The Nesting Place: It Doesn’t Have to Be Perfect to Be Beautiful Info

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Popular blogger and author of Cozy Minimalist
Home
Myquillyn Smith (The Nester) helps readers find beauty in
imperfection and freedom to take risks to create the home - and life -
they’ve always wanted. This beautiful four-color book is full
of photos and creative, easy ideas for arranging, decorating, and
cultivating a welcoming home.

Myquillyn Smith is all
about embracing reality - especially when it comes to decorating a
home bursting with boys, pets, and all the unpredictable messes of life.
In The Nesting Place, Myquillyn shares the secrets of
decorating for real people - and it has nothing to do with creating a
flawless look to wow your guests. It has everything to do with embracing
the natural imperfection and chaos of daily living.

Drawing on
her years of experience creating beauty in her 13 different homes,
Myquillyn will show you how to think differently about the true purpose
of your home and simply and creatively tailor it to reflect you and your
unique style - without breaking the bank or stressing over comparisons.
Full of easy tips, simple steps, and practical advice, The Nesting
Place
will give you the courage to take risks with your home and
transform it into a place that’s inviting and warm for family and
friends.

There is beauty in the lived-in and loved-on and
just-about-used-up, Myquillyn says, and welcoming that imperfection
wholeheartedly just might be the most freeing thing you’ll ever
do.


Average Ratings and Reviews
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Ratings and Reviews From Market


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Reviews for The Nesting Place: It Doesn’t Have to Be Perfect to Be Beautiful:

5

Sep 23, 2014

I've said here before that we live in an old farmhouse. It was built in 1898. The last couple of years have been rough. A down to the studs kitchen remodel (still going!), a new furnace, we lost five, old (ancient really) trees and just finished grading the yard, this summer we replaced our front porch. Read: CHA-ching, CHA-ching, CHA-ching. What I was once excited about I am now ambivalent about most days. I just want to relax!

Thank goodness this book came across the counter at the library. It I've said here before that we live in an old farmhouse. It was built in 1898. The last couple of years have been rough. A down to the studs kitchen remodel (still going!), a new furnace, we lost five, old (ancient really) trees and just finished grading the yard, this summer we replaced our front porch. Read: CHA-ching, CHA-ching, CHA-ching. What I was once excited about I am now ambivalent about most days. I just want to relax!

Thank goodness this book came across the counter at the library. It is a wicked beacon of positivity. I am quite sure it is the only decorating book I have ever read cover to cover. Filled with pretty pictures and reassuring words- embrace the chaos of daily living! Imperfection is a natural state! Why fight it?! And don't compare! LOVED.

...more
4

Jul 30, 2014

While even the best books have one or two things that I don't completely agree with, and this book was no exception; overall, I really enjoyed it. I've struggled with my house for years and years. I've lived in the same house for nearly eight years; the same one my husband purchased as a bachelor. There are have always been a lot of conflicting emotions for me regrading this place I live in. While I always it considered it my house, I've never considered it my home. There are so many things I While even the best books have one or two things that I don't completely agree with, and this book was no exception; overall, I really enjoyed it. I've struggled with my house for years and years. I've lived in the same house for nearly eight years; the same one my husband purchased as a bachelor. There are have always been a lot of conflicting emotions for me regrading this place I live in. While I always it considered it my house, I've never considered it my home. There are so many things I love to hate about it. But after reading Smith's book, I realized I was being selfish and ungrateful for the things God has provided for me. Even the house I love to hate can have imperfections I can embrace - down to the constant pet hair from the dogs, the dust from an unfinished backyard and the unstylish decorating from my husband's unmarried days. I have a house with the a pretty good layout, perfect square footage, high vaulted ceilings, and the really quirky corner wet bar in our family room. I'm now on a kick to get painting and embrace what I truly find beautiful in my home.

