The Primal Blueprint: Reprogram your genes for effortless weight loss, vibrant health, and boundless energy (Primal Blueprint Series) Info

Which weight loss plan works best? What are the best books on health and nutrition - What is the best free weight loss app? Discover the best Health, Fitness & Dieting books and ebooks. Check our what others have to say about Mark Sisson books. Read over #reviewcount# reviews on The Primal Blueprint: Reprogram your genes for effortless weight loss, vibrant health, and boundless energy (Primal Blueprint Series) before downloading. Read&Download The Primal Blueprint: Reprogram your genes for effortless weight loss, vibrant health, and boundless energy (Primal Blueprint Series) by Mark Sisson Online


Being healthy and fit has gone mainstream--millions sweat the
calories away on the roads or in health clubs and scrutinize labels and
menus trying to do the right thing to control weight, delay aging, and
feel healthy, fit, and energetic. And it's simply not working. Rates of
obesity, diabetes, arthritis, heart disease, and cancer continue to
climb, and even the most committed fitness enthusiasts often carry 10 or
20 extra pounds of body fat.In this updated and expanded edition of the
2009 hardcover release from Mark Sisson, MarksDailyApple.com publisher
and de-facto leader of the burgeoning primal/paleo/evolutionary health
movement presents the compelling premise that you can reprogram your
genes in the direction of weight loss, health, and longevity by
following 10 immutable Primal laws validated by two million years of
human evolution.

This 2012 paperback release contains extensive,
never-before-published bonus material, including an incredible
full-color, 16-page insert of seven Primal Blueprint reader success
stories and their stunning before/after photos, pictorials, detailed
descriptions and workout log pages for the Primal Essential Movements
and Primal sprint workouts, hacks for each of the 10 Primal Blueprint
lifestyle laws (to promote quick results in body composition, fitness,
athletic performance, daily energy levels, and reduce disease risk
factors and reliance on medication, solutions to common questions and
stumbling blocks)-- pulled from Primal Blueprint reader submissions, and
commentary on diets and dieting, including compare/contrast of Primal
Blueprint with other popular programs.


Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for The Primal Blueprint: Reprogram your genes for effortless weight loss, vibrant health, and boundless energy (Primal Blueprint Series):

5

March 8, 2012

Forget the pounds - do it for the pain relief!-WITH UPDATE!
My husband can't eat gluten and I ran across this book while doing my endless research on grains, inflammation and diet. This book is wonderful in many ways, but I'm going to focus my review on the information the book covers on grains and why we shouldn't be eating them. Give it chance. Don't immediately think this is the Atkins diet only with organic foods. Don't roll your eyes and think that this whole "gluten-free" thing you keep hearing about is some trend that the celebrities are talking about. This book spells out what grains do to us. Even though we had removed wheat from our diet, we had really just replaced it with a lot of corn products and other seemingly "safe" grains. We were overweight, always hungry, and my husband had a lot of pain throughout his body - just mysterious aches and pains everywhere. I was beginning to think we needed to get to a fibromyalgia specialist or a pain management doctor. I kept hanging onto this book and after several weeks of prodding, I finally got hubby to agree to give me a month on this diet. It was not an easy sell because he had already given up so many favorite foods by going gluten free, but I finally got him to say "yes." I cleaned out the pantry, made a shopping list, bought the food and we started in mid-January. Now we are in early March and we've both lost about twenty pounds each. Attention Ladies - the belly fat came off -six inches worth off my waist (I'm 49-not easy to do). But that is not why I love Mark Sisson and this book - not at all. I love it because the body-wide pain my husband had is nearly gone. He said he feels better than he has since he was a young man. I am so grateful to Mark Sisson because I was days away from looking into prescription pain relief for my husband as he deteriorated before my eyes. I hope some day I can meet Mr. Sisson and shake his hand. This morning as I left for work, my husband was bopping around the kitchen, making breakfast and looked happy and healthy. A few weeks ago he was hobbling around like an old man. His mother called me crying when she saw him walking from his car into her apartment building because she said he looked 80 years old.

Do yourself a favor and give it a month. Many people say the foods on this diet are expensive, and it is a shock to buy organic produce and meat, but a week or two into the diet, you are just not very hungry and I have found that I actually spend less on groceries. I buy grass-fed ground beef and large packs of organic chicken from Costco. We eat loads of organic salad, broccoli and kale. If we have a sweet craving we eat a little dark chocolate. Even if you can't buy totally organic - just apply the principles in the book and avoid the sugar and grains and you will feel like a new person.

Bottom line - we both feel great and my husband's pain is soon to be a thing of the past. It's great to have smaller pants, but it's even greater to have our health improved in such a short period of time.

