The Way I See It: A Personal Look at Autism & Asperger's Info

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In this innovative book, Dr. Temple Grandin gets down to the
REAL issues of autism, the ones parents, teachers, and individuals on
the spectrum face every day. Temple offers helpful do’s and don’ts,
practical strategies, and try-it-now tips, all based on her ";insider";
perspective and a great deal of research. These are just some of the
specific topics Temple delves into: How and Why People with Autism Think
Differently Economical Early Intervention Programs that Work How
Sensory Sensitivities Affect Learning Behaviors Caused by a Disability
vs. Just Bad Behaviors Teaching People with Autism to Live in an
Unpredictable World Alternative Medicine vs. Conventional Medicine
Employment Ideas for Adults with Autism This revised and expanded
edition contains revisions based on the most current autism research, as
well as 14 additional articles including:

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Reviews for The Way I See It: A Personal Look at Autism & Asperger's:

4

Mar 17, 2019

This book is [mostly] a collection of articles by Grandin and suffers from the typical issues of article and blog post collections: repetition and lack of depth.

I've read a fair amount of Aspie stuff online over the years, but mostly avoided published Autism related stuff as it's so focused on childhood development. There is some good stuff here, and I mostly enjoyed it, but I think I might enjoy her book The Autisitic Brain more.

I feel Grandin's personal variation as visual thinker biases her This book is [mostly] a collection of articles by Grandin and suffers from the typical issues of article and blog post collections: repetition and lack of depth.

I've read a fair amount of Aspie stuff online over the years, but mostly avoided published Autism related stuff as it's so focused on childhood development. There is some good stuff here, and I mostly enjoyed it, but I think I might enjoy her book The Autisitic Brain more.

I feel Grandin's personal variation as visual thinker biases her ideas about language. She sometimes writes as if it's only function is social.

In lieu of an in depth review, here are some bits I highlighted, and occasionally my responses:

Music and Math Thinkers - Patterns instead of pictures dominate the thinking processes of these children. Both music and math are a world of patterns, and children who think this way can have strong associative abilities. Research shows that they have superior abilities to perform mental rotation tasks.

The thinking patterns of individuals with ASD are markedly different from the way “normal” people think.

--- Well how the fuck do normal people think?

Both as a young child and throughout my high school years I was motivated by two factors. The first was getting recognition from others and, secondly, I enjoyed seeing my creations being used in places and events that were important to me.

Sensory Problems Are Variable One of the problems in understanding sensory issues is that sensory sensitivities are very variable, among individuals and within the same individual. A person can be hyper-sensitive in one area (like hearing) and hypo-sensitive in another (like touch). One person can have a marked olfactory sensitivity and another might not be affected at all in that sense. Complicating matters even further, on a day-to-day basis, in the same individual, the sensory sensitivities can change, especially when the person is tired or stressed.

There are two kinds of auditory problems: 1) sensitivity to loud noise in general and 2) not being able to hear auditory detail, such as discerning one voice among other sounds, or hearing the hard consonant sounds of words.

they may have difficulty going up and down a strange set of stairs due to distorted depth perception

Even though children and adults with ASD can easily pass a standard hearing test, they often have difficulty hearing auditory detail.

Fear Is the Main Emotion

An individual with severe autism can easily panic if something new is suddenly introduced.

--- Birds!

When I stimmed, sounds that hurt my ears stopped. Most kids with autism do these repetitive behaviors because it feels good in some way. It may counteract an overwhelming sensory environment, or alleviate the high levels of internal anxiety these kids typically feel every day.

Another reason having a good career is so important to me is that I am what I do instead of what I feel.

--- Both horrible options.

For many people on the autism spectrum, the most effective dose of antidepressants and atypical medications is much lower than the recommended dose on the label.

Not all the “problems” within autism arise from the autism. Some arise just because of who we are and the personality we each have.

It is my opinion that most people with autism notice far more details in any given situation than do people without autism.

You simply cannot tell other people they are stupid, even if they really are stupid.

