The Soul's Code: In Search of Character and Calling Info

Check out books about Hinduism, Judaism, Christianity and get your questions answered fast. Take a look at hundreds of reviews and ratings for each book related to Religion & Spirituality. Want to see what people say about James Hillman and find the best shops to download The Soul's Code: In Search of Character and Calling? This is the right place to be. Read&Download The Soul's Code: In Search of Character and Calling by James Hillman Online


Average Ratings and Reviews
review-bg

4.10

3100 Ratings

5

4

3

2

1


Ratings and Reviews From Market


client-img 4.2
112
19
19
7
14
client-img 3.99
1197
1144
376
3
0

Reviews for The Soul's Code: In Search of Character and Calling:

4

Jan 17, 2012

I was going to contact Dr. James Hillman and thank him for his wonderful book, and found that he died this past summer. I wish I would have read this book 20 years ago. It echoes many sentiments I have felt about my psychotherapy clients, the ones who were labeled "crazy" when they were simply following their soul's calling. Hillman draws on Jungian archetypal therapy to explain what he calls the acorn theory. We all have an acorn that demands to become an oak, regardless of convention. When I was going to contact Dr. James Hillman and thank him for his wonderful book, and found that he died this past summer. I wish I would have read this book 20 years ago. It echoes many sentiments I have felt about my psychotherapy clients, the ones who were labeled "crazy" when they were simply following their soul's calling. Hillman draws on Jungian archetypal therapy to explain what he calls the acorn theory. We all have an acorn that demands to become an oak, regardless of convention. When that acorn does not fit societal norms or parental expectations, we are given a psychiatric label, called obstinate or resistant, or medicated to bring us back into line.

Hillman shares many fascinating stories about famous people who refused to be put in a box. Violinist Yehudi Menuhin wanted a violin for his fourth birthday, and was given a toy violin. Menuhin states, "I burst into sobs, threw it on the ground and would have nothing more to do with it." Hillman explains, "The daimon (acorn, soul's calling) does not want to be treated as a child; it is not a child." Indeed, it is our inner wisdom, the drive to wholeness, which is routinely dismissed in our society.

I remember a case I had in which the identified patient began literally screaming, and the family wanted her hospitalized. She was simply screaming to be heard, and the family did not want to hear what she had to say. In fact, she was calling out the family dysfunction, so it was easier for the family to label her crazy than to listen to what she was saying.

In my own case, several therapists called me dysfunctional, when I was simply following my soul's calling. I knew deep down that I did not fit the categories they were putting me in, but also knew they did not have a clue about the depth of the drive I felt. I tried to supress this drive for 20 years and it would not let me go. Reading this book made me realize I'm not obsessed, fixated, codependent, or any other of the psychiatric labels traditional psychiatry would pin on me. Now that I have stopped judging myself, I feel whole. I honor my soul's quest rather than running from it.

We all have something we dream of doing, but few of us follow our dreams. Hillman's book reminds us that we will never be happy until we pay attention to our inner urgings. One of my favorite quotes is "Don't die with your dreams inside you." I believe it's from Wayne Dyer. ...more
5

Jun 01, 2012

This is the book that I love giving away to my friends because I believe everybody should read it (I gave so many and still dont have my own copy). Contary to Western culture that believe we are product of genes/family or Eastern culture that says we are pre-destined by Karma, Hillman somehow combines them into one and thinks we are born with certain purpose and will achieve what we are meant to do in life one way or another - every individual holds a potential inside himself just like acorn This is the book that I love giving away to my friends because I believe everybody should read it (I gave so many and still dont have my own copy). Contary to Western culture that believe we are product of genes/family or Eastern culture that says we are pre-destined by Karma, Hillman somehow combines them into one and thinks we are born with certain purpose and will achieve what we are meant to do in life one way or another - every individual holds a potential inside himself just like acorn holds a pattern for a Oak, invisible in itself - but the most important thing is to listen your inner voice (in other times people used to call it "Guardian Angel", Hillman simply calls it "inner voice"). Reading this book I was thrilled because for the first time I found in one place everything I always knew but didn't know how to put in words.