Some of my favorite bullet points from Smiths's book:
~Give up on perfection. (She talks about how perfection is really a pride issue)
~Start with real purpose. Decide how you want people to feel in the space. (Cozy family room? Yes! Fun and cheerful master? Double yes!)
~Embrace risk and remember that doing nothing is also a risk, maybe the biggest risk. (I'm going to spray paint my bed frame. Perfectly good wrought iron but not my color.)
~Fill your walls with meaningful beauty, such as a gallery full of memories.
~Buy a plant. If it dies, that's okay. Buy another kind of plant until you find one that lives. (I have an aloe and peace plant that are hard to kill. Monkey plants are also great).
~Consider a signature piece. (Like the awesome, colorful coverlet from Pottery Barn)
~Sprinkle a few opposites. (I love modern and 1950s vintage)
~Add a dash of quirk if your space is feeling too serious and if that makes you happy. (Hooray for the white moosehead, thank you white faux taxidermy, that will adorn by bedroom wall)
~Live in and enjoy your space. Don't fret when something breaks or gets scratched, because that is a sign of a life well lived. Yippie, you are doing it right! (Something I always struggle with. Now I can laugh about the cupcake sprinkles stuck inside the grooves of my coffee table)
~Welcome your friends into your home without apology. (I will no longer feel guilty about dust on the TV or papers all over my desk)
...more
1

Aug 26, 2014

I really thought I was the target demographic for this book - a renter with a chaotic life who'd still like her living space to look nice and feel homey. It appears, however, that I was incorrect. This book was basically just one big pep talk on being okay with "scary" and unconventional decorating decisions like (horror of horrors) using a lot of nails to mount wall decorations. While I do have many anxieties in life, I can't say that fear of hanging things up is one of them. Judging by the I really thought I was the target demographic for this book - a renter with a chaotic life who'd still like her living space to look nice and feel homey. It appears, however, that I was incorrect. This book was basically just one big pep talk on being okay with "scary" and unconventional decorating decisions like (horror of horrors) using a lot of nails to mount wall decorations. While I do have many anxieties in life, I can't say that fear of hanging things up is one of them. Judging by the popularity of this book, I appear to be in the minority on that one, but as someone looking for concrete tips and projects beyond "hey, you can buy cheap used things and paint them/cover them in new fabric!", this book proved pretty useless. ...more
5

Sep 03, 2015

4.5 stars Myquillyn Smith and her husband have lived in 14 homes in 18 years, so she’s had plenty of practice in figuring out how to make a house (or apartment) into a home. But what I found most inspiring about this book is that she’s not a perfectionist. In fact, she talks about not focusing on perfection, but making your home a place that welcomes and nurtures you and your family. She even shows a pair of photos of her own office, one staged for a magazine shoot, and one the way it normally 4.5 stars Myquillyn Smith and her husband have lived in 14 homes in 18 years, so she’s had plenty of practice in figuring out how to make a house (or apartment) into a home. But what I found most inspiring about this book is that she’s not a perfectionist. In fact, she talks about not focusing on perfection, but making your home a place that welcomes and nurtures you and your family. She even shows a pair of photos of her own office, one staged for a magazine shoot, and one the way it normally looks: messy, used, and lived in.

And she really understands that fear of doing it “wrong” is what holds a lot of us back from doing anything at all to our homes. She encourages her readers to take risks, whether it’s to go ahead and paint that $8 yard-sale side table, or moving the sofa to another wall, or putting up a bunch of photos and/or art. I had to laugh when she says there are 83 nail holes in her gallery wall – 83 that aren’t currently in use and that she had to fill in, that is! I’m one of those people who is scared to put up the pictures, because what if I don’t get the arrangement right? In fact, I am so afraid of making bad choices when it comes to my house that I haven’t really done anything in years… and it shows. But the two rooms I actually designed about 10 or 12 years ago – my office and Robin’s bedroom – while both currently cluttered and full of too much stuff, are pretty and inviting when they’re cleaned up. So what am I afraid of?

