The Literacy Bridge - Large Print - Invisible Info

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A National Book Award-winning Author
A Junior Library
Guild Selection
A Junior Library Guild Selection ?
Publishers
Weekly and School Library Journal Reviews

Lots of people think
Doug Hanson is a freak - he gets beat up after school, and the girl of
his dreams calls him a worm. Doug's only refuge is building elaborate
model trains in his basement and hanging out with his best friend, Andy
Morrow. Andy is nothing like Doug, but they can talk about anything -
except what happened at the Tuttle place a few years back.

Available
only in The Literacy Bridge 5.


Average Ratings and Reviews
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4.05

2496 Ratings

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Ratings and Reviews From Market


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Reviews for The Literacy Bridge - Large Print - Invisible:

5

Feb 22, 2018

Okay, so I did get one thing right. bit then there was so much more. I enjoyed this as a fan of the author and of psychology.
3

Apr 26, 2008

Five years ago I read Hautman's Mr. Was. A student of mine recommended it to me. The book was weird... and more than a little bit twisted... but I enjoyed it.

Invisible continues the weird/twisted trend, but with a more linear plotline (read: mechanical) and less likable characters. Far less likeable. In fact, I'd argue that Hautman missed the boat completely with Dougie, the narrator. Dougie is clearly a disturbed individual, but Hautman peppers him with cloying asides and "quirks" that come Five years ago I read Hautman's Mr. Was. A student of mine recommended it to me. The book was weird... and more than a little bit twisted... but I enjoyed it.

Invisible continues the weird/twisted trend, but with a more linear plotline (read: mechanical) and less likable characters. Far less likeable. In fact, I'd argue that Hautman missed the boat completely with Dougie, the narrator. Dougie is clearly a disturbed individual, but Hautman peppers him with cloying asides and "quirks" that come off as a third-rate Christopher Swindon (from The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time). It becomes tiresome.

The central concept of Invisible is embarrassingly apparent by page 25; even if you figure it out, don't give up. Knowing the twist added to the suspense: I constantly wondered how Hautman would tie it all together.

He does. And he doesn't. What saves Invisible from being a wash is Hatuman's pacing: it is terrifically unnerving. The chapters are short and taut, infused with a sinister edge that is typically unfound in YA novels. The book mercilessly bullets toward its denouement and skids to a satisfyingly oblique ending that neither absolves or completely punishes the actions of its characters. ...more
4

Apr 08, 2012

(I've decided to write a small review in light of the fact I chose to re-read this book for my English class's literature circle).

Doug is a socially awkward, literal-minded middle school student who is basically ignored by everyone but a super popular kid in his own grade named Andy. Doug asserts himself when he says that he and Andy are like this --(crosses fingers)---....close, I mean... Ahem.

But there's more to Doug's relationship with Andy than meets the eye, and as your read on, you'll find (I've decided to write a small review in light of the fact I chose to re-read this book for my English class's literature circle).

Doug is a socially awkward, literal-minded middle school student who is basically ignored by everyone but a super popular kid in his own grade named Andy. Doug asserts himself when he says that he and Andy are like this --(crosses fingers)---....close, I mean... Ahem.

But there's more to Doug's relationship with Andy than meets the eye, and as your read on, you'll find that there's something dark and sinister and potentially lethal he's hidden so far away within himself that even he has forgotten, forgotten about the "Tuttle Incident"....


