The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain Workbook: Guided Practice in the Five Basic Skills of Drawing Info

Fan Club Reviews of best titles on art fashion, artists, history, photography. Check out our top reviews and see what others have to say about the best art and photography books of the year. Check out The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain Workbook: Guided Practice in the Five Basic Skills of Drawing Community Reviews - Find out where to download The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain Workbook: Guided Practice in the Five Basic Skills of Drawing available in multiple formats:Spiral-bound,Paperback,Ring-bound The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain Workbook: Guided Practice in the Five Basic Skills of Drawing Author:Betty Edwards Formats:Spiral-bound,Paperback,Ring-bound Publication Date:Oct 28, 2002


Millions of people have learned to draw using the methods of Dr.
Betty Edwards. Now, in an essential companion to her bestselling
classic, Edwards offers readers the key to mastering this art form:
guided practice in their newfound creative abilities.
Here are
forty new exercises that cover each of the five basic skills of drawing.
Each practice session includes a brief explanation and instructional
drawings, suggestions for materials, sample drawings, and blank pages
for the reader's own drawings. Also provided in this spiral-bound
workbook is a pullout viewfinder, a crucial tool for effective practice.
While The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain focused
primarily on portrait drawing with pencil, this workbook gives readers
experience in various subject matter-still life, landscape, imaginative
drawing-using alternative mediums such as pen and ink, charcoal, and
conté crayon.
For all those who are taking a drawing
class, who have already received instruction through a book or course,
or who prefer to learn by doing, this volume of carefully structured
"homework" offers the perfect opportunity to reinforce and improve their
skills and expand their repertoire.

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Reviews for The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain Workbook: Guided Practice in the Five Basic Skills of Drawing:

2

November 1, 2002

Very Disappointing
I loved the video "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" and also the book "The New Drawing on the right Side of the Brain",but this new book is just a new format for the exercises covered in the book and video. There are not 40 new exercises as promised, and actually there are very few new exercises.
I was looking forward to the book to further the skills I developed with new ideas not to redo the exercises I've completed.
It's a great book for someone who never invested time or money in Betty Edwards' book or video, but it's not worth it if you have.
1

September 2, 2005

More pseudoscientific left/right brain drivel.
The idea that creativity and artistic ability were located in the right hemisphere was an idea first proposed back in the 1960s. It was quickly dismissed because the data (from studies of normal and brain damaged individuals) showed it to be wrong. No competent neuroscientist has taken it seriously for decades. In sum, it is simply wrong to say that art or creativity is "in" the right hemisphere and that training the right hemisphere will improve artistic abilities. In fact, it is absurd for her to even claim that her training program improves right hemisphere function at all. Where is the evidence? Like studies showing that after following her training program people are really better artists and that their right hemispheres are more active, ideally by some fMRI criteria? Yet Edwards goes on and on making her claims and taking money from the gullible.
2

June 15, 2006

Too advanced for beginners
This book is way too hard for a beginner. After I read it, I set it aside and got the book So You Thought You Couldn't Draw by Sandra Angelo. That is truly a workbook for rank beginners. She starts you out with copying the masters, then photos and then from life. Edwards starts you off working from life which is too hard for a novice.

I really liked the way Edwards explains the drawing process though. For an intellectual read, this is good but if you are beginner that wants to learn to draw, buy Sandra Angelo's book So You Thought You Couldn't Draw and its 4 companion DVD's that demonstrate the entire drawing process. You can go from stick figures to artist in just a few weeks. Doing it Edwards way would take you forever and the results aren't nearly as good. When you compare the before and after drawings in Edwards book to Angelo's book you can see that Angelo takes her students to a much higher level of accomplishment.
4

November 25, 2009

Finally, Betty Edwards without the Psychobabble!
I do have her original book and her "new" Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, and each time I picked them up I found the exercises useful but was quite turned off by her fairly incessant, and often physiologically incorrect, psychobabble. Now this exercise book provides you with her exercises largely shorn of the right brain/left brain psychobabble. The exercises are good and do help release and train your creativity and are designed to improve your "vision" of the surrounding world, and in this it succeeds. The workbook has blank pages left for you to draw in the book itself, which is useful since it leaves you with a permanent record of your progress. I do wish they had used better drawing paper for those pages, but then I can be fussy about my materials and since many art students use newsprint for their practice exercises and since the book is meant as a set of exercises rather than as finished art work, I guess I am nitpicking here.
1

