The Jesus Storybook Bible: Every Story Whispers His Name Info

Find the best rated books in Schools & Teaching | Higher & Continuing Education | Studying & Workbooks | Test Preparation and much more. Check out latest releases by Sally Lloyd-Jones,Jago and find where to Download The Jesus Storybook Bible: Every Story Whispers His Name Hardcover,Kindle Online. Read&Download The Jesus Storybook Bible: Every Story Whispers His Name by Sally Lloyd-Jones,Jago Online


If you are a parent, grandparent, pastor, or teacher looking
for a way to teach the children in your life about God’s “Never
Stopping, Never Giving up, Unbreaking, Always and Forever Love,” look no
further than The Jesus Storybook Bible.

What
makes The Jesus Storybook Bible different from every other
Kids’ Bible?

While other Kids’ Bibles contain stories
from the Old and New Testaments, The Jesus Storybook Bible
tells the Story beneath all the stories in the Bible, pointing to Jesus
as our Savior. From the Old Testament through the New Testament, as the
Story unfolds, children will clearly see that Jesus is at the center of
God's great story of salvation—and at the center of their story
too.

The Jesus Storybook Bible:

• Visually
brings scripture to life for children

• Contains 21 stories from
the Old Testament

• Contains 23 stories from the New
Testament

• Presents the best-loved stories of the Bible in an
easy-to-understand format

• Shares how Jesus is at the center of
our story

• Features the award-winning illustrations of
Jago

• Features the beloved, bestselling writing of Sally
Lloyd-Jones

• Is the perfect Kids’ Bible for any age up to 6th
grade

For the past ten years, The Jesus Storybook
Bible
has been the trusted and preferred starting point for
thousands and thousands of parents, grandparents, and pastors to teach
their kids about the Bible. The beautiful, award-winning illustrations
of Jago connect with the bestselling writing of Sally Lloyd-Jones so
that the text of Scripture visually comes to life in the minds of
children. The Jesus Storybook Bible contains 21 stories from
the Old Testament and 23 stories from the New Testament, presented in an
easy-to-understand way that makes learning about the Bible as fun for
younger children, preschool and below, as it is for older children,
kindergarten to sixth grade.


Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for The Jesus Storybook Bible: Every Story Whispers His Name:

5

October 4, 2014

A great book teaching kids the big story of God's work in the world.
I'm a pastor, and (currently) the father of two, a 2.5 year old boy and a 7 month old girl. I've been excited to introduce my children to the Bible, but totally overwhelmed with finding a Bible that would faithfully communicate the Scriptures at a level that made sense young children. I've tried three or four toddler Bibles, but they ranged from the meaningless and banal (Read With Me Bible For Toddlers) to the downright horrifying in their interpretation (The Story For Little Ones). Let me give you a couple of examples to demonstrate what I mean. The Jesus Storybook Bible, on the other hand, seeks to show how God's plan of salvation is unfolding through each story, and largely succeeds in doing so. Let me try and demonstrate what I mean.

First of all, there are children's Bibles like the Read With Me Bible that are simply bland. Granted, toddlers are not going to pick up on every nuance of a story from the Bible, but the Read With Me Bible often chooses the wrong points to emphasize, entirely leaving out important points of narrative along the way. One story simply lists miracles Jesus did with no context, failing to communicate that Jesus' miracles actually anticipate and begin to realize a new world, a world where God's Kingdom and rule are breaking into the world in a new and exciting way. Now, children obviously won't grasp the entirety of this message (indeed, even the most mature Christian is still growing in their understanding) but Jesus is more than a magician, he is more than simply amazingly powerful, so why drain the miracle stories of their power? If salt loses its saltiness, what is it good for?