For example, Hillman talks about clever kids who never fit in schools because they don't blossom in big groups. Or about why is it that parents/family never recognize potential in a kid because they are too occupied with everyday life (its usually some distant relatives or kind neighbors or teacher who see who we really are). He also talks about importance of getting away from family and spreading the wings somewhere else...too many things to mention here but I can only recommend this book with all my heart to everyone and its definitely one of the books that changed my life. ...more
3

Jun 06, 2013

This was my second time reading the book (the first was probably when it first came out, some 15 years ago). As always, Hillman (whom I knew quite well) is contrarian and pungently critical of conventional psychotherapy and psychology. Hillman is in search of something more archaic and anarchica deeper, mythopoetic, and uncanny sense of calling and character that propels and compels us into and along our life's journey. Hillman's wide readingespecially from ancient Greek and Roman sources and This was my second time reading the book (the first was probably when it first came out, some 15 years ago). As always, Hillman (whom I knew quite well) is contrarian and pungently critical of conventional psychotherapy and psychology. Hillman is in search of something more archaic and anarchic—a deeper, mythopoetic, and uncanny sense of calling and character that propels and compels us into and along our life's journey. Hillman's wide reading—especially from ancient Greek and Roman sources and the various literatures of the world—makes THE SOUL'S CODE infinitely suggestive and sinewy even if the theory isn't quite convincing. In fact, the coda on methodology at the end of the book is essential to the reading of the book: it acts as a kind of apologia to some of the far-fetchedness of his theorizing. That this segment is a coda at all hints at a slight lack of confidence on the part of the book's author (or perhaps the editor) about the theory's relevance or universality. Hillman's interpretation of the biographies of the famous and infamous, while entertaining, only reinforces a certain randomness to his theory. Why these biographies and not others? In the end, THE SOUL'S CODE is best read for its motifs and expressions of aesthetic and imaginal mysteries—and as a corrective to reductionist psychology—rather than any kind of in-depth examination of character. ...more
5

Feb 10, 2013

A friend of ours...
dear Unique Individuals,
... was taking a psychology class at Sonoma State University in which one of Hillman's books was required reading. When the day for discussion of the book arrived one of the students jumped up, ripped pages from his book, threw the book to the floor and stomped on it in frustration, hysterically crying out, "No one should be allowed to write like this". Needless to say, that made us somewhat hesitant when we began reading this book, however, what we A friend of ours...
dear Unique Individuals,
... was taking a psychology class at Sonoma State University in which one of Hillman's books was required reading. When the day for discussion of the book arrived one of the students jumped up, ripped pages from his book, threw the book to the floor and stomped on it in frustration, hysterically crying out, "No one should be allowed to write like this". Needless to say, that made us somewhat hesitant when we began reading this book, however, what we found instead was one of the best written, best argued books we've ever encountered. It is a truly brilliant book, and if you are interested in understanding the development of character and the significance of the personal myth, we know of no better place to begin.
kyela,
the silver elves
Goodreads author of Living the Personal Myth: Making the Magic of Faerie Real in One's Own Life ...more
2

Feb 10, 2011

I give this sloppily written book two stars instead of one because I think Hillman's central idea is important. Many a physician and pharmacist would be wise to at least entertain this notion that there is more life than our luck-of-the-draw genes and environment. Perhaps we are who we are for some kind of reason, and we might even have souls or callings or daimons. Unfortunately, reading Hillman's book won't make said healthcare professionals perceive these ideas as any less wishy-washy. He I give this sloppily written book two stars instead of one because I think Hillman's central idea is important. Many a physician and pharmacist would be wise to at least entertain this notion that there is more life than our luck-of-the-draw genes and environment. Perhaps we are who we are for some kind of reason, and we might even have souls or callings or daimons. Unfortunately, reading Hillman's book won't make said healthcare professionals perceive these ideas as any less wishy-washy. He overstates his argument, often implying that genes and environment have no relevance at all to the field of psychotherapy, and he offers only anecdotal evidence randomly drawn from the lives of celebrities. A short philosophical essay that doesn't masquerade as scientific would be a more suitable home for this idea. ...more
1

Jul 08, 2009

I've tried valiantly to get into this book, but just haven't. I don't know if I ever will. Fascinated as I am about psychology, I can't help but want Hillman to get to the point already. His thesis about a daimon guiding our lives and leading us to our best destiny works well in hindsight and for explaining the lives of famous people (Josephine Baker, Judy Garland, Henry Ford) but as far as I've read, Hillman gives little insight into how lesser mortals can listen better to their own daimon and I've tried valiantly to get into this book, but just haven't. I don't know if I ever will. Fascinated as I am about psychology, I can't help but want Hillman to get to the point already. His thesis about a daimon guiding our lives and leading us to our best destiny works well in hindsight and for explaining the lives of famous people (Josephine Baker, Judy Garland, Henry Ford) but as far as I've read, Hillman gives little insight into how lesser mortals can listen better to their own daimon and heed their inner voices. Perhaps in order to get a better sense of Jungian theory, I should read Jung. ...more
1

