The New Jerusalem Bible: The Complete Text of the Ancient Canon of the Scriptures with Up-to-Date Introductions and Notes Info

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Contains the complete text of the ancient canon of scripture,
along with up-to-date and extensive introductions and notes. Eight pages
of color maps and indexes, including biblical themes, personal names,
and major footnotes.

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Reviews for The New Jerusalem Bible: The Complete Text of the Ancient Canon of the Scriptures with Up-to-Date Introductions and Notes:

4

Jul 26, 2015

(the New Jerusalem Bible (NJB))

This is the first of my Catholic Bibles that I have read. I quite liked it, though less than the Amplified Bible.

There is no maps, but there's a glossary, chronological table, and measurements that are helpful. Each book has a small introduction and subjects are sometimes given title within the text, which are helpful. I also like this one's size.

Some things I like less, like only giving the name-meanings of Job's three daughters (I would rather have the (the New Jerusalem Bible (NJB))

This is the first of my Catholic Bibles that I have read. I quite liked it, though less than the Amplified Bible.

There is no maps, but there's a glossary, chronological table, and measurements that are helpful. Each book has a small introduction and subjects are sometimes given title within the text, which are helpful. I also like this one's size.

Some things I like less, like only giving the name-meanings of Job's three daughters (I would rather have the untranslated ones if one would have to choose between the two choices). The goddess of Ephesus was named Artemis, not Diana as the Romans would've put it (it's put as Diana here). And then there's the 'sallying out' of fortresses, now and then - I haven't heard it elsewhere and it sounds a bit funny, like they're almost waltzing out, holding onto the hems of their shirts or something. The second point here is the only one that's not about my taste, but still...

But, in the end, this is a decent translation, and a good Catholic Bible. I still have to read some other versions, but this one I will keep, and can recommend :) ...more
5

Feb 28, 2019

This is the heavy hardbound book out of Doubleday (1985) with a repro of Raphael's Transfiguration on the front cover. I came to this bible late in life, having grown up Protestant, but despite its size and bulk it has much to recommend it to the general reader.

For one thing, it includes the Deuterocanonical books ("Apocryphal books") that Protestant bibles generally do not. While not the most elaborate study bible out there, it has learned and helpful commentary.

What may matter most to us This is the heavy hardbound book out of Doubleday (1985) with a repro of Raphael's Transfiguration on the front cover. I came to this bible late in life, having grown up Protestant, but despite its size and bulk it has much to recommend it to the general reader.

For one thing, it includes the Deuterocanonical books ("Apocryphal books") that Protestant bibles generally do not. While not the most elaborate study bible out there, it has learned and helpful commentary.

What may matter most to us general readers is: how does it read? It reads differently from most of the English-language bibles around today, the main reason is that it's not descended from the line of (Tyndale) King James (aka "Authorised" Version) that most such bibles are. Here's a comparison of a crucial Old Testament passage in three different translations, leading with this one:

Genesis Ch. 3, verses 12-14:

In the New Jerusalem Bible:

"12.The man replied, 'It was the woman you put with me; she gave me some fruit from the tree, and I ate it.' 13.Then Yahweh God said to the woman, 'Why did you do that?' The woman replied, 'The snake tempted me and I ate.' 14.Then Yahweh God said to the snake, 'Because you have done this, Accursed be you of all animals wild and tame! On your belly you will go and on dust you will feed as long as you live."

New International Version (NIV):

12 The man said, “The woman you put here with me—she gave me some fruit from the tree, and I ate it.”
13 Then the Lord God said to the woman, “What is this you have done?”
The woman said, “The serpent deceived me, and I ate.”
14 So the Lord God said to the serpent, “Because you have done this,
“Cursed are you above all livestock
and all wild animals!
You will crawl on your belly
and you will eat dust
all the days of your life.”

Finally, the Amplified Bible:

12 And the man said, “The woman whom You gave to be with me—she gave me [fruit] from the tree, and I ate it.” 13 Then the Lord God said to the woman, “What is this that you have done?” And the woman said, “The serpent beguiled and deceived me, and I ate [from the forbidden tree].” 14 The Lord God said to the serpent,
“Because you have done this,
You are cursed more than all the cattle,
And more than any animal of the field;
On your belly you shall go
And dust you shall eat
All the days of your life.”