Myquillyn’s style isn’t mine; she uses a lot more painted furniture than I want to, while I’m more into the beauty of the wood. But she embraces the personally meaningful and the whimsical in her style, and both of those are things I want to highlight as well: family treasures, things that have personal meaning or wonderful memories, and things that reflect my passions (reading, knitting, fantasy creatures.) Reading the book inspired me to bring up our oversize dragon cookie jar that has languished in the basement for the last 12 or 15 years. We don’t need to eat a lot of cookies, so instead I filled him with Luna bars (power bars.) He’s green and yellow – not the colors I would have chosen – but he’s also cute and whimsical and dragonish, and I love him.

The real test of a how-to book is in whether you actually follow through on the inspiration and ideas you get from it, and I can’t really report on that yet. It’s only been a week or so since I read it, after all. But I found some sections of the book and some of the quotes inspiring enough that I decided to buy my own copy so I can refer back to it whenever I get discouraged.

Wish me luck! ...more
3

Nov 27, 2016

I didn't know anything about Myquillyn Smith, a popular blogger at The Nester, before reading this book. She's a mom of three, married, and living in a house she rents. Apparently her family has moved something like 13 times in 15 years. They owned a couple of those homes, but mostly they rented. Through it all, she's finally come to the conclusion that you have to make your home your own right now, even if you don't own it and even if you don't have a lot of money. To improve her own space, I didn't know anything about Myquillyn Smith, a popular blogger at The Nester, before reading this book. She's a mom of three, married, and living in a house she rents. Apparently her family has moved something like 13 times in 15 years. They owned a couple of those homes, but mostly they rented. Through it all, she's finally come to the conclusion that you have to make your home your own right now, even if you don't own it and even if you don't have a lot of money. To improve her own space, she's a big fan of crafting, DIY projects, thrift shops, and cheaper home goods stores--or even just using whatever she already has to change things up (like rearranging furniture, for example).

I like Smith's emphasis on being content with what you have. And I think her "fixes on the cheap" appeal to younger couples just starting out. I will say, though, that when I began reading The Nesting Place, I thought it was going to be a pretty design book that was light on words and heavy on design inspiration. And though the book does showcase some motivating pictures, it actually focuses a lot more on Smith's personal story and her Advice on Life than anything else. That isn't a bad thing necessarily, but it did take some getting used to.

What was especially weird to me, though, was all the religious talk. I get that Smith is a Christian and that God is important to her and her family. That's totes fine with me. But sometimes her religious perspective would take genuinely good advice and make it, well, awkward. For example, Smith, when talking about the dangers of perfection, quotes Sandy Coughlin: "Perfection comes from a place of great need--usually the need to avoid criticism and gain praise and approval from others." Interesting. I kind of like that. But Smith's take away? Perfection is so self-centered! You need to be thinking of others! Hm, that's a weird way to reframe it, but okay.

Or later in the book she talks about not apologizing to guests or visitors for the disorder or unfinished-ness of your home. She encourages readers to accept their homes as they are, imperfections and all. Again, great advice. But then she adds, besides, "if you're married and your husband hears you apologizing for what he's provided, it could be hurtful." Um, what? Was I just transported to 1953? Yikes.

In short, this book was engaging and I enjoyed parts of it--but it wasn't at all what I was expecting. Honestly, if I had known it was more of a memoir--with all the religious stuff thrown in, too--I probably wouldn't have picked it up in the first place.

