The New Primal Blueprint: Reprogram Your Genes for Effortless Weight Loss, Vibrant Health and Boundless Energy Info

Which weight loss plan works best? What are the best books on health and nutrition - What is the best free weight loss app? Discover the best Health, Fitness & Dieting books and ebooks. Check our what others have to say about Mark Sisson books. Read over #reviewcount# reviews on The New Primal Blueprint: Reprogram Your Genes for Effortless Weight Loss, Vibrant Health and Boundless Energy before downloading. Read&Download The New Primal Blueprint: Reprogram Your Genes for Effortless Weight Loss, Vibrant Health and Boundless Energy by Mark Sisson Online


Mark Sisson’s 2009 release of The Primal
Blueprint
 was the catalyst for the primal/paleo/ancestral health
movement to gain mainstream awareness and acceptance. Both the hardcover
and paperback editions enjoyed a seven-year run at the top of the
primal/paleo charts and selling hundreds of thousands of copies. Sisson,
publisher of the acclaimed MarksDailyApple.com, the acclaimed and
most-visited primal/paleo blog, has spent the past six years diligently
researching and evaluating recent the most up-to-date science and
reflecting on thousands of users’ experiences going primal. The second
edition of The New Primal Blueprint offers a comprehensively
revised, expanded, and updated message from the original runaway
bestseller.


The New Primal Blueprint serves as the
ultimate road map for anyone wishing to make the shift from flawed
conventional wisdom about diet and exercise to a healthy, happy
empowering lifestyle patterned after the evolutionary-tested behaviors
of our hunter-gatherer ancestors. The book details the ten immutable
Primal Blueprint lifestyle laws that enable empower you to reprogram
your genes to direct in the direction of weight loss, health, and
longevity. The Primal Blueprint laws are validated by two million years
of human evolution as well as an ever-expanding body of contemporary
scientific research. Sisson’s philosophy was originally met with
skepticism as he aggressively challenged numerous mainstream health
tenets. Eight years later, mainstream medical and health science are
validating the Primal Blueprint tenets assertions that a high-carb,
grain-based diet will make you fat, tired, and sick; that a consistent
routine of medium-to-difficult cardiovascular workouts can actually
compromise your health and longevity and increase risk of heart disease;
and that consuming (whole food sources of) fat and cholesterol does not
lead to heart disease as we have been led to believe, but rather offers
many health benefits.
 
The New Primal Blueprint comes
alive with a vibrant full-color presentation packed with photos,
graphics, and cartoons to make for a fun, easy, and memorable read. Join
hundreds of thousands of primal enthusiasts and embrace a new way of
life where you take responsibility for your health, fitness, and
happiness. Reject once and for all the flawed conventional wisdom that
has left modern citizens struggling with fatigue, excess body fat, and
elevated disease risk factors as a consequence of grain-based eating
habits, exhausting exercise routines, sedentary lifestyle patterns, and
high-stress existences that misdirect our genes and promote illness
instead of wellness and longevity.
Here is a quick overview
of the ten Primal Blueprint laws that will help you quickly and
effortlessly reprogram your genes in the direction of health, happiness,
and longevity:
Law #1 - Eat Plants and
Animals:
 Enjoy the nutritious, satisfying foods that fueled two
million years of human evolution.
Law #2 - Avoid
Poisonous Things:
 Avoid toxic modern foods (primarily refined
vegetable oils, sugars, and grains) that make us fat, sick, and
malnourished.
Law #3 - Move
Frequently:
 Enhance fat metabolism, improve cognitive function,
and avoid the stress of chronic cardio by keeping active with aerobic
workouts at a comfortable heart rate, increased everyday movement, and
complementary flexibility/mobility activities throughout your day.
/>
Law #4 - Lift Heavy Things: Brief, intense
sessions of functional, full-body resistance exercises supports muscle
development, increases bone density, and prevents injury.

/>Law #5 - Sprint Once in a While: Occasional all-out
sprints turbo-charge fat reduction and deliver a boost of anti-aging
hormones.

Law #6 - Get Plenty of
Sleep:
 Align your sleep with your circadian rhythm by
minimizing artificial light and digital stimulation after dark, and
creating a calm, quiet, dark sleeping sanctuary. Optimal sleep promotes
healthy immune, brain, and endocrine function.
Law #7
- Play:
 Balance the stress of modern life with some
unstructured, physical fun! Both brief breaks and grand outings are
essential to nurture a cognitively fluid mind and a free spirit.
/>
Law #8 - Get Plenty of Sunlight: Expose large
skin surface areas frequently to optimize vitamin D production
(increases energy, prevents cancer). Maintain a slight tan, but never
burn. Diet alone doesn’t cut it. 
Law #9 - Avoid
Stupid Mistakes:
 Learn to be mindful and vigilant against
dangers, both extreme and routine. Cultivate risk management skills to
stay safe and sensible and eliminate “avoidable suffering.”


