The Nesting Place: It Doesn’t Have to Be Perfect to Be Beautiful Info

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Popular blogger and author of Cozy Minimalist
Home
Myquillyn Smith (The Nester) helps readers find beauty in
imperfection and freedom to take risks to create the home - and life -
they’ve always wanted. This beautiful four-color book is full
of photos and creative, easy ideas for arranging, decorating, and
cultivating a welcoming home.

Myquillyn Smith is all
about embracing reality - especially when it comes to decorating a
home bursting with boys, pets, and all the unpredictable messes of life.
In The Nesting Place, Myquillyn shares the secrets of
decorating for real people - and it has nothing to do with creating a
flawless look to wow your guests. It has everything to do with embracing
the natural imperfection and chaos of daily living.

Drawing on
her years of experience creating beauty in her 13 different homes,
Myquillyn will show you how to think differently about the true purpose
of your home and simply and creatively tailor it to reflect you and your
unique style - without breaking the bank or stressing over comparisons.
Full of easy tips, simple steps, and practical advice, The Nesting
Place
will give you the courage to take risks with your home and
transform it into a place that’s inviting and warm for family and
friends.

There is beauty in the lived-in and loved-on and
just-about-used-up, Myquillyn says, and welcoming that imperfection
wholeheartedly just might be the most freeing thing you’ll ever
do.


Average Ratings and Reviews
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4.49

5482 Ratings

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Ratings and Reviews From Market


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Reviews for The Nesting Place: It Doesn’t Have to Be Perfect to Be Beautiful:

5

April 29, 2014

A book for your home ... for your very life
We bought our kitchen table when we moved back to the farm many years ago.

It was a pine rectangle with square pegs and sturdy legs. The saleswoman told us that the craftsmen pounded the wood with chains and ball-peen hammers to give the table its distressed finish.

We paid dearly to have a kitchen table that looked older than it really was. This was the most expensive piece of furniture we'd ever bought. I protected the table so fiercely, you might think it had once served duty in the Upper Room.

The delivery men brought the table to the farm a few days after Thanksgiving that year. But even if it had been arrived in time for the holiday, I wonder if I would have let the fork-wielding toddlers eat from it. After all, this table had been beaten to distressed perfection. And this was as well-worn as I wanted it to look. Ever.

About a year after our big purchase, I gave up the urge to stand guard. Maybe it's because I had no choice but to surrender to this truth: We bought the table because, well, we actually needed a place to eat. And I suppose I also realized that we live on a farm, not in the Louvre.

I wish I could turn back time and read this fantastic book by Myquillyn Smith before decorating our home on the farm. This is a book for anyone who wants to find new freedom -- not only in her own home, but in her very life, so she can actually live and enjoy her home, rather than perfect and protect her "stuff."

This is an invitation to love the home and the life you're in, rather than wishing for something more or something different.

Beware perfectionists (my hand is raised): This book is going to change the way you look at everything. This is a book that helps you dwell in the home and in the life you have, rather than trying to over-manage and perfect the places where you live and love.

The content is warm, inviting, and insightful. It's a positively beautiful book filled with lovely photos and helpful ideas.

And I love the way it looks on that beat-up, well-loved pine rectangle in my kitchen.
2

July 1, 2014

I presumed this would be a SECULAR home decor book!
I presumed this would be a SECULAR home decor book! But, I just received it and am completely surprised to find so many references to God. I feel completely duped by Amazon, the author, the book cover/description & the other reviews. No offense to the author or her pastor husband, but I'm not interested in bible references when it comes to design tips. I would have given this review 1 star, but I gave it 2 to be fair since I only made it to about page 50. But, I did flip through the rest of the book though, and SURE ENOUGH, saw more references to God.

So, I've already requested my refund and will be returning this book.
3

November 28, 2016

Interesting book, though it wasn't what I was expecting.
I didn't know anything about Myquillyn Smith, a popular blogger at The Nester, before reading this book. She's a mom of three, married, and living in a house she rents. Apparently her family has moved something like 13 times in 15 years. They owned a couple of those homes, but mostly they rented. Through it all, she's finally come to the conclusion that you have to make your home your own right now, even if you don't own it and even if you don't have a lot of money. To improve her own space, she's a big fan of crafting, DIY projects, thrift shops, and cheaper home goods stores--or even just using whatever she already has to change things up (like rearranging furniture, for example).