Next, there are children's Bibles that don't simply drain the Scriptures of their power, but that actually wrongly interpret the Scriptures in horrifying ways. Two examples from The Story For Little Ones. The story of Samson says that Samson did everything God wanted him to do. This simply displays a level of ignorance about the story of Samson that is beyond belief for someone writing (interpreting) a Bible for children! Samson disobeys God at every turn, and the end of his story is that of a man so consumed by hate and revenge (and who does revenge belong to, by the way?) that he is willing to kill himself to destroy HIS (not God's!) enemies! The point is that the best God has to work with to rescue Israel is someone as corrupt as Samson, yet God is able to use even Samson to rescue His undeserving people! Consider also the end of the Bible, the book of Revelation. In The Story For Little Ones, the end of Scripture is that Jesus will return and take us away from this world and we'll live with him forever. This is exactly what Revelation does not say. Now, I'm not a dispensationalist, nor do I believe in a rapture, but that isn't the doctrine I'm criticizing here. At the end of the book of Revelation, the new Jerusalem descends out of heaven to earth, precisely because the Christian hope is resurrection, not going to heaven when you die (that's what happens to those who die before Christ's return, who go to be with Jesus in paradise). God's goal is not for His people to escape the world, but instead God is working to redeem and recreate the world. That is why Romans 8:22 speaks of the creation groaning as in the pains of childbirth, waiting for the revealing of the sons of God.

Okay, finally on to The Jesus Storybook Bible. This Bible works to explain the big idea, and big picture of the Scriptures at every turn. The focus is on God's love for the lost, the great problem of sin, and the great hope we have in Christ. So, for example, the story of the Exodus is told not as the story of God's great magic show, but instead on the great, mighty, and terrifying rescue of God's people from their slavery, pointing forward also to humanity's slavery to sin and coming rescue in Jesus. That is why the subtitle to this Bible is "Every Story Whispers His Name." Every story anticipates the coming of Jesus and the great rescue he brings to those who put their faith in him. This is a great Reformed concept, and a great Reformed work for children (I am an evangelical Presbyterian, by the way).

Now is this Bible perfect? No, and no translation is, much less a paraphrase. Other have commented on some of the shortcomings of this Bible. Sometimes the language and tone is a bit casual, although casual doesn't necessarily mean disrespectful. Every story doesn't say as much as it could, although this is a strength rather than a weakness for a paraphrase (See: The Message). Not all of the theology expressed in the paraphrase matches perfectly with my own, but I see that as a teaching opportunity rather than a fatal flaw, not to mention that I think children should know early on that there are many ideas in the world, and not all of them are equally valid, and certainly not all of them are true. But again, the strength of this Bible is that it gets the story right, interpreting the main idea correctly and always pointing toward Jesus.
1

November 5, 2018

This version takes A LOT of liberty in adding extrabiblical material!
I bought this upon the recommendation of friends. I was told it connected everything to the new covenant in Christ, and that was exactly what I wanted for my daughter as she gets older. When I received it, however, I was greatly disappointed to find lots of extra information added that's nowhere in the real Bible. For example:

"God saw all that he had made and he loved them. And they were lovely because he loved the. But God saved the best for last. From the beginning, God had a shining dream in his heart. He would make people to share his Forever Happiness. They would be his children, and the world would be their perfect home. So God breathed life into Adam and Eve. When they opened their eyes, the first thing they ever saw was God's face. And when God saw them he was like a new dad. "You look like me," he said. "You're the most beautiful thing I've ever made!""

And

"Just trust me,' the serpent whispered. 'You don't need God. One smal taste, that's all, and you'll be happier than you could ever dream...' Eve picked up the fruit and ate some. And Adam ate some, too. And a terrible lie came into the world. It would never leave. It would live on in every human heart, whispering to everyone one of God's children: 'God doesn't love me.'"

It gets better later on in the book, but there's just too much added in the way of emotions, particularly on God's part, for me to feel comfortable. And I understand what the author was trying to do. She was trying to make the Bible personal to children with an angle that points toward Christ, a desire I applaud. But that doesn't mean we can twist the Bible to say things it doesn't say. I'll be sending it back and buying something that's a little less creative.
5

May 19, 2017

My Twins Love This Bible!
Last fall, I started attending a mom's group at our church and they were giving away copies of the Jesus Storybook Bible. I didn't win one that day but my friends told me this book was one of their kids' favorites so I ordered the hardcover copy since it would be easier for us to read and for my kids to look at.