/>Law #10 - Use Your Brain: Engage in creative and
stimulating activities away from your core daily responsibilities. This
will keep you refreshed, energized, creative, and productive in
everything you do.

(Mark Sisson)

Average Ratings and Reviews
review-bg

4.52

8547 Ratings

5

4

3

2

1


Ratings and Reviews From Market


client-img 4.5
95
9
12
4
4
client-img 5
0
0
0
2
1
client-img 4.06
3505
3373
1057
4
1

Reviews for The New Primal Blueprint: Reprogram Your Genes for Effortless Weight Loss, Vibrant Health and Boundless Energy:

5

January 13, 2017

It works, its sustainable and you'll love how you feel!
When I started following the Primal Blueprint on 4/1/16 I was 400 pounds, I'm now 225 and dropping! I feel the best I've ever felt and yes my blood lipids, blood sugar and liver function are all great!!! I highly recommend the Primal Blueprint to anyone looking to lose weight or even just feel better and be much healthier!
5

December 15, 2016

what an upgrade of first edition
Wow. What an update on the first edition. This thing is loaded with updates. While it is close to the first edition, it is upgraded in all the right ways. The extra sidebars and graphs are great. Plus Sisson links to other great work being done in the field in related areas, like Katy Bowman, Kelly Staret, and Phil Maffetone. This is a complete reference for all things health and wellness.
3

April 11, 2017

I kept thinking, this will come to a point eventually, right?
Where to start? First, the book rambles on and on about things most of you aren't going to care about. There is little in the way of scientific information and if you want to get to the "nuts and bolts" of the primal diet you're going to be digging for awhile. I found this book to be slow to progress and a bit obnoxious. The author tells you how he is a prime human specimen with 6 to 8% body fat, and that he was a marathon runner/Olympic hopeful etc. Then he tells you about his imaginary caveman friend Grok for awhile. After that bit of fun you get to read about how you should only be buying organic, pasture raised, grass fed, pesticide free food and if you don't, well that's your folly now isn't it? Because you should stretch your budget and cut whatever you need to cut to make this happen. Stuff your fridge with organic grass fed beef and seafood and produce and tell the kids that college is out the window because you're eating primal! Little consideration seems to be given to the thousands of people in this country that are living on a smaller budget and can't afford to buy half of a grass fed organically raised cow.
Oh and if you were hoping this book would tell you to go carte blanche and load up on pans of (grass fed organic) bacon and beef, you're barking up the wrong tree. Instead it suggests you have a nice breakfast of steamed beets and carrots with some (organic free range) eggs. Basically it comes down to this: Eat clean foods, with lots of veggies and some quality meat/protein sources, limited fruit and leave the processed crap alone. Same thing you've been told over and over. So you can just do it, or you can pay for this book to read what you've already heard a hundred times before.
To be clear, I think the dietary idea is sound. I do think a diet that consists of good quality meats and vegetables with reasonable quantities of fruits is a good idea. I just didn't like this book.
5

July 25, 2017

Live feels worth living again.
The primal blueprint has changed my life. Within days of adopting this lifestyle, my joints and muscles stopped hurting, I gained so much energy. Not only do I feel like doing things, life feels worth living. My appetite has balanced out. In fact, I only feel like eating two meals a day and a small snack. My cravings are gone. I understand that others will experience sugar withdrawal. I didn't. Maybe that's because I've done a considerable amount of fasting in the past 6 years (although none for the past 6 months). The only negative I experienced was my sleep was disturbed for about 10 days. I'd wake up in the middle of the night for an hour or two and read, then go back to sleep. However, now I'm sleeping better than ever. I really encourage people who try this to implement all 10 Primal Blueprint "laws," not just the food related ones. I'm happy to answer questions.
4

Feb 27, 2012

A very easy read with lots of great information on diet, sleep, play, and permission to quit exercising yourself to death. He promotes 10 easy rules:

1. Eat lots of animals, and plants.
2. Move around a lot at a slow pace (walk).
3. Lift heavy things.
4. Run really fast every once in a while (very short sprints).
5. Get lots of sleep.
6. Play.
7. Get some sunlight every day.
8. Avoid trauma (self-destructive behaviors).
9. Avoid poisonous things (sugar, processed foods, man-made fats).
10. Use your mind A very easy read with lots of great information on diet, sleep, play, and permission to quit exercising yourself to death. He promotes 10 easy rules:

1. Eat lots of animals, and plants.
2. Move around a lot at a slow pace (walk).
3. Lift heavy things.
4. Run really fast every once in a while (very short sprints).
5. Get lots of sleep.
6. Play.
7. Get some sunlight every day.
8. Avoid trauma (self-destructive behaviors).
9. Avoid poisonous things (sugar, processed foods, man-made fats).
10. Use your mind (exercise your brain daily).