The reader will notice that there are differences between the New Jerusalem Bible and the other two, apart from the fact that the NJB says "Yahweh God" instead of "Lord God," and that when the Almighty speaks, it is not shown in verse. To me it just reads more smoothly in many cases: Eve complains that the snake "tempted" her rather than "deceived," "beguiled" or even "tricked" her as in other versions.

THE NEW JERUSALEM BIBLE is not a novelty, but a significant different translation of the bible. Unless you are Catholic you may not want to make it your primary bible but it is a worthy contender among bibles, and many people (including one bible-as-literature professor) have told me they think it just reads more smoothly and often more meaningfully, too. The fifty-dollar retail price can be significantly undercut by shopping around, or buying used.

THE NEW JERUSALEM BIBLE has a new version on the way: The Revised New Jerusalem Bible. I'm sorry to say I am not familiar with it.

...more
5

Apr 22, 2008

The Jerusalem Bible was the first English bible I actually read from cover to cover while taking the introductory courses in Hebrew and Christian scriptures in college. The reason for selecting it had nothing to do with its identification as the newest Catholic bible. It had everything to do with the fact that the scholar's edition purchased had better notes and marginalia than the Oxford Revised Standard or the New English texts also recommended for class.

Unlike other Catholic bibles I've The Jerusalem Bible was the first English bible I actually read from cover to cover while taking the introductory courses in Hebrew and Christian scriptures in college. The reason for selecting it had nothing to do with its identification as the newest Catholic bible. It had everything to do with the fact that the scholar's edition purchased had better notes and marginalia than the Oxford Revised Standard or the New English texts also recommended for class.

Unlike other Catholic bibles I've referred to, the Jerusalem is intellectually honest. They may have the trinitarian texts which appear in such editions, but they always include notes indicating that such texts are only found in very late manuscript traditions.

Unlike the Oxford Revised Standard, the Jerusalem is free of the compulsion to copy, as much as honestly possible, the traditional formulations of the Authorized (or "King James") Version. This was a plus for me as all my previous serious study had been either with the RSV or AV. I wanted a fresh look and something that wasn't tied to Protestant traditions. There is, however, substantial reliance on the translations of the original French edition.

The only great weakness of the Jerusalem is that it is not as complete as the Oxford R.S.V., not including all canons of all Christian sects as their scholarly edition does.

In 1985 I went out and purchased this edition of The New Jerusalem Bible for classes with Loyola University's Institute of Pastoral Studies, giving my old edition away to someone who lacked a decent text. This newer version is a bit more literal than its predecessor. ...more
0

Sep 01, 2013

Spent months reading the bible and looking at it from a historical and literary perspective. Eye-opening stuff. This is supposedly the most accurate translation, though I did notice that in the King James (considered the most beautiful, if less accurate, translation) there is a UNICORN in psalm 22, whereas in this version it is merely a wild bull.

I'm not going to pick a rating for the bible, Goodreads.
5

Aug 15, 2008

It's the most accurate translation currently available, to my knowledge. I like to go back and forth between it and other translations like the KJV or the NIV when I don't understand something.
5

Jul 11, 2008

Best version of the Bible, in my opinion. It balances accuracy with beauty of writing, and is more fair to women without being politically correct in a fake way.
5

Dec 21, 2007

I am fortunate enough to own the edition illustrated by Salvador Dali and it is exquisite - both a delight to the senses, but also so readable. Yahweh is used in the Old Testament for clarity and authenticity - I find myself going to this out-sized edition more often than a smaller King James version every time. I have this in the large edition and also in the smaller paperback. One of the reasons I was drawn to this translation is that it is directly translated from the Hebrew, Greek or I am fortunate enough to own the edition illustrated by Salvador Dali and it is exquisite - both a delight to the senses, but also so readable. Yahweh is used in the Old Testament for clarity and authenticity - I find myself going to this out-sized edition more often than a smaller King James version every time. I have this in the large edition and also in the smaller paperback. One of the reasons I was drawn to this translation is that it is directly translated from the Hebrew, Greek or Aramaic. I received this as a gift upon graduation and I have treasured it since then as one of the most beloved books I own. ...more
0

Oct 02, 2009

I wrote a David Cross quote in the margins of Genesis when I read this translation for a class in college. What was it...oh yeah, it was regarding God resting on the seventh day: "God gets tired?? God needs a nap???"
5

Feb 10, 2011

If you are looking for modern, clear language then this in my opinion is the best bible available.