The Jesus Storybook Bible contains many stories from both the Old and New Testaments that children would be likely to hear at Sunday School or kids' groups that teach Bible lessons. The book is 351 pages long and contains 21 stories from the Old Testament and 23 stories from the New Testament. Each story ranges from about six to ten pages in length and contains beautiful, colorful pictures that go along with the stories. The pages are glossy and the book is a hardcover, measuring 6 1/2 inches by 7 3/4 inches by 1 inch. Unless otherwise noted, all of the Scripture notations are taken from The Holy Bible, New International Version.

When we received this Bible, my kids initially weren't too interested in it but they started asking for me to read it after awhile. My son, especially, loves it and calls it the "Bible book." A lot of times I will find him sitting and looking through the pictures. I love that the stories are paraphrased for kids to make the stories simple and easy to understand, not to mention FUN! The stories are told in words that kids are likely to understand and they are easy for parents to explain if an explanation is needed. I'd say the stories take about ten minutes to read, give or take a few if you take some extra time to explain more of the story or the pictures so they would be great for bedtime stories.

I cannot recommend this book enough because my kids LOVE it! They weren't too interested in this Bible at first but now they love it and ask for me to read it fairly often. There are a lot of stories that kids are likely to hear in Sunday School so this would be a great book to help reinforce their learning and understanding of them. I'm so glad we purchased this Bible for my twins, who are now four. It's a fun way for them to learn Bible stories and it would make a great gift for many children!
3

May 15, 2014

Worthwhile with Caution
I purchased the Jesus Storybook Bible to read to children I babysit and to give them as gifts. For these purposes, the book is really neat. The illustrations are captivating, and the book is a good way to get a summary of the Bible focusing on Jesus as the center of its message. For someone who has never read the full version of the Bible, this book could be a great introduction and even an enticement to pick up the Bible and read it.

For someone who may be familiar with the full version of the Bible and may be concerned about teaching children biblical accuracy, this book may be found a bit frustrating. Since other reviewers have thoroughly described the inaccuracies and artistic liberties taken in the Jesus Storybook Bible, I won't go into detail regarding those. Those are the same types of things that bother me. While the illustrations are whimsical and a great accompaniment to the text, and the story language is simple and easy to follow, there are an awful lot of unnecessary additions. These embellishments could possibly be helpful in a quest to grasp situational context, but they more seem to be wild imaginations that may or may not veer too far. In a read aloud, the distracting sentences can be omitted.

Still, I would recommend this book as a gift for anyone who may want to know more about the Bible or who may want to introduce their children to the Bible. While it very much diminishes the basic wrongness of sin along with our sinful guilt, it very much raises the centrality of Jesus to the story of the Bible and depicts very well the fact that most of the Old Testament stories are pictures of Jesus. It could be extremely helpful as a summary for anyone just beginning to study the Bible or for many of us who have studied the Bible for years without realizing these things. It is very well done.
1

April 2, 2018

Strays From The Word!
After pre reading this my husband and I both agree this is not something we will be reading to our children. Very disappointing how even simple scripture was distorted when completely unnecessary. This is not His word.
1

January 20, 2018

Not biblical. They add things in the stories that ...
Not biblical. They add things in the stories that did not actually happen in the Bible. It has caused confusion with my 7 year old daughter when she asks questions and I have to explain that's not how it actually happened. We read a different children's Bible every year and I've never had a problem with things being added as if it were true, when it's completely made up and not in the Bible. I would have never bought this if I knew this.
5

March 30, 2018

Powerful and Creative
I started reading this with my son and I am already hooked. The book is powerful. I find that it helps me feel closer to God too. You feel like your reading an awesome story or fairytale. Perfect for kids (even for parents).

I had to write about those writing negative reviews: I'm not sure I really understand, though. Most of you are upset because the author took creative license with the story, but it was designed for children to easily relate. You are getting upset about "Hello light!" vs "Let there be light!"? Or other changes in the book. If you wanted a literal translation of The Bible, then why don't you just read The Bible? Why would you buy a book that's designed to be creative and then give it negative reviews? It is called The Jesus "STORYBOOK" Bible, afterall. Seems unfair.