His health philosophy is simple: "I follow a diet based on an understanding of evolutionary science. I think it’s more important to eat, move, and live according to how humans are designed and not according to society’s artificial developments of the last 100 years. Fortunately, this regimen is not only incredibly healthy, it’s quite simple.
In a nutshell:
- fresh, organic, unprocessed food – no junk!
- daily activity – whether it’s the gym or a walk along the beach, it all counts
- plenty of quality sleep
- plenty of water, no soda or sweetened drinks
- antioxidants galore – the key to limiting stress
- a good fish-oil supplement
- lots of essential fats, reckless amounts of vegetables, and clean protein
- time for fun – don’t take anything too seriously – ethical behavior – because what goes around comes around
- taking responsibility for yourself and your life – openness to new things and ideas"

The author is 57 and he and his wife look amazing. He has a website with LOTS of information, testimonials with photos, and an e-mail series that you can sign up for that will give you all the basic information you need to get started: www.marksdailyapple.com/ ...more
5

Dec 02, 2011

Let me make it clear up front that I'm giving 5 stars to the concept of primal eating and not to the quality of the book. I would rate the book more like 3 stars. The concepts in this book are seemingly life-changing for me. I've been eating according to these guidelines in this book for about 4-5 weeks now and have experienced convincing and even dramatic results.

But first let me give you a little background.

I've had gradually declining health for many years now. All my vitals are borderline Let me make it clear up front that I'm giving 5 stars to the concept of primal eating and not to the quality of the book. I would rate the book more like 3 stars. The concepts in this book are seemingly life-changing for me. I've been eating according to these guidelines in this book for about 4-5 weeks now and have experienced convincing and even dramatic results.

But first let me give you a little background.

I've had gradually declining health for many years now. All my vitals are borderline dangerous: weight, waist size (over 40"), blood pressure, lipid profile (high cholesterol, triglycerides, low HDL, etc), signs of insulin resistance. My father has adult-onset diabetes and I know I'm on the same track if I don't make a change. While I've known for almost 10 years that the warning signs are there, it wasn't until a health check-up through my employer prompted me to take action. In the check-up I had all the signs of metabolic syndrome which is just a term used to describe the combination of all the above symptoms and also is used to describe someone with insulin resistance which is essentially a pre-diabetic state. I figured I'd have significant lifestyle changes sooner or later if I get diabetes. I might as well make the changes now so that I can choose what they will be.

I visited the doctor to get checked out and did extensive research and reading to find out how best to address metabolic syndrome. What I found was very confusing at best. Every book I read touted a different approach to handling metabolic syndrome. They mostly had similarities but sometimes were dramatically different and contradictory.

I settled on an approach outlined in the book "The Insulin-Resistance Diet." This was a great book that taught be the importance of insulin in your metabolic process and that controlling your insulin response is key in managing your weight and, in-turn, metabolic syndrome. To manage insulin it taught a way of "linking" carbs and protein so dampen the insulin response. The method was simple and seemed sustainable as a long-term eating plan. For about 4 months I used this method (with varying degrees of faithfulness) and lost about 5 pounds over that period of time.

In October a friend from high school came into town with his family. Over dinner we found out that he and his wife had made some dramatic lifestyle changes over the last many months, one of which was to eat a paleo diet which is very similar to that found in this book (yes I'll get back to the book). I remembered that my doctor had suggested I might try a paleo diet and asked more about it. It didn't take much convincing and I was ready to give it a try. I started applying some of the principles within a few days and gradually got more and more strict in living the principles as I learned more.

Here are my results so far:

--I've lost just over 10 pounds.
--I've re-gained 3 notches on my belt.
--My blood pressure is now normal (119/79) after being in the pre-hypertension range (140/90).
--My energe level is extremely stable. No more highs and lows. No more food comas. No more trying to stay awake on my drive home. I can even wake up much more easily in the morning (I've never been a morning person).
--No more food cravings, particularly for cookies and doughnuts which were my personal kryptonite.

We'll see in the next couple of months how this improves my poor lipid profile. The good news with this lifestyle is that it's one I think I'll be able to maintain.

A very rough overview of the book

The book outlines several steps for living a primal lifestyle - that is to say one that paleolithic man may have lived. Mostly the steps are diet related but also outline other aspects of general living. Here's an overview to the most important concepts.

1. DON'T EAT GRAINS, SUGAR, OR LEGUMES, AND REDUCE CARB INTAKE - The book recommends a daily carb intake of 50-100g for weight loss and 100-150 for weight maintenance.

This is by far the most shocking and seemingly unrealistic parts of the plan and one that I didn't immediately embrace. But after starting to dramatically reduce my grain intake I found a dramatic reduction in cravings, particularly for sweets (I could rarely resist a cookie or doughnut everyday after lunch). It was almost magical. I never thought I would be able to resist eating grains. It was tough at first but within the first week I didn't even have a desire for grains. Sure I get a craving on occasion if others are eating cookies or other sweets, and sometimes I indulge, but on a day-to-day basis those cravings are gone.

