so I can enjoy them savor them like a good juicy steak. When I begin a Connelly novel—be it Harry Bosch, Mickey Haller or a standalone like Chasing the Dime--I sit back, get all comfy in my favorite recliner and for a few nights disappear into the world of Michael Connelly and forget about my problems.

This book was an effort to get through. This book was a struggle to finish. The last 60 pages I actually skimmed. It became like I was doing homework and not reading for enjoyment.
And that is what hurts me to write this. I am a huge fan of Michael Connelly. I’ve rated every one of his novel 5 stars. I’d rate them 10 if I could.

But this was a major disappointment.

In this novel Harry is working two separate cases. He is working on finding a serial rapist while being hired by a billionaire at the end of his life searching for heirs.
The serial rape part was interesting. Harry’s a detective and that’s what detectives do. Or at least detectives in works of fiction. The parallel storyline, however, was boring and uneventful. We spend half the book following Harry around as he files motions and searches through records and birth/death certificates. I was fascinated to see how Mr. Connelly would somehow tie these 2 separate storylines together.

He didn’t.

I cant help but feel he has two potential stories in his head but not enough for a full novel and therefore took two semi-storylines and combined that into one book.

I’ve always found Mr. Connelly’s writing crisp and fast-moving. However, this novel seemed to go off the tracks and drag over and over again. Yes, Harry lives and works in LA. And like Randy Newman says, “I Love LA.” But this novel went over and above with directions. Harry took the 5 freeway to his exit, made a right, drove three blocks to the such and such, made a left…You get the idea.

And one scene, which should have been exciting dragged.


***spoiler***
There was one scene where Harry and Sisto are searching the house for Bella. Is she alive? Is she dead? Is she even there? This should be compelling and spellbinding. Yet, it dragged on and on and on. We are given a play by play of Harry going into every single room, looking in every single corner, behind every box in an attic. They go out back, they look in a wash, they go down into the wash, then they come back out of the wash. Then they see boxes which harry assumes covers a trapdoor. And for three paragraphs we are given a play by play of how Harry uses a handcart to move boxes and lift a manhole.
***end spoiler***

Two more things that make no sense and cause me to wonder is Connelly wrote this or had a ghostwriter.

***Spoiler****

Ida, Vance's confidante and assistant for 35 years is upset because she was left out of the will. However, Vance has no second thoughts to handing Harry $10,000 for a 20 minute meeting, $10,000 to a complete stranger???

Also, Vance is a billionaire a la Howard Hughes. He has close ties with the US govt and therefore, since his company built choppers used in Viet Nam, he probably has known several presidents and numerous political powerbrokers over his life. That being the case, then when he wants to find any missing heirs, why in the world would he hire a homicide detective??? He would likely hire someone who had worked for the FBI. The FBI finds people. Homicide detectives don't.

****end spoiler****

There are always surprises in his novels. But not this one. It was SO OBVIOUS who the killer was that I figured, “Nah, it can’t be that person. That’s too obvious.” Well, it WAS that obvious.

I read the book in 3 nights: about 120 pages the first night, 110 the next and 150 the final night. It started out good and interesting. The middle of the book slowed and the last third dragged. I’ve never had such a hard time finishing a book by Michael Connelly as I did this one.

I’m pretty sure that this is the first novel he’s written since getting involved with the BOSCH TV show. Supposedly, it’s a good show. But please, Mr. Connelly, perhaps you should back away from the show and focus more on the writing. This novel didn’t flow and was very disjointed. I cant help but feel he wrote it in between takes of filming.

Not every Tom Hanks film is Forrest Gump. Not every Hitchcock film was Psycho. Not every Spielberg movie is Schindler’s List. Not every Beatles’ song is Hey, Jude. Even Hanks and Hitchcock and Spielberg and the Beatles have things that don’t measure up to their standards. I truly hope that this is the case for The Wrong side of Goodbye rather than a trend.
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4