My son is too young to fully understand the language and wording in The Bible. One day we will read The Bible together, but this is an excellent resource to lay a wonderful foundation for my son to be interested and want a relationship with God. No one can be upset about that.
1

June 12, 2019

Not a Bible. Major liberties taken by author
My 6 year old son did not like this Bible. Immediately from page one- he had a strong negative opinion. We have read 4 other storybook type Bibles back to back. He loved each one and developed a passion for reading the Bible. This one was our 5th. He immediately said, that’s not in the Bible with nearly every sentence. Within the first few pages - he was so upset, I promised I’d return it for a “better one.” He also disliked the pictures. He felt they were cheesy and not real. He was pretty insulted by the Moses in particular 😂.

As a pastor, I felt that this was more a book about God than a children’s bible. The things the book was saying are grounded in Scripture properly but it’s not a Bible. It’s a book about God- the author takes major liberties with the stories (which I don’t necessarily have a problem with because they are acceptable conclusions to come to but it needs said that it is not a Bible). It is a children’s book about God.
5

May 25, 2010

My friend, Julie's review:

As a teacher, I have seen dozens of children's Bibles. I have never been impressed, really, preferring the real thing to the cheesy, cartoony pages of children's Bibles. Until now. Through one of my favorite singer/songwriters, I have come across The Jesus Storybook Bible by Sally Lloyd-Jones. I teared up when I read the first pages. And now, I have purposed to buy it for every child's birthday or baby shower that comes across my calendar. (Sorry to spoil the surprise My friend, Julie's review:

As a teacher, I have seen dozens of children's Bibles. I have never been impressed, really, preferring the real thing to the cheesy, cartoony pages of children's Bibles. Until now. Through one of my favorite singer/songwriters, I have come across The Jesus Storybook Bible by Sally Lloyd-Jones. I teared up when I read the first pages. And now, I have purposed to buy it for every child's birthday or baby shower that comes across my calendar. (Sorry to spoil the surprise for all of my friends out there awaiting gifts) I have read most of the book, and it's honest, clever, thoughtful, and definitely kid-friendly. Every story points to Jesus. "Every story whispers his name," the title truthfully claims. The Pharisees are referred to as Extra-Super-Holy-People. I mean, what kid wouldn't understand that? So this is just my little recommendation to you. Take it or leave it. But I hope you will take it. If I tag you in this note, it's because I think you are a good parent or you love kids. :) Here's an excerpt from the beginning of the book...

God wrote, "I love you"- he wrote it in the sky, and on the earth, and under the sea. He wrote his message everywhere! Because God created everything in his world to reflect him like a mirror- to show us what is is like, to help us know him, to make our hearts sing.

The way a kitten chases her tail. The way red poppies grow wild. The way a dolphin swims.

And God put it into words, too, and wrote it in a book called "the Bible."

Now, some people think the bible is a book of rules, telling you what you should and shouldn't do. The Bible certainly does have some rules in it. They show you how life works best. But the Bible isn't mainly about you and what you should be doing. It's about God and what he has done.

Other people think the Bible is a book of heroes, showing you people you should copy. The Bible does have some heroes in it, but (as you'll soon find out) most of the people in the Bible aren't heroes at all. They make some big mistakes (sometimes on purpose). They get afraid and run away. At times they are downright mean.

No, the Bible isn't a book of rules, or a book of heroes. The Bible is most of all a Story. It's an adventure story about a young hero who comes from a far country to win back his lost treasure. It's a love story about a brave Prince who leave his palace, his throne- everything- to rescue the one he loves. It's like the most wonderful of fairy tales that has come true in real life!

You see, the best thing about this Story is- it's true.

There are lots of stories in the Bible, but all the stories are telling one Big Story. The Story of how God loves his children and comes to rescue them.

It takes the whole Bible to tell this Story. And at the center of the Story, there is a baby. Every Story in the Bible whispers his name. He is like the missing piece in the puzzle - the piece that makes all the other pieces fit together, and suddenly you can see a beautiful picture.

And this is no ordinary baby. This is the Child upon whom everything would depend. This is the Child who would one day - but wait. Our Story starts where all good stories start. Right at the very beginning...