There are two reasons for not eating grains and reducing carb intake. The first and less-convincing is simply because paleolithic man didn't farm and therefore didn't eat grains. The more convincing reason is that excess carbs and grains in particular produce a very sharp insulin response. Insulin is the main culprit in inducing fat storage not to mention taking a toll on your pancreas which can lead to diabetes.

In my mind this is the single most important principle.

2. EAT MEAT, VEGGIES, NUTS AND FRUIT UNTIL SATISFIED

With this lifestyle you get most of your calories from protein and fat. You train your body to burn body fat and dietary fat for fuel rather than sugar or blood glucose. This seems so counter-intuitive because you end up eating a lot of fats but since you're not producing excessive insulin your body uses the fat for fuel instead of storing it. A great side-effect of this is you don't tend to get ravenously hungry and your energy level remains much more consistent.

3. DON'T DO CHRONIC CARDIO.

I can't speak so much to the exercise portion of the plan since I've just started implementing it. In short you do low-grade cardio (walking primarily) for roughly 2 hours a week (30 minutes a few days a week). Do strength training for 2 days a week focusing mostly on natural body exercises. Do sprinting or interval training for 20-30 minutes once every 7-10 days. Avoid doing cardio over 75% of your max heart rate for extended periods of time.

4. EAT AS ORGANIC AS POSSIBLE.

I haven't followed these guidlines but plan on integrating them in with our family diet over time. Basically you should eat organic produce, grass-fed meat (that sounds weird, I should probably say grass-fed protein sources), and stay was from anything too processed. It reminds me to a recommendation I once heard to shop on the outside walls of your grocery stores. This ends up being about how we're starting to shop now. We avoid boxes :).

So, back to the actual book rating.

The good:
I'm obviously a fan of this lifestyle and right now plan on living these principles for the long haul. The results have been dramatic for me. It's not just the weight loss either but mostly the dramatic difference in how I feel.

The bad:
The book seemed long and drawn out. Chapter 2 was particularly good which chronicles the lifestyle of a typical family and how broken it is. You can get all the basic principles from the authors website (marksdailyapple.com) without having to slog through the book. In fact, he seems to refer to his website countless times throughout the book. Nonetheless I'm was glad to have read the book in whole to get a grasp of the big picture. ...more
3

Jul 09, 2010

At this point, I am primarily detailing my reactions to the book itself, as I have not yet tried the diet and fitness plan. Excuse me, the “lifestyle.” None of these diet and fitness books want to call themselves diet and fitness books. The “Primal Blueprint” is a “way of life” – just like all those other ways of life out there. It’s not “restrictive” like a diet – unless, of course, you consider eliminating an entire food group from your diet to be restrictive, or only being able to purchase At this point, I am primarily detailing my reactions to the book itself, as I have not yet tried the diet and fitness plan. Excuse me, the “lifestyle.” None of these diet and fitness books want to call themselves diet and fitness books. The “Primal Blueprint” is a “way of life” – just like all those other ways of life out there. It’s not “restrictive” like a diet – unless, of course, you consider eliminating an entire food group from your diet to be restrictive, or only being able to purchase and consume organic and/or locally grown foods to be restrictive. He does give you an out, however, in maintaining this very restrictive diet: aim for 80% of the time. As long as you maintain it 80% of the time, you’ll be on the road to improvement.

The Primal Blueprint is similar to an Atkins plus fruits and vegetables plan or South Beach minus whole wheat plan. No grains or starches at all –no bread, no pasta, no potatoes, no rice no sweets. And limit dairy (and only drink/eat raw dairy). And no beans, because they’re “toxic” (whatever that means), which is evidenced by the fact that you have to soak them before you eat them. It all has something to do with insulin. Our body doesn't respond well to all these grains. Eat primal, and you’ll feel more full and, once your body adjusts, more energetic. No more carb crashes. And you’ll be eating foods with more nutrients. Your “entire diet should consist of plants and animals.”

It’s “primal” because this is how our hunter/gather ancestors ate. They didn’t eat grain. Agriculture came along and ruined health. Of course, it also made possible modern civilization. Bread has its virtues. Just don't eat it. Ever. Which you can manage to do without going hungry, if you are lucky enough to live in the middle-class in a prosperous, technologically advanced nation - which everyone who would buy this book is.

He intermittently uses evolutionary theory to bolster the evidence of the benefits of this lifestyle. (Evolution, I guess, hasn't adapted our bodies to eating grains in 10,000 years. We're still designed to eat like Gork.) So if you’re trying to decide what’s best to eat, you can always ask yourself, “What would Gork do?” But you can eat some things Gork never would have eaten – a great many fruits and vegetables that are plentifully available to us now and would not have been to Gork – provide you get them locally or organically. Still, limit the sweeter, tastier fruits: grapes, bananas, mangoes, papayas, nectarines, pineapple, oranges, plums, and tangerines. And no potatoes or corn, of course. Fortunately, you don’t have to limit nuts and berries – a prime source of food for hunters and gatherers.

