The Triathlete's Training Diary: Your Ultimate Tool for Faster, Stronger Racing, 2nd Ed. Info

Check out best sellers books in football, baseball or golf. Find hundreds of reviews on your favorite sports memoirs, coaching guides, training advice, outdoors and field guides. Explore our list of Outdoor & Adventure Sports ebooks/Books and download The Triathlete's Training Diary: Your Ultimate Tool for Faster, Stronger Racing, 2nd Ed. after reading our community reviews and ratings. Read&Download The Triathlete's Training Diary: Your Ultimate Tool for Faster, Stronger Racing, 2nd Ed. by Joe Friel Online


A perfect companion to any triathlon training program,
The Triathlete’s Training Diary offers an ideal way for
you to plan, record, and better understand your workouts and
performance.
With undated pages for use any time of the year, this
diary offers plenty of space for all the objective and subjective
performance metrics you might want to track in a smart format that’s
been carefully designed, tested, and refined by Joe Friel, the top coach
in the sport of triathlon.

The Triathlete’s Training Diary
is wirebound to lay flat and flips easily so you can look up past
workouts or settle your pre-race nerves by proving to yourself that
you’ve done the work. This paper workout log is simple to use, never
requires a login or password, and can be completely customized to meet
your needs for any triathlon training schedule. This physical record of
your workouts will reveal insights that don’t display on an online
dashboard.

Fully compatible with Joe Friel’s best-selling training
programs like The Triathlete’s Training Bible, Your First
Triathlon
, Going Long, and Your Best Triathlon, this
diary simplifies the planning and execution of your triathlon
training.

High-performing athletes know that a training diary is
an invaluable tool. Whether they work with a coach or train
independently, even elite triathletes keep a training log to hone their
feel for performance, consolidate training data in one location, track
their progress, monitor for injuries and overtraining, and reshape their
goals throughout the season.

The Triathlete’s Training
Diary
includes:

  • Coach Friel’s introduction to the
    essential details of keeping a training log.
  • Friel’s guide to
    planning out your season.
  • Season goals, Annual training hours,
    Weekly training hours
  • 53 undated weekly spreads.
  • Space
    for every training metric like rest/recovery, weight, workout type,
    route, distance/time, average heart rate and power, zones, weather,
    heart rate, RPE, and your custom notes
  • Room for two-a-day
    workouts.
  • Weekly Summary charts
  • Race Results Summary to
    log finish times, split times, pre- and post-race nutrition, efforts,
    and age-group rankings
  • Physiological test results such as VO2max
    and lactate threshold.
  • Training Grids to graph the data you
    choose
  • Road and mountain bike measurements with space to note
    adjustments
  • Your favorite routes and best times
  • Season
    results summary
  • Race day gear checklist

What gets
measured gets managed. Add The Triathlete’s Training Diary to
your program and you’ll unlock valuable insights that can help you
improve in your sport.


Average Ratings and Reviews
review-bg

4.47

2031 Ratings

5

4

3

2

1


Ratings and Reviews From Market


client-img 4.8
60
14
0
2
0
client-img 4.13
831
790
250
4
1

Reviews for The Triathlete's Training Diary: Your Ultimate Tool for Faster, Stronger Racing, 2nd Ed.:

5

Aug 03, 2007

I was thinking about runners this morning. The way they look. The way they move.

I don’t mean the champions of distance running. Despite the impossibility of their feats (26 miles at a 4:50 pace, 50 miles a day for 90 days, etc.), the competitors themselves srike me as very real, fundamentally human. Lank simians new-cast in nudity on the savannah, running a gazelle to exhaustion.

But then I think about one of these Olympic track stars. A guy like Usain Bolt. His whole life dedicated to the I was thinking about runners this morning. The way they look. The way they move.

I don’t mean the champions of distance running. Despite the impossibility of their feats (26 miles at a 4:50 pace, 50 miles a day for 90 days, etc.), the competitors themselves srike me as very real, fundamentally human. Lank simians new-cast in nudity on the savannah, running a gazelle to exhaustion.

But then I think about one of these Olympic track stars. A guy like Usain Bolt. His whole life dedicated to the staggeringly impractical ability to run a mere hundred meters faster than any human being has ever crossed by foot that span.

I mean, have you ever really looked at this guy? He belongs in a DC Comic even more than a Greek pantheon. His last name is Bolt, for God’s sake! This is not the little ape on the prairie any more. This is a physique engendered not of hunting and travail and the fear of starvation, but of something more otherworldy: an emanation from the forge of human potentiality.