UPDATE: September 2012 - my husband and I continue to shrink. This is the first time I have ever lost more weight than him (40 pounds)and that's just because he eats more fruit smoothies than I do. The big news is that my husband's bloodwork has completely changed in the time since I wrote the original review. Cholesterol dropped over 40 points, good cholesterol went up and triglycerides went down. CRP (inflammation) went down under 1 which means my husband is out of danger in terms of cardiac risk. This time last year my husband was in daily pain, couldn't remember anything and was being treated by a cardiologist. My husband's doctor told him he would never be able to turn his cholesterol around without statin drugs. This month, when the doctor reviewed my husband's labs he was amazed. He said, and I quote "what was the name of that book again?" This way of eating has changed our lives in ways I could not have imagined - we have so much more energy, brain fog is gone, more new pants for me, more inches off my waist, and people who haven't seen us for a while say we look 20 years younger. This plan takes commitment, but if you truly clean out the junk foods (grains) in your house and hang in there to get through the initial cravings, you will never look back. It is such a relief to never be hungry and not have to always think about food. If you are heading down the heart attack path of high cholesterol and your doctor is saying you have to get on statins - do this instead. If you have pain from arthritis or fibromyalgia, try this. It is truly life changing.
2

February 27, 2016

I love Paleo and used to be a regular reader of ...
I love Paleo and used to be a regular reader of Mark's Daily Apple blog. So I thought to myself, "I'll buy his book. It'll be great."

Well...

I'll sum it up like this: It's an okay book that's overly verbose.

Or another way: You can find all you need to know about Mark's "blueprint" on his blog/website for free, in a more concise format that's faster to digest and easier to put in practice.

Again, I'm a fan of this guy and personally I lost 30 lbs. using the Paleo method. My problem with this book is not the content, but that it could've used an editor to cut down large sections. My cynical, sneaking suspicion is that they can't sell a 20-page pamphlet as an authoritative "book" and needed to fill out space. That's probably not the author's intention. But it's my impression as a buyer and reader (take it for what it's worth).

My paleo tips for success summary (which would fit on a postcard):

• Eat lots of chicken, fish and vegetables
• Fruits, nuts and milk are sometimes foods
• Cut out bread and sugar except as special treats
• Walk and exercise some.
• Read Mark's Daily Apple for inspiring stories
• Watch Tom Naughton's "Fat Head" documentary (it's funny, you'll like it, and available on Amazon)

In conclusion, great guy, good book, but considering "time is money" there are more efficient ways to get this info.
4

Feb 27, 2012

A very easy read with lots of great information on diet, sleep, play, and permission to quit exercising yourself to death. He promotes 10 easy rules:

1. Eat lots of animals, and plants.
2. Move around a lot at a slow pace (walk).
3. Lift heavy things.
4. Run really fast every once in a while (very short sprints).
5. Get lots of sleep.
6. Play.
7. Get some sunlight every day.
8. Avoid trauma (self-destructive behaviors).
9. Avoid poisonous things (sugar, processed foods, man-made fats).
10. Use your mind A very easy read with lots of great information on diet, sleep, play, and permission to quit exercising yourself to death. He promotes 10 easy rules:

1. Eat lots of animals, and plants.
2. Move around a lot at a slow pace (walk).
3. Lift heavy things.
4. Run really fast every once in a while (very short sprints).
5. Get lots of sleep.
6. Play.
7. Get some sunlight every day.
8. Avoid trauma (self-destructive behaviors).
9. Avoid poisonous things (sugar, processed foods, man-made fats).
10. Use your mind (exercise your brain daily).

His health philosophy is simple: "I follow a diet based on an understanding of evolutionary science. I think it’s more important to eat, move, and live according to how humans are designed and not according to society’s artificial developments of the last 100 years. Fortunately, this regimen is not only incredibly healthy, it’s quite simple.
In a nutshell:
- fresh, organic, unprocessed food – no junk!
- daily activity – whether it’s the gym or a walk along the beach, it all counts
- plenty of quality sleep
- plenty of water, no soda or sweetened drinks
- antioxidants galore – the key to limiting stress
- a good fish-oil supplement
- lots of essential fats, reckless amounts of vegetables, and clean protein
- time for fun – don’t take anything too seriously – ethical behavior – because what goes around comes around
- taking responsibility for yourself and your life – openness to new things and ideas"

The author is 57 and he and his wife look amazing. He has a website with LOTS of information, testimonials with photos, and an e-mail series that you can sign up for that will give you all the basic information you need to get started: www.marksdailyapple.com/ ...more
1

June 2, 2015

Learn to reprogram your own genes for $18.59! (batteries, double-helix reprogramming calipers, and shark skin oil not included)
This is one of the dainty caveman life-style books, complete with the inevitable connection to a website and supplements/products, shipped from the Stone Age to your door at post-Space Age prices. This author's claim to expertise involves a purported 4th place finish in an "iron man" contest of some sort, apparently long ago (unless they have one of those senior divisions for guys in their 50's and 60's like they do in golf and dominoes).

On the glossy book sleeve, the author promises to enable you, the potential reader, to “re-program your genes,” and thereby obtain a bonanza of health benefits. The list of of benefits is so incredible that probably not even Dr. Oz, Bernard L. Madoff, or Princess Caraboo could promise them all without blushing.

In fact, the author borrows several basic suppositions from the pro-“paleo,” pro-“primal” and related literature, and repeats them over and over and over, as if by virtue of repetition without attribution, one might turn someone else's ideas into one's own. In fairness to the author, he does acknowledge being "inspired" by some of the original authors in the field--apparently much the same way Bonnie and Clyde were inspired by bankers.