I like Smith's emphasis on being content with what you have. And I think her "fixes on the cheap" appeal to younger couples just starting out. I will say, though, that when I began reading The Nesting Place, I thought it was going to be a pretty design book that was light on words and heavy on design inspiration. And though the book does showcase some motivating pictures, it actually focuses a lot more on Smith's personal story and her Advice on Life than anything else. That isn't a bad thing necessarily, but it did take some getting used to.

What is especially weird to me, though, is all the religious talk. I get that Smith is a Christian and that God is important to her and her family. That's totes fine with me. But sometimes her religious perspective takes genuinely good advice and make it, well, awkward. For example, Smith, when talking about the dangers of perfection, quotes Sandy Coughlin: "Perfection comes from a place of great need--usually the need to avoid criticism and gain praise and approval from others." Interesting. I kind of like that. But Smith's take away? Perfection is so self-centered! You need to be thinking of others! Hm, that's a weird way to reframe it, but okay.

Or later in the book she talks about not apologizing to guests or visitors for the disorder or unfinished-ness of your home. She encourages readers to accept their homes as they are, imperfections and all. Again, great advice. But then she adds, besides, "if you're married and your husband hears you apologizing for what he's provided, it could be hurtful." Um, what? Was I just transported to 1953? Yikes.

In short, this book is engaging and I enjoyed parts of it--but it wasn't at all what I was expecting. Honestly, if I had known it was more of a memoir--with all the religious stuff thrown in, too--I probably wouldn't have picked it up in the first place.
2

June 29, 2014

This might be an okay decorating book, but after ...
This might be an okay decorating book, but after 2 Christian references in the first 4 pages I decided to return it. I guess I am a secular decorator.
5

May 10, 2017

This book transformed my house!
It took me a little bit to embrace it, but I fell in love with this book because it helped me fall in love with my house. To strike the perfect balance between accepting it as it is and celebrating its potential. I have never read the author's blog, am not Southern or a Christian (something she mentions occasionally), and don't even share her decorating style most of the time, nevertheless, I appreciate this book for all the wisdom it shares - from design principals to diy tips to attitude adjustments and beyond. I feel like it would be as helpful to a novice just starting to think about home decor as it would be to a burnt out design junkie who's read every book, blog, and mag out there but just can't seem to get things "right." I keep it on my coffee table now as a constant reminder that the most beautiful home is one where love is, and that decorating is supposed to be fun!
1

May 13, 2017

I am actually annoyed I bought this book
I am actually annoyed I bought this book. I bought it to read about decorating and personal style and finding one's perfection in imperfection. Instead it was sprinkled with religion; talks of spreading Jesus' word and God's purpose. If I wanted religion with my decorating tips I would have sought that out. I wasn't looking for that but it is what I got.
4

July 16, 2016

Yes- you should
Why buy a bloggers book when you can read the blog? And why buy a book when there is a REALLY AMAZING e-course? Because sometimes hearing the same message a new way encourages that same message to take root. And because this book is both and inspiration and a how to. It's gorgeous - attainable pictures and processes actually inspire me to get started when all I can say is the"the list to do is so so long it's hopeless and I will just try again later (after we have moved, when the baby is bigger, after Christmas, next summer etc.) instead in a non judgey my way the nester says seek beauty.
My favorite in here is "buy a plant... If it dies...buy a different plant"

She also talks about when to save and when to settle. And I love it
2

July 28, 2014

A a personal journey by the author.... Not a decorating idea book
My error in ordering thinking that the book was about decorating ideas and tips but it is more a personal journey by the author. That was not what I was seeking.
5

September 23, 2015

Permission not to be perfect - thank goodness!
Myquillyn Smith and her husband have lived in 14 homes in 18 years, so she’s had plenty of practice in figuring out how to make a house (or apartment) into a home. But what I found most inspiring about this book is that she’s not a perfectionist. In fact, she talks about not focusing on perfection, but making your home a place that welcomes and nurtures you and your family. She even shows a pair of photos of her own office, one staged for a magazine shoot, and one the way it normally looks: messy, used, and lived in.