Sep 26, 2014

James Hillman's The Soul's Code was the first book I read while actively disliking. In fact I disliked most of the book. His work was sloppy and disorganized and his attitude pretentious. The narrative assumed the doubtless truth of his "Acorn theory" which, is a convoluted presentation of fate guiding us into a particular destiny. He set out an entire chapter which claims to explain how this is not the same as fate and wandered off in the middle of his arguments, failing to distinguish at a James Hillman's The Soul's Code was the first book I read while actively disliking. In fact I disliked most of the book. His work was sloppy and disorganized and his attitude pretentious. The narrative assumed the doubtless truth of his "Acorn theory" which, is a convoluted presentation of fate guiding us into a particular destiny. He set out an entire chapter which claims to explain how this is not the same as fate and wandered off in the middle of his arguments, failing to distinguish at a basic level how an "acorn" was not simply something someone was destined to do (what he calls fatalism).

In fact there were innumerable times while I was reading this that I thought of trivial counterexamples to situations which he claims are only explainable by the acorn theory. This was a hard read to get through because of that mental noise constantly created by fighting his rude oversimplifications of scientific principles.

I did find some redeeming qualities about this book, his occasional breakthrough poetic statements were utterly beautiful and I found his respect for the mysteries of life and the universe not only fascinating but admirable. However,to put it simply the acorn theory is the most convoluted and byzantine example of post hoc ergo propter hoc I have ever seen.

I would not recommend this book to anyone.

Cheers,

John NB Pienta. ...more
5

Aug 26, 2013

James Hillman offers observations on the human experience and the nature of the mind that stands outside of the mainstream of American psychology, refreshingly so, with its current emphasis upon reducing all our experience to biological processes, whether it be sociobiology, neuropsychology, cognitive-behavioral, or applied behavior analysis. All these orientations are based upon an unquestioned epistomological assumption that the material reality is the only reality, since it is what science James Hillman offers observations on the human experience and the nature of the mind that stands outside of the mainstream of American psychology, refreshingly so, with its current emphasis upon reducing all our experience to biological processes, whether it be sociobiology, neuropsychology, cognitive-behavioral, or applied behavior analysis. All these orientations are based upon an unquestioned epistomological assumption that the material reality is the only reality, since it is what science has focused upon with its obsession on measurement and predictability. What Hillman's work asserts, aligning itself with the anthropomorphic cosmological orientation of the ancient Greeks (and really most of our so-called indigenous peoples), is that to fully understand the nature of our human experience, we have to return to the concept of soul. To unquestioningly accept the idea that we exist only on a "horizontal" dimension of material extension and eventual personal finality, is to live utterly blind to what gives our lives meaning, the "vertical" dimension of the soul. Our culture has so lost its way that we are only allowed an occasional glimpse of the soul dimension, which we inhabit every bit as much as the material dimension. It often comes to us as "symptoms", or "struggles" where things just aren't working the way they're "supposed" to work. We then go to a psychologist or psychiatrist, to "get better." What Hillman is trying to bring back into our cultural experience is that we not only inhabit a soul dimension, whether we are aware of it or not, but it is often only when we confront our "struggles" and "symptoms" that we begin to catch a glimpse of who we really are, what we are called to be. As we grapple with our own immediate experience, we begin to become aware of and oriented within a world that is full of unimagined depth and meaning. It is the world we long to find ourselves within and which we project outward and seek out somewhere else or in some other time. Of course, it is our fundamental nature and we inhabit it all the time, but it is not until it becomes an object of our conscious experience that understanding begins to grow. And this happens only in the context of relationship with the inhabitants of this soul dimension, which includes not just other human beings, but the Gods, which Hillman refers to as the archetypes. Once awareness of the soul dimension is born, we become aware that it is actually the Gods that are intruding into our lives and causing us these pesky "symptoms" and "struggles." We become aware that we actually inhabit a world of divinities, the manifestations of the soul dimension, that are calling us to become conscious of our relationship with them. The task of archetypal psychology is to assist as we grow into this deeper awareness that is really our birthright and destiny to discover. Read Hillman and recognize who we really are. ...more
5

Feb 24, 2008

The Soul's Code is one of the best books I've read in a long time. Using Plato's Myth of Er as a backdrop, Hillman skillfully applies Platonic reasoning to the problem of purpose and destiny. Rather than approaching destiny as a secondary concern of the human pursuit, Hillman elevates it to a place of unequaled parallel.