I have a feeling the nanny might have been Asperger’s herself, because she had an old car seat out of a jeep that she had in her room—it was her favorite chair. ...more
1

Jan 23, 2018

In contrast to "Thinking in Pictures" which is a classic in autistic literature, this work is absolutely dreadful. Temple is a star on the parent conference circuit and presumably purchased this for the sole purpose of having something to sell to autograph seekers. She comes across as impatient crank urging parents to be firm and strict. In fact Temple owes her success in life to a remarkably flexible and accommodating mother. If you must buy it in order to secure her autograph. Do not read it. In contrast to "Thinking in Pictures" which is a classic in autistic literature, this work is absolutely dreadful. Temple is a star on the parent conference circuit and presumably purchased this for the sole purpose of having something to sell to autograph seekers. She comes across as impatient crank urging parents to be firm and strict. In fact Temple owes her success in life to a remarkably flexible and accommodating mother. If you must buy it in order to secure her autograph. Do not read it. Do not lend it to anyone nor encourage them to read it.

Business is business afterall. Pretzels and beer are sold at ball parks. Popcorn is marketed in movie theatres. Ghastly objects like this are sold to autograph seekers at parent conferences. ...more
2

May 08, 2009

This is another book sent for me to review . . .

A big plus for most readers today is that this book is easy to read. I finished it in just a few hours. The writing is perfectly at level for most reading audiences. I also think that parents of Autistic children and those with Aspgergers are going to like this book. It appears to be helpful for parents, especially. Now, for all of the praise I just heaped, I am going to come up with a few points I didn't like about the book, and I will list them This is another book sent for me to review . . .

A big plus for most readers today is that this book is easy to read. I finished it in just a few hours. The writing is perfectly at level for most reading audiences. I also think that parents of Autistic children and those with Aspgergers are going to like this book. It appears to be helpful for parents, especially. Now, for all of the praise I just heaped, I am going to come up with a few points I didn't like about the book, and I will list them here, along with brief explanations. I do not mean any disrespect against the author or people in the Autistic spectrum, as I have always thought I was a bit on the mild Asperger spectrum mystelf, but I am just being honest; the following could even hurt my reputation as a Vine reviewer, but I really need to be sincere about my review:

First of all, there is a strange emphasis in one section of the book that mentions nutrition, and meat consumption. Is it a coincidence that the author used to work for a meat company and still deals with the cattle business? As a vegetarian (for most of my life), I found this offensive, and anyone who has studied nutrition knows that you can get good protein from non-animal products. It is rather distasteful, considering that eating meat can contribute to Alzheimer's and many other diseases, as well as for those who have spiritual reasons for not eating meat, to constantly read this. Throughout the book I found references to the meat plant and meat industry. I also find it strange because, I for one, have always thought I may be slightly on the mild Asperger's spectrum, yet I have a very high empathy for animals and could never ever think of hurting them.

Another point I did not like was that there was such an emphasis in the book about people in the Autistic and Asperger's spectrum and "technicality," as well as too much emphasis on finding a "good" job which, according to the author, can only be found in technical vocations. Well, the truth is, not all people like technical things or vocations. I am also bad at algebra (like the author), but I also never excelled in any technical classes. "Nerds" come in all packages (the author frequently refers to Asperger folks as nerds). I for one, enjoy literature, poetry, writing, art, music, and am adept at all of these (I can play seven instruments for example and am a classically-trained pianist), but I am terrible when it comes to technical things and find them very boring. So I would ask the author to please consider that not all people in this spectrum are techie-nerds. I also could not sell my soul to make money. On the other hand, my husband, who is also sort of Asperger-like (a true Techie in all ways) is very good at technical things, but he was never able to attend college so far, so I would also ask the author to consider what would happen if parents had to raise a child in the autistic spectrum who were also financially impoverished. This could be quite a challenge and make for a book in itself.

I also found it odd that the author thinks that only people in this spectrum need a balance between hobbies and life. Well, I thought that was applicable to anyone, even the neurotypicals ("normal" people, that is). Most people need to have something in life other than a work identity, that is just human nature, and very essential to spiritual growth in general. This is not just applicable to those in the Autistic or Asperger's spectrum. I know that some people, even neurotypicals, are fed-up with materialism and need an identity other than work.

Also, there is a very strong emphasis in this book on male thinking. While I consider myself able to think in both a "female" and "male" way, the male way of thinking isn't always that great. It has many bad points. And sure, Einstein was a genius, but his genius brought a lot of suffering as well. (We would have all been better off without atomic bombs.) And not all geniuses were "male" oriented. Many countless poets, artists, and musicians have contributed to our societies with their rich visions of the ephemeral that "male" ways of seeing cannot provide. What about the mystery of the beautiful and the sublime? It seems there is just so much emphasis in this book about technical matters, success, and power. Also, I thought the author was very good with animals, but why no empathy for the poor cattle who get slaughtered? I do not mean this as disrespect, I am just curious.