And she really understands that fear of doing it “wrong” is what holds a lot of us back from doing anything at all to our homes. She encourages her readers to take risks, whether it’s to go ahead and paint that $8 yard-sale side table, or moving the sofa to another wall, or putting up a bunch of photos and/or art. I had to laugh when she says there are 83 nail holes in her gallery wall – 83 that aren’t currently in use and that she had to fill in, that is! I’m one of those people who is scared to put up the pictures, because what if I don’t get the arrangement right? In fact, I am so afraid of making bad choices when it comes to my house that I haven’t really done anything in years… and it shows. But the two rooms I actually designed about 10 or 12 years ago – my office and Robin’s bedroom – while both currently cluttered and full of too much stuff, are pretty and inviting when they’re cleaned up. So what am I afraid of?

Myquillyn’s style isn’t mine; she uses a lot more painted furniture than I want to, while I’m more into the beauty of the wood. But she embraces the personally meaningful and the whimsical in her style, and both of those are things I want to highlight as well: family treasures, things that have personal meaning or wonderful memories, and things that reflect my passions (reading, knitting, fantasy creatures.) Reading the book inspired me to bring up our oversize dragon cookie jar that has languished in the basement for the last 12 or 15 years. We don’t need to eat a lot of cookies, so instead I filled him with Luna bars (power bars.) He’s green and yellow – not the colors I would have chosen – but he’s also cute and whimsical and dragonish, and I love him.

The real test of a how-to book is in whether you actually follow through on the inspiration and ideas you get from it, and I can’t really report on that yet. It’s only been a week or so since I read it, after all. But I found some sections of the book and some of the quotes inspiring enough that I decided to buy my own copy so I can refer back to it whenever I get discouraged.

Wish me luck!

REVIEW ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED on The Bookwyrm's Hoard blog.
5

Sep 23, 2014

I've said here before that we live in an old farmhouse. It was built in 1898. The last couple of years have been rough. A down to the studs kitchen remodel (still going!), a new furnace, we lost five, old (ancient really) trees and just finished grading the yard, this summer we replaced our front porch. Read: CHA-ching, CHA-ching, CHA-ching. What I was once excited about I am now ambivalent about most days. I just want to relax!

Thank goodness this book came across the counter at the library. It I've said here before that we live in an old farmhouse. It was built in 1898. The last couple of years have been rough. A down to the studs kitchen remodel (still going!), a new furnace, we lost five, old (ancient really) trees and just finished grading the yard, this summer we replaced our front porch. Read: CHA-ching, CHA-ching, CHA-ching. What I was once excited about I am now ambivalent about most days. I just want to relax!

Thank goodness this book came across the counter at the library. It is a wicked beacon of positivity. I am quite sure it is the only decorating book I have ever read cover to cover. Filled with pretty pictures and reassuring words- embrace the chaos of daily living! Imperfection is a natural state! Why fight it?! And don't compare! LOVED.

...more
2

May 27, 2014

Why?
I got his book as a gift. After reading through it, I know I never would have spent the money myself. I found nothing in it different from what can be found on the author's blog. It's basically book form of everything she's posted about for the past several years, so spending money on what's available to read and see at no cost seems sort of silly to me.
4

Jul 30, 2014

While even the best books have one or two things that I don't completely agree with, and this book was no exception; overall, I really enjoyed it. I've struggled with my house for years and years. I've lived in the same house for nearly eight years; the same one my husband purchased as a bachelor. There are have always been a lot of conflicting emotions for me regrading this place I live in. While I always it considered it my house, I've never considered it my home. There are so many things I While even the best books have one or two things that I don't completely agree with, and this book was no exception; overall, I really enjoyed it. I've struggled with my house for years and years. I've lived in the same house for nearly eight years; the same one my husband purchased as a bachelor. There are have always been a lot of conflicting emotions for me regrading this place I live in. While I always it considered it my house, I've never considered it my home. There are so many things I love to hate about it. But after reading Smith's book, I realized I was being selfish and ungrateful for the things God has provided for me. Even the house I love to hate can have imperfections I can embrace - down to the constant pet hair from the dogs, the dust from an unfinished backyard and the unstylish decorating from my husband's unmarried days. I have a house with the a pretty good layout, perfect square footage, high vaulted ceilings, and the really quirky corner wet bar in our family room. I'm now on a kick to get painting and embrace what I truly find beautiful in my home.