And I think of what it must mean to him, that race. Nine seconds, you know? Nine point six-nine seconds. His whole life, a growing crescendo to this one measure in which he will either be validated or he will fail. Nine seconds. It’s a mental burden, to be sure. But the pressure of the moment cannot possibly exceed the trials of the body thereto.

This latter I know – in some tentative way – because I have become something of an athlete myself, in no small part thanks to this book. By “athlete” I do not mean that I am particularly gifted, nor even particularly good, but that improving and competing in a particular sport has become a chief purpose in my life. There is work, and there is training. There is little else that matters.

What Joe Friel offers is the structure that makes this possible.

Because training at or near your peak physiological efficiency cannot be done haphazardly. It requires discipline, it requires obsession, and it requires a whole lot of time.

The more one learns about the theory of peak performance – the further, in other words, that one ventures into the mind of Joe Friel – the more aspects of previously quotidian existence which are subsumed into the training structure.

There is periodicity, to start with. What was once a random affair of going to the gym when you could cements its way into the calendar at preordained intervals. Then there is the principle that workouts should vary in duration and intensity (attributes themselves subject to a separate rubric of periodicity) in a certain specific way. This implies those same workouts must be planned far in advance, and carefully.

Then, of course, enters nutrition, and training suddenly becomes not just how one exercises but how one eats. Every meal is scripted by calorie and macronutrient, then micronutrient and glycemic index. Then come the laws of recovery, which govern sleep, posture, bathing, outside recreation. There are fast-twitch and slow-twitch fibers, regulation of glycogen stores, injury prevention, neurological training, sports psychology, cadence regulation, heart rate and power output monitoring; the list, presumably, is infinite.

Soon one’s entire day has pledged fealty to some distant and cruel master, from literally the first seconds that one struggles from slumber and must grab a watch to take a resting heart rate (a good predictor of adaptation to training stresses), to the final collapse into bed as sweet slumber overtakes an exhausted body once more. In between, you must do exactly what Joe Friel tells you.

In short, I cannot conscionably recommend this book to those with a penchant for obsessive compulsions and alpha-male extravagances, unless you are willing to give up your previous ideas of living.

For soon you’ll start looking at a guy like Usain Bolt – and you’ll be realizing that despite everything you do, nothing is enough. Every time you cut a workout 15 minutes short (to get to your desk on time), or run an interval with your heat pumping at one beat per minute too slow (because you got 11 minutes too little sleep the night before), you are falling short of what he is. You’ll realize that even with every free minute allotted to training, the gap between you and a guy like Bolt is far vaster than the gap between you and the average couch potato.

And you just go on struggling, and the starting gun is fired, and there goes Usain out the blocks like some sort of devil or madman, flailing and writhing and then nine seconds is gone. And the impossible is made real in that moment and from where you sit, all those thousands of hours behind those few seconds suddenly attain a significance so clear to you that you could weep. A clarity that is forever denied you, even as your fingers trace the soothing grid lines of your schedule, or Friel’s lactate threshold curves: their numerological tangibility belying the human torment which draws them.

And you just keep on, not daring to hope anymore for that clarity of significance. It doesn’t mean anything any more, nor will it. At some point it just turned into living. You do it because it’s what you do. ...more
3

Jan 05, 2012

This book is advertised as suitable for people of all levels, but it's definitely not meant for novices. It's too technical and comprehensive for the intimidated beginner, and none of the example training plans are suitable for those just starting out. The most helpful information for beginners is tucked away on a few pages in the final chapter. I'll keep this as a reference, but I now need to get a better novice guide.
4

Jul 31, 2011

I don't think that this book will move from my "currently reading" list for a while.

I purchased it shortly after I registered for my first triathlon--the 2011 NYC Triathlon. I didn't crack it until I was on vacation in Jamaica last February, about my fourth rum-based cocktail in, sitting under an umbrella is a nice beach chair. Looking at the insane work out plan that basically says I needed to start training about seven years ago if I want any chance of finishing this race and will immediately I don't think that this book will move from my "currently reading" list for a while.

I purchased it shortly after I registered for my first triathlon--the 2011 NYC Triathlon. I didn't crack it until I was on vacation in Jamaica last February, about my fourth rum-based cocktail in, sitting under an umbrella is a nice beach chair. Looking at the insane work out plan that basically says I needed to start training about seven years ago if I want any chance of finishing this race and will immediately need to start a training program that has me working out 16 hours a week on the "light" side really killed my buzz.