(view spoiler)[ Personally, I thought that perhaps Doug was an Aspie, that is, someone with Asperger's Syndrome, because of his inability to communicate with his classmates, his rants on his favorite subjects--basically trains, train models, and the Golden Gate Bridge he's making a miniature model of--as well as his straight, to the point, and literal minded way of looking at things. I also thought that what people saw as symptoms of schizophrenia (him more than likely seeing Andy as a hallucination) was to me just a case of PTSD from the Tuttle incident, his mind's way of coping with the fact that Andy is dead and gone from his life, or simply just an illusion that Doug sees everyday without having warning bells go off in his head like say, veterans with PTSD would have. But to each his own.. I think this is my own idea, I doubt anyone has interpreted Doug's undeniable mental illness as him being autistic with a dash of PTSD, but this sort of diagnostic thing isn't my forte, plus stuff like this overlaps, doesn't it? It's really guessing in my opinion, but whatevers! (hide spoiler)]

His father screams like a maniac; I hate people like that, people who think that JUST BECAUSE YOU SHOUT LIKE THIS YOUR SIDE OF THE ARGUMENT IS AUTOMATICALLY RIGHT!!!!! RAWR!!!! Ahem, Doug's dad never "rawred", I just added that for the funsies :D

Anyways, his mother is scatterbrained, and Doug himself is an obsessive little mite by himself. Plus he doesn't take his medication! Idiot child! You don't ever stop taking your medication! Even if it does more harm than good--in your stupid, child's opinion. Have you done at least 10 years of research and training to be able to perscribe people medication for their problems? No? Then don't stop taking them. I don't care if they make you super sleepy like horse tranquilizers, take them, wait until the next appointment, and then say, "Hey quack, these things are shit, fo' realz yo. I need me something a little lighter, kno' what I'm sayin'?" WARNING: Do not say this. Results are 1/10000 that the psychiatrist will actually take you seriously, let alone give you different medication

So the kid's an idiot, and probably a little loopy, but this is a good book overall. I highly recommend for literature circles that focus on "Mental Illness" as the theme.

(view spoiler)[ And did you guys see how Doug's sigil transformed and morphed as he slowly went more and more insane? When I look at the very last one for too long I feel queasy and my eyes go funny.. I can friggin SEE and FEEL the mental illness Doug is basically oozing out of his pores... my eyes are screaming "look away, or you'll go crazy too!!"

It reminds me of this guy, Louis Wain, who descended into schizophrenia. He was an artist and loved to paint kitties. This link will show you his descent into madness, and how his artwork reflects the corruption of his senses...
crazy ass kitties
(hide spoiler)] ...more
0

Jun 25, 2009

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. ** spoiler alert **

SUMMARY:
The vivid tale of seventeen year old Doug Hanson who trusts only two things: the significance of the model train bridge he is building in his basement and the connection between him and his best friend Andy. Where Doug is what the gorgeous Melissa Haverman calls a "worm," Andy is one of the most popular boys in school -- a football star who's also successful in drama and on student council. When Dougie gets caught "peeping" on Melissa Haverman, his life begins to get ** spoiler alert **

SUMMARY:
The vivid tale of seventeen year old Doug Hanson who trusts only two things: the significance of the model train bridge he is building in his basement and the connection between him and his best friend Andy. Where Doug is what the gorgeous Melissa Haverman calls a "worm," Andy is one of the most popular boys in school -- a football star who's also successful in drama and on student council. When Dougie gets caught "peeping" on Melissa Haverman, his life begins to get a little more complicated and not even his friendship with Andy seems able to get him through.

WHAT I ENJOYED ABOUT THIS BOOK:
:: Now this is a masterful YA protagonist voice -- a narrator who is utterly captivating and distinctive yet who's unreliability creeps into the narrative at precisely correct intervals.
:: There is a central mystery or secret within this narrative, one likely legible earlier than I caught it. But what's excellent about it is that, once you figure out what's happening, knowledge of the mystery only amplifies the poignancy and urgency of the story. It's an artful move -- to have this twist work on both sides. The narrative is captivating enough if you haven't figured it out, yet casts everything in a totally different light once you do. Really well-crafted.
:: I admire the way Hautman captured Doug's OCD aspects as features of his personality as well as what might be considered mental illness. Permits a kind of empathy for Doug's situation even as it productively exploits the mental illness aspects for their narrative utility.
:: The only reason I didn't give this book 4 or 5 stars is that I really didn't connect to it emotionally. I was fascinated and admired Hautman's craftsmanship, yet never really found myself emotionally captivated by the characters or the scenario. A tricksy, enthralling page-turner...in the best tradition of Rod Serling and Stephen King...but it didn't really make me feel a whole lot (which I sorta need for the higher ranking). ...more
4