Hillman's ideas are personified in what he calls the acorn theory. The basic tenet of this theory "holds that each person bears a uniqueness that asks to be lived and that is The Soul's Code is one of the best books I've read in a long time. Using Plato's Myth of Er as a backdrop, Hillman skillfully applies Platonic reasoning to the problem of purpose and destiny. Rather than approaching destiny as a secondary concern of the human pursuit, Hillman elevates it to a place of unequaled parallel.

Hillman's ideas are personified in what he calls the acorn theory. The basic tenet of this theory "…holds that each person bears a uniqueness that asks to be lived and that is already present before it can be lived." [6] To illustrate this theory in action, Hillman uses many examples of exceptional people whose lives and actions, early in their development, clearly demonstrate a sense of purpose and calling that extends beyond the mundane. He uses extraordinary people and events to "reveal the ordinary in an enlarged and intensified image." [31]

In essence, Hillman hypothesizes that each individual is born into the world with a daimon or destiny, a guardian angel (concepts that Hillman uses interchangeably to denote the same thing) that seeks to order our lives to some predetermined end. Similar to Plato's Myth of Er, Hillman proposes that we each choose this path before birth and that we choose our parents and the station in life that will best suit this innate potential. Its something that is wired into the code of our soul. Life's fulfillment is found only in satisfying the mandate of this mission.

This view creates a very unique way of looking at life: our childhood, compulsions, choices, etc. Similar to Kierkegaard's theory that life can only be understood backwards, Hillman takes the reader through example after example of extraordinary people who endured extraordinary things in life, yet these things prepared them and ultimately provided for what was clearly seen as their destiny once their life was over.

I heartily recommend this book to anyone who is searching for meaning in life. While some of Hillman's proposals appear outlandish at first glance, he does an excellent job of creating an alternative view of life and how we experience it.

...more
5

Feb 11, 2015

This book challenged the part of me that is partial to existential philosophy. In this book James Hillman presents his acorn theory of human development. Other terms for the acorn are image, character, fate, calling, daimon, soul, or destiny. Everyone is born with a defining image we embody our soul. This is not to be confused with fatalism. He is not undermining free will. Or is he? He skirts around the issue as only a genius psychologist could. to focus on free will is to miss his point.

The This book challenged the part of me that is partial to existential philosophy. In this book James Hillman presents his acorn theory of human development. Other terms for the acorn are image, character, fate, calling, daimon, soul, or destiny. Everyone is born with a defining image— we embody our soul. This is not to be confused with fatalism. He is not undermining free will. Or is he? He skirts around the issue as only a genius psychologist could…. to focus on free will is to miss his point.

The book presents his rich scholarship, thick with opinion. If Hillman mentions Ella Fitzgerald, however briefly, you will probably find one or two Ella Fitzgerald biographies mentioned in the notes. And he is critical. Critical of psychology, critical of modern western culture. I found his opinions thought provoking and profound.

The chapter on parental fallacy to be particularly poignant to me. With the parental fallacy our parents are seen as crucial in determining who we are by supplying us with our genes, conditioning, and behavioral patterns. Placing extreme importance of parenting leads to over-parenting, and the value overall environment and culture are deemphasized. It also allows us to blame our deficiencies on bad parenting. He concludes that this fallacy is harmful to self-awareness. I am not doing justice to these concepts, but that’s it in a nutshell (haha). The oak tree the produces the acorn has only so great an influence on the tree that grows from the acorn. There are many other factors. ...more
4

Jan 23, 2017

Once, I don't remember where, when I travelled a lot, I met a friendly stranger at a bar, and in the course of our innocuous conversation he mentioned that he has always tried to believe-- particularly when he felt powerless or overly-stressed-- that before his birth, he had deliberately chosen this time period to exist in. I've never remembered that guy's name, but I've never forgotten about his fascinating belief. It may sound impossible to you, but I promise you that, when life is trying, it Once, I don't remember where, when I travelled a lot, I met a friendly stranger at a bar, and in the course of our innocuous conversation he mentioned that he has always tried to believe-- particularly when he felt powerless or overly-stressed-- that before his birth, he had deliberately chosen this time period to exist in. I've never remembered that guy's name, but I've never forgotten about his fascinating belief. It may sound impossible to you, but I promise you that, when life is trying, it is well worth the effort of temporarily trying on that belief, and discovering what an earnest exploration of its consequences can do to your perspective.