At times his philosophy seems outrageous. And that is the thing about this sport--it is totally possible to become insanely obsessed and there are definitely a certain contingent that are addicted to this sport for that exact reason. But, I have referred to it time and time again as I have trained and realize that he is really right about so many practical things and gives thorough and rounded guidance for how to get through this crazy sport that humans are probably not intended to do.

Bottom line, his book put the fear of God in me that I needed to kick-start my training and get me to a place where I can even think about successfully finishing my race, and it has helped me trouble shoot and problem solve along the way. It definitely can't be the only advice taken throughout the training process, and might be good to take with a grain of salt anyway. But a MUST have for any new triathlete.

[This entire review may be totally null and void after next weekend...] ...more
5

Aug 10, 2018

If you can’t afford a trainer and your goal is to run a triathlon of any distance this will act as your trainer.
0

May 10, 2011

Very comprehensive, recommended to triathletes of all age and ability.
I found the self-assessment tests particularly useful, something I have not met in any other book for triathletes.
5

Oct 11, 2017

An excellent book for anyone interested in endurance sports. The specific focus is on triathletes, but much of the advice and planning in the book can be applied to any endurance sport. This book is extremely comprehensive (as the title suggest). It includes training plans, quizzes about your mental toughness, advice for resting, and everything else you can imagine to help you succeed. Even as a casual/amateur triathlete, I gained a great deal from this book.
5

Mar 10, 2009

I don't have to finish reading this book to say it's the best book out there on triathlons. Might be a bit too complex for a newbie or a recreational athlete, but if you've been in the sport for awhile and want to improve without a coach, this seems to be the book to get. It's not full of boring basic stuff. I've read (or at least skimmed) a couple dozen books on triathlons and this is the first one I'm reading cover to cover. Lots of good info in here on periodization, peaking, creating an I don't have to finish reading this book to say it's the best book out there on triathlons. Might be a bit too complex for a newbie or a recreational athlete, but if you've been in the sport for awhile and want to improve without a coach, this seems to be the book to get. It's not full of boring basic stuff. I've read (or at least skimmed) a couple dozen books on triathlons and this is the first one I'm reading cover to cover. Lots of good info in here on periodization, peaking, creating an annual training plan. I guess that stuff is in other books too, but this really is the training bible. I also love it because there are lots of graphs that demonstrate what Friel's explaining, and there are some worksheet-type pages that help you identify your strengths/weaknesses, create your training plan, etc. I wish I'd bought it before my first half ironman.

---
This book is awesome. ...more
5

Mar 19, 2017

Just as Walt Whitman kept writing and rewriting Leaves of Grass year after year, so does Friel continuously ponder, tinker, and rethink each bit and piece of his advice. Sure, Transcendentalism may have helped a few dudes intuit their way through the world, but triathlon helps them swim, bike, and run their way through it. This new fourth edition contains all the building blocks of the previous three with some added twists; six sections deal with the various aspects of the sport and are labeled Just as Walt Whitman kept writing and rewriting Leaves of Grass year after year, so does Friel continuously ponder, tinker, and rethink each bit and piece of his advice. Sure, Transcendentalism may have helped a few dudes intuit their way through the world, but triathlon helps them swim, bike, and run their way through it. This new fourth edition contains all the building blocks of the previous three with some added twists; six sections deal with the various aspects of the sport and are labeled broadly (e.g., “Mind and Body,” “Training Fundamentals,” etc.). Throughout each section, Friel drills into specifics about the “how-to” amid the “why.” “Purposeful Training” will, for example, change “going for a run” into teaching your body to run faster. Similarly, “Stress, Rest, and Recovery” clearly explains the difference between “overreaching,” a careful balance of training stress and focused rest, and “overtraining,” a serious condition with symptoms that mirror Lyme disease or mono. New material is incorporated seamlessly and is focused on individualization of training. In the “Muscular Force” chapter, for example, readers learn that the sport isn’t all heart and lungs but muscle, too; it provides exercises, explanations, and illustrations of particularly helpful ones. The end of the book contains several appendixes to help athletes of all levels create workable training plans with periodization (cycles of increasingly intense drills broken up with rest) and various kinds of workouts to develop all-around skill and fitness in each of the sports’ three disciplines. Thus, you’re not just “going swimming,” you’re swimming in any of six various modes in order to get your body to swim faster overall. VERDICT Essential. In fact, it was Whitman who wrote, “Every man has to believe in something. I believe I will go swimming.”

Find reviews of books for men at Books for Dudes, Books for Dudes, the online reader's advisory column for men from Library Journal. Copyright Library Journal. ...more
5

Aug 03, 2019

Great book, will make sure to come back to it for specific workouts and for creating the training calendar for the next season.
5

Nov 26, 2010

Provides the background behind his training philosophy, and details on building your own training plan.