Aug 31, 2011

Invisible has a few key characters. Doughie is the main one. Doughie is considered a nobody having one hobby and one best friend. His hobby is building elaborate model trains and his only best friend is Andy Morrow. Andy is a popular football star and drama kid (nothing at all like Doughie). Melissa is another key character, also Doughie's crush. Dougie's parents, psychiatrist, and a policeman are other key characters in the book.
Doughie is considered a freak. He gets bullied by other boys and Invisible has a few key characters. Doughie is the main one. Doughie is considered a nobody having one hobby and one best friend. His hobby is building elaborate model trains and his only best friend is Andy Morrow. Andy is a popular football star and drama kid (nothing at all like Doughie). Melissa is another key character, also Doughie's crush. Dougie's parents, psychiatrist, and a policeman are other key characters in the book.
Doughie is considered a freak. He gets bullied by other boys and the girls think he is weird (with all the innapropriate stares he gives them). He doesn't understand why he has to be sent to therapy or why he has to take pills. Whenever he mentions Andy (or is heard talking to him) people give him a wierd look. He has a deep fascination with fire and all he can do in art class is repeated versions of his sigil. Throughout the story Doughie tries to conceal something that happened to Andy and him at the Tuttle place few years back. The story is finally uncovered, and Doughie's life changes forever.
I think Pete Hautman's audience is teens our age. The book has many twisted and disturbing events that at first you won't understand. Thats what keeps you flipping the pages for more. Once you get to the end you can't stop thinking about the twisty ending. Its easy to read, but keeps you involved and thinking. I think its a good level for teen girls and boys who like realistic fiction.
There is a constant theme throughout the book. I say its fire. Doughie and Andy are always getting in trouble. No matter wat they get in trouble for, fire always seems to have part in it. Doughie and Andy are inseparable friends who share a morbid interest in fire. Simone Weil said "Fire destroys that which feeds it." Which is exactly what happened to Doughie and Andy.

...more
5

Oct 05, 2009

"I think that this book is fantastic!. Throughout the book there is a mysterious feel about the main character (I can't remember his name). You think that you can predict what is going to happen next, but then the book does the complete opposite. The book keeps you guessing and that was what was interesting. When i was reading it, I couldn't put it down. The flow of the words was just perfect, and there wasn't so much description that made it boring. After a while though I wondered what was "I think that this book is fantastic!. Throughout the book there is a mysterious feel about the main character (I can't remember his name). You think that you can predict what is going to happen next, but then the book does the complete opposite. The book keeps you guessing and that was what was interesting. When i was reading it, I couldn't put it down. The flow of the words was just perfect, and there wasn't so much description that made it boring. After a while though I wondered what was going to happen. The book just talked about the main character's every day life. Then in the second or third last chapter, everything changed. It was sort of hard to follow along at first but in the end it was very good. THis book is perfect for people who are looking for a short book, but a very entertaining one. ...more
3

May 10, 2017

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. [Possible spoilers ahead]

Not my favourite book, but it was interesting. The plot, and what happened at Tuttle Place, is hella obvious fom the very beginning, which was really aggrivating.

This story follows Doug who possessivly claims Andy as his best friend, which immediately threw red flags up for me that something is up with him. As in, Andy must be dead, faking it, or doesn't exist at all. And how Andy never spoke to another character for literally the whole book. Only to Doug. Also his [Possible spoilers ahead]

Not my favourite book, but it was interesting. The plot, and what happened at Tuttle Place, is hella obvious fom the very beginning, which was really aggrivating.

This story follows Doug who possessivly claims Andy as his best friend, which immediately threw red flags up for me that something is up with him. As in, Andy must be dead, faking it, or doesn't exist at all. And how Andy never spoke to another character for literally the whole book. Only to Doug. Also his obsession with fire is concerning, so I know fire is a big part of something.