See more of my reviews at www.BugBugBooks.com. ...more
1

Apr 01, 2016

Things you will get in this book:

- the feeling of reading a blog. (Which you may like but man do I chafe at reading a blog smooshed unskillfully into book form.)
- lots of pictures of the same space over and over with tiny tweaks
- loads of talk about God. So much that I think it should have been part of the title cause that was not my expectation in a home decor book.
- antlers everywhere - real and faux. Lots of relying on the same feature all over the place.
- talk about how to get your Things you will get in this book:

- the feeling of reading a blog. (Which you may like but man do I chafe at reading a blog smooshed unskillfully into book form.)
- lots of pictures of the same space over and over with tiny tweaks
- loads of talk about God. So much that I think it should have been part of the title cause that was not my expectation in a home decor book.
- antlers everywhere - real and faux. Lots of relying on the same feature all over the place.
- talk about how to get your husband on board to decorate. Because obv only women care about their homes & they obv are only women with husbands who probably don't see any value in home decor. At some point she gives you tips for pushing them into your projects & lets you know that men are logical & so they won't understand making unnecessary changes. This is my #1 reason for the 1 star.

Just loads of weird assumptions in this book blog. ...more
2

Jul 10, 2015

Do you want a lovely interior design book with gorgeous photos, antiquated gender roles, with a smattering of good Christian values thrown in? I've got the book for you!

Honestly, it's not a horrible book. There aren't any brilliant ideas here, but I do like her emphasis on embracing imperfection and small budgets. Also, it's nice to see interior design tips aimed at renters who can't just change a house willy-nilly.

But when there is a whole section about how to get your husband (husband - not Do you want a lovely interior design book with gorgeous photos, antiquated gender roles, with a smattering of good Christian values thrown in? I've got the book for you!

Honestly, it's not a horrible book. There aren't any brilliant ideas here, but I do like her emphasis on embracing imperfection and small budgets. Also, it's nice to see interior design tips aimed at renters who can't just change a house willy-nilly.

But when there is a whole section about how to get your husband (husband - not partner/spouse/boyfriend, etc) to come around to your idea? And one of the tips is to not accost him right after he's coming home from work and wait for him to have dinner first.......?

Is it 2015 or 1955, because I'm not sure. ...more
5

Apr 25, 2016

A lovely little decorating book, adorned with pictures that will make you drool for her decorating prowess, what made this coffee table book unique was the honesty of the author. Spilling her secrets of success and failure, it took the book from what could be just a decorating book into a moving and grace filled journey of home and heart.
1

Aug 13, 2014

This is a glorified blog! I normally do not bother to review books, but I could not have more disappointed with this book. This book is simply one talented woman telling you the history of everywhere she has lived (with pictures of the outside of her past rental houses, and how she "creates" on a budget. There are truly not any strong DYI ideas and instructions to get someone started on their own home. I honestly believe the only reason people rate this book so highly is because of its beautiful This is a glorified blog! I normally do not bother to review books, but I could not have more disappointed with this book. This book is simply one talented woman telling you the history of everywhere she has lived (with pictures of the outside of her past rental houses, and how she "creates" on a budget. There are truly not any strong DYI ideas and instructions to get someone started on their own home. I honestly believe the only reason people rate this book so highly is because of its beautiful pictures and that the IDEA of the book validates how each and every one of us feels- that our home does not have to be perfect. That is it, that is the gist of the entire book. I could have just followed her blog. The pictures are beautiful, but I should add that there are over a dozen pictures of the same wall in her house. Over 12 pictures of the same wall. All the other picture are staged areas in her house (using the same decor). This book fell completely short for any expectations. There are a lot of other great decorating books on the market. ...more
3

Sep 03, 2014

While watching a string of episodes on HGTV one particular Saturday, my husband turned to me and asked, "What's our style? I mean, is it Early American or Neo-classical or what?" We pondered awhile as we looked around us, at a bit of a loss for a definition.
The next day it hit me and I went to my dearly beloved, "We do have a sense of style," I assured him, "It's my Mom's."

Fortunately for us, my Mom's style was created through our years of living overseas courtesy of the US Navy, the gypsy While watching a string of episodes on HGTV one particular Saturday, my husband turned to me and asked, "What's our style? I mean, is it Early American or Neo-classical or what?" We pondered awhile as we looked around us, at a bit of a loss for a definition.
The next day it hit me and I went to my dearly beloved, "We do have a sense of style," I assured him, "It's my Mom's."