Some of my favorite bullet points from Smiths's book:
~Give up on perfection. (She talks about how perfection is really a pride issue)
~Start with real purpose. Decide how you want people to feel in the space. (Cozy family room? Yes! Fun and cheerful master? Double yes!)
~Embrace risk and remember that doing nothing is also a risk, maybe the biggest risk. (I'm going to spray paint my bed frame. Perfectly good wrought iron but not my color.)
~Fill your walls with meaningful beauty, such as a gallery full of memories.
~Buy a plant. If it dies, that's okay. Buy another kind of plant until you find one that lives. (I have an aloe and peace plant that are hard to kill. Monkey plants are also great).
~Consider a signature piece. (Like the awesome, colorful coverlet from Pottery Barn)
~Sprinkle a few opposites. (I love modern and 1950s vintage)
~Add a dash of quirk if your space is feeling too serious and if that makes you happy. (Hooray for the white moosehead, thank you white faux taxidermy, that will adorn by bedroom wall)
~Live in and enjoy your space. Don't fret when something breaks or gets scratched, because that is a sign of a life well lived. Yippie, you are doing it right! (Something I always struggle with. Now I can laugh about the cupcake sprinkles stuck inside the grooves of my coffee table)
~Welcome your friends into your home without apology. (I will no longer feel guilty about dust on the TV or papers all over my desk)
...more
2

May 6, 2015

Don't judge the book by its sexy cover
Sigh. I really wanted to like this book. The cover is so perfect, I've read so many great reviews from bloggers I love.....
But no, I don't really like the book.
It would be a fine book to happen upon in your sister's house to borrow, or to find on the nightstand in the bedroom where you're staying for the weekend.
But really, after 45 minutes of reading every word and looking at every picture, I just feel like for $15 I should have bought that Butters London color I wanted....
She seems like a sweet woman, and her rental home is very inviting and cosy looking but I'm not really sure what the book is about.
I think it's a self-help book for either lazy slobs or perfectionists. She wants us all to meet in the middle....
Well, I guess I'll loan it to my sister or leave it in the guest room.
1

Aug 26, 2014

I really thought I was the target demographic for this book - a renter with a chaotic life who'd still like her living space to look nice and feel homey. It appears, however, that I was incorrect. This book was basically just one big pep talk on being okay with "scary" and unconventional decorating decisions like (horror of horrors) using a lot of nails to mount wall decorations. While I do have many anxieties in life, I can't say that fear of hanging things up is one of them. Judging by the I really thought I was the target demographic for this book - a renter with a chaotic life who'd still like her living space to look nice and feel homey. It appears, however, that I was incorrect. This book was basically just one big pep talk on being okay with "scary" and unconventional decorating decisions like (horror of horrors) using a lot of nails to mount wall decorations. While I do have many anxieties in life, I can't say that fear of hanging things up is one of them. Judging by the popularity of this book, I appear to be in the minority on that one, but as someone looking for concrete tips and projects beyond "hey, you can buy cheap used things and paint them/cover them in new fabric!", this book proved pretty useless. ...more
1

August 16, 2018

Awful on so many levels
Terrible “decorating” book, if you can call it that. More just the author’s ideology/nonsense and recycled photos from different angles in the same few rooms. Nothing inspiring. Shocked this ever even got published. Irritating commentary.
2

September 10, 2014

I like the message…be happy in the home you are in
I like the message…be happy in the home you are in. Seems like the pictures are all of the same room with a couple of items swapped out. Was dissapointed.
5

July 27, 2018

*The* new design and decorating bible
In a world where we have Pinterested, Instagrammed and whatevered ourselves into near- — if not, absolute — paralysis in our homes and lives because we simply cannot live up to the pictured perfection, along comes Myquillyn to snap us out of our fear and discontent. We know that those pictures and articles are not true reflections of our reality but they are everywhere and, by their sheer volume, overwhelming. Thank goodness for Myquillyn, her laugh-out-loud sense of humor, her charming sense of self, her willingness to share her life, and her generosity of spirit. She and her design / decorating / lifestyle philosophy is much more than the proverbial breath of fresh air in what has become an echo chamber of glossy, sterile perfection. (I love the design / decorating magazines, books, websites and shows; but I have neither won the lottery to fund the majestic projects or buy “the” house nor have a staff to execute or maintain the ideal.)

Treat yourself, read this book and proceed. When you get stuck, re-read this book and begin again. And if you have a friend who is stuck, gift this book (but keep your copy!).