The problem with the topic (which becomes evident with the book) is that there are so many options to choose from, depending on the athletes current fitness, future goals (Sprint vs Ironman), and key limiters. This book covers it all, which can make it difficult creating your own complete plan. For Ironman training, consider pairing this book with Going Long, which is written by an associate Provides the background behind his training philosophy, and details on building your own training plan.

The problem with the topic (which becomes evident with the book) is that there are so many options to choose from, depending on the athletes current fitness, future goals (Sprint vs Ironman), and key limiters. This book covers it all, which can make it difficult creating your own complete plan. For Ironman training, consider pairing this book with Going Long, which is written by an associate and edited by Joe.

This book requires the athlete has some background in triathlon already, as part of building a plan is to identify your current limiters, which would be difficult/impossible for a newbie. You will also find yourself re-reading the book, because as you gain experience in triathlon, you will get new insights into the content of the book. ...more
4

Mar 25, 2012

Goes deep into the nitty-gritty of training and designing a comprehensive schedule. A little bit difficult to use: I think I'd get the most out by sitting down with it and working up a full yearly plan, but that would be difficult without a previous read-through. So it's a read once, then refer to, kind of book. On the weak side, Friel relies too heavily on anecdotes over structured study (although he does not exclued the latter.) He's also too big on the paleo diet: many of the bottom-line Goes deep into the nitty-gritty of training and designing a comprehensive schedule. A little bit difficult to use: I think I'd get the most out by sitting down with it and working up a full yearly plan, but that would be difficult without a previous read-through. So it's a read once, then refer to, kind of book. On the weak side, Friel relies too heavily on anecdotes over structured study (although he does not exclued the latter.) He's also too big on the paleo diet: many of the bottom-line recommendations are reasonable, but there's something ludicrous about saying our bodies can't adapt to a diet different from a million years ago, yet can happily hop on a bicycle. The big advantage over other training books is a real understanding of the balance between strength, endurance, and skills work. Too many plans emphasize hours of effort rather than developing form and targeting weak points. On the whole, this is a great recommendation for the multi-sport athlete and an excellent resource for single-sport athletes, particularly those interested in cross-training. ...more
5

Mar 25, 2016

Now in its third edition, you get the TTB when you’ve gotten serious about triathlon but before you go full-bore bug-eatin’ crazy for it. It can help you train for any distance and is most useful to newbies and self-trained athletes who want ‘traditional’ training advice (e.g., increased training volume, race-specific workouts). Friel introduces readers to the science of training and performance enhancement, the concept of training periodization, fitness assessment, and race-specific fitness Now in its third edition, you get the TTB when you’ve gotten serious about triathlon but before you go full-bore bug-eatin’ crazy for it. It can help you train for any distance and is most useful to newbies and self-trained athletes who want ‘traditional’ training advice (e.g., increased training volume, race-specific workouts). Friel introduces readers to the science of training and performance enhancement, the concept of training periodization, fitness assessment, and race-specific fitness testing. Content will help you identify factors that limit gains and provide a lot of swim-bike-run technique advice as well as material on heart-rate zone training, and racing economically. The diet section encourages athletes to see it as fuel and not a daily all-you-can-eat smorgasbord. Friel knows that triathletes are characterized by a strong work ethic and often refuse to back off, so he hammers home the importance of recovery “Your body has limits when it comes to endurance, strength and speed…” he writes, going on to give excellent advice on when to stay within those limits and when to push beyond them. The books caps off with swimming, biking, running, and brick (one activity immediately following another) workouts. ...more
2

Sep 17, 2017

The better use of one's time would be to go for an extra Brick session. "Bible" also accurately describes the relevance of the book in the 21st century.
5

May 02, 2018

Great book

Slightly long , but has all the information needed to start ordered and structured training. Serves as a great intro material.
5

Jan 02, 2019

Hugely helpful guide to training at competitive level for triathlon. Lapped up every page!
5

Feb 28, 2019

Invaluable guide to triathlon training from the expert coach. If you want to compete in a triathlon, buy this book!
5

Jan 02, 2020

Even as a runner, not a triathlete, I've learned a lot of things and it's definitely worth reading.
5

Jun 19, 2018

Great tips and advices

You have to take advantage of more than 30 years of coaching experience. It’s good to know that you are not alone when it comes to training and having a “normal” life, you can find tips on how to manage your life and your training.
4

Jul 23, 2019

This book is absolutely jam-packed full of useful information. It was a little more advanced than what I needed as a very beginner triathlete, but it's one that I could come back to again and again if I want to pursue training and racing more seriously in the future.
5

Jan 04, 2020

Provides knowledge to effectively create your own training plan. Introduces key training concepts and techniques that are well-researched and have been effective for elite athletes for years.