Fortunately for us, my Mom's style was created through our years of living overseas courtesy of the US Navy, the gypsy spirit it breathed into life, and the giftedness she received by hand of her Creator to be an artist. Her example was carried further along in the lives of her children by the constant message of encouragement to try and fail, get up, and try again - as well as her relentless love for us.

All this to say, I have style thanks to my Mom.

The Nesting Place is for those who are looking for someone to coax them to take that step forward and risk making the necessary mistakes that happen along the way to making your abode your home. It's a sisterly voice that promises that some of those mistakes will actually turn out to be unique wonders just waiting for their author (you) to give birth to them. It's the call of a friend to come out and play, sing your song, do your dance, and find ways to express the special person God created you to be in the haven you're living in this side of heaven. And for those of us who've already found our sense of style... we're still welcome to walk around in the rooms of Myquillin's beautiful home and listen to her words of inspiration and cheer. ...more
1

Aug 03, 2014

I checked this book out from the library, thinking I'd be inspired to embrace creative design and be able to find ideas or techniques to create a comfortable family home. Although there were some pictures of the author's own home, which looked nice enough, the book was really more of an autobiography or self-realization essay that focused on her own shedding of materialism and seeking perfection than on any actual home decor ideas. My favorite part of the book was the Appendixes, one of which I checked this book out from the library, thinking I'd be inspired to embrace creative design and be able to find ideas or techniques to create a comfortable family home. Although there were some pictures of the author's own home, which looked nice enough, the book was really more of an autobiography or self-realization essay that focused on her own shedding of materialism and seeking perfection than on any actual home decor ideas. My favorite part of the book was the Appendixes, one of which was a list of many home decorating and crafting blogs which will be a better resource and fount of inspiration than this book was. Although I totally agree that using your wealth of resources to help others instead of just your own material indulgences is a worthy and necessary behavior, I found the writing to be repetitive. It kind of felt like she was writing to get rid of the feelings of guilt associated with wanting more than only God's presence and the love of a good man and some kids. Caring about the environment you create for your family is a noble pursuit, especially if it inspires those who live or spend time there to carry that positive love energy out into the world to do good. Just buy the damned rug already and let's crack open the new Stephen King novel! ...more
5

Mar 29, 2016

I love the authors ideas on new design in your home with what you already have. There were also so many great ideas on refurbishing used furniture and creating out of the box decorations that are affordable. I now want to frequent thrift shops and garage sale every weekend
5

May 10, 2016

Part home decorating, part spiritual formation book, all wonderful to read. I thoroughly enjoyed this book.
5

Jun 17, 2014

I am an overthinker when it comes to decorating (and, just as described in this book, it's led to decorating-paralysis), and I felt like this book was just for me. But if you're an underthinker (too many trinkets without any real sense of "home") this book is also for you. Or if you are worried about decorating "wrong." If you're renting, this book is also definitely for you (where was this the first half of my married life?!), though homeowners will surely get a lot out of this book, too. This I am an overthinker when it comes to decorating (and, just as described in this book, it's led to decorating-paralysis), and I felt like this book was just for me. But if you're an underthinker (too many trinkets without any real sense of "home") this book is also for you. Or if you are worried about decorating "wrong." If you're renting, this book is also definitely for you (where was this the first half of my married life?!), though homeowners will surely get a lot out of this book, too. This book is for people who want to love their homes without spending a fortune (maybe that means finding deals on Craigslist or thrift stores -- or even finding what you love about a home without spending a single cent). My hunch is that even seasoned DIY-ers who don't need the "it doesn't have to be perfect to be beautiful" reassurance would enjoy this book, just to see how Myquillyn arrived where she did.

The design of this book is beautiful. The photos are great because a) they are the kind of photos that might actually occur in real life (kid on sofa with DS; board game on the floor) and b) you see the same rooms over and over, changed up a bit (one Myquillyn's tips is to shop your own house -- don't be afraid to change where things are hung or where furniture is sitting!).