But this could all be easily be overlooked if the book were more . . . interesting. Admittedly, taking several pages of worthwhile information and turning it into a 275 page book is a challenge requiring some kind of creativity. Here, the author invents, among other things, Grok, a “not necessarily gender-specific euphemism [sic] for primal ancestor(s).” The author then compares Grok’s family’s lifestyle to its “modern-day antithesis,” in an exercise that starts off tedious, becomes something like watching a cat give itself a bath, and before long becomes just mind bogglingly boring.

There is plenty of additional filler provided, and there are even three otherwise blank pages at the very end of the book, entitled “Primal Notes,” to add some of your own.

Having read the book from cover-to-cover, I’m still looking for that part about how to “reprogram” your genes, so I can send it to the committee that awards the Nobel Prize for Medicine. Maybe I can just send the committee the back cover of the book sleeve, which includes a photo of the book’s hero and author, dressed in less than a cave man would wear. He looks a lot like that surfer dude played by Sean Penn in “Fast Times at Ridgmont High,” except 40 years later and after some genetic or other modification. Anyway, if you buy the book and follow the blueprint, maybe you can look as good as the author, or at least Grok!

I should mention that although the book comes with only one glossy sleeve, that sleeve does contain TWO color photos of the author. He just looks so good that one can't help but wonder whether Real Cave Men may have had to battle narcissism, and whether some Rice Crispy Treats might have been helpful, if not as a cure for the munchies and cognitive repetition, at least as an evolutionary distraction.

By the way, anyone wanting a different perspective on the Paleo diet can check out Christina Warinner’s video on YouTube: “Debunking the paleo diet.” By way of disclosure, Dr. Warinner has never finished 4th in a iron man contest, and she doesn’t even have a line of cave woman supplements for sale on the internet. Her critique is hardly flawless, but she remains fully dressed throughout the video.
5

June 30, 2016

FINALLY Success!!!
After having a hysterectomy at age 51 I experienced that frustrating menopausal weight gain and seemed helpless to stop it. I tried everything that had worked for me before to no avail. Not only was I gaining weight, but I now had fat around my mid-section which I never had before. I saw Mark in a TV interview and decided to try the program. I purchased the book and started the program with lots of doubt. Lo and behold, I lost 14.5 pounds and over 22 total inches in 4 months.Yes, it took 4 months, not the 4 weeks that many claimed. I didn't mind, though, as I felt great and was looking so much better. I lost a pant size and started working out because of renewed energy and health.

Was it difficult? Not at all! I found that I never felt cheated or hungry. I had no cravings and decided I finally found the way to eat for the rest of my life. After going on vacation and gaining 3 pounds (yes, I ate all the no-no's and then some), I lost 2 within 5 days of because back on the plan. It just doesn't get any better than this! I
5

March 30, 2016

From 250lbs on 1/4/2016 to 216lbs on 3/30/2016. So I guess its working ;o)
Well after years in a executive position, several hundered thousand air miles logged, and enough stress to drop an elephant, I have decided to change a few things.

I am 6 foot tall and 61 years old. My normal fighting weight when I am working out regularly is around 200 lbs.

Out of high school into college I weighed ~150 lbs and started running and weight lifting, playing tennis, rock climbing, 10Ks and 26.2's, snow skiing/instructor/Ski Patrol, President of the Kayak club..... I leveled out around 200 lbs being well rounded in all my activities and had ~10-12 % body fat(dunk tank)

Then I start working after college as a mechanical engineer in both the medical industry and aerospace specializing in advanced composite materials, armor systems and mine blast attenuating seats(for IED protection)

Quickly moved up the ranks into management with more responsability, travel and longer hours.

My 40&50's were made up of 50-70 hours a week, hundereds of thousands of miles in flights all over the world, high stress and little "me time". Lots of client dinners and wine/beer/whiskey and no exercise.

In the last 10 years my weight has gone from 205-245/250 and toss in high blood pressure, high cholesterol and a case of increasing psoriasis . Add in the mortally equation considering there is more time behind me than in front..... I Had to make a change.

I made a promise to myself that as of Jan 4(after the weekend) I would stop drinking (liver needs a break) and live Paleo/Primal life style and do something physical 5 days a week, even just a short 3 mile walk.

I have all of Marks Primal books including cook books( thanks to the Monkies for the intro). We have probably 50+ Paleo cookbooks cuz my wife has been follow that lifestyle( gluten free, sugar free and dairy free) due to illness for the last 8 years.

Weight on 1/4/2016 was 245.9 lbs and this morning Sunday 1/10/2106 I am at 239.2 BP(Before Poop) and I ate and was not hungry at all.

So 6.7 lbs BP.....not to bad for the start.

The above was written on Jan 10 2016.

Today on 3/30/2016 I am down to 216lbs from the 246-250 lbs range which is almost 30 lbs gone.

So I would say its worth it if you want to make a change and its not really that hard, but you have to be committed to make it work.

My goal is to be @ 200lbs by May of 2016 and I have little doubt I will make it not break that goal.