The fitness recommendations make sense and rely on low-impact aerobic exercise such as walking or hiking 2-5 hours a week, high-intensity all out “sprints” for less than ten minutes once a week, and heavy lifting for 7-60 minutes one to three times a week. This is actually a doable fitness plan for me (especially if I start with 7 minutes and once a week on the heavy lifting and do smaller weights with more reps, which he endorses as just as good as larger weights with fewer reps.) He provides quite a bit of evidence for why all out high cardio on a regular basis is not a good way to go.

He also throws in a few other suggestions: get enough direct sunlight to make sure you have enough Vitamin D (his time recommendations are very moderate here and so I’m pretty sure I’m already getting this; mainly because I’m a stay-at-home mom and outside quite a bit with the kids); get seven to eight hours of sleep a day, with a regular bed time and wake time (doing pretty well there); and don’t be stupid (can’t argue with that).

The book itself is extremely repetitive, and could have easily been boiled down to fifty pages without losing any essential information. There are a number of lame attempts at jokes throughout, to lighten an otherwise heavy volume of information. He makes liberal use of quotations from a wide range of famous people – politicians, writers, athletes. There are plenty of shaded boxes and charts to please the eye and tell you what you’ve already been told in pictorial form. There is a lot of exaggeration in the book, particular with the tossing around of the word "toxin."

-----

ADDITION: I did a trial run. I kept the diet but did less than the suggested exercise, though more than usual. I lost six pounds in two weeks. And then I quit because I'm weak and lazy and because having most of my diet consist of meat and vegetables and no grains made me feel sluggish, tired, unhappy, and like I wanted to vomit once a day. ...more
3

April 8, 2017

Good Primer---IF YOU DON't ALREADY OWN the first version
Primal Blueprint is a great read-with ONE huge caveat. If you have either read or own the original version of Mark Sisson's Primal Blueprint, then don't bother buying this version. It is pretty much the exact same version as the original with the addition of a few more anecdotes (found on his website), some somewhat cheesy graphics, and lots of photos of himself pretty much shirtless. While I am an advocate of the Primal/Ancestral way of wellness, I found myself rather "over it" with this version. If you're new to this way of wellness, then you can certainly go ahead and purchase this text. BUT if you have either the original or are more advanced in Primal/Ancestral wellness, then you skip this version.
3

December 17, 2016

All good stuff inside
All good stuff inside! BUT....I have the previous version. I have the 21 day challenge. I have Primal Endurance. This new version will be best used to practice lifting heavy things. Sure Mr. Sisson has changed his mind on a few things like protein, and exercise and has added a bunch of color self portraits......BUT as one that keeps up to date with primal paleo life I think he should have provided a free amendment. Because I live in Canada I did not even get the freebe offered with the deal. I have buyers remorse. I will need help lifting this volume up to my bookshelf where it will stay. Amazon delivery was very good as usual.
5

Jul 17, 2011

This is the best book I've read about what is also known as the "paleo" diet (no grains, reduced dairy, no sugar but honey, lots of vegetables, fruits, good fats like coconut oil, high-quality meat and eggs, and nuts). He explains the science in a logical way and outlines the diet in a down-to-earth, doable fashion. (His website at Mark's Daily Apple is also a treasure trove.) After putting many of these principles into practice, I've dropped almost 35 pounds since late January. My blood sugar This is the best book I've read about what is also known as the "paleo" diet (no grains, reduced dairy, no sugar but honey, lots of vegetables, fruits, good fats like coconut oil, high-quality meat and eggs, and nuts). He explains the science in a logical way and outlines the diet in a down-to-earth, doable fashion. (His website at Mark's Daily Apple is also a treasure trove.) After putting many of these principles into practice, I've dropped almost 35 pounds since late January. My blood sugar isn't screwy anymore, my energy levels and moods are better, and my allergies and asthma are better. When I go off the diet, I have problems again. So I think the best review of this book is to say: It works! ...more
5

Jun 26, 2012

As a vegan who was recently diagnosed with celiac disease, I wondered what the hell I was going to eat now. Along my research path, I stumbled across this book and I am now thinking celiac disease may be one of the best things that has ever happened to me. Mark Sisson pretty much sums up all the common sense stuff that somehow we have forgotten in our culture. This is not a diet but a way to really LIVE. I've been gluten free for a little over two weeks and primal for about one week and I have As a vegan who was recently diagnosed with celiac disease, I wondered what the hell I was going to eat now. Along my research path, I stumbled across this book and I am now thinking celiac disease may be one of the best things that has ever happened to me. Mark Sisson pretty much sums up all the common sense stuff that somehow we have forgotten in our culture. This is not a diet but a way to really LIVE. I've been gluten free for a little over two weeks and primal for about one week and I have lost 14 lbs and feel my body changing every day for the better. Best of all, NOTHING HURTS anymore. I highly recommend this book to everyone, not just celiacs. It just might change your life. ...more
5