Although technically Catholic, the fact that the Church of England also approve of this version is very important to me.
4

Jan 04, 2013

Most people who debate the Bible's legitimacy have never actually read it. The NJB makes this task accessible to students of religion.
4

Feb 07, 2013

liked this pocket version a lot, some times if I was reading on the road, the text is way to small. Other that that a very good Bile and includes "Deuterocanonical":) books as well, so in the old Testament section you will get more then 66 "original" books.
5

Aug 02, 2015

I am not Catholic, however, the NJB is an academically sound version. Interesting for it's emphasis on certain key words. A must own for any serious student of scripture.
5

Apr 24, 2008

A crisp, modern and scholarly edition of the Bible with commentary. Not as Poetic as King James or as readable as the Good News version. It's Catholic, too. Useful for those using the Bible as a reference or for those interested in the process of translating.
4

Sep 10, 2007

The Jerusalem Bible is a contemporary English version of what started out as a French project. It is a fine translation, with some very beautiful passages. The strength of this Bible is that it works from a clean slate and employed some of the finest translators and writers in the English language. Tolkien helped a bit with it
5

Jul 26, 2010

I give this 5 stars because it's necessary to real the Bible in this day and age and realize how crazy and sick it is and how if there really was a god you should do everything in your power to fight him and bring down his immoral and sick religion. That's not to say there aren't some beautiful parts or that Jesus doesn't drop a few words of wisdom here and there.

I love it when Jehovah's witnesses come to my door- they don't know what they're in for and always leave confused. That's reason I give this 5 stars because it's necessary to real the Bible in this day and age and realize how crazy and sick it is and how if there really was a god you should do everything in your power to fight him and bring down his immoral and sick religion. That's not to say there aren't some beautiful parts or that Jesus doesn't drop a few words of wisdom here and there.

I love it when Jehovah's witnesses come to my door- they don't know what they're in for and always leave confused. That's reason enough to read this book. ...more
5

Apr 03, 2018

I enjoy this Bible translation because it seems to read as more literary than most. Having grown up hearing Bible verses in the King James version, I miss their poetic charms with most modern translations. This edition seems to flow better than most.

Once I'd bought this one and had been using it for a few years, I read that this English translation was done from the French translation of the original Hebrew. That made complete sense; I studied French for several years, have a natural attraction I enjoy this Bible translation because it seems to read as more literary than most. Having grown up hearing Bible verses in the King James version, I miss their poetic charms with most modern translations. This edition seems to flow better than most.

Once I'd bought this one and had been using it for a few years, I read that this English translation was done from the French translation of the original Hebrew. That made complete sense; I studied French for several years, have a natural attraction to it, and found that my genealogy goes back to some parts of France.

I also like the large number of citations in this book; footnotes, maps, a chronological table, indices...it's very well documented. Although this is not the version recommended by my church, it's the Bible I prefer to use. ...more
5

Jan 04, 2019

Excellent notes. Superb literary masterpiece. Unlike many Scripture renditions, this is more than a translation, this is a work of art, as is the Authorized Version.
5

Aug 14, 2019

First let me make a confession: I've marked it as 'read' but that isn't strictly true. I have, however, read those parts that make up the recognised canonical books of the Bible. The apocryphal books I left until last. The Maccabees I have always intended to read since, although not part of the OT canon, they have always been recommended as well worth reading.

As I write, I've read the books of Judith and Tobit, Both Maccabees and of course, the missing last chapter of Daniel featuring Bel and First let me make a confession: I've marked it as 'read' but that isn't strictly true. I have, however, read those parts that make up the recognised canonical books of the Bible. The apocryphal books I left until last. The Maccabees I have always intended to read since, although not part of the OT canon, they have always been recommended as well worth reading.