The good thing is you can eat as much as you want as long as you are eating the right stuff.
5

Dec 02, 2011

Let me make it clear up front that I'm giving 5 stars to the concept of primal eating and not to the quality of the book. I would rate the book more like 3 stars. The concepts in this book are seemingly life-changing for me. I've been eating according to these guidelines in this book for about 4-5 weeks now and have experienced convincing and even dramatic results.

But first let me give you a little background.

I've had gradually declining health for many years now. All my vitals are borderline Let me make it clear up front that I'm giving 5 stars to the concept of primal eating and not to the quality of the book. I would rate the book more like 3 stars. The concepts in this book are seemingly life-changing for me. I've been eating according to these guidelines in this book for about 4-5 weeks now and have experienced convincing and even dramatic results.

But first let me give you a little background.

I've had gradually declining health for many years now. All my vitals are borderline dangerous: weight, waist size (over 40"), blood pressure, lipid profile (high cholesterol, triglycerides, low HDL, etc), signs of insulin resistance. My father has adult-onset diabetes and I know I'm on the same track if I don't make a change. While I've known for almost 10 years that the warning signs are there, it wasn't until a health check-up through my employer prompted me to take action. In the check-up I had all the signs of metabolic syndrome which is just a term used to describe the combination of all the above symptoms and also is used to describe someone with insulin resistance which is essentially a pre-diabetic state. I figured I'd have significant lifestyle changes sooner or later if I get diabetes. I might as well make the changes now so that I can choose what they will be.

I visited the doctor to get checked out and did extensive research and reading to find out how best to address metabolic syndrome. What I found was very confusing at best. Every book I read touted a different approach to handling metabolic syndrome. They mostly had similarities but sometimes were dramatically different and contradictory.

I settled on an approach outlined in the book "The Insulin-Resistance Diet." This was a great book that taught be the importance of insulin in your metabolic process and that controlling your insulin response is key in managing your weight and, in-turn, metabolic syndrome. To manage insulin it taught a way of "linking" carbs and protein so dampen the insulin response. The method was simple and seemed sustainable as a long-term eating plan. For about 4 months I used this method (with varying degrees of faithfulness) and lost about 5 pounds over that period of time.

In October a friend from high school came into town with his family. Over dinner we found out that he and his wife had made some dramatic lifestyle changes over the last many months, one of which was to eat a paleo diet which is very similar to that found in this book (yes I'll get back to the book). I remembered that my doctor had suggested I might try a paleo diet and asked more about it. It didn't take much convincing and I was ready to give it a try. I started applying some of the principles within a few days and gradually got more and more strict in living the principles as I learned more.

Here are my results so far:

--I've lost just over 10 pounds.
--I've re-gained 3 notches on my belt.
--My blood pressure is now normal (119/79) after being in the pre-hypertension range (140/90).
--My energe level is extremely stable. No more highs and lows. No more food comas. No more trying to stay awake on my drive home. I can even wake up much more easily in the morning (I've never been a morning person).
--No more food cravings, particularly for cookies and doughnuts which were my personal kryptonite.

We'll see in the next couple of months how this improves my poor lipid profile. The good news with this lifestyle is that it's one I think I'll be able to maintain.

A very rough overview of the book

The book outlines several steps for living a primal lifestyle - that is to say one that paleolithic man may have lived. Mostly the steps are diet related but also outline other aspects of general living. Here's an overview to the most important concepts.

1. DON'T EAT GRAINS, SUGAR, OR LEGUMES, AND REDUCE CARB INTAKE - The book recommends a daily carb intake of 50-100g for weight loss and 100-150 for weight maintenance.

This is by far the most shocking and seemingly unrealistic parts of the plan and one that I didn't immediately embrace. But after starting to dramatically reduce my grain intake I found a dramatic reduction in cravings, particularly for sweets (I could rarely resist a cookie or doughnut everyday after lunch). It was almost magical. I never thought I would be able to resist eating grains. It was tough at first but within the first week I didn't even have a desire for grains. Sure I get a craving on occasion if others are eating cookies or other sweets, and sometimes I indulge, but on a day-to-day basis those cravings are gone.

There are two reasons for not eating grains and reducing carb intake. The first and less-convincing is simply because paleolithic man didn't farm and therefore didn't eat grains. The more convincing reason is that excess carbs and grains in particular produce a very sharp insulin response. Insulin is the main culprit in inducing fat storage not to mention taking a toll on your pancreas which can lead to diabetes.

In my mind this is the single most important principle.

2. EAT MEAT, VEGGIES, NUTS AND FRUIT UNTIL SATISFIED

With this lifestyle you get most of your calories from protein and fat. You train your body to burn body fat and dietary fat for fuel rather than sugar or blood glucose. This seems so counter-intuitive because you end up eating a lot of fats but since you're not producing excessive insulin your body uses the fat for fuel instead of storing it. A great side-effect of this is you don't tend to get ravenously hungry and your energy level remains much more consistent.

3. DON'T DO CHRONIC CARDIO.

I can't speak so much to the exercise portion of the plan since I've just started implementing it. In short you do low-grade cardio (walking primarily) for roughly 2 hours a week (30 minutes a few days a week). Do strength training for 2 days a week focusing mostly on natural body exercises. Do sprinting or interval training for 20-30 minutes once every 7-10 days. Avoid doing cardio over 75% of your max heart rate for extended periods of time.