...more
5

Oct 04, 2008

I love every aspect of this Bible. The illustrations by Jago are both charming and intriguing. There are about fifty stories, a good balance. The text itself is exactly what I want my children to hear, theologically. I love this line from the very first chapter. "The Bible isn't mainly about you and what you should be doing. It's about God and what he has done." AMEN.

The subtitle is "Every Story Whispers His Name" and indeed, every story does. "No, the Bible isn't a book of rules, or a book of I love every aspect of this Bible. The illustrations by Jago are both charming and intriguing. There are about fifty stories, a good balance. The text itself is exactly what I want my children to hear, theologically. I love this line from the very first chapter. "The Bible isn't mainly about you and what you should be doing. It's about God and what he has done." AMEN.

The subtitle is "Every Story Whispers His Name" and indeed, every story does. "No, the Bible isn't a book of rules, or a book of heroes. The Bible is most of all a Story. It's an adventure story about a young Hero who comes from a far country to win back his lost treasure. It's a love story... You see, the best thing about this Story is -- it's true. There are lots of stories in the Bible, but all the stories are telling one Big Story. The Story of how God loves his children and comes to rescue them."

She goes on to say that the center of the story is a baby who is like the missing piece to a puzzle that makes all the other pieces fit together, and to reveal the beautiful picture. She stays true to this aim, pointing to Christ with every story, helping children to see the whispers of redemption through it all. If you buy just one Children's Story Bible, I'd commend this one to you.
...more
4

Nov 01, 2011

I am frequently dissatisfied with children’s Bibles, which may be why I acquire so many. I keep hoping the next one will compensate for the deficiencies of the last. I have one I chose because the vocabulary, for a change, wasn’t too dumbed down; one I chose because the pictures, for a change, were actually Semitic in appearance (no blonde, Anglo-Saxon Jesus in that one); one I chose because the stories weren’t overly sanitized; one I chose because it included more stories than most. This one, I am frequently dissatisfied with children’s Bibles, which may be why I acquire so many. I keep hoping the next one will compensate for the deficiencies of the last. I have one I chose because the vocabulary, for a change, wasn’t too dumbed down; one I chose because the pictures, for a change, were actually Semitic in appearance (no blonde, Anglo-Saxon Jesus in that one); one I chose because the stories weren’t overly sanitized; one I chose because it included more stories than most. This one, however, I didn’t choose. In fact, I have absolutely no idea how my children acquired it, but today my son brought it to me and asked me to read it.

He said he wanted the “Moses story,” so I started by turning to the table of contents to locate it, and I was instantly cynical. With chapter titles like “The present,” “The girl no one wanted,” “God to the resuce!” and “The teeny, weenie…true king,” I knew it would not only be difficult to locate the stories I wanted but also suspected the text would be so dumbed down and sanitized as to make me want to gag myself with two fingers. I flipped a few pages back to see who the publisher was…Zonderkidz. Zondervan, you see. For kids, you see. With a z, no less. How cute. Let me just say this discovery did nothing to abate, and quite a bit to increase, my cynicism.

But then I started reading…and the greater part of my cynicism slowly faded. The stories are certainly child friendly. They certainly try to make the tales “entertaining,” so to speak. They certainly have a non-droll style. But the overall quality of the writing was much better than I anticipated. The style was actually somewhat effective, despite being non-serious. The pages were enjoyable to read aloud. The “sound” of the stories rolled off my tongue. I especially appreciated the way the storytelling pointed backward and forward to the major themes that course throughout the Bible, linking past, present, and future stories, and, as a Christian, I appreciated the way it pointed everything to Jesus without being too terribly clichéd or contrived about it. There's a strong sense of God's grace coursing throughout the storytelling, an idea that these stories, even the most violent of them, point to a gentler, beautiful, and loving truth. It does this, too, I think, without seeming pollyanish, without turning God into a teddy bear.

Of course, I’m basing this entire opinion exclusively on the three “Moses stories” I read my son tonight. My opinion could very well change as I read more. But it was nice to put the breaks on my jaded, gut reaction and to find quite a few things to appreciate about this Bible. Or maybe I’m just uncharacteristically impressed because I didn’t have anyone to share my bottle of mulled wine with on this chilly November night.