There are some parts of this book that may threaten your basic assumptions about what is "obvious" or simply strain your credulity, but if you tough up stay with it, these are always followed by original-- and surprisingly lucid-- insights. ...more
4

Jan 11, 2011

Hillman's acorn theory, exposed in this book, is a rejuvenation of Heraclitus' dictum "ethos anthropoi daimon" (normally rendered into "Character is fate") and its later embodiments, such as Plato's myth of the daimon calling for a body to incarnate after passing through the hands of the Fates and Necessity, Plotinus' postillae and commentaries, Romans' "homo faber fortunae suae", Ficino's ideas on souls, and so on and on. The echo of the oraculus of Apollo ("know yourself") lives on and Hillman's acorn theory, exposed in this book, is a rejuvenation of Heraclitus' dictum "ethos anthropoi daimon" (normally rendered into "Character is fate") and its later embodiments, such as Plato's myth of the daimon calling for a body to incarnate after passing through the hands of the Fates and Necessity, Plotinus' postillae and commentaries, Romans' "homo faber fortunae suae", Ficino's ideas on souls, and so on and on. The echo of the oraculus of Apollo ("know yourself") lives on and inspires again the sensible reader of this famous work by the founder of the Archetypal psychology (as a follower of C. G. Jung).
Hillman indeed goes back to the myths as self-contained (bootstrapped) explanation of aspects of reality, and calls to re-install the right place and importance of the invisibles in human life after the rough blinding (that is, overflowing its original context) due to the Enlightment. So the book carries an atmosphere of fable and romanticism as it tells of genius, daimon, soul, angel and other wordly names of that acorn that may reside at the core of each person's life, thereby containing all further blossomings in a nutshell. Happyness as eudaimonia (assolving the requests of the daimon), fate and necessity, accidents to help the daimon express its power to give direction and an impelling sense of urgence and importance though without exceeding into the extremist position of fatalism and consequent de-responsabilization.
Hillman criticizes the current psychology's exclusive accent on "parental fallacy", genetical and environmental factors as all-inclusive explanations for children's future and achievements, and offers the daimon as a third way, besides nature and nurture, to explain the proper and unquestionably irreproducible development of the individual lives.
Hillman produces a large number of pieces of eminent biographies (and also discusses the often observed repulsion of relevant characters to encapsule their lives into biographies) to support his claims, considering the extraordinary as general case containing the ordinary as special. His style is soft and eloquent throughout, well spoken and passionate at times, devoid of technicisms but rich in images and facts.
Overall, this essay can be very stimulating in its provocative (yet old) claim, as it is provocative in calling for a return to older positions re-invented in hindsight and sub specie aeternitatis.
...more
4

May 25, 2018

I found this book quite refreshing, and amusing. I may not agree with it completely. The concept is not new, tough, they have in India, in some 'philosophies' the idea of 'svadharma', which translates into this book, the 'acorn theory'.

The author gives famous examples, which becomes a bit tedious, and brings out the question what about everyone else?And he answers this question later, almost in the end. Frankly, this part could have been in the beginning, and then he could give the more extreme I found this book quite refreshing, and amusing. I may not agree with it completely. The concept is not new, tough, they have in India, in some 'philosophies' the idea of 'svadharma', which translates into this book, the 'acorn theory'.

The author gives famous examples, which becomes a bit tedious, and brings out the question what about everyone else?And he answers this question later, almost in the end. Frankly, this part could have been in the beginning, and then he could give the more extreme examples to make his pint.
Also, I did not get the insisting of the relationship between the pupil and mentor being erotic. I his examples he mentions Truman Capote and his teacher, and older woman. We know Capote was gay, so where's the eroticism in that? The author sees very clearly the hidden meanings in mythologies etc, but why then does the Freudian sexualization?