Doug's father ALSO TALKED LIKE THIS FOR MOST OF THE BOOK. I AM NOT SURE WHY. LOGIC. (WHICH IS ALSO DOUG'S ARGUMENT FOR EVERYTHING.) ...more
4

Jun 23, 2019

The protagonist of Invisible, Douglas, is a seventeen-year-old loner who could easily be described as an unreliable narrator. Douglas, better known as Doug or sometimes (unfortunately) Dougie, is obsessed with three things- his friendship with his much more popular best friend Andy, his beautiful classmate Melissa Haverman, who openly hates his guts, and a incredibly intricate model railroad hes building in his basement.

Douglas fixation with trains (and in particular, model trains) are basically The protagonist of Invisible, Douglas, is a seventeen-year-old loner who could easily be described as an ‘unreliable narrator.’ Douglas, better known as ‘Doug’ or sometimes (unfortunately) ‘Dougie,’ is obsessed with three things- his friendship with his much more popular best friend Andy, his beautiful classmate Melissa Haverman, who openly hates his guts, and a incredibly intricate model railroad he’s building in his basement.

Douglas’ fixation with trains (and in particular, model trains) are basically his entire life, his project is all-consuming and his mother worries that he’s not getting out enough and doesn’t have a firm grasp on reality. Unfortunately, she’s exactly right; Doug isn’t processing things that happened when he was younger in what anyone would consider a normal way. He also has an intense interest in fire and playing with fire, which is never a good sign. At school and home, things escalate to the point where Doug finds himself more alone than ever before and quickly running out of options.

Doug is an interesting protagonist, with a unique and well-developed personality and a very distinct voice. His mom and dad are the typical  negligent YA parents who don’t really seem to acknowledge or care about their kid. I found myself wondering early on if Doug’s dad was mentally ill too, he yelled at people constantly and didn’t seem to have a very good handle on his own behavior. I couldn’t help but feel empathy for Doug but that said, I didn’t really like him all that much. Even though the way Melissa treated him was wrong, it’s hard to deny that his behavior towards her was outright harassment. The scene where he sits on the bleachers on a football field and throws lit matches at a rat scuttling among the trash underneath didn’t exactly help me like him.

I think it was a good decision for the author to leave Doug’s exact diagnosis ambiguous, I feel like he was probably schizophrenic although that’s certainly up for debate. There were points where he seemed like he might be on the spectrum but his behavior overall didn’t seem to add up to that conclusion. I think the portrayal of what happens when Doug starts taking his medication again after years of being off it could potentially be problematic, because although I have no doubt that certain anti-psychotics have very similar side effects to what Doug experiences in the book, I worry that the horrific portrayal could scare teenagers who read this out of taking psychiatric meds even if they need them.

I don’t necessarily disagree with the author’s decision to portray things the way he did, and I think it could be an important topic for discussion between kids and parents. I thought it was particularly messed-up that Doug’s parents watched their son’s medication turn him almost instantaneously into a drugged-out zombie, and they didn’t even consider getting him put on an less harmful alternative. No parents of the year award for them.

Overall, Invisible is sad, a little disturbing the author’s admittedly compelling portrayal of the main character and his inner demons make it a worthwhile read for both teens and adults who still enjoy a good YA novel. ...more
5

Aug 01, 2018

I must say that this story was well written and leads the reader through twists and turns that completely alter our way of thinkng. I feel that the ending of this tragic book leaves us to interpret this in a way that we ourselves can come to terms with it. This is one book that will forever stay with me.
4