Thank you, Myquillyn!
2

August 11, 2014

Was not happy about it
I ordered the Kindle version of this book. I think the pictures are small and you are unable to expand them. Was not happy about it. Overall the book is easy to read and there are some great idea's.
Should have purchased a hard copy instead
5

Sep 03, 2015

4.5 stars Myquillyn Smith and her husband have lived in 14 homes in 18 years, so she’s had plenty of practice in figuring out how to make a house (or apartment) into a home. But what I found most inspiring about this book is that she’s not a perfectionist. In fact, she talks about not focusing on perfection, but making your home a place that welcomes and nurtures you and your family. She even shows a pair of photos of her own office, one staged for a magazine shoot, and one the way it normally 4.5 stars Myquillyn Smith and her husband have lived in 14 homes in 18 years, so she’s had plenty of practice in figuring out how to make a house (or apartment) into a home. But what I found most inspiring about this book is that she’s not a perfectionist. In fact, she talks about not focusing on perfection, but making your home a place that welcomes and nurtures you and your family. She even shows a pair of photos of her own office, one staged for a magazine shoot, and one the way it normally looks: messy, used, and lived in.

And she really understands that fear of doing it “wrong” is what holds a lot of us back from doing anything at all to our homes. She encourages her readers to take risks, whether it’s to go ahead and paint that $8 yard-sale side table, or moving the sofa to another wall, or putting up a bunch of photos and/or art. I had to laugh when she says there are 83 nail holes in her gallery wall – 83 that aren’t currently in use and that she had to fill in, that is! I’m one of those people who is scared to put up the pictures, because what if I don’t get the arrangement right? In fact, I am so afraid of making bad choices when it comes to my house that I haven’t really done anything in years… and it shows. But the two rooms I actually designed about 10 or 12 years ago – my office and Robin’s bedroom – while both currently cluttered and full of too much stuff, are pretty and inviting when they’re cleaned up. So what am I afraid of?

Myquillyn’s style isn’t mine; she uses a lot more painted furniture than I want to, while I’m more into the beauty of the wood. But she embraces the personally meaningful and the whimsical in her style, and both of those are things I want to highlight as well: family treasures, things that have personal meaning or wonderful memories, and things that reflect my passions (reading, knitting, fantasy creatures.) Reading the book inspired me to bring up our oversize dragon cookie jar that has languished in the basement for the last 12 or 15 years. We don’t need to eat a lot of cookies, so instead I filled him with Luna bars (power bars.) He’s green and yellow – not the colors I would have chosen – but he’s also cute and whimsical and dragonish, and I love him.

The real test of a how-to book is in whether you actually follow through on the inspiration and ideas you get from it, and I can’t really report on that yet. It’s only been a week or so since I read it, after all. But I found some sections of the book and some of the quotes inspiring enough that I decided to buy my own copy so I can refer back to it whenever I get discouraged.

Wish me luck! ...more
3

Nov 27, 2016

I didn't know anything about Myquillyn Smith, a popular blogger at The Nester, before reading this book. She's a mom of three, married, and living in a house she rents. Apparently her family has moved something like 13 times in 15 years. They owned a couple of those homes, but mostly they rented. Through it all, she's finally come to the conclusion that you have to make your home your own right now, even if you don't own it and even if you don't have a lot of money. To improve her own space, I didn't know anything about Myquillyn Smith, a popular blogger at The Nester, before reading this book. She's a mom of three, married, and living in a house she rents. Apparently her family has moved something like 13 times in 15 years. They owned a couple of those homes, but mostly they rented. Through it all, she's finally come to the conclusion that you have to make your home your own right now, even if you don't own it and even if you don't have a lot of money. To improve her own space, she's a big fan of crafting, DIY projects, thrift shops, and cheaper home goods stores--or even just using whatever she already has to change things up (like rearranging furniture, for example).

I like Smith's emphasis on being content with what you have. And I think her "fixes on the cheap" appeal to younger couples just starting out. I will say, though, that when I began reading The Nesting Place, I thought it was going to be a pretty design book that was light on words and heavy on design inspiration. And though the book does showcase some motivating pictures, it actually focuses a lot more on Smith's personal story and her Advice on Life than anything else. That isn't a bad thing necessarily, but it did take some getting used to.

What was especially weird to me, though, was all the religious talk. I get that Smith is a Christian and that God is important to her and her family. That's totes fine with me. But sometimes her religious perspective would take genuinely good advice and make it, well, awkward. For example, Smith, when talking about the dangers of perfection, quotes Sandy Coughlin: "Perfection comes from a place of great need--usually the need to avoid criticism and gain praise and approval from others." Interesting. I kind of like that. But Smith's take away? Perfection is so self-centered! You need to be thinking of others! Hm, that's a weird way to reframe it, but okay.