4. EAT AS ORGANIC AS POSSIBLE.

I haven't followed these guidlines but plan on integrating them in with our family diet over time. Basically you should eat organic produce, grass-fed meat (that sounds weird, I should probably say grass-fed protein sources), and stay was from anything too processed. It reminds me to a recommendation I once heard to shop on the outside walls of your grocery stores. This ends up being about how we're starting to shop now. We avoid boxes :).

So, back to the actual book rating.

The good:
I'm obviously a fan of this lifestyle and right now plan on living these principles for the long haul. The results have been dramatic for me. It's not just the weight loss either but mostly the dramatic difference in how I feel.

The bad:
The book seemed long and drawn out. Chapter 2 was particularly good which chronicles the lifestyle of a typical family and how broken it is. You can get all the basic principles from the authors website (marksdailyapple.com) without having to slog through the book. In fact, he seems to refer to his website countless times throughout the book. Nonetheless I'm was glad to have read the book in whole to get a grasp of the big picture. ...more
3

Jul 09, 2010

At this point, I am primarily detailing my reactions to the book itself, as I have not yet tried the diet and fitness plan. Excuse me, the “lifestyle.” None of these diet and fitness books want to call themselves diet and fitness books. The “Primal Blueprint” is a “way of life” – just like all those other ways of life out there. It’s not “restrictive” like a diet – unless, of course, you consider eliminating an entire food group from your diet to be restrictive, or only being able to purchase At this point, I am primarily detailing my reactions to the book itself, as I have not yet tried the diet and fitness plan. Excuse me, the “lifestyle.” None of these diet and fitness books want to call themselves diet and fitness books. The “Primal Blueprint” is a “way of life” – just like all those other ways of life out there. It’s not “restrictive” like a diet – unless, of course, you consider eliminating an entire food group from your diet to be restrictive, or only being able to purchase and consume organic and/or locally grown foods to be restrictive. He does give you an out, however, in maintaining this very restrictive diet: aim for 80% of the time. As long as you maintain it 80% of the time, you’ll be on the road to improvement.

The Primal Blueprint is similar to an Atkins plus fruits and vegetables plan or South Beach minus whole wheat plan. No grains or starches at all –no bread, no pasta, no potatoes, no rice no sweets. And limit dairy (and only drink/eat raw dairy). And no beans, because they’re “toxic” (whatever that means), which is evidenced by the fact that you have to soak them before you eat them. It all has something to do with insulin. Our body doesn't respond well to all these grains. Eat primal, and you’ll feel more full and, once your body adjusts, more energetic. No more carb crashes. And you’ll be eating foods with more nutrients. Your “entire diet should consist of plants and animals.”

It’s “primal” because this is how our hunter/gather ancestors ate. They didn’t eat grain. Agriculture came along and ruined health. Of course, it also made possible modern civilization. Bread has its virtues. Just don't eat it. Ever. Which you can manage to do without going hungry, if you are lucky enough to live in the middle-class in a prosperous, technologically advanced nation - which everyone who would buy this book is.

He intermittently uses evolutionary theory to bolster the evidence of the benefits of this lifestyle. (Evolution, I guess, hasn't adapted our bodies to eating grains in 10,000 years. We're still designed to eat like Gork.) So if you’re trying to decide what’s best to eat, you can always ask yourself, “What would Gork do?” But you can eat some things Gork never would have eaten – a great many fruits and vegetables that are plentifully available to us now and would not have been to Gork – provide you get them locally or organically. Still, limit the sweeter, tastier fruits: grapes, bananas, mangoes, papayas, nectarines, pineapple, oranges, plums, and tangerines. And no potatoes or corn, of course. Fortunately, you don’t have to limit nuts and berries – a prime source of food for hunters and gatherers.

The fitness recommendations make sense and rely on low-impact aerobic exercise such as walking or hiking 2-5 hours a week, high-intensity all out “sprints” for less than ten minutes once a week, and heavy lifting for 7-60 minutes one to three times a week. This is actually a doable fitness plan for me (especially if I start with 7 minutes and once a week on the heavy lifting and do smaller weights with more reps, which he endorses as just as good as larger weights with fewer reps.) He provides quite a bit of evidence for why all out high cardio on a regular basis is not a good way to go.

He also throws in a few other suggestions: get enough direct sunlight to make sure you have enough Vitamin D (his time recommendations are very moderate here and so I’m pretty sure I’m already getting this; mainly because I’m a stay-at-home mom and outside quite a bit with the kids); get seven to eight hours of sleep a day, with a regular bed time and wake time (doing pretty well there); and don’t be stupid (can’t argue with that).

The book itself is extremely repetitive, and could have easily been boiled down to fifty pages without losing any essential information. There are a number of lame attempts at jokes throughout, to lighten an otherwise heavy volume of information. He makes liberal use of quotations from a wide range of famous people – politicians, writers, athletes. There are plenty of shaded boxes and charts to please the eye and tell you what you’ve already been told in pictorial form. There is a lot of exaggeration in the book, particular with the tossing around of the word "toxin."