Feb 24, 2017

I read the book Invisible by Pete Hautman. In the book there is a kid named Doug Hanson and he isnt the most popular kid in school but it doesnt matter because all he was to do is build his model bridge. He hangs out with his best friend Andy Morrow the most popular guy in school and a football star and they share everything they know.
I liked this book because it was different from everything else I read because everything else is a sports book that I would enjoy being an athlete. This book was I read the book Invisible by Pete Hautman. In the book there is a kid named Doug Hanson and he isn’t the most popular kid in school but it doesn’t matter because all he was to do is build his model bridge. He hangs out with his best friend Andy Morrow the most popular guy in school and a football star and they share everything they know.
I liked this book because it was different from everything else I read because everything else is a sports book that I would enjoy being an athlete. This book was a good book because I liked how I felt like I was involved. The way I felt involved was i felt like I was with the main character the whole time, whenever he was with his best friend or building his bridge. I couldn’t put the book down because it was such a good read but it was also a short read once I got hooked. The book Invisible was interesting when it tugged at different emotions throughout the book with different situations that he was in. I recommend reading this book if you loved sitting down and just reading for fun. ...more
4

Oct 28, 2010

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I am currently looking for quality young adult novels on the subject(s) of teen bullying, teen depression, and teen suicide. This gave me the opportunity to look more into Minnesota author, Pete Hautman. "Invisible" wasn't at all what I expected it to be. A short, fast read, it is long on thematic content. There is much her to think about and discuss. And Hautman leaves us with no pat answers - there is lots of gray area here.

Seventeen year old, Doug Hanson is a loner obsessed with model trains, I am currently looking for quality young adult novels on the subject(s) of teen bullying, teen depression, and teen suicide. This gave me the opportunity to look more into Minnesota author, Pete Hautman. "Invisible" wasn't at all what I expected it to be. A short, fast read, it is long on thematic content. There is much her to think about and discuss. And Hautman leaves us with no pat answers - there is lots of gray area here.

Seventeen year old, Doug Hanson is a loner obsessed with model trains, drawing (the same thing over and over), fire, knives (especially his Swiss Army Victorinox), and Melissa Haverman. At first, after having recently read many books on the subject of autism, I wondered if he was on the spectrum. As he lives the present, and slowly reveals his past to the reader, it becomes clear that he is a deeply disturbed young man. Much is revealed to us through his conversations with his best friend Andy (whom we, not surprisingly, learn actually died in a fire three years earlier), conversations with his therapist, and conversations directed at the reader. Because of his tragic past, Doug fights to cope with his losses and still move through his days by immersing himself in his obsessions. His strange behaviors, which he logically defends (after all, his father mows the lawn in a suit, and the neighbor gets drunk and plays his guitar in his garage), leads to verbal, emotional, and physical bullying by his peers. When he is beaten so savagely that he ends up in the hospital, and those who attacked him are not punished, years of anger and trying to keep control lead to a frightening conclusion.

"Invisible" again points out the always destructive, sometimes deadly, consequences of teen bullying.This topic is front page news right now, as teens are committing suicide at an alarming rate (one death is too many, in my mind) as a consequence of bullying. Themes of grief, parenting, mental illness, coping mechanisms, the "crazy" things we all do, etc. take a back seat to this important message.

Intense, dark, spell-binding. Highly recommended! ...more
3

Jun 26, 2009

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. On the cover of this book, I thought it was a picture of a dust pan. Later I realized they were matches.

Okay, this book wasn't the best book I've ever read, but it was good. I stayed up well past midnight (on a SCHOOL night!!!) reading it, almost finishing it. I liked the story and I was anxious to find out what happened on "that night". Of course, I assumed that the two boys did something intimate, but of course I was wrong: someone died. This book was really fast-paced, and the mystery of it On the cover of this book, I thought it was a picture of a dust pan. Later I realized they were matches.

Okay, this book wasn't the best book I've ever read, but it was good. I stayed up well past midnight (on a SCHOOL night!!!) reading it, almost finishing it. I liked the story and I was anxious to find out what happened on "that night". Of course, I assumed that the two boys did something intimate, but of course I was wrong: someone died. This book was really fast-paced, and the mystery of it was so intriguing that I everything I assumed I was wrong about. There was this little symbol the main character was developing throughout the novel and soon enough, you could tell it was going to turn into fire. You could just tell. It got all spiky and shtuff.