More useful for experienced triathletes that require more specific training regimens (vs. novices that will see improvements as long as they are consistently training).
3

Oct 27, 2019

Good read but with some dated examples as the version I read is quite old (1998). For example, the cycling computer is touted as something "new" that not everyone might have.... whereas anyone today likely has 2 or 3 computers between their handlebar-mounted cellphone, gps watch, and heartrate monitors.

Some of the training methods are still applicable and it's a good intro read. However the serious competitor (which I am not) probably needs something more up to date.
4

Oct 26, 2019

The book would be better off without the author's self-promoting and advertisement of his co-founded service TrainingPeaks.

But it's a good read, and I learned a lot of vocabulary and methods through it. It felt like it was intended for me, starting my 4th year in the sport, but due to recurring injuries (which pushed me to buy the book), I'm better not considering myself as the intended target, and take things a bit slower than suggested.
I will keep it close by throughout my journey in the The book would be better off without the author's self-promoting and advertisement of his co-founded service TrainingPeaks.

But it's a good read, and I learned a lot of vocabulary and methods through it. It felt like it was intended for me, starting my 4th year in the sport, but due to recurring injuries (which pushed me to buy the book), I'm better not considering myself as the intended target, and take things a bit slower than suggested.
I will keep it close by throughout my journey in the sport. ...more
5

Jan 30, 2019

Very very very necessary.

The only thing that makes this tough to get through is that this is not your personal coach. It is a book of coaching. So the book will speak to a spectrum of people and takes a lot of weeding out the most appropriate recipe for success on an individual basis.

Also if someone is dedicated to a sport to read a book on it's most intricate skills, you're likely already overambitious by nature. It's important to be clear with yourself at which level you are starting and Very very very necessary.

The only thing that makes this tough to get through is that this is not your personal coach. It is a book of coaching. So the book will speak to a spectrum of people and takes a lot of weeding out the most appropriate recipe for success on an individual basis.

Also if someone is dedicated to a sport to read a book on it's most intricate skills, you're likely already overambitious by nature. It's important to be clear with yourself at which level you are starting and build from there.

But I'm super pumped to start the new year with this guide. ...more
5

Nov 07, 2017

I finally understand Joe Friel! I had tried to get serious with triathlon with a previous edition of the training bible, but it went way over my head. Now with a few more seasons under my belt and especially having followed a simple plan last season, the contents of this book really clicked. I love that he starts with the mental side and systematically dissects all parts of training. A fully scientific way to go about training. Love it! I got a coach this season and this book really helped bring I finally understand Joe Friel! I had tried to get serious with triathlon with a previous edition of the training bible, but it went way over my head. Now with a few more seasons under my belt and especially having followed a simple plan last season, the contents of this book really clicked. I love that he starts with the mental side and systematically dissects all parts of training. A fully scientific way to go about training. Love it! I got a coach this season and this book really helped bring me up to speed and advance my training program with him. ...more
4

Aug 01, 2019

Rereading in the new edition after a long gap.

This is - still - the Bible. Essential for anyone serious about training for triathlon, although not perhaps the best for a complete beginner in endurance sports. It looks like the current edition has undergone a complete rewrite (as opposed to earlier revisions which underwent tweaks and edits between versions).

As with many of his fellow writers in the field (looking at you Matt Fitzgerald…), Friel is pushing his own agenda here a little. Some of Rereading in the new edition after a long gap.

This is - still - the Bible. Essential for anyone serious about training for triathlon, although not perhaps the best for a complete beginner in endurance sports. It looks like the current edition has undergone a complete rewrite (as opposed to earlier revisions which underwent tweaks and edits between versions).

As with many of his fellow writers in the field (looking at you Matt Fitzgerald…), Friel is pushing his own agenda here a little. Some of his nutrition recommendations are a little left-field but tie into a book his written about the paleo diet for athletes. Overall though he has a scientific approach to training and is unafraid to put his hands up and alter his views on the correct way of doing something when the science proves him wrong. ...more

Best Books from your Favorite Authors & Publishers

compare-icon compare-icon
Thousands of books

Take your time and choose the perfect book.

review-icon review-icon
Read Reviews

Read ratings and reviews to make sure you are on the right path.

vendor-icon vendor-icon
Multiple Stores

Check price from multiple stores for a better shopping experience.

gift-icon

Enjoy Result