The whole ephemeral way of expression was the amusing part. I imagined myself in a stuffy, private library, with old big armchairs, and this old man rambling on with interesting anecdotes.What is really good about this book is that it gives another perspective to the 'victim' mode. It makes on more of an actor in a play.
I had to add that the author writes that some things are true about love- that women fall for a man with a luxury car, or something like this, but I haven't yet met a woman who would have chosen a guy because of his car! Maybe this is just car industry propaganda, ha ha? ...more
5

Jun 21, 2010

I don't agree with everything he says, but I was fascinated by the idea of the current you and the eternal you. Give ya hope, if current you is kind of a nerdhole.
5

Aug 24, 2017

Follow your spirit guide's gut, and keep your children safe from do-gooders who think your child should be medicated.
3

Apr 15, 2018

This was tantalizing, frustrating, confusing, but never dull. Frankly, I don't know how to rate it because it would be like rating a conversation you had with a very interesting person that left you a bit confused and excited. I have a feeling my regard for this book will grow with time and a few months of reflection. I should probably read up on my Plotinus.

I read this book on the recommendation of a psych professor I know. It is also important to note that I am not trained in psychology, This was tantalizing, frustrating, confusing, but never dull. Frankly, I don't know how to rate it because it would be like rating a conversation you had with a very interesting person that left you a bit confused and excited. I have a feeling my regard for this book will grow with time and a few months of reflection. I should probably read up on my Plotinus.

I read this book on the recommendation of a psych professor I know. It is also important to note that I am not trained in psychology, though I have done a smattering of readings of Jung, Freud, Lacan, and some others in the course of my armchair philosophical endeavors. ...more
2

Nov 22, 2012

Interesting concept, but I could barely start the book, let alone try to finish it. The style and content was completely ethereal. I mean that in several connotations. First, the book is so spiritual/philosophical in nature that it loses all possibility of practical application. Secondly, there seems to be no real substance. Lots of words, but little content. Nothing to indicate how to use this theory or any suggestions on how to be proactive in one's life.
2

Feb 01, 2020

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Just not my cup of tea, I suppose. He has some wonderful insights and I am given to understand he was a brilliant guy. I agree that psychology pathologizes way too much. I suppose I am not much of a Jungian, I don't believe that just because a spiritual or religious perspective is older (or newer, for that matter) it is automatically better, and I don't believe that we choose to be born and live a tragic existence because our souls have a lesson to learn that requires us to be beaten to death as Just not my cup of tea, I suppose. He has some wonderful insights and I am given to understand he was a brilliant guy. I agree that psychology pathologizes way too much. I suppose I am not much of a Jungian, I don't believe that just because a spiritual or religious perspective is older (or newer, for that matter) it is automatically better, and I don't believe that we choose to be born and live a tragic existence because our souls have a lesson to learn that requires us to be beaten to death as a child or die in the Rawandan genocide. I do believe there are people who simply cannot tolerate an existence in which they can't explain bad things away, and James Hillman was one of them. ...more
0

Feb 01, 2019

very much like the idea that there is a something between and around nature and nurture. Yes. That's me! for you, it's you.

lots of examples in this book - little narratives of famous people's lives and their daemons
5

Mar 14, 2019

A wealth of information on 'acorn theory'.
Will definitely be re-reading this one.
5

Aug 29, 2018

With the many voices speaking about 'purpose' & "jumping in" regarding living your best life, James Hillman surmised that there are those who are achieving their destinies from a place of 'predestination,' a passion ingrained in them or their personality/deeper self. Hillman mentions many celebrities (etc.) that have always known (on a deeper level) what they wanted (not insinuating they didn't have to work or apply themselves), yet none - to not many - had thought about it possibly being a With the many voices speaking about 'purpose' & "jumping in" regarding living your best life, James Hillman surmised that there are those who are achieving their destinies from a place of 'predestination,' a passion ingrained in them or their personality/deeper self. Hillman mentions many celebrities (etc.) that have always known (on a deeper level) what they wanted (not insinuating they didn't have to work or apply themselves), yet none - to not many - had thought about it possibly being a 'phenom' or perhaps an 'internal' higher code - an example of living 'true' self manifestly or a little more umph - in going for dreams without giving into the 'ego' (our sternest critic) or fears.