It turned into fire.

...yyyeahh...

Anyway, the blasted plot turned into this psycho-thriller movie, something that I'm not a great fan of because they always end up the same: main character comes back to Earth and whatever person they were talking to was really dead and THEY disappear for a while, then there's some REALLY confusing hospital scene, and the dead guy comes back. So... annoying...
That's the sucky part of the book: the very end. The last two or three chapters just killed it all for me. I was so excited to read about something ELSE, but it HAD to turn into a psycho-thriller movie.

Read it if you want, but "Godless" was times better. ...more
5

Jul 31, 2012

This was the first book ever to make me cry. I thought the ending was so sad. I was actually quite surprised to read that people didn't understand or "get" the book. I might spoil it right here. (view spoiler)[ But basically during the first half of the book you learn that there is Doug and Andy but by the end you learn that Andy was never there. Doug was still seeing Andy and imagining him being there. Andy had died in a fire before the start of the book. Who knows if Andy's ghost really did This was the first book ever to make me cry. I thought the ending was so sad. I was actually quite surprised to read that people didn't understand or "get" the book. I might spoil it right here. (view spoiler)[ But basically during the first half of the book you learn that there is Doug and Andy but by the end you learn that Andy was never there. Doug was still seeing Andy and imagining him being there. Andy had died in a fire before the start of the book. Who knows if Andy's ghost really did come to Doug or if he was just making him up. I just find it so sad how they both were interested in fire and yet Andy had died in a fire and Doug gets burns all over his face and body from his play trains having exploded at the end of the book. And how as he's laying in the burn victims section at the hospital Andy comes there and he has a conversation with him, which I thought the conversation was sad but I can't remember it. (hide spoiler)] I didn't think it was a hard read to understand, it's like one of those movies where you have to watch it a second time when you learn by the ending that something was never really there. ...more
4

Mar 29, 2011

Students have been recommending Hautman's books for years, but it wasn't until this weekend that I finally picked one up. I'm slapping myself that I didn't read his work sooner.

The story is told from the perspective of its narrator, 17 year-old Doug Hanson. Doug lives next door to his best friend, Andy Morrow. The two boys could not be more different: Doug is a model-train obsessed outsider who dreams of a romance with one of the "pretty girls" but can never make himself talk to her; Andy is the Students have been recommending Hautman's books for years, but it wasn't until this weekend that I finally picked one up. I'm slapping myself that I didn't read his work sooner.

The story is told from the perspective of its narrator, 17 year-old Doug Hanson. Doug lives next door to his best friend, Andy Morrow. The two boys could not be more different: Doug is a model-train obsessed outsider who dreams of a romance with one of the "pretty girls" but can never make himself talk to her; Andy is the football team's starting quarterback and acts in school plays.

This novel reminds me of Chris Lynch's Inexcusable Even from the beginning of the novel, something is off about Dougie. Like Lynch's Keir, the way Doug tells his stories and the details he chooses to avoid hint that his interpretations of events isn't entirely factual.

This isn't Hautman's most celebrated work, yet I was was engaged from start to finish, Given how much I enjoyed watching Doug develop as a character, I am certain this will not be the last Hautman novel I read. ...more
4

Jan 06, 2009

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I just finished Invisible. It was short (140-some pages) and while I'd normally attribute that to how quick the read was I have to say this book was engrossing. I suspected out the plot twist fairly early on, but that didn't stop me from being interested in where it was going and that's a plug for the writing. I really liked that this was my second YA book to prove to me that people are writing books about the "other" kids in the world. The main character in this story is a social outcast and I just finished Invisible. It was short (140-some pages) and while I'd normally attribute that to how quick the read was I have to say this book was engrossing. I suspected out the plot twist fairly early on, but that didn't stop me from being interested in where it was going and that's a plug for the writing. I really liked that this was my second YA book to prove to me that people are writing books about the "other" kids in the world. The main character in this story is a social outcast and while he does have troubles beyond the normal realm of a regular teen, I think a good portion of this story is illuminating the life of the invisible kid in school. Granted now I'm not sure if combining the outcast story with the story of a kid with real mental problems is a good precedent for students to read: instead of showing them the human, relatable side of kids they don't normally notice/like, it almost gives them an excuse to discount them more and assume they're all "disturbed". Something to think about. But still a good read!
...more
1