July 2, 2017

The BEST wellness book I ever read!
In the past year I've read over 20 books on health and wellness and nutrition and fitness, and found this to be the single best source for a comprehensive overview of virtually all aspects of finding wellness in your life. Don't be deceived by the easy conversational tone of the writing --I find this book has deep wisdom and is extremely well-informed, making accessible the same latest research and thought that I read in more difficult and technical books and articles. I bought 3 copies so far, I give them to the people I love who show readiness to transform their physical (and even emotional/spiritual) condition.
4

Sep 20, 2011

This book isn't written particularly well, but I would give 5 stars for the advice. If you want to get more into the details that Mark glosses over, pick up one of the Gary Taubes books. "Why We Get Fat" is a lot more readable than "Good Calories, Bad Calories".

However, the advice in the book is spot-on. I have been following the advice for about 3 months now, with very few variations. I was already in pretty decent shape, but following this advice, I was able to easily lose a little more fat This book isn't written particularly well, but I would give 5 stars for the advice. If you want to get more into the details that Mark glosses over, pick up one of the Gary Taubes books. "Why We Get Fat" is a lot more readable than "Good Calories, Bad Calories".

However, the advice in the book is spot-on. I have been following the advice for about 3 months now, with very few variations. I was already in pretty decent shape, but following this advice, I was able to easily lose a little more fat and put on a little more muscle. And I actually lifted weights less than before. Additionally, I have felt much better since giving up some grains. My insulin levels seem to have normalized, and I no longer feel shaky when I'm late for a meal. Also, eating this way means that you never feel bloated. I had always assumed that feeling bloated after a large meal was normal. Now, I can eat a pound of steak and a 1/2 pound salad and still want to take the dog on a walk.

Highly recommended for the information that it contains. ...more
2

Mar 04, 2012

I've been familiar with paleo-lifestyle for about a year now. I recently heard of Mark on an episode of the Lew Rockwell Show.

Wiki: "Mark Sisson is an American fitness author and blogger, and a former distance runner, triathlete and Ironman competitor. Sisson finished 4th in the February 1982 Ironman World Championship."

I agree with most things in the book and have shifted my eating habits in his direction. I thought the book was informative, easy to read, but way too fluffy. I didn't like the I've been familiar with paleo-lifestyle for about a year now. I recently heard of Mark on an episode of the Lew Rockwell Show.

Wiki: "Mark Sisson is an American fitness author and blogger, and a former distance runner, triathlete and Ironman competitor. Sisson finished 4th in the February 1982 Ironman World Championship."

I agree with most things in the book and have shifted my eating habits in his direction. I thought the book was informative, easy to read, but way too fluffy. I didn't like the fact that the book exceeded 200+ pages for the content presented. I feel like you could have understood everything in the book by just reading a few articles and in less time.

The book could have been easily trimmed to 100 pages.

Though, if you aren't familiar with the primal lifestyle then this is a good book to get started.

Mark presents an exercise routine and some dietary guidelines which I liked.

Interview with Mark: http://www.lewrockwell.com/lewrockwel... ...more
5

November 29, 2016

Five Stars
If you are looking at going Paleo or Primal this is the book to guide through a healthy lifestyle.
2

September 17, 2017

Two Stars
This wasn't really much of an update to the first book. Just check it out from the library.
3

January 4, 2018

Great concept, but I cannot recommend based on the amount of evolution involved.
I had high hopes for this book. I read through the entire Introduction and I was enthusiastic about reading the main text. I was; however, disappointed by what I read in the first few pages. As this review is entirely my own opinion I can clearly state here that I do not believe in evolution. I think it's complete poppy cock. I cannot recommend this book to those who wish to eat healthy and only wish to eat healthy. Pass this one up if you don't want to have evolution shoved down your throat. The author claims that he will dispel all of the lies that you've been told about being healthy and what you should and shouldn't eat. Instead I was bombarded with lies and a belief system that I do not embrace. If you are looking for a book that is along the same lines as this one (eat real food, and forget the processed junk) I can highly recommend Dr. Caroline Leaf's book, "Think and Eat Yourself Smart". ( https://www.amazon.com/Think-Eat-Yourself-Smart-Neuroscientific/dp/0801015715/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1515096879&sr=8-1&keywords=think+and+eat+yourself+smart ) Mr. Sisson's book is not one that encourages me to think about what I read. But the very fact that I have trained myself to think about what I read has caused me to stop reading this book. He may have good points and excellent tips on living a healthier lifestyle. But, after the "Welcome" and "Introduction" sections I could not find any. If you agree with evolution and believe in it then by all means read the book. I hope it improves your lifestyle. But if you don't want to be bombarded with a bunch of evolution and you just want to learn how to be healthy, pass this one up. You don't need to be an evolutionist to realize that the SAD Diet (Standard American Diet) is not a healthy lifestyle.
5

Oct 18, 2011

Mark Sisson’s enthusiasm for Primal eating and his robust and entertaining writing style make this book a pleasure to read! The premise of The Primal Blueprint is to encourage you to eat and move the way that mankind has evolved to over the past two million years. He discusses why “calories in, calories out” is not always successful, and what other factors you should consider if you want to not only lose weight, but improve your health and longevity.