I loved the whole tone and humor of this book. It was so engaging that I devoured the whole thing in a day. I read the section on the fear of putting nail-holes in the wall out loud to my husband and even he was chuckling. This woman's been published in magazines for her decorating, but somehow she feels real and friendly.

Unlike all the other design books I've happened upon, I finished this book feeling inspired instead of intimidated. I've rearranged the furniture (I think I like it again!) and I am ready to try a few more things to make my house a home.

Most of all, though, I finished this book feeling like I had a new perspective on my home. I feel like I'm more able to accept the mess that comes with real life. I love how Myquillen compares the fancy home magazine photos to a woman's wedding photo -- no one expects that woman to be wearing an updo and heels every day, just because that's how she's pictured on her wedding day (not exactly the look to go for while running a 5K or snuggling a colicky baby). So why do we get upset with ourselves when our homes look "lived in" compared to those perfect magazine photos? We need to realize that our goal in decorating a home (or homemaking in general) is not to create perfection but to create a place of warmth and comfort for our family.

Really, really appreciated this book and wholeheartedly recommend it to any of my mom-friends who want to be more inspired and satisfied in their homemaking. ...more
5

May 01, 2015

I grew up with a mother who epitomizes quirk and used discarded wooden crates to decorate our living room. I married a man whose mother is arguably THE thrifting queen and can make a theme for any room with stuff she already has. My sister-in-law has impeccable taste and somehow with 2 littles and 1 on the way, her home somehow always looks put together. And then there's me. I have ideas. Quirky ideas. But I've never known where to start. I'm always afraid to start a DIY project because WHAT IF I grew up with a mother who epitomizes quirk and used discarded wooden crates to decorate our living room. I married a man whose mother is arguably THE thrifting queen and can make a theme for any room with stuff she already has. My sister-in-law has impeccable taste and somehow with 2 littles and 1 on the way, her home somehow always looks put together. And then there's me. I have ideas. Quirky ideas. But I've never known where to start. I'm always afraid to start a DIY project because WHAT IF it looks bad or doesn't work or no one else likes it or it doesn't turn out perfectly? And frankly...we aren't rich. Not even close. Not by a long shot. Pinterest is amazing but it can also be overwhelming for a simpleton like me who can't sew and lacks appropriate attention to detail. But this book was encouraging. It was inspiring. It isn't a "how to" book, although it's filled with great tips...but it gave me enough confidence to at least paint those ugly bedside tables with some extra paint we had in the garage. After all, "you can't ruin something you already don't like."It also helped me understand a bit more that my home doesn't need to look like anyone else's in order to be lovely. Embrace who you are and what makes you happy, decoratively speaking. I also really appreciated how she encourages to examine your heart and to be content with what you already have. To live in the moment and stop waiting to become a homeowner and start making your house a home now. I also really really appreciate the fact that SHE IS A RENTER. I seriously cannot rave enough about this book. Can you tell? ...more
3

May 01, 2014

I especially liked her emphasis on just starting (i.e. not letting perfection get in the way of making your house feel like a home). Her style is totally not mine so I didn't find much inspiration (other than that I definitely need to get more pictures in frames up around our house).

And this is totally nitpicky - but why, oh why, did she not cut off those threads hanging down from the chair that she re-upholstered (and it featured on the cover)? I know her bit is that "it doesn't have to be I especially liked her emphasis on just starting (i.e. not letting perfection get in the way of making your house feel like a home). Her style is totally not mine so I didn't find much inspiration (other than that I definitely need to get more pictures in frames up around our house).