Jul 07, 2009

I don't like this book, as I didn't like Godless. Maybe I just don't get it. Douglas MacArthur Hanson is 17 and obsessed with model trains. He's constructed an entire town, Madham, the size of two ping pong tables in his basement. His current project is a replica of the Golden Gate Bridge made of matchsticks. Doug's best - only- friend is Andy Morrow. Doug's parents are/seem as odd as Doug. The question the story poses for me is whether Doug is disturbed, and if so, why? His voice seems too I don't like this book, as I didn't like Godless. Maybe I just don't get it. Douglas MacArthur Hanson is 17 and obsessed with model trains. He's constructed an entire town, Madham, the size of two ping pong tables in his basement. His current project is a replica of the Golden Gate Bridge made of matchsticks. Doug's best - only- friend is Andy Morrow. Doug's parents are/seem as odd as Doug. The question the story poses for me is whether Doug is disturbed, and if so, why? His voice seems too immature for 17 - though that may be intentional, as a consequence of his problem. Still, it is distracting. Once Doug is revealed as an unreliable narrator, the ending of the book is more confusing than resolved. Although it is intended for a YA audience, it is completely without hope. ...more
5

Jun 08, 2014

Pardon my language for those of you that take offense to this but: HOLY SHIT... I'm still speechless about how it all ended. It's one of the shortest books I've ever read, but so much happens in it that it's left a great impression on me. For those of you that are in need of a quick and easy read: pick this up. If you're trying to recommend a book to someone who isn't much of a book reading kind of person: this is the exact book for them. I don't blame Doug in the end for what he did to himself, Pardon my language for those of you that take offense to this but: HOLY SHIT... I'm still speechless about how it all ended. It's one of the shortest books I've ever read, but so much happens in it that it's left a great impression on me. For those of you that are in need of a quick and easy read: pick this up. If you're trying to recommend a book to someone who isn't much of a book reading kind of person: this is the exact book for them. I don't blame Doug in the end for what he did to himself, but I wish that he would've been the better person and just let go of the past. ...more
4

Oct 17, 2016

Invisible is about a boy named Dougie and his best friend Andy. Dougie is very shy and awkward but Andy is popular. Dougies parents think he is troubled so they send him to a therapist which Dougie thinks he doesn't need. Throughout the book Dougie is working on a bridge for his train set that his grandfather gave to him. I liked the plot twist and suspense. I didn't like that the beginning was slow moving and boring. I would recommend this book to someone who likes suspense.
4

Nov 02, 2012

THE HECK WAS THIS. It was kinda normal in the beginning...but it's like a mix between The Sixth Sense and The Twilight Zone. I wish it was longer, but it was nice that I read it in only a day. Anyway, I recommend this because there's lots of twists, and even though it's so short, the plot and the symbols and everything are great. It's a mystery.
4

Jul 27, 2016

Pete Hatuman is just a flat-out talented writer. I love how real his characters are and how they give you a chance to look at things from perspectives you couldn't consider. Most of all I love the very honest way his characters go about making sense of their lives and the big questions we all consider.
4

Oct 04, 2010

Oh. My. God. Talk about a twist ending.
This is a beautiful (and somewhat frightening) story about friendship that can't be described with words. The sarcastic and popular Andy and the quiet and severely depressed Dougie are both amazing characters. I cried over this book- and I haven't cried over a book in a while. It's a brilliant story.
5

Apr 30, 2013

So far the greatest book I have ever read in my entire life. This book had me on the edge of my chair the entire time. I almost cried at the end though. Extremely dramatic twists in this book. Great book! I encourage everyone in Highschool to read this.
3