I read it awhile ago, it was one of 'Oprah's Book Club' reads, yet I've never forgotten Mr. Hillman (maybe his name, which I mangled/changed to Joseph Hillerman) or his premise & often wonder if I could have been Perry Mason, acting on the stage, while writing lyrics for any who would sing them! I took Acoustic Guitar in my early thirties, I reinvent myself when life &/or people upset my plans (or livelihood) because 'The Soul's Code' encouraged me to see Life, Myself & all 'I' can be are achieve: in search of my calling, as for my 'character' well it's an acquired taste & I do give fair warning, that I'm good with that & it.

Where the truth lays here for the Aretha's, Einstein's, McCain's, Oprah's & Maya's of the world - born glowing with a burning calling or inner determination & no matter/manner the obstacle, they would achieve & those of us who think

"Why not me," I say - using - the words of the awesome Marianne Williamson:

"We are born to manifest the glory within us. It's not just in some; it is in everyone. As we let our light shine, we unconsciously give others the permission to do the same. And as we are liberated from our fears our presence automatically liberated others."

So let your light shine & your 'Soul's Code' lead the way! ...more
4

Sep 22, 2017

The acorn pushes beyond the edge; its principal passion is realization. The calling demands untrammeled freedom of pursuit, a freedom life on arrival, and this freedom cannot be guaranteed by society. 273

Hillman does not give it to you easily, but once you make it to the end the journey seems well worth it. One of those books that you read, and only after putting it down you realize how much impact it actually had on you. The message is powerful:

You cannot blame your parents.

You cannot blame “The acorn pushes beyond the edge; its principal passion is realization. The calling demands untrammeled freedom of pursuit, a freedom “life on arrival,” and this freedom cannot be guaranteed by society.” 273

Hillman does not give it to you easily, but once you make it to the end the journey seems well worth it. One of those books that you read, and only after putting it down you realize how much impact it actually had on you. The message is powerful:

You cannot blame your parents.

You cannot blame your environment.

Because you chose it.

You chose it so you could become whatever you needed to become.

The acorn theory is potent goods and not everyone is willing to swallow it. The direction is approximately 180 degrees away from any tabula rasa argument, and there is absolutely no possibility for any kind of scientific verification, so it is up to you whether you take it or leave it. A leap and a half from any standard psychology book, but Hillman will never fail you when it comes to providing one with depth.

I agree the book could have been easier written, and many of the examples especially in the middle of the book seemed unnecessarily detailed. Yet when it comes to a theory that cannot be proven the only way to seek reassurance for it is through stories, and some of them may stay with you far longer than you anticipate... Read the book without too much thinking and see what it does to you. ...more
2

Jul 15, 2017

The main idea is important. There is more to us than genes and environment but that is all I can say I like about this book. It is composed of tales of famous people and it is quite boring for someone who isn't into this kind of reading. I struggled to finish it because it kept saying the same thing in different ways without bringing evidence or different ideas. Most of the people presented in the book I don't even know and I fought boredom while reading it. Some passages were downright tedious, The main idea is important. There is more to us than genes and environment but that is all I can say I like about this book. It is composed of tales of famous people and it is quite boring for someone who isn't into this kind of reading. I struggled to finish it because it kept saying the same thing in different ways without bringing evidence or different ideas. Most of the people presented in the book I don't even know and I fought boredom while reading it. Some passages were downright tedious, never ending accounts of biographies. Always struggling to find similarities between biographies. 🙄🙄🙄 Yea, well, we all drink water, here is a correlation you can think of. Stop searching correlations where there isn't anything to correlate.
We all have a guardian angel, a purpose on this Earth but I already knew this. There is nothing new that I have learnt from here, just some random facts about supposedly famous folks. Oh, maybe I did learn that Hell is cold and Hitler had one testicle. ...more
5

Jan 13, 2008

If you like Hillman and/or depth psychology, you'll enjoy this book. I read this a couple years ago and it stimulated the nature/nurture debate in my own mind (again!) I also like the way Hillman used the biographies of historical figures to weave his theoretical discourse.

2

Jun 20, 2014

Great ideas, but the most ponderous and convoluted writing style to convey them. In my estimation, 75 percent of the text is fluff. I really did not like the writing style at all -- make a point already!

Best Books from your Favorite Authors & Publishers

compare-icon compare-icon
Thousands of books

Take your time and choose the perfect book.

review-icon review-icon
Read Reviews

Read ratings and reviews to make sure you are on the right path.

vendor-icon vendor-icon
Multiple Stores

Check price from multiple stores for a better shopping experience.

gift-icon

Enjoy Result