The author also has a concern with violence. Well, sure, but where does that violence come from? It comes from a mostly "male-thinking" society where empathy isn't regarded highly, and "success" and competition are the way of life, which means suffering for many others. I do not think that sensitive people like Autistics and Aspies should have to become like this. This is just very cold. And again, I may have a mild form of Aspergers myself, but I have a very balanced male/female mind. Not all of us think in such black and white ways.

I would only recommend this book for people who need advice with their children with these disorders, but otherwise, there are many points, as you can tell, that I disagree with -- and I usually don't get this upset regarding a Vine review, so I'm telling it like it is. Maybe it's because I expected more from the author. I didn't feel that there was any real soul to this book underneath the advice given. ...more
4

Dec 09, 2009

"The Way I See It" is a look at autism and Asperger's syndrome from someone who it contends with it every day. The author is Temple Grandin, who is a big-name and animal behavior in animal psychology. In fact, autism has helped her become successful in her field because of the way that she sees the world. I have really enjoyed her other books and I especially enjoyed the books about her own personal struggles with autism. Autism and Asperger's syndrome affect many people. No one knows what "The Way I See It" is a look at autism and Asperger's syndrome from someone who it contends with it every day. The author is Temple Grandin, who is a big-name and animal behavior in animal psychology. In fact, autism has helped her become successful in her field because of the way that she sees the world. I have really enjoyed her other books and I especially enjoyed the books about her own personal struggles with autism. Autism and Asperger's syndrome affect many people. No one knows what causes it and although headway has been made with treatments, there is still a little bit to go.

Grandin gives readers of front seat look at what it's like to contend with autism every day and how it affects the way that she sees the world. She also gives out some advice about what to do and how to interact with people with autism. She also deals some controversial advice in some parts. I really liked how up front she was with everything that she goes through. Honesty went a long way in making this book so interesting!

It was really interesting to hear from somebody who faces autism every day as to what her personal experience was. She writes with clarity and honesty that really gave me an appreciation for everything that she was going through. Overall, I think this is a really unique perspective of autism and readers who are interested in the subject will enjoy this book. ...more
4

Aug 13, 2012

I read through this book because I adore Temple Grandin. However, as a compilation of separate articles, this book has no flow, no continuation, and is rather repetitive, as the articles were originally written as stand-alone pieces. This does not diminish my admiration for Ms. Grandin, however.

I especially love how she points out, over and over again, that parents need to take charge of their kids. Parents need to expect and demand proper behavior from their children. I love the part where she I read through this book because I adore Temple Grandin. However, as a compilation of separate articles, this book has no flow, no continuation, and is rather repetitive, as the articles were originally written as stand-alone pieces. This does not diminish my admiration for Ms. Grandin, however.

I especially love how she points out, over and over again, that parents need to take charge of their kids. Parents need to expect and demand proper behavior from their children. I love the part where she says that her mother forced her to drive to the lumber yard to do some shopping, even though Ms. Grandin begged off, saying that it would upset her so much that it'd make her cry. Her mother replied (and I broadly paraphrase), "OK, well, cry, just go to the lumberyard." Ms. Grandin reports that she went to the lumber yard, she cried, she completed the task, and *never again* was a trip to the lumber yard frightening, and future trips went off without a hitch. I just love this.

If you love Ms. Grandin, you'll most likely like this book, but her other books are far more interesting and informative. ...more
5

Feb 27, 2009

I am just a bit into this book, but it is full of very concrete, helpful advice for working with kids with AS disorders. I wish that I had read this when I was working in EI. Though I am reading it with professional's eye, it is written in very clear, straightforward way. This is a result of Dr. Grandin's diagnosis and thank goodness for that! In other words, in my own circuitous way what I am trying to say is that this is a great book for professionals and parents alike.

One of my favorite I am just a bit into this book, but it is full of very concrete, helpful advice for working with kids with AS disorders. I wish that I had read this when I was working in EI. Though I am reading it with professional's eye, it is written in very clear, straightforward way. This is a result of Dr. Grandin's diagnosis and thank goodness for that! In other words, in my own circuitous way what I am trying to say is that this is a great book for professionals and parents alike.