Oct 28, 2015

I really liked invisible because it had a very funny main character. He liked to have fun but was a bit quirky. It has good suspicion to it. Im not too sure very many girls would like it but I would recommend it to all of my friends.
3

Feb 01, 2013

the ending was what really boggled my mind. Whether it is in Doug's imagination that leads him to smelling burnt plastic and seeing "Madham Burn Unit" or he has died and Madham Hospital is his place of rest is not revealed, and that is driving me crazy!
5

Feb 26, 2019


INVISIBLE
Page historylast edited by RichiesPicks 9 years, 6 months ago
7 May 2005 INVISIBLE by Pete Hautman, Simon & Schuster, June 2005, ISBN: 0-689-86800-6

"Trouble
Oh trouble set me free
I have seen your face
And it's too much too much for me
Trouble
Oh trouble can't you see
You're eating my heart away
And there's nothing much left of me"
--Cat Stevens, "Trouble"

Pete Hautman's INVISIBLE is going to make for one hot booktalk.

"My full and proper name is Douglas MacArthur Hanson. I am named after
INVISIBLE
Page historylast edited by RichiesPicks 9 years, 6 months ago
7 May 2005 INVISIBLE by Pete Hautman, Simon & Schuster, June 2005, ISBN: 0-689-86800-6

"Trouble
Oh trouble set me free
I have seen your face
And it's too much too much for me
Trouble
Oh trouble can't you see
You're eating my heart away
And there's nothing much left of me"
--Cat Stevens, "Trouble"

Pete Hautman's INVISIBLE is going to make for one hot booktalk.

"My full and proper name is Douglas MacArthur Hanson. I am named after Douglas MacArthur, the famous general, who was a second cousin of my father's great-aunt. Everyone on my father's side is named after some famous person we are supposedly related to. My father's name is Henry Clay Hanson. Henry Clay was a politician who died before the Civil War. He was my grandfather's cousin's great-uncle. Or something like that. It goes on and on. Since my grandfather's name was George Washington Hanson, I guess I'm related to the father of our country too. Anyway, I'm glad I got named after a general instead of a politician. I think it makes me sound more respectable.
"Usually when I meet someone for the first time, I tell them my full and proper name. Then I say, 'But you can call me General.' Some people find this amusing. Andy always laughs. Sometimes he calls me General, just to tease me. I don't mind. I kind of like it. I am very easy to get along with.
"My mother would not agree with that. She finds me difficult. In fact, she thinks that I am troubled and disturbed. I find it troubling that she finds me disturbing, so she must be right.
"Right?"

In a spectacular and tense piece of writing that recalls my favorite Cormier novel, I AM THE CHEESE, but with the strings pulled even tighter, Pete Hautman has created a disturbingly real character whose troubled life will cause you nightmares.

" 'Haven't I seen you somewhere in hell,
or was it just an accident?' "
--Jimi Hendrix, "My Friend"

Dougie is a loner who is thoroughly obsessed with the model train world he has created in the basement, with numbers and order, and with the beautiful Melissa Haverman. His best friend and next door neighbor, the popular Andy Morrow, is both a drama kid and the star quarterback on the football team.

"And it's burn baby burn
When am I going to get my turn?"
--Bruce Cockburn, "Burn"

"Do I strike you as troubled?
"Let me give you some facts and figures. I am seventeen years old. I am a junior at Fairview Central. I have never skipped school and I have a 3.4 grade point average. I do not use drugs or alcohol. I have never been seriously ill. I have never broken a bone, lost a limb, or had an organ removed. I am scrupulously honest, except for necessary lies. I sleep well at night. I am not a loner. I have a best friend."

Do NOT believe him.

And do NOT start reading INVISIBLE if you have to be anywhere important in the next couple of hours.
Richie Partington, MLIS
Richie's Picks http://richiespicks.pbworks.com
https://www.facebook.com/richiespicks/
richiepartington@gmail.com

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