Or later in the book she talks about not apologizing to guests or visitors for the disorder or unfinished-ness of your home. She encourages readers to accept their homes as they are, imperfections and all. Again, great advice. But then she adds, besides, "if you're married and your husband hears you apologizing for what he's provided, it could be hurtful." Um, what? Was I just transported to 1953? Yikes.

In short, this book was engaging and I enjoyed parts of it--but it wasn't at all what I was expecting. Honestly, if I had known it was more of a memoir--with all the religious stuff thrown in, too--I probably wouldn't have picked it up in the first place.

See more of my reviews at www.BugBugBooks.com. ...more
1

Apr 01, 2016

Things you will get in this book:

- the feeling of reading a blog. (Which you may like but man do I chafe at reading a blog smooshed unskillfully into book form.)
- lots of pictures of the same space over and over with tiny tweaks
- loads of talk about God. So much that I think it should have been part of the title cause that was not my expectation in a home decor book.
- antlers everywhere - real and faux. Lots of relying on the same feature all over the place.
- talk about how to get your Things you will get in this book:

- the feeling of reading a blog. (Which you may like but man do I chafe at reading a blog smooshed unskillfully into book form.)
- lots of pictures of the same space over and over with tiny tweaks
- loads of talk about God. So much that I think it should have been part of the title cause that was not my expectation in a home decor book.
- antlers everywhere - real and faux. Lots of relying on the same feature all over the place.
- talk about how to get your husband on board to decorate. Because obv only women care about their homes & they obv are only women with husbands who probably don't see any value in home decor. At some point she gives you tips for pushing them into your projects & lets you know that men are logical & so they won't understand making unnecessary changes. This is my #1 reason for the 1 star.

Just loads of weird assumptions in this book blog. ...more
4

October 9, 2017

Clever design, sweetly written, very personal. Sometimes too personal.
There are good messages in this book - I love her encouragement about putting some nails in your walls (PS - do some extra reading if you have plaster), gaining confidence in your projects, not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good, realizing that even houses in magazines don't look that way day-to-day, make your house welcoming, not flawless, etc. The pictures are sweet and some of the ideas are very clever (faux fur on an old ottoman - fun!).

But I was distracted by the references to Dave Ramsey (chances of one of husband's businesses being multi-level marketing seem alarmingly high), religion (nothing too prescriptive - some casual Jesus references and light determinism), and the section on how to convince your husband to let you try out a design idea in the house he is providing. I get it - it's her book, her story, she's making herself vulnerable by sharing this, and these are pivotal pieces of her narrative. But for me as a reader, these were distancing.

So, I won't give this book as a gift, but I'm glad to have read it, and will continue to appreciate her design ideas.
3

October 28, 2016

More of a personal biography
This book is mostly a personal biography and meant to be inspiring instead of providing specific decorating ideas that you can apply. I wasn't a huge fan of the author's writing style and I didn't feel like I could personally relate to her as closely as maybe others can. If you like an inspirational back story on how a home was put together, this may be your cup of tea.
2

Jul 10, 2015

Do you want a lovely interior design book with gorgeous photos, antiquated gender roles, with a smattering of good Christian values thrown in? I've got the book for you!

Honestly, it's not a horrible book. There aren't any brilliant ideas here, but I do like her emphasis on embracing imperfection and small budgets. Also, it's nice to see interior design tips aimed at renters who can't just change a house willy-nilly.

But when there is a whole section about how to get your husband (husband - not Do you want a lovely interior design book with gorgeous photos, antiquated gender roles, with a smattering of good Christian values thrown in? I've got the book for you!

Honestly, it's not a horrible book. There aren't any brilliant ideas here, but I do like her emphasis on embracing imperfection and small budgets. Also, it's nice to see interior design tips aimed at renters who can't just change a house willy-nilly.

But when there is a whole section about how to get your husband (husband - not partner/spouse/boyfriend, etc) to come around to your idea? And one of the tips is to not accost him right after he's coming home from work and wait for him to have dinner first.......?

Is it 2015 or 1955, because I'm not sure. ...more
5

Apr 25, 2016

A lovely little decorating book, adorned with pictures that will make you drool for her decorating prowess, what made this coffee table book unique was the honesty of the author. Spilling her secrets of success and failure, it took the book from what could be just a decorating book into a moving and grace filled journey of home and heart.

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