One of my favorite pieces of advice is to use transition sentences such as "Kaitie, I have something to tell you" when changing subjects. She explains that because their processing may be slower, many times statements about new subjects get "clipped". For example if you are working on an art project and then all of a sudden say "I put your juice on the table", the child may only hear "on the table" while the brain plays catch up. This seems like great advice for not just kids and adults with autism, but ADD, nuero issues and injuries, MR, etc. It is little things like this that can make a world of difference. ...more
3

Oct 09, 2013

The title of this book is a bit misleading. That is, I expected that "A Personal Look" would be more focused on Grandin's own life and experiences. Instead, this is a compilation of articles Grandin has written, mostly involving practical advice on how to pursue help for people on the autism spectrum in either school or the work world. There is personal information in it, and she relates information to her own experiences on occasion, but this book is more like an advice book for parents dealing The title of this book is a bit misleading. That is, I expected that "A Personal Look" would be more focused on Grandin's own life and experiences. Instead, this is a compilation of articles Grandin has written, mostly involving practical advice on how to pursue help for people on the autism spectrum in either school or the work world. There is personal information in it, and she relates information to her own experiences on occasion, but this book is more like an advice book for parents dealing with children on the Autism spectrum and for people who are on the spectrum who need to learn how to move into the working world. Much of the material is repetitive--a lot of 'keep trying until you find the routines and conditions that best work for your child' and 'encourage strengths, don't focus on weaknesses.' Some examples/pieces of advice get overused, like the idea that people on the spectrum who are sensitive to fluorescent lights can have their own incandescent lamps at desks or work stations, and that in the past children learned proper manners, but they aren't subject to the same strict upbringing these days. The writing is also not the strongest. Some of my pet peeves, such as vague words like "very" and "good" were riddled throughout the book. The advice, generally speaking, is, ahem, good--but for people not dealing regularly with people on the spectrum or not on the spectrum themselves, it becomes tedious. ...more
4

Jul 19, 2010

Great book. Divided into small concise sections about various issues relating to the autistic spectrum. Temple Grandin gives practical information and advice to people on the spectrum and their parents and carers.

Her focus is largely on encouraging people on the autistic spectrum to pursue their special interests, and not to try to become something they are not. She emphasises that the focus should not be on weaknesses but on strengths. At the same time, she is big on the importance of following Great book. Divided into small concise sections about various issues relating to the autistic spectrum. Temple Grandin gives practical information and advice to people on the spectrum and their parents and carers.

Her focus is largely on encouraging people on the autistic spectrum to pursue their special interests, and not to try to become something they are not. She emphasises that the focus should not be on weaknesses but on strengths. At the same time, she is big on the importance of following certain social etiquette, such as: 'You simply cannot tell other people they are stupid, even if they really are stupid.' This made me smile. :-)

In all, the book had lots of useful, common-sense tips. It felt a bit bitty to read, but then that is because it's a collection of articles she's written over the years, rather than something she wrote as a whole. I think I'd like to read a book she has written as a whole book. ...more
4

Jun 17, 2010

Part biography, part self aggrandizing, part text book, Dr. Grandin takes you into her world of Autism through magazine articles previously published and reorganized into an easier to follow format that incorporates her opinions on the inner workings of Autism and Asperger's.

I loved her comment about -- if it wasn't for Autism we would be a world full of highly social people who would accomplish very little. The Social people are not going to want to spend the time necessary to create great Part biography, part self aggrandizing, part text book, Dr. Grandin takes you into her world of Autism through magazine articles previously published and reorganized into an easier to follow format that incorporates her opinions on the inner workings of Autism and Asperger's.

I loved her comment about -- if it wasn't for Autism we would be a world full of highly social people who would accomplish very little. The Social people are not going to want to spend the time necessary to create great art, beautiful music, or masterworks of engineering that require a great attention to detail.

Instead of thinking about Asperger's as a detriment, it's now easier to see that it can be a gift, the ability to use different parts of the brain that the rest of the population is clueless about. So, some people are wired differently, may not have the same social skills, but in the long run, if it wasn't for people thinking differently, would I be able use this computer. Would there even be computers?