And this is totally nitpicky - but why, oh why, did she not cut off those threads hanging down from the chair that she re-upholstered (and it featured on the cover)? I know her bit is that "it doesn't have to be perfect to be beautiful" but it would take about 10 seconds to cut off the strings and it would be so much more beautiful than with them on. This is probably [definitely] my perfectionist side coming out but in the scheme of things, cutting off threads is oh so easy and attention to that tiny detail can make anything look more professional. So why not do it? ...more
3

Nov 01, 2018

So, this is a Zondervan book which means it is written by and for Christians who take their faith seriously and lean towards evangelical. (Nothing against Christians specifically, but given the current political climate in 2018, three Southern Christian homeschooled white boys reading textbooks called The Patriot's Handbook gives me the shivers). The section on how to sell your husband on your decorating ideas (presumably so that he doesn't just shut them down, given his status as head of the So, this is a Zondervan book which means it is written by and for Christians who take their faith seriously and lean towards evangelical. (Nothing against Christians specifically, but given the current political climate in 2018, three Southern Christian homeschooled white boys reading textbooks called The Patriot's Handbook gives me the shivers). The section on how to sell your husband on your decorating ideas (presumably so that he doesn't just shut them down, given his status as head of the household) is kind of icky.
However, the Christian influence is not overpowering and there is plenty of good advice here.
I really enjoy her voice and her style. I particularly like how she dissects what keeps women from decorating (fear, perfectionism). I've got ideas now and am ready to tackle some DIY that I wasn't before. ...more
3

Feb 05, 2015

Takeaway: There's a lot you can do to pretty up a rental house if you're willing to forego your security deposit.
5

July 17, 2014

I grabbed this book hoping I would find some tips on creating and styling my space on a dime. I did not know that there was a beautiful story about to unfold that would help me appreciate and love more the imperfect pieces of where I am in life and in my home. She brings such an enlightened, hone...Full Review
3

Mar 21, 2019

Probably closer to three and a half stars. I resonated with several things in this book. I haven't lived in as many homes as the author but I have struggled to enjoy certain things about each of my homes. There was always something I wanted to try that I thought needed to wait for the next house. I also struggle with listening to all the advice about what should and should not be done in decorating. I've let others choose paint colors and sofas and bedding while internally wishing it was Probably closer to three and a half stars. I resonated with several things in this book. I haven't lived in as many homes as the author but I have struggled to enjoy certain things about each of my homes. There was always something I wanted to try that I thought needed to wait for the next house. I also struggle with listening to all the advice about what should and should not be done in decorating. I've let others choose paint colors and sofas and bedding while internally wishing it was different. But I'm a non confrontational person who would rather go with whatever than cause ripples. I'm not a super perfectionist but I am thrifty so the thought of spending money on something and changing it then it not turn out right and that money is wasted does keep me from being adventurous when DIYing. So the way she addressed those concerns was refreshing and what I needed to read.
I don't agree with her section on husbands. I feel like she was advocating for manipulation. And if he doesn't trust you to have an opinion about a paint color, you might have other issues. I was also a little confused by the structure of the chapters. She hopped from house to house in one chapter then dealt completely with one house in the next. I lost a little bit of where she was talking about. Her voice is very conversational and genuine. If you've heard her talk on a podcast you can hear her voice loud and clear while reading this book.
All in all, it was an interesting book that encouraged me to look outside the box a bit and to just be thankful where I am. Anywhere can be a home when we are surrounded by those we love. ...more
4

Feb 19, 2018

This isn't so much a design manual as it is one long letter giving you permission to let go of the idea of having a "perfect" home, of embracing and loving the house or apartment you're in (with all its "lovely limitations"), and of letting yourself loose to play around with your home decor and make mistakes and try new things and see where it gets you.

In other words, this book happened to be EXACTLY what I needed to hear, as I tend to overthink every design choice and need to hear, over and This isn't so much a design manual as it is one long letter giving you permission to let go of the idea of having a "perfect" home, of embracing and loving the house or apartment you're in (with all its "lovely limitations"), and of letting yourself loose to play around with your home decor and make mistakes and try new things and see where it gets you.