As I write, I've read the books of Judith and Tobit, Both Maccabees and of course, the missing last chapter of Daniel featuring Bel and the dragon. I have to say I've enjoyed them all so far but I can see why they didn't make the final cut when the OT was put together.
But since I have another three of the contested books to go (Wisdom, Ecclesiasticus, and Baruch) you might ask why I have the nerve to review a book that I haven't quite finished; and you'd have every right to do so. But since I have read the Bible 'proper' in it, it's upon that that I feel justified to comment.
My opinion? Simply put, it is now my favourite of all the seven Translations I own. While the NT is on par with the others - apart from its translation of Jesus' reason to allow divorce - the Old Testament is breathtaking.
Firstly, it not only retains the Divine Name, but it uses the more accurate Yahweh form rather than the constructed Jehovah rendering of the tetragrammaton. But then I would prefer that to the superstitious capitalised 'LORD' that has become the norm.
Secondly, and just as important, it flows in a way that draws you in with its sheer poetry. Several sections, particularly in the Psalms, gave me goosebumps.

The book referred to is the hardcover, which is good for reference but far too small to just read; for that purpose, I bought the regular size paperback as well, so you could say that this is two reviews in one. Can't be bad, eh? ...more
5

Sep 23, 2016

I have read a lot of Bible translations in my 30+ years on this Earth - Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox. There are MANY Protestant translations. Some are too stilted to read (I'm looking at you King James), and some are too casual to read (Sorry Good News Translation!). Catholics don't have that "luxury" of all the translations. The main versions I can think of are the Revised Standard (RSV) and New Revised (NRSV); New American (NAB) and New America Revised (NABRE); the Douay-Rheims (DR); and I have read a lot of Bible translations in my 30+ years on this Earth - Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox. There are MANY Protestant translations. Some are too stilted to read (I'm looking at you King James), and some are too casual to read (Sorry Good News Translation!). Catholics don't have that "luxury" of all the translations. The main versions I can think of are the Revised Standard (RSV) and New Revised (NRSV); New American (NAB) and New America Revised (NABRE); the Douay-Rheims (DR); and the Jerusalem Bible (JB) and New Jerusalem (NJB). Each translation has strengths and weaknesses, and different people have different preferences for translations. I'm not going to tell you which one to pick today, but instead just tell you about about the New Jerusalem Bible as it is one I haven't read before until recently.

The New Jerusalem Bible was published in 1985. It is a hardcover volume that is over 2100 pages long. It is single column format (rare for Bibles, but appreciated) and contains introductions to sections, i.e, the Pentateuch and specific books of the Bible. At the back of the Bible are supplements like colored maps, a chronological table, and various indices (major persons, footnotes, etc.) It has some inclusive language, but doesn't go overboard with it. The pages are somewhat see through, but not so thin that you feel like they will rip merely from turning it. There are tons of cross-references in the margins and the amount of footnotes is impressive. The margins themselves feel a little bit bigger (not much mind you) than other editions, which will give you room for notes, if you are the type of person who marks up their Bible.

Overall, I'm pleased with this version of the Bible and would say if you can get it for a reasonable price (MSRP is $50, but Amazon usually has it for $30), it is a good Bible for someone who hasn't read through the Bible before. The language is very inviting without being casual. It is not liturgical like the NABRE, and not literal like the RSV. It is somewhere in the middle, and what I would call a reading Bible. You won't go into great depth using this Bible as a study tool, but it would be useful for the first reading of a passage and then going deeper with a different translation of the Bible. I could see myself reading this one over the NABRE if I am reading for enjoyment, mainly because it flows better (to me) and the page formatting is much more appealing to the eyes. If I was picking one Bible to read for enjoyment and not in-depth study, it would be this one. ...more
3

Aug 12, 2014

Hmm...this Bible was the one I had to buy whilst studying as a convert to the Catholic faith. I used it for the adult course and it was good to use for the material in the lessons and tutor discussion but I can't really say as a Bible to sit and read I have taken to it at all. My problems are mainly with the O.T. and the constant use of Yahweh, I can't get on with that at all. Also the psalms are nothing like the wording I grew up with. I read psalm 23 and thought " really?....."