I highly recommend this fascinating book; I just suggest that you take it in small bits so you can digest the full meaning that Dr. Grandin is trying to get across. ...more
4

Sep 21, 2018

Personally, this book was wonderful. As the parent of an autistic child, there was such a wealth of knowledge and ideas and things I marked to try with my child. It really gave me so much more of an insight than all the doctors we’ve seen because this is from a woman who is actually autistic, who is on the inside.
I have to say, I’m not clear on why a few people who are vegan or vegetarian are using that as a reason to criticize the book. Temple Grandin’s career in animal husbandry, includes Personally, this book was wonderful. As the parent of an autistic child, there was such a wealth of knowledge and ideas and things I marked to try with my child. It really gave me so much more of an insight than all the doctors we’ve seen because this is from a woman who is actually autistic, who is on the inside.
I have to say, I’m not clear on why a few people who are vegan or vegetarian are using that as a reason to criticize the book. Temple Grandin’s career in animal husbandry, includes slaughtering cattle, really has no impact on her advice on helping children with autism. And for the parents who are desperately seeking answers, or just any kind of window into their children so we can begin to help, we really do not care if she’s not a vegetarian. ...more
2

Apr 27, 2018

I've been trying to read all of Grandin's books so I feel more confident when critiquing them but this is the last one for me. I know this one is a bit old so there are some things about it that can be attributed to that rather than Grandin's opinions but I still take issue with a lot of what she says in the book. She doesn't seem to understand that not all autistic people are capable of or interested in following a life path similar to hers. Either that or she doesn't care to hear or consider I've been trying to read all of Grandin's books so I feel more confident when critiquing them but this is the last one for me. I know this one is a bit old so there are some things about it that can be attributed to that rather than Grandin's opinions but I still take issue with a lot of what she says in the book. She doesn't seem to understand that not all autistic people are capable of or interested in following a life path similar to hers. Either that or she doesn't care to hear or consider that perspective.

In any case, as an autistic person myself, she doesn't speak for me. ...more
3

Feb 26, 2011

The Way I See It is a complication of articles Ms. Grandin has written for the Autism Asperger's Digest magazine over the past decade or so, grouped into loose categories. The nature of the format means that the book is somewhat repetitive and choppy with little, if any, transition between the short articles (often only 3-4 pages each).

Ms. Grandin provides solid information on how people on the Spectrum think, how to help them broaden their skill sets and deal with sensory issues, with an The Way I See It is a complication of articles Ms. Grandin has written for the Autism Asperger's Digest magazine over the past decade or so, grouped into loose categories. The nature of the format means that the book is somewhat repetitive and choppy with little, if any, transition between the short articles (often only 3-4 pages each).

Ms. Grandin provides solid information on how people on the Spectrum think, how to help them broaden their skill sets and deal with sensory issues, with an emphasis on discipline and teaching proper appropriate behavior. I actually found several ideas I think may help with my son with ADHD.

Many interesting insights including this one: "I have often thought that people on the mild end of the Asperger's spectrum may have fit in better years ago than they do today...In many ways, today's 'always connected' society has put more social demands on people, and a lack of social ability may be seen as more of a handicap than in the past."

For more book reviews, come visit my blog, Build Enough Bookshelves. ...more
4

Sep 27, 2014

An enlightening book.
Highly recommended for the ones interested to learn about the spectrum.
4

Nov 25, 2012

A good read for anyone who wants to learn about autism and asperger's. It is a collection of articles, so easy to read. Not overly detailed. Grandin being autistic makes this book more credible and her research helps us understand the needs of these people. A good resource.
4

Aug 19, 2013

"The Way I See It" by Temple Grandin is an excellent resource for anyone who is dealing with an Autism Spectrum Disorder, or just interested in finding out more about Autism. It is a collection of articles she has written covering every aspect of autism and, because she has Autism herself, is really insightful, concise, and logical, with the unique perspective of someone on the Autism Spectrum. I highly recommend this book - especially to parents of children with an ASD. I am definitely going to "The Way I See It" by Temple Grandin is an excellent resource for anyone who is dealing with an Autism Spectrum Disorder, or just interested in finding out more about Autism. It is a collection of articles she has written covering every aspect of autism and, because she has Autism herself, is really insightful, concise, and logical, with the unique perspective of someone on the Autism Spectrum. I highly recommend this book - especially to parents of children with an ASD. I am definitely going to read more of her books. ...more
3