In other words, this book happened to be EXACTLY what I needed to hear, as I tend to overthink every design choice and need to hear, over and over, that usually "done" is better than "nothing." I feel like reading this gave me the confidence just to try things out, without feeling the need to research it to death first or consider all the endless possibilities. I'm not one to want to read a book telling me how to decorate or what the "right" way to do it is, so I appreciated this fresh take on making a house into a home. And--bonus!--now I'm excited to tackle all the rooms in our new-ish home that still need some love! ...more
5

Jun 01, 2018

Fall in love with the home you have

I picked up this book because I’ve followed Myquillin for many years, and love her style. However I had no clue how much till I flew through this book. I felt like I sat down to coffee with a near stranger and walked away with a new friend, and kindred spirit, who imparted SO much wisdom in a short visit.
This book is such a fun read because of the way she come across so conversational and authentic. From introducing us to her family to all the personal and Fall in love with the home you have

I picked up this book because I’ve followed Myquillin for many years, and love her style. However I had no clue how much till I flew through this book. I felt like I sat down to coffee with a near stranger and walked away with a new friend, and kindred spirit, who imparted SO much wisdom in a short visit.
This book is such a fun read because of the way she come across so conversational and authentic. From introducing us to her family to all the personal and imperfect stories about their many homes, you walk away from this book not only inspired, but as if you have a new friend.
If you are a recent college grad, or a newly wed, or an empty nester there are gems of truth and insight for all of us about cultivating a home we love with what we have. There is something for everyone that will help you see whatever your living situation is with fresh perspective and a drive to create! ...more
3

Oct 19, 2018

Smith’s style isn’t quite my style, so the inspiration photos didn’t do much for me. That being said, her philosophy is sound. I have often seen someone fixing up their house to sell and thought ‘wow, if they’d done that a year ago they could have enjoyed it themselves.’ This isn’t about renovation, it’s more about decorating, but the thought is the same: enjoy what you have now. Don’t wait until you have the perfect house, make where you’re living now into a home. Even if you’re renting. As Smith’s style isn’t quite my style, so the inspiration photos didn’t do much for me. That being said, her philosophy is sound. I have often seen someone fixing up their house to sell and thought ‘wow, if they’d done that a year ago they could have enjoyed it themselves.’ This isn’t about renovation, it’s more about decorating, but the thought is the same: enjoy what you have now. Don’t wait until you have the perfect house, make where you’re living now into a home. Even if you’re renting. As someone who has been living for three years in an apartment I thought we would live in for 6 months tops, I’m grateful for the little superficial changes I’ve made to make this place home. And I have enjoyed its constant evolution. It looks nothing like it did a year ago, or two. While I still feel the limitations of a place that isn’t strictly my own, I appreciated Smith’s advice to apply gratitude and courage to home decor. Love what you have, but take risks to make it better. ...more
3

Jan 25, 2018

Makes a strong case for finding contentment with the home you already have (not your "dream home," or your "next home," or whatever it is you're wishing for). This is a particularly attainable book on interior design; I do love those coffee-table beauties, but those rooms are just not attainable.
I'm not so keen on propping furniture up with books (the librarian in me just cringes), but on the other hand I loved her torn-page wreath and garland. I also found her advice on "quieting" a room Makes a strong case for finding contentment with the home you already have (not your "dream home," or your "next home," or whatever it is you're wishing for). This is a particularly attainable book on interior design; I do love those coffee-table beauties, but those rooms are just not attainable.
I'm not so keen on propping furniture up with books (the librarian in me just cringes), but on the other hand I loved her torn-page wreath and garland. I also found her advice on "quieting" a room (purging all the tchotchkes, knick-knacks, and other dust catchers) to be particularly valuable. ...more
4

Mar 10, 2019

Some great messages to enjoy the home you're in now and how to work with - and even appreciate - parts of your home that you dislike. Yeah, there are some quirky things stuck into this decorating book, like when she talks about her connection with Anna Nicole Smith or when she talks about not having enough money to buy fries at McDonald's and yet getting a job herself never surfaces as a solution. But overall it's a quick, fun, inspiring read.

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