May 28, 2017

I eagerly wait each year for a new installment of this detective series to come out, and if I can grab it before too many others at my local library I drop everything to read it. This time around I had two seasons of the TV series on early Harry Bosch to keep him fresh in my mind. At this point Harry is retired from the Los Angeles force, but splits his time doing cold cases part-time for the small San Fernando force while taking on private detective cases. For this novel he works a case of a I eagerly wait each year for a new installment of this detective series to come out, and if I can grab it before too many others at my local library I drop everything to read it. This time around I had two seasons of the TV series on early Harry Bosch to keep him fresh in my mind. At this point Harry is retired from the Los Angeles force, but splits his time doing cold cases part-time for the small San Fernando force while taking on private detective cases. For this novel he works a case of a serial rapist for which the police have made no progress on for a long time. At the same time he has been hired by an aging billionaire to investigate whether he might have an heir from a Mexican art student he loved and got pregnant when he was in college in the 50s, which led to his family intervening and the girl paid to disappear.

I got plenty of satisfaction watching Harry work from the slimmest of clues and his keen observation of people when he is interviewing them. For the rapist case, he draws out of the victims information that suggests the perpetrator had been monitoring them closely, leading Harry to fruitful speculations about what job he might have had which would allow that. He also expands his search for more victims by pursuing a broader geography and timeframe. He realizes he must be getting closer to solving the case when his eager partner, Bella, turns up missing. Despite this story being a police procedural and not a thriller, it was quite exciting to experience Harry going into overdrive and leading his colleagues on the force past their resentments of him into a choreography of teamwork to try to save Bella.

The case of finding a potential heir turned out to have some urgency and serious risks as well. The aerospace magnate is dying, and there are a lot of people on the board who could benefit from more ownership or control of the company if there were no heir. For this reason, Harry has to do work slowly and quietly in secret as long as possible. One potential candidate for an heir brings out a fascinating side story of his possibly being an MIA in Vietnam, which Harry has insight about due to his own experience in the war. The life of another possible descendant also draws Harry into a history of the interface of social activism and art in the service of uplifting struggling poor residents of LA. Far from being filler, these stories make the distant past Harry is trying to reconstruct a lot more real, involving people he can identify with. At the same time, he is aware that any heir he might find might not become happier with the life-changing consequences and burdens associated with suddenly inheriting hundreds of millions of dollars. Also, before the old man dies, their life will be in danger.

All in all, I was happy to see Harry doing good and saving lives through his dogged persistence and competent imagination and craft. We no longer have the thrills of him fighting on the street or battling corruption at high levels of the LA police, but I appreciated his quiet heroism and compassion. I see no reason why a reader new to Connelly couldn’t take this up as a first read of him.
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4

Nov 13, 2016

It is hard to believe that this is the 23rd book in the Harry Bosch series. Harry is now doing some private investigator work and is a volunteer reserve officer with the San Fernando Police Department. Harry is working as a detective on a series of unsolved rape cases that go back over a number of years. He is beginning to think he has a serial rapist case and the rapist will soon strike again. On the P. I. side of his life, he is hired by billionaire Whitney Vance to find out if he might have It is hard to believe that this is the 23rd book in the Harry Bosch series. Harry is now doing some private investigator work and is a volunteer reserve officer with the San Fernando Police Department. Harry is working as a detective on a series of unsolved rape cases that go back over a number of years. He is beginning to think he has a serial rapist case and the rapist will soon strike again. On the P. I. side of his life, he is hired by billionaire Whitney Vance to find out if he might have an heir from a relationship he had while he was a young university student.

The book is well written and Connelly keeps the plot twisting, turning and the suspense building to keep me reading. Connelly has skillfully revealed Harry ‘s transition from LAPD detective to that of an unpaid reserve investigator. He reveals the problems of his being a former big time LAPD detective to the “old guy” in a small-town police department. It has been great to watch the aging and work changes of Bosch along with that of his readers.

Titus Welliver does a good job narrating the book. Welliver is an actor and painter as well as audiobook narrator. He also plays Bosch on the Amazon T.V. Bosch series.
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5

Aug 03, 2018

Harry is part time with the PD on the cold case desk and a part time private dic. when he gets a call from an old acquaintance who does personal security for a well known billionaire. He does not plan on taking the case until a very old man appeals to the softer side of Harry. This addition is a good mix between tough unrelenting Harry and an Agatha Christi-esqu story line. Very good, fast paced caper that has a double story and double ending.

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