But if I can revert to my usual cynical self for a moment, based on what I've read, there are too many chunks of the story left out. The chunks are left out because the author is busy making a point, a worthy point, but I wonder if that point could have been made without, for instance, boiling down the ten commandments to, say, four. Now, if you wanted to boil them down to TWO, the two Jesus (and the prophets) specified (love the Lord your God with all your heart and all your mind and your neighbor as yourself), okay, but why four? I think that sort of thing is going to annoy me after awhile. But for now, I leave my rating at four stars.

-----

ADDITION: Today we read from page one through the end of the Noah story. The cutesy language does get on my nerves a bit, but, overall, I’m finding it still fairly well (rhythmically, descriptively) written. It’s as much commentary as story, but I happen to agree with a great deal of the commentary, and I like its perspective that the Bible is not a book of rules or a catalog of heroes to emulate, but rather a grand story of God’s love for his creation; not so much a story of what we should do, but a story of what God has *done.* This is a perspective I want my children to have. It might be a little heavy handed and overplayed in parts, but I’m still impressed by the uniqueness of the presentation.

That said, I defy anyone to attempt to read a children’s Bible to my daughter. Here’s how it went down tonight - - Me (reading the text of the Noah story): “Why would anyone need an umbrella, let alone an ark?” Her: They didn’t have umbrellas back then. They weren’t invented yet. They didn’t have lacquer. The Japanese invented lacquer. [Later] Me (reading): “Noah sent his dove out to explore, and it wasn’t long before she brought him back a fresh olive leaf.” Her: No, he sent a raven out first. Actually, it went dove, raven, then dove. [Later] Me (reading): “God said, ‘I won’t ever destroy the world again.’” Her: No, only by FLOOD. He didn’t say he wouldn’t destroy it another way. Like by flames or fire. Or ice.

I guess my daughter has the same problem with children’s Bibles I do.
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2

Sep 30, 2013

The more I read this the more I don't like it. I think it would be better labeled the Jesus storybook, because this is not the bible. In fact it is so added too and taken from its far from the bible. Just to mention a few theological discrepancies in the very beginning God says " hello stars" it does not say he spoke them into existence. then you have Eve believing that God does not love her, that's not what the bible says at all. To go on the story of Rachel and Leah frustrates me to no end. The more I read this the more I don't like it. I think it would be better labeled the Jesus storybook, because this is not the bible. In fact it is so added too and taken from its far from the bible. Just to mention a few theological discrepancies in the very beginning God says " hello stars" it does not say he spoke them into existence. then you have Eve believing that God does not love her, that's not what the bible says at all. To go on the story of Rachel and Leah frustrates me to no end. Rachel is popular and stuck up, and Leah is a victim. Then one day Laban had a sudden idea, Jacob has been working for me all this time, I should let him marry one of my daughters. The bible tells us Jacob loved Rachel right away and was working to win her marriage. It was Jacobs idea from the beginning. Then there is the Passover, it might not seem like a big deal to change simple wording, but in this place I believe it is a very, very big deal. In the jsb Jesus says this bread is "like" my body and this wine is "like" my blood. Jesus true words are this is my body and this is my blood, big difference. Another problem I have are the assumptions it describes. Like when God changes his mind about Isaacs sacrifice, it says " great sobs shook the old mans whole body. Scalding tears filled his eyes. And for a long time they stayed like that, in each others arms, the boy and his dad." I feel if this was called the Jesus storybook things would be different, but it's claiming to be a bible and adding to the word of God. Some of these things may seem small, but from a young age I am telling my children over and over again that the bible is Gods words. What would it then look like when they ask why these other things are not in the bible. I do find this book very moving by its wording and believe it has some great stories for kids, but when it comes to reading them the bible and telling them it's the absolute word of God, I will stick to the real thing. ...more
4

Dec 18, 2012

Sally Lloyd-Jones wrote another children's book that positively depicts a same-sex couple; see here and here. Her children's book How To Get Married is also a little fishy.