-----

ADDITION: I did a trial run. I kept the diet but did less than the suggested exercise, though more than usual. I lost six pounds in two weeks. And then I quit because I'm weak and lazy and because having most of my diet consist of meat and vegetables and no grains made me feel sluggish, tired, unhappy, and like I wanted to vomit once a day. ...more
5

May 21, 2015

This by far is the best book written on the subject in my opinion
I have read a lot of books on Paleo Diets. This by far is the best book written on the subject in my opinion. Mark really lays it out so you can understand why we need to eat the Primal way. I didn't understand why I was getting sick and fat eating a Vegan lifestyle of wheat, grains and now I know. I have lost 20 lbs (from 200 to 180) and feel so much healthier. Also, my blood lipid profile was horrible when I adopted the Vegan diet. After reading this book I really stuck with it and my cholesterol went down 20 points which isn't that great but my triglycerides went from 422 to 109. That's when it really clicked for me. I was spiking my blood sugar daily with my routine of Wheat, rice and oatmeal. So glad to be eating veggies, nuts, seeds and meat again. No sugar - just good whole food.
3

June 18, 2016

Good Program To Follow
In my opinion, this material is exactly what people should follow who are looking for a change in body chemistry, attitude and status quo. I believe the author repeats himself way too often and could reduce the references to his website and the Primal Laws. It would be nice to see the author embed the BMR calculators and a handful of recipes to get the new converts engaged into the lifestyle. Perhaps this is a way to get the reader to purchase the cookbook. Overall, I would recommend this program to others who need the lifestyle change.
1

August 14, 2015

Lots of repetition, references his supplement line
The book could be much shorter; it has lots of repetition. The book lost credibility with me when the author referenced his supplement line. The book references a web site that sells wild-caught Alaskan salmon. I checked that web site and they charge $21/pound. The same stuff can be obtained at Costco for $9/pound. There are better books on the subject, in my opinion.
5

Jul 17, 2011

This is the best book I've read about what is also known as the "paleo" diet (no grains, reduced dairy, no sugar but honey, lots of vegetables, fruits, good fats like coconut oil, high-quality meat and eggs, and nuts). He explains the science in a logical way and outlines the diet in a down-to-earth, doable fashion. (His website at Mark's Daily Apple is also a treasure trove.) After putting many of these principles into practice, I've dropped almost 35 pounds since late January. My blood sugar This is the best book I've read about what is also known as the "paleo" diet (no grains, reduced dairy, no sugar but honey, lots of vegetables, fruits, good fats like coconut oil, high-quality meat and eggs, and nuts). He explains the science in a logical way and outlines the diet in a down-to-earth, doable fashion. (His website at Mark's Daily Apple is also a treasure trove.) After putting many of these principles into practice, I've dropped almost 35 pounds since late January. My blood sugar isn't screwy anymore, my energy levels and moods are better, and my allergies and asthma are better. When I go off the diet, I have problems again. So I think the best review of this book is to say: It works! ...more
5

Jun 26, 2012

As a vegan who was recently diagnosed with celiac disease, I wondered what the hell I was going to eat now. Along my research path, I stumbled across this book and I am now thinking celiac disease may be one of the best things that has ever happened to me. Mark Sisson pretty much sums up all the common sense stuff that somehow we have forgotten in our culture. This is not a diet but a way to really LIVE. I've been gluten free for a little over two weeks and primal for about one week and I have As a vegan who was recently diagnosed with celiac disease, I wondered what the hell I was going to eat now. Along my research path, I stumbled across this book and I am now thinking celiac disease may be one of the best things that has ever happened to me. Mark Sisson pretty much sums up all the common sense stuff that somehow we have forgotten in our culture. This is not a diet but a way to really LIVE. I've been gluten free for a little over two weeks and primal for about one week and I have lost 14 lbs and feel my body changing every day for the better. Best of all, NOTHING HURTS anymore. I highly recommend this book to everyone, not just celiacs. It just might change your life. ...more
1

August 2, 2015

Whatever works for some may not work for others
This did not work for me. Everybody is different and different things work for different people. It may or may not work for you. It's generally trial and error with me until i figure out what works and what doesn't. I am slightly hypoglycemic so sometimes my blood sugar gets low and i get shakey and I need real starchy carbs or sugar not vegetables to feel better.
4

Sep 20, 2011

This book isn't written particularly well, but I would give 5 stars for the advice. If you want to get more into the details that Mark glosses over, pick up one of the Gary Taubes books. "Why We Get Fat" is a lot more readable than "Good Calories, Bad Calories".

However, the advice in the book is spot-on. I have been following the advice for about 3 months now, with very few variations. I was already in pretty decent shape, but following this advice, I was able to easily lose a little more fat This book isn't written particularly well, but I would give 5 stars for the advice. If you want to get more into the details that Mark glosses over, pick up one of the Gary Taubes books. "Why We Get Fat" is a lot more readable than "Good Calories, Bad Calories".