September 18, 2004

I don't know much about art, but....
This the worst sort of psycho-babble fused with art. There is only one decent book on learning to draw, "The Natural Way to Draw."
3

October 24, 2005

three stars
The workbook is written in language which could be difficult for people who have no knowledge of drawing. Unfortunately, the "Glossary of Terms" compounded the problem rather than cleared up the difficulties.
5

Jul 26, 2012

This is a workbook that goes with the main text, The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain . It has more exercises than the main text (40 exercises, in fact). This workbook has minimal explanation compared with the main text-- the latter delves a great deal into brain hemisphere function and ways to access those parts that are best for drawing, whereas the workbook only focuses on actual drawing. So I think of the main text as the "teacher text," this workbook as the "student text," and the This is a workbook that goes with the main text, The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain . It has more exercises than the main text (40 exercises, in fact). This workbook has minimal explanation compared with the main text-- the latter delves a great deal into brain hemisphere function and ways to access those parts that are best for drawing, whereas the workbook only focuses on actual drawing. So I think of the main text as the "teacher text," this workbook as the "student text," and the DVD as a crash course for both teacher and student. I recommend all three, especially if you're a homeschooler looking to incorporate art into your curriculum.

This workbook has a coil binding and is designed to be sketched directly into it (blank pages are provided after each of the exercises). At the back of the book is a plastic PicturePlane Viewfinder to cut out (which is one of the tools used with this drawing method). The author divides drawing into 5 basic skills: the perception of edges, the perception of spaces (negative space), the perception of relationships (sighting perspective & proportions), the perception of lights & shadows, and perception of the whole. This workbook provides multiples exercises for each skill. Each exercise briefly states the exercise's purpose, provides a list of materials needed, provides instructions and post-exercise remarks. Some of the exercises are the same as what you'll find in the main text and DVD, but there are many more that are new. An exercise or two per week would make a nice one-year drawing curriculum for homeschoolers or for anyone wanting an independent drawing program.

By the way, if you want a hassle-free way to get all the drawing materials, go to the author's website. We love the Portfolio Workshop Kit.

See my related review of the main text here. ...more
2

February 11, 2008

Disappointed
I expected something more and insightful than the original book but it's pretty much the same thing. The book could actually be half its thickness since half of it is blank pages where you're supposed to draw.
5

January 19, 2011

Teaching me things I'd forgotten and making me want to draw again
I used to draw all the time when I was a kid. Literally. I'd draw during class, I'd draw during lunch, I'd draw on the bus home, I'd draw once I was home. Draw, draw, draw. But I never actually learned to draw.

Somehow, though, I managed to learn to switch on the right side of the brain on my own, and had learned some of the techniques Dr. Edwards teaches in her book, because it was like coming home to do those exercises. My mother was a trained artist, and an art teacher -- most likely I picked up stuff from her without realizing it, and this book reminded me of what I already knew.

I'm now almost through the book, presently working on drawing full frontal and three-quarter views of faces. I'm drawing from photos I print from the internet, as well as self portraits, since none of my family will pose for me, and I'm finding this works very well.

Possibly the only complaint I have is that I want to do more than just draw faces -- I want to draw bodies and other things as well. I haven't attempted drawing a cat, for example, or drawing anything else -- I think I'm afraid I'll slip back into my old manner of unrealistic drawing. But I'm going to have to do it sometime... maybe today is the day.

Overall, though, if you used to draw or if you've never drawn, this is a great book to get your hand back in with. You won't be disappointed.
5

February 3, 2008

some overlap from her other books, still a great book
Yes there is some overlap from her previous books, it's still a great book. I went from drawing very poorly- and over 40 books that supposedly taught one how to draw- to using her text, and being able to turn out very high quality art, that is very satisfactory to me, and to others. I checked this book today because I am sending this book to a guy who works with poor children in Caracas, Venezuela, for his use. For what books and postage cost now, I would never waste my money on anything less than the best available.
4

August 12, 2009

Great for Teaching
This workbook is very helpful for teaching this course. I will be teaching at an academy of Lifelong learning in the fall and look forward to my students having this book in hand (literally) to get the most out of the course.
4

Nov 14, 2018

Happily there are now endless outstanding books and online courses to teach yourself to draw, and this is one of them.

Here we have forty exercises across a range of subjects and mediums (pen and ink to crayon). Actually, one of my favourite lessons from the book is not one of these exercises but a piece of advice that comes right at the beginning: How to fight procrastination.