The Primal Blueprint dispels many long-held Mark Sisson’s enthusiasm for Primal eating and his robust and entertaining writing style make this book a pleasure to read! The premise of The Primal Blueprint is to encourage you to eat and move the way that mankind has evolved to over the past two million years. He discusses why “calories in, calories out” is not always successful, and what other factors you should consider if you want to not only lose weight, but improve your health and longevity.

The Primal Blueprint dispels many long-held myths about carbohydrates and insulin, ketones, and even cholesterol. It also examines specific foods and food groups and explains their effects on human metabolism so that you can fine tune your diet and achieve better results with your health and fitness goals.

One of the primary strengths of this book is that, in addition to giving both general and specific guidelines for you to follow, Sisson encourages you to continually listen to your body and fine tune all of his advice based on the feedback that your body gives you. That, coupled with the excellent information, makes The Primal Blueprint a definite must-read. ...more
5

August 20, 2017

The only lifestyle and health book you'll ever need
I've read both the original and The New Primal Blueprint. The new edition goes much deeper and introduces a wider range of subject matter than the original. I would recommend this to either a Primal enthusiast or someone looking for long term relief from existing health issues. A nice mix of tough love, humor and solutions all wrapped up in understandable and actionable principles.
4

February 10, 2017

Lots of information! I do not believe in evolution ...
Lots of information! I do not believe in evolution which is referred to in this book. However, if you can look past that it is very informative and we plan to try his plan.
4

May 27, 2010

I had to give this book a certain amount of credence since I am exhibiting so many of the problems Mark Sisson claims results from eating too many carbs. Although I walk 5 miles a day except on week-ends and have since I retired a little over 2 years ago, I have not lost weight, I am developing an immuno response problem with my skin, and my cholesterol count continues to climb. The most alarming news I gleaned from this book is that the consumption of potatoes, rice, bread, etc. causes insulin I had to give this book a certain amount of credence since I am exhibiting so many of the problems Mark Sisson claims results from eating too many carbs. Although I walk 5 miles a day except on week-ends and have since I retired a little over 2 years ago, I have not lost weight, I am developing an immuno response problem with my skin, and my cholesterol count continues to climb. The most alarming news I gleaned from this book is that the consumption of potatoes, rice, bread, etc. causes insulin production. Until now I thought I only had to watch the sweets, a life-long love affair that I have found difficult to control. Diabetes runs in my family. "It's in the genes" and Mark Sisson would laugh and say, "Reprogram the genes". Wow! What a concept! So, I told myself, let's give this a try for a few weeks and see what happens. Easier said than done. After four days in which I have not yet managed to get through an entire day without bread, potatoes, sugar, or pasta (not all on the same day, but at least one slip each day), I was getting distressed at the difficulty. Then I remembered Mark says 80% success is good. You don't have to be 100%. I breathed a little easier and tried to at least eat primally during the day - until dinner. By day four I had managed at least this. Lo and behold, I found I had also lost two pounds! Which means I need to try harder. What I really, really like about this approach is that I don't have to think about food all the time, something I really hate about diets. All I have to ask myself is, "Would I eat this raw?" and if the answer is no, I try to skip it. This does not mean meat. Just the vegetables and fruits. I also don't tell myself I can't have a cookie or a brownie. Skipping those will come later -- probably much later, but eventually I hope to get there, too. Meanwhile, we'll see how it goes after a few weeks. I had a stomach ache for the first two days, much to my surprise, but it went away on day three and I have to admit my energy levels are picking up a bit and I am sleeping well. Not too bad for day four. Oh, and Mark makes an important point when he says the way you eat and the way you exercise should be pleasing to you or you'll never stick to it. A very good point. Stress comes in many forms, doesn't it? The only point he makes that I would argue with is the amount of water one should consume. Of course, I don't like dairy products, particularly milk, I don't like coffee, I don't drink much fruit juice, preferring to get my juice by eating fruit, I can't drink soda because I suffer from GERD (along with 80% of Americans), so I almost always choose to drink water with an occasional Arnie Palmer for variety. I think of water consumption as a way to wash the inside just like standing in a shower washes the outside. Water is good, but I agree with Mark, drink when you're thirsty and don't force it down, but then, I have no problem drinking four or more glasses of tap water daily and would be hard put to drink less. On the other hand, 8 glasses does seem a bit much. ...more
5

Jan 31, 2011

I really enjoyed this book. It's well written and nicely laid out. The chapter summary/highlight sections are great for sharing with people who are interested in the topic, but maybe not committed enough to read the whole book yet. The information presented here makes a lot of sense. Don't think of it as a diet...this is a plan you want to implement permanently--at least aiming to do so 80% of the time.