However, the advice in the book is spot-on. I have been following the advice for about 3 months now, with very few variations. I was already in pretty decent shape, but following this advice, I was able to easily lose a little more fat and put on a little more muscle. And I actually lifted weights less than before. Additionally, I have felt much better since giving up some grains. My insulin levels seem to have normalized, and I no longer feel shaky when I'm late for a meal. Also, eating this way means that you never feel bloated. I had always assumed that feeling bloated after a large meal was normal. Now, I can eat a pound of steak and a 1/2 pound salad and still want to take the dog on a walk.

Highly recommended for the information that it contains. ...more
2

Mar 04, 2012

I've been familiar with paleo-lifestyle for about a year now. I recently heard of Mark on an episode of the Lew Rockwell Show.

Wiki: "Mark Sisson is an American fitness author and blogger, and a former distance runner, triathlete and Ironman competitor. Sisson finished 4th in the February 1982 Ironman World Championship."

I agree with most things in the book and have shifted my eating habits in his direction. I thought the book was informative, easy to read, but way too fluffy. I didn't like the I've been familiar with paleo-lifestyle for about a year now. I recently heard of Mark on an episode of the Lew Rockwell Show.

Wiki: "Mark Sisson is an American fitness author and blogger, and a former distance runner, triathlete and Ironman competitor. Sisson finished 4th in the February 1982 Ironman World Championship."

I agree with most things in the book and have shifted my eating habits in his direction. I thought the book was informative, easy to read, but way too fluffy. I didn't like the fact that the book exceeded 200+ pages for the content presented. I feel like you could have understood everything in the book by just reading a few articles and in less time.

The book could have been easily trimmed to 100 pages.

Though, if you aren't familiar with the primal lifestyle then this is a good book to get started.

Mark presents an exercise routine and some dietary guidelines which I liked.

Interview with Mark: http://www.lewrockwell.com/lewrockwel... ...more
4

September 29, 2016

Great information but overdid it with the primal history lesson bro.........
This would be a five star BUT! there is aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaalot of information on how cavemen used to live. I found it to be excessive just to prove a point. Mark Sisson is a smart man but I am not looking for a history lesson from him. I purchased this book so I may learn about his primal diet, not history. However, he does have a compelling argument towards the negative effect of carbs and offers great work out advice. Just beware, as in all nutrition books, the goal is to motivate you to purchase another one of their products! Blaming the food industry of taking advantage of people is no different than maipulating people into purchasing different products that offer similar or minimally different information. Well that's my opinion. Cheers!
5

April 22, 2016

Good book.
Mark gives a detailed account of what goes on in our bodies when we consume proteins and carbs. His advice challenges conventional wisdom and provides a new look at the food pyramid. I was following a similar regiment on my own prior to reading his book but I tweaked things afterwards. I have had profound improvements in my health since I cut the carbs and changed my eating habits. I am completely free of BP meds, my cholesterol has continually dropped and I feel better than I have in years.

The biggest thing surprising me was I am not hungry, don't have the cravings I used to, and still I am shedding pounds. I can easily sustain this eating style permanently.
5

March 25, 2017

Very smart and well written
Pretty great read! I was Paleo for about a year, lost weight, got a boyfriend and then went off Paleo because the boy eats grains. Now the boy is gone so I am getting back into Paleo again and my digestion is so much better without the grains in my diet! Great for the belly and the brain.
1

November 24, 2016

Lacking
Poorly written and very repetitive and redundant. It just repeats the same thing over and over throughout. I was hoping for a complete list of foods I could eat, the carbs in those foods, and a shopping list. Instead it bounces around with some foods listed in one chapter and other foods listed in another. disappointing. I threw it away the same day I got it. I am doing the diet but don't expect much from the book that you don't already find online.
5

Oct 18, 2011

Mark Sisson’s enthusiasm for Primal eating and his robust and entertaining writing style make this book a pleasure to read! The premise of The Primal Blueprint is to encourage you to eat and move the way that mankind has evolved to over the past two million years. He discusses why “calories in, calories out” is not always successful, and what other factors you should consider if you want to not only lose weight, but improve your health and longevity.

The Primal Blueprint dispels many long-held Mark Sisson’s enthusiasm for Primal eating and his robust and entertaining writing style make this book a pleasure to read! The premise of The Primal Blueprint is to encourage you to eat and move the way that mankind has evolved to over the past two million years. He discusses why “calories in, calories out” is not always successful, and what other factors you should consider if you want to not only lose weight, but improve your health and longevity.

The Primal Blueprint dispels many long-held myths about carbohydrates and insulin, ketones, and even cholesterol. It also examines specific foods and food groups and explains their effects on human metabolism so that you can fine tune your diet and achieve better results with your health and fitness goals.