We all have these great plans to set aside a day a week or an hour a day to practice drawing, but it never happens – Happily there are now endless outstanding books and online courses to teach yourself to draw, and this is one of them.

Here we have forty exercises across a range of subjects and mediums (pen and ink to crayon). Actually, one of my favourite lessons from the book is not one of these exercises but a piece of advice that comes right at the beginning: How to fight procrastination.

We all have these great plans to set aside a day a week or an hour a day to practice drawing, but it never happens – something always gets in the way. I have no idea where that inertia comes from, because once I actually start drawing the time flies by in pure enjoyment of the process. But the key is how to get to actually sitting at the desk with a pencil in your hand?

Edwards says forget about timetabling drawing time. Instead just set a minimum goal which she calls the ‘two minute miracle.’ The idea is that you set yourself tiny, easily-achievable goals whereby you coax yourself, kind of trick yourself, into starting to draw. So you say to yourself, ‘Ok, I’m only going to look at what the next exercise is.’ ‘Ok, I’m just going to lay in the edges of the drawing.’ And before you know it you’ve already started putting pencil to paper, and then it’s easy to forget all those pressing excuses to do anything else but.

It reminds me of some exercise advice I saw, where a gym instructor said the same kind of thing about setting minimum goals: Just turning up to the gym, even if you sit there and read a paper for 20 minutes, is a good start. Before long once you find you’re actually there it’s so much easier to start exercising.

The exercises I found most useful were:

Drawing upside down
This is straight copying an upside-down drawing (it works better with line drawings), which really forces you to look at the relationship between lines and shapes, to look at negative space, and ignore all those ‘symbols’ floating around in your brain and making inaccurate shortcuts in your drawing. This really helps you to ‘unlearn’ what you think you know and draw what’s really there.

Drawing negative space
This concentrates on just drawing the negative space around a chair and a bunch of flowers in a vase, leaving the flowers themselves blank. This reminder to look at negative space is useful because you often forget, even when in the ‘trance-like’ drawing mode, to stop concentrating on discrete objects and look at everything as being equally worthy of consideration. Plus when you concentrate on negative space it does make your drawings more vivid, ‘drawing that emphasize negative spaces are a pleasure to look at, perhaps because the compositions are strong (emphasis on negative space always improves composition) and the spaces and shapes are unified.’

Drawing the head in profile
‘Eye level to chin is the same distance as back of the eye to the back of the ear.’ Drawing profiles is good for practising edges, spaces and relationships. Good to use negative spaces when you run into trouble. And when ‘drawing the hair, squint your eyes to see the larger highlights and the shadows. Avoid drawing symbolic hair – repeated parallel or curly lines. Hair forms a shape, focus on drawing that shape.’

Edwards herself says that she found one of the most useful to be this one:

Pure contour drawing
Sit at a table, with your pencil in hand on the sketchpaper. Now turn in your seat 90 degrees away from the paper (so that you can’t see your drawing) and look at the palm of your other hand. Concentrate on drawing the line on one square inch in the palm of your hand.

She says that this is the most efficient way for preparing the brain for visual tasks. The verbal, system-based ‘left’ side of the brain switches off at such a boring task, allowing the visual ‘right’ side of the brain to take over.

I have a different, but related, way of doing the same thing: I begin my drawings with my non-drawing hand (which is my right, as I’m left handed). This takes so much concentration in basic motor control that I kind of phase out anyway, and I’m left with an interesting sketch I can refine with my drawing hand afterward.

Drawing on the picture plane
This one is for those who haven’t got the hand of foreshortening yet, and probably of great use to beginning or younger students. You balance a hard, transparent plastic sheet on your non-drawing hand, then use a wipeable marker to draw your hand as you see it directly onto the plastic sheet. Then place the completed drawing on a white background so you can see it properly.

Foreshortening and the picture plane are concepts that are like a switch, they seem incomprehensible till you grasp the idea and then once you have the epiphany it’s just a matter of refining your skill.

On the cover it says this books is ‘guided practice in the five basic skills of drawing.’ What are they, according to Betty Edwards?

1 Edges
Contours. She defines ‘contours’ in the beginning as ‘a line that represents the shared edges of shapes, or shapes and spaces.’ What a lay person would call ‘outlines.’

2 Spaces
Meaning ‘negative spaces,’ instead of looking at the table legs, try and draw the shape of the space between the table legs.

3 Relationships
Perspective (portraying three dimensions on a two dimensional surface) and proportion (the size, location, or amount of one element in relation to another).