Jun 09, 2010

this was an interesting book about autism/Asperger's... i think i would have enjoyed reading one of her earlier books that describes the experience of being on the autism spectrum a bit more than i would did this book. it got repetitive nearing the middle of the book...while i was looking to be educated on how to handle situations i face with folks who are autistic, i found it a little too specific and more directed towards folks who actually have the disorder rather than those who interact with this was an interesting book about autism/Asperger's... i think i would have enjoyed reading one of her earlier books that describes the experience of being on the autism spectrum a bit more than i would did this book. it got repetitive nearing the middle of the book...while i was looking to be educated on how to handle situations i face with folks who are autistic, i found it a little too specific and more directed towards folks who actually have the disorder rather than those who interact with them. ...more
4

Jun 06, 2013

Very good book. It is great to have the insight of someone who actually is Autistic rather than someone who has only studied those who are Autistic. It gives a whole new perspective on the daily situations and life of a person with opposed to those without. What I liked about Temple's book more than others is that she gives you a sample situation and then also gives you a possible solution. Other books just tell you what is wrong and give various situations about what is going wrong but offer Very good book. It is great to have the insight of someone who actually is Autistic rather than someone who has only studied those who are Autistic. It gives a whole new perspective on the daily situations and life of a person with opposed to those without. What I liked about Temple's book more than others is that she gives you a sample situation and then also gives you a possible solution. Other books just tell you what is wrong and give various situations about what is going wrong but offer nothing in the way of a solution. ...more
4

Aug 20, 2011

Compilation of short articles about various aspects of autism and Asperger's based in large part on her own experience of being autistic. Always iffy to draw general conclusions from one's own experience (i had tremendous noise sensitivity, so people with autism are noise sensitive), but she supplements the personal anecdotes with information gleaned from people who write her or come to hear her speak, as well as more systematic research. Her ability to analyze the condition objectively, Compilation of short articles about various aspects of autism and Asperger's based in large part on her own experience of being autistic. Always iffy to draw general conclusions from one's own experience (i had tremendous noise sensitivity, so people with autism are noise sensitive), but she supplements the personal anecdotes with information gleaned from people who write her or come to hear her speak, as well as more systematic research. Her ability to analyze the condition objectively, acknowledge variability in people's symptoms and experiences, and communicate to "neurotypicals" is outstanding. ...more
3

Mar 06, 2011

I think highly of Temple and admire her advocacy and openness when it comes to sharing her views as a woman with ASD. There is a lot of valuable information in this book, especially for those just exploring the autism spectrum. I disagree with some of Temple's ideas and approaches to parenting and educating children on the spectrum. The key thing for me to remember whilst reading is that this is the way Temple sees it based on her experiences. This book is a worthwhile read for parents and I think highly of Temple and admire her advocacy and openness when it comes to sharing her views as a woman with ASD. There is a lot of valuable information in this book, especially for those just exploring the autism spectrum. I disagree with some of Temple's ideas and approaches to parenting and educating children on the spectrum. The key thing for me to remember whilst reading is that this is the way Temple sees it based on her experiences. This book is a worthwhile read for parents and educators who can remember that all of us, ASD or NT, are individuals. Whilst ASD children obviously share specific challenges and issues, there is no cut and dry "one size fits all" approach that works across the board. ...more
3

Jan 03, 2011

My rating: 3 of 5 stars
Recommended for: Parents of autistic/aspergers children

This is my first book read in the new year. The book is really a collection of articles written by the author over the years. A lot of them dealt more with children with autism and aspergers than they did adult topics, and therefore weren't entirely relevant to me. I did however recognize some of the behaviors and difficulties I had as a child. I would recommend this book to the parents of a child on the spectrum more My rating: 3 of 5 stars
Recommended for: Parents of autistic/aspergers children

This is my first book read in the new year. The book is really a collection of articles written by the author over the years. A lot of them dealt more with children with autism and aspergers than they did adult topics, and therefore weren't entirely relevant to me. I did however recognize some of the behaviors and difficulties I had as a child. I would recommend this book to the parents of a child on the spectrum more than I would an adult with asperger's or autism, particularly one that wasn't diagnosed until later in life.