One of the primary strengths of this book is that, in addition to giving both general and specific guidelines for you to follow, Sisson encourages you to continually listen to your body and fine tune all of his advice based on the feedback that your body gives you. That, coupled with the excellent information, makes The Primal Blueprint a definite must-read. ...more
4

May 27, 2010

I had to give this book a certain amount of credence since I am exhibiting so many of the problems Mark Sisson claims results from eating too many carbs. Although I walk 5 miles a day except on week-ends and have since I retired a little over 2 years ago, I have not lost weight, I am developing an immuno response problem with my skin, and my cholesterol count continues to climb. The most alarming news I gleaned from this book is that the consumption of potatoes, rice, bread, etc. causes insulin I had to give this book a certain amount of credence since I am exhibiting so many of the problems Mark Sisson claims results from eating too many carbs. Although I walk 5 miles a day except on week-ends and have since I retired a little over 2 years ago, I have not lost weight, I am developing an immuno response problem with my skin, and my cholesterol count continues to climb. The most alarming news I gleaned from this book is that the consumption of potatoes, rice, bread, etc. causes insulin production. Until now I thought I only had to watch the sweets, a life-long love affair that I have found difficult to control. Diabetes runs in my family. "It's in the genes" and Mark Sisson would laugh and say, "Reprogram the genes". Wow! What a concept! So, I told myself, let's give this a try for a few weeks and see what happens. Easier said than done. After four days in which I have not yet managed to get through an entire day without bread, potatoes, sugar, or pasta (not all on the same day, but at least one slip each day), I was getting distressed at the difficulty. Then I remembered Mark says 80% success is good. You don't have to be 100%. I breathed a little easier and tried to at least eat primally during the day - until dinner. By day four I had managed at least this. Lo and behold, I found I had also lost two pounds! Which means I need to try harder. What I really, really like about this approach is that I don't have to think about food all the time, something I really hate about diets. All I have to ask myself is, "Would I eat this raw?" and if the answer is no, I try to skip it. This does not mean meat. Just the vegetables and fruits. I also don't tell myself I can't have a cookie or a brownie. Skipping those will come later -- probably much later, but eventually I hope to get there, too. Meanwhile, we'll see how it goes after a few weeks. I had a stomach ache for the first two days, much to my surprise, but it went away on day three and I have to admit my energy levels are picking up a bit and I am sleeping well. Not too bad for day four. Oh, and Mark makes an important point when he says the way you eat and the way you exercise should be pleasing to you or you'll never stick to it. A very good point. Stress comes in many forms, doesn't it? The only point he makes that I would argue with is the amount of water one should consume. Of course, I don't like dairy products, particularly milk, I don't like coffee, I don't drink much fruit juice, preferring to get my juice by eating fruit, I can't drink soda because I suffer from GERD (along with 80% of Americans), so I almost always choose to drink water with an occasional Arnie Palmer for variety. I think of water consumption as a way to wash the inside just like standing in a shower washes the outside. Water is good, but I agree with Mark, drink when you're thirsty and don't force it down, but then, I have no problem drinking four or more glasses of tap water daily and would be hard put to drink less. On the other hand, 8 glasses does seem a bit much. ...more
5

Jan 31, 2011

I really enjoyed this book. It's well written and nicely laid out. The chapter summary/highlight sections are great for sharing with people who are interested in the topic, but maybe not committed enough to read the whole book yet. The information presented here makes a lot of sense. Don't think of it as a diet...this is a plan you want to implement permanently--at least aiming to do so 80% of the time.

After only a week of seriously following the plan I feel better than I have in years. Of I really enjoyed this book. It's well written and nicely laid out. The chapter summary/highlight sections are great for sharing with people who are interested in the topic, but maybe not committed enough to read the whole book yet. The information presented here makes a lot of sense. Don't think of it as a diet...this is a plan you want to implement permanently--at least aiming to do so 80% of the time.

After only a week of seriously following the plan I feel better than I have in years. Of course only time will tell how successful I will be, but I'm confident that I'm at least headed down a better path now. Check out the author's website if you want to get a better understanding of what this is all about before reading the book.
...more
4

Jun 06, 2011

Like all of these diet books, what should fit in a 5-10 page white paper has been stretched out to fill a book.

That said, this approach to eating has changed my life. I picked up the book because I was diagnosed with advanced arthritis in several joints and wanted to treat myself with diet rather than with drugs. My pain diminished markedly within 7-10 days, and has pretty much stayed away (except when I cheat).

Additionally, I've lost 10 lbs and digestive problems I've had my entire life have Like all of these diet books, what should fit in a 5-10 page white paper has been stretched out to fill a book.

That said, this approach to eating has changed my life. I picked up the book because I was diagnosed with advanced arthritis in several joints and wanted to treat myself with diet rather than with drugs. My pain diminished markedly within 7-10 days, and has pretty much stayed away (except when I cheat).

Additionally, I've lost 10 lbs and digestive problems I've had my entire life have completely disappeared.

There is no big secret here: I'm eating fish, poultry, meat, eggs, nuts, fruits, and vegetables -- all healthy foods. I'm not eating: dairy, grains, most legumes, potatoes.

Next, I'll try his approach to exercise. ...more
1

July 26, 2015

Endurance Athlete turned Nutrition Guru
Eat like me to look like me? Not so fast!

Like so many of the books written by todays (and yesterdays) Nutrition Gurus, it's just a lot of scam with little to no scientific base.

But at least the book jumpstarted his career and made him incredibly wealthy. But for their own sakes, his followers should stop listening to him since they are quite obviously not getting lean and healthy, but rather turn into frustrated, depressed, burned out and sick insomniacs.

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