4 Light and shadow
At a basic level, this is ‘shading,’ using light to bring out the three dimensional portrayal of the subject. Can also mean the communication of time, atmosphere and mood. In traditional art instruction there are four aspects of light and shadow: Highlights (the lightest lights), cast shadows (the darkest darks), reflected lights (not as light as the highlights) and crest shadows (the shadow that falls between the highlight and reflected light, not as dark as cast shadow).

5 ‘Gestalt’
‘The “thingness” of the thing.’ This one is perhaps a bit difficult to explain eloquently, but I think is actually the most essential element, especially in heavily stylised drawing. Does this drawing convey the essential qualities of a bicycle, a koi carp or Albert Einstein? This is what I love about illustration, in that true masters can capture their subject with just a few strokes of the pen.

...more
5

May 10, 2013

Make so much sence.
I have purchased all of Betty's books and use them as a reference for the art classes that I teach. A great library addition for anyone that enjoys drawing or has an interest in drawing. I've seen a lot of DVD's and other books relatng to drawing both I feel Bett Edwards books rank in the top 5.
1

February 10, 2010

Drawing on the right side of the brain woorkbook
The company sent the textbook, not the workbook. I would rate them as unacceptable
4

February 9, 2011

Beginner's book on drawing
I purchased this book on the recommendation of a friend whose relative is artistically inclined. I find it enlightening and very helpful to anyone interested in viewing the world from a different prospective (other than how you view everything on a daily basis).
I recommend this to anyone who is looking to try any sort of drawing.
4

June 9, 2010

Satisfactory
I ordered this book new and it arrived in a larger than necessary box with a damaged cover. The pages themselves seem undamaged. The cover had scratches, indents, signs of crushing, and parts of the cover art flaking off. This is indeed a work book. There are detailed exercises and each exercise has pages for your practice so you can look book on your work and see how you progressed. In spite of the damaged cover, I am pleased overall. The book was order after noon on Saturday and arrived before 11AM on the following Wednesday with standard shipping. The exercises cover several mediums. I may not invest in the other mediums and simply use pencil for all of the exercises because the nearest art supply store to me is about 40 minutes away. Not worth the fuel.
5

Jan 09, 2019

No matter how long you've been drawing, you can always benefit from reviewing your fundamentals. I thought I was fairly good when I started, having an art degree and over two decades of experience under my belt, but the portraits I drew at the beginning and end of the class look like they were done by two different people.
Some people may say that Edwards only teaches you to draw from observation, but that is the foundation on which all imaginative drawing is built.

For my part, I cannot recommend No matter how long you've been drawing, you can always benefit from reviewing your fundamentals. I thought I was fairly good when I started, having an art degree and over two decades of experience under my belt, but the portraits I drew at the beginning and end of the class look like they were done by two different people.
Some people may say that Edwards only teaches you to draw from observation, but that is the foundation on which all imaginative drawing is built.

For my part, I cannot recommend this book highly enough, regardless of your perceived ability to draw, and will be recommending it to all my students. ...more
0

Nov 28, 2007

Drawing is fun. A refreshing change from daily activities, mainly at work, which require logical and verbal side of the brain :-)
Although not a good drawer (yet) myself, this activity has given me the ability to see the world differently.
This book provide an interesting method to follow. Another frontier to explore!

5

Oct 10, 2008

Companion workbook to the actual book. I recommend getting both together, very helpful.
5

March 17, 2017

A great reference for all those who wish to develop their drawing skills. A fascinating study of left and right brain.
An amazing book for all would be artists or those wishing to awaken the creative side of their right brain. I can't seem to get enough of this book and the techniques presented here. I am so glad I chose to include this book in my personal library.
5

March 3, 2019

Good book
Great for having the instructions and space for the exercises in one place. Good purchase for me.
1

June 11, 2019

just buy the book, this was a total waste of $$$
the book is great, this was just a money maker for the author.
5

March 11, 2017

Excellent clean workbook copy
Excellent clean workbook copy. Spiral bound so I can scan and print work pages to redo exercises over and over. Excellent value!
5

February 15, 2016

it helps to unlock the artistic side of your brain so you can create amazing works of art
This helps you get over the "I'm stuck for an idea" mood. it helps to unlock the artistic side of your brain so you can create amazing works of art.
5

November 21, 2012

I really like this Workbook....
I used this workbook last year for my art classes. I bought another one for my niece for Christmas since she likes to draw. The packaging was fairly good, although when I got this there was a small puncture on the front cover. The seller really should be a bit more careful how they handle, and store them due to this fact.

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