Not for me I'm Hmm...this Bible was the one I had to buy whilst studying as a convert to the Catholic faith. I used it for the adult course and it was good to use for the material in the lessons and tutor discussion but I can't really say as a Bible to sit and read I have taken to it at all. My problems are mainly with the O.T. and the constant use of Yahweh, I can't get on with that at all. Also the psalms are nothing like the wording I grew up with. I read psalm 23 and thought " really?....."

Not for me I'm afraid. Personally I much prefer the Collins Catholic Bible anglicised NRSV version. It just suits me better and contains what for me are the old familiar psalms plus the Grail psalms. I suppose it's what you are used to.

To sum up the NJB is not a bad Bible, just as a child of the sixties who had an old fashioned Methodist aunt (bless her ) not for me , more accurate or not.
...more
0

Feb 29, 2008

Actually, I couldn't find the book I have, The New Jerusalem Bible, Reader's Edition, dark green paperback. It's got no ISBN number or publication date, though the editor's forward (1989) says it is based on the much larger Regular Edition 1985.

This book is pretty large! Anyway, I like it because it has more obscure books of the bible, like Tobit (I love Tobit) and Judith (that's my real name, though I use Indira) and Esther. And all the prophets like Jonah and Habakkuk.

Though for poetry and Actually, I couldn't find the book I have, The New Jerusalem Bible, Reader's Edition, dark green paperback. It's got no ISBN number or publication date, though the editor's forward (1989) says it is based on the much larger Regular Edition 1985.

This book is pretty large! Anyway, I like it because it has more obscure books of the bible, like Tobit (I love Tobit) and Judith (that's my real name, though I use Indira) and Esther. And all the prophets like Jonah and Habakkuk.

Though for poetry and love of language, my favorite is always the King James Version.

I say currently reading because I have never read this whole book and might never. ...more
5

Apr 06, 2015

Ethnic cleansing! Mass murder! Infanticide! Mass rape and forced marriage! Genital mutilation! It starts off great. But Yahweh's Israelites are truly terrible people and it's hard to feel sorry for them later on in the book. In fact I saw it as a good thing Babylon put an end to their reign of terror. But then they get all fanatically passive aggressive which doesn't endear you to them any more. Jesus does lighten things up with his promise of a communist utopia, regardless of whether you have a Ethnic cleansing! Mass murder! Infanticide! Mass rape and forced marriage! Genital mutilation! It starts off great. But Yahweh's Israelites are truly terrible people and it's hard to feel sorry for them later on in the book. In fact I saw it as a good thing Babylon put an end to their reign of terror. But then they get all fanatically passive aggressive which doesn't endear you to them any more. Jesus does lighten things up with his promise of a communist utopia, regardless of whether you have a foreskin or not, but then John goes on that massive drug fuelled bender at the end. ...more
1

Sep 14, 2013

Being a former catholic and having only read the children's version of the bible around the time I did my holy communion I felt it was only right to properly take the time to study the bible and assess its value. Aside from the fiction aspect it gave me a nice insight into the broad structure of patriarchy holding both the jewish and the christian faith together. So aside from the scientific and moral reasoning behind my atheism, my belief in equality between the sexes made me even stronger in Being a former catholic and having only read the children's version of the bible around the time I did my holy communion I felt it was only right to properly take the time to study the bible and assess its value. Aside from the fiction aspect it gave me a nice insight into the broad structure of patriarchy holding both the jewish and the christian faith together. So aside from the scientific and moral reasoning behind my atheism, my belief in equality between the sexes made me even stronger in my rejection of the abrahamic religions. ...more
2

Dec 01, 2016

To be honest, this bible is too long to read the whole book. In the history class, we read some stories from this bible, and they were pretty interesting because you can find out the contradiction and indifference point between Jewish and Christ. What we believe about the religion today is way different from what they believed in the ancient Israel. However, this bible is too heavy to carry in my bag every day, and fell down from the table for hundred times because of hugeness in size.
3

Feb 20, 2008

I know a lot of people love this translation, but I've never really "clicked" with it - I much prefer the New American Bible translation. I do use this particular bible for travelling and for workshops and the like, it's small enough to carry around easily (mostly because it doesn't include a lot of additional reference or study material).

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