After only a week of seriously following the plan I feel better than I have in years. Of I really enjoyed this book. It's well written and nicely laid out. The chapter summary/highlight sections are great for sharing with people who are interested in the topic, but maybe not committed enough to read the whole book yet. The information presented here makes a lot of sense. Don't think of it as a diet...this is a plan you want to implement permanently--at least aiming to do so 80% of the time.

After only a week of seriously following the plan I feel better than I have in years. Of course only time will tell how successful I will be, but I'm confident that I'm at least headed down a better path now. Check out the author's website if you want to get a better understanding of what this is all about before reading the book.
...more
4

Jun 06, 2011

Like all of these diet books, what should fit in a 5-10 page white paper has been stretched out to fill a book.

That said, this approach to eating has changed my life. I picked up the book because I was diagnosed with advanced arthritis in several joints and wanted to treat myself with diet rather than with drugs. My pain diminished markedly within 7-10 days, and has pretty much stayed away (except when I cheat).

Additionally, I've lost 10 lbs and digestive problems I've had my entire life have Like all of these diet books, what should fit in a 5-10 page white paper has been stretched out to fill a book.

That said, this approach to eating has changed my life. I picked up the book because I was diagnosed with advanced arthritis in several joints and wanted to treat myself with diet rather than with drugs. My pain diminished markedly within 7-10 days, and has pretty much stayed away (except when I cheat).

Additionally, I've lost 10 lbs and digestive problems I've had my entire life have completely disappeared.

There is no big secret here: I'm eating fish, poultry, meat, eggs, nuts, fruits, and vegetables -- all healthy foods. I'm not eating: dairy, grains, most legumes, potatoes.

Next, I'll try his approach to exercise. ...more
5

November 1, 2018

Great information
I agree with other reviewers - it's kind of a slog to get through this book, and it could probably use another cut (this is the 2nd edition). But the information is true, true, true, and could be lifesaving. (This is nit-picky, but large chunks of the book are presented in color fonts which don't come up well on e-readers. I'll give up my e-reader when somebody pries it out of my cold, dead hands, but I had to read this book on a tablet.) Now for what's great about the book:

Mr. Sisson opens up and gives you all his thoughts, and a few of them continue to resonate for me, weeks after finishing the book. The comparison between the normal day of a caveman family vs. a modern family is one. Here's another (Ch. 10): "In my opinion, the heaviest realization of all is that you are on your own. The imagined safety net of government, modern medicine, or the food or pharmaceutical industries looking after your health is a facade." Sad but true. A recent health crisis in my life showed me that my doctors were focused on treating the symptoms, not the causes, and using drugs to do it. Several health professionals told me that my problems were caused by inflammation, but not one of them bothered to mention that the #1 dietary cause of inflammation is sugar. Why not? It would have been good to know. Instead, I got painkillers that made me sick.

Like anyone adopting a new eating plan, I found myself at that crossroads, thinking, "Now I know what NOT to eat. Tell me what I CAN eat." The author goes into great detail on that, and has a website with recipes and encouragement.

One of the things I found most refreshing was his advice on staying active. He advises regular exercise, but not knock-yourself-out exercise. So true. The time of my life when I was the fattest and looked the worst was the 10 years I devoted to a supercharged aerobics and weightlifting program. I was pushing into plus sizes when I finally got a grip on myself and stopped. Riding a bike is fine. Yoga is fine. Pilates - great. Bringing yourself to the point of collapse - not great. It was a relief to have someone with the author's fitness background reinforce that thinking for me.

Mr. Sisson is obviously passionate about the paleo lifestyle, and has devoted his life and career to it. It's worth listening to him, because he's not just an enthusiast - he's done his homework and has the research to back up what he says.
4

January 28, 2019

A good place to start
A nice place to start with nutrition, because this is based on how humans lived and ate tens of thousands of years ago. But beware. This should only be a starting point. I'll recommend to experiment on yourself over many years. How are you really feeling after starting with this diet? Experiment with foods. Does it make you feel better physically and psychologically? If yes, continue, if not eat something else. Everyone is different even though we have the same ancestors. Evolution has also existed the last 10.000 years, so take that into account. If you're an Arfrican your best diet is probably different from a white mans. And if you're old, your ideal diet is not the same as when you were 20. And dont forget the psychological/emotional aspects. Your emotions are highly influenced by the chemistry in your body, which is influenced by the food you eat. I recommend the field of Ayurveda for a deeper understanding of this,, which is a more holistic way of thinking about health than this book is.

But anyway, I recommend this book. Here is an infographic which summarizes the book quite well.

Best Books from your Favorite Authors & Publishers

compare-icon compare-icon
Thousands of books

Take your time and choose the perfect book.

review-icon review-icon
Read Reviews

Read ratings and reviews to make sure you are on the right path.

vendor-icon vendor-icon
Multiple Stores

Check price from multiple stores for a better shopping experience.

gift-icon

Enjoy Result