That being said, there is a lot of good information here. The articles are well-written, and easy for a lay person with little experience on the science of the topic to read. The subject manner is presented in an engaging way, and the topics are divided up up into chapters with interrelated articles so you can easily find a topic if you want to read about something specific. The author herself is on the spectrum, and therefore her knowledge on the topics is personal as well as professional.
...more
4

Jan 09, 2018

Fascinating book. A must read for parents of autistic child, anyone who has to deal with autistic person, anyone who works with public. I would say everyone. You can understand for example why your co-worker is so weird. And how to deal with it.
And make sure you read her other books. Absolutely amazing woman. But she wouldn't be who she is if it wouldn't be for her mother. Thats why I believe that this book should be taught in school.
3

Jul 16, 2018

I learned so much from this book, it was incredible. What a helpful, well-written book. Seriously, I am thoroughly impressed.

The reason I gave it was 3 stars was because it was repetitive. Because it was a collection of 32 essays, published at different times a lot of the information was told over and over again. Like if I had to hear the story about Temple's boss giving her deodorant, I was going to put the book down. So that was difficult and forced me to push through. Additionally, some of I learned so much from this book, it was incredible. What a helpful, well-written book. Seriously, I am thoroughly impressed.

The reason I gave it was 3 stars was because it was repetitive. Because it was a collection of 32 essays, published at different times a lot of the information was told over and over again. Like if I had to hear the story about Temple's boss giving her deodorant, I was going to put the book down. So that was difficult and forced me to push through. Additionally, some of Temple's assessments were difficult to swallow and a little old fashioned. She does acknowledge this, and she is 63 and comes from a different generation. So it was difficult sometimes to read outdated opinions.

I understand this book has had multiple editions, but I still wish there was a more updated one. That said, the research and the references are so helpful. I can't wait to dig through my notes and highlights for the golden nuggets that will apply to myself and future stories.

Conclusion: Keep and reference ...more
4

Dec 01, 2017

The book, “The Way I See It” by Temple Grandin PH.D., is especially interesting, since the author has had her place on “the spectrum”, having autism since birth. Autism is a developmental disorder with different degrees of strengths and challenges. Individuals who are very close to the same place on the spectrum may react with very different levels of severity. Every person with autism is unique and that is why it is referred to as a spectrum disorder. The issues can range from problems of being The book, “The Way I See It” by Temple Grandin PH.D., is especially interesting, since the author has had her place on “the spectrum”, having autism since birth. Autism is a developmental disorder with different degrees of strengths and challenges. Individuals who are very close to the same place on the spectrum may react with very different levels of severity. Every person with autism is unique and that is why it is referred to as a spectrum disorder. The issues can range from problems of being nonverbal and challenges, that can include self-injurious behaviors and mental challenges, to the higher functioning level known as Asperger’s Syndrome. At the higher level of the spectrum people are often extremely intelligent and have expressive language skills.

Grandin says that she does not think in words but instead retrieves images from memory. She says she lacks social intuition and relies on logic to guide her behavior. She is a professor of animal behavior and well-known designer of livestock equipment. She credits her autism to her success in understanding animals.

The original title for this book was A Cow's Eye View and it was her observation of cattle's reactions in squeeze chutes that led her to design a squeeze machine that she uses daily to calm her anxieties. Her work with animals is fascinating and the book profiles much of her work.

More on this book including a summary of it's focus on web site www.connectedeventsmatter.com

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4

Apr 09, 2019

Let me preface this review by saying I’m a behavior interventionist that works with kids with autism (and other developmental disabilities.)

This book was aptly named “The Way I See It” as it is a collection of articles and essays that she wrote that are based on her opinion (though she cites her sources in depth.)

I’ve heard that her other books are written in a different format, (not a collection of essays/articles) and I’m intrigued to read one of those as I found this book very redundant. Let me preface this review by saying I’m a behavior interventionist that works with kids with autism (and other developmental disabilities.)

This book was aptly named “The Way I See It” as it is a collection of articles and essays that she wrote that are based on her opinion (though she cites her sources in depth.)

I’ve heard that her other books are written in a different format, (not a collection of essays/articles) and I’m intrigued to read one of those as I found this book very redundant. That being said, I gravely respect Miss Grandin and having met her, truly believe she is one of the strongest advocates of ASD in our field. I guess I was just hoping for a little more from this book. I probably should have read one of her other, more “popular” books. ...more
4

May 28, 2017

I’m glad I read Dr. Grandin’s mother’s book first. However, I still really enjoyed the perspective Temple gave. She talks about some common problems among the spectrum kids including passage comprehension, personal care and motivation troubles. I loved that she talks about what motivated her and some of the struggles she had in school. If you’re looking for some practical strategies to try for some specific problems, this would be a great book to read!

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