Part of the reason for the four-star rating is a section towards the end that sounds a little antinomian: No rules (or just a few)! Just grace! Which doesn't make sense, because grace includes law. I'm sure the author's intent was not to spread antinomian views, but that section could have been worded better.
1

Jan 10, 2013

Notes:
yes, every story does whisper His name, but not like this book
this is not a bible at all, just a poorly written storybook
embellished inaccurate stories are ridiculous
omits real truth for a watered down, feel-good gospel
implies that our hearts are full of question marks instead of sin
wrong in every possible way, will never read this to my children
1

August 22, 2019

THIS IS NOT A BIBLE
This is not a Bible:
I’m going to be very clear, this is not a Bible. This is a prose story authored by a lady with a wonderfully big heart. I can tell from her writing that she really loves the Lord. However this is not the authoritative word of God. She basically goes through the Bible from beginning to end and writes her own story about how she thinks people would have felt and communicated. Once again, this is not an actual Bible with Bible verses. This is a story based on truth, with added fictitious details. I tried reading the creation story of Genesis to my five-year-old son. About two pages into it he stopped me and said, “Dad, this is not the real Bible. God never said those things.“

Is this book OK for children? My answer is no. If you want your children to know the word of God, read them the word of God. If you read them this story, then they will be confused when you read them the actual word of God. I know this lady meant well, but she adds all sorts of things in quotes that God said, which He did not say in the actual authoritative Bible. I know she meant well, but this book cannot stay in my house. I have already returned this book for a refund.
3

November 19, 2018

Lovely pictures and true themes, but also lots of interpretation interspersed
Things I like about this story Bible: it shows how the Messiah is foreshadowed throughout the Bible. The illustrations are bright and beautiful. It shows the heart and tender love God has for his children.

What I don't like - the author takes some liberties with the scriptures that I'm not comfortable with and also makes needless changes to wording. The author does a ton of interpretation presented as the Bible.

I read my copy to children but make changes of my own when I feel the story deviates too much from scripture. This is not a Bible, but is a useful book to use along side the Bible.
2

May 8, 2018

Excellent book, poor book-binding.
The book itself deserves 5 starts. HOWEVER, be sure to see the photo. This is why I have only checked two stars. This book was purchased as a gift for my granddaughter because the previous two books fell apart which I attributed to two active older brothers. This was opened only a couple of times. Very disappointing. The publisher needs to talk to the book binding people and figure out a solution. I hate to add a disclaimer every time I give it as a gift! "Handle with care."
5

May 29, 2008

The strength of this book is two fold. One, every story ends with a reference to Jesus, showing how He illustrates a truth, fulfills a prophecy, exemplifies a character trait, etc. Secondly, the illustrations are truly unique and not "westernized." Jesus really has an olive complexion as his Jewish roots would indicate. People and angels come in various colors.

This book is part of our regular Bible rotation, and we have given it as gifts for Christmas, Birthday and baby showers. Advertisements The strength of this book is two fold. One, every story ends with a reference to Jesus, showing how He illustrates a truth, fulfills a prophecy, exemplifies a character trait, etc. Secondly, the illustrations are truly unique and not "westernized." Jesus really has an olive complexion as his Jewish roots would indicate. People and angels come in various colors.

This book is part of our regular Bible rotation, and we have given it as gifts for Christmas, Birthday and baby showers. Advertisements list the age as 4-8, but we started at 2. In moments of impatience associated with this young age, we would skip some, just reading the highlights. Now that he is school age, he is almost ready for another trip through where he will do the reading! The pictures are engaging and this book is often chosen to sit with, even before he could read. Highly recommended! Enjoy!

Also highly recommended:

Read-Aloud Bible Stories, Lindvall, 1982
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

Jesus Loves Me, Anderson, 1988
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... ...more
4

Jan 14, 2013

The more I read and understand the Bible, the more I find it difficult to teach certain stories to kids and feel that I'm being honest to the meaning. Think of the stories that we teach in Sunday School:

1. the garden of eden (nudity, disobedience, stealing)
2. Noah's ark (death and distruction on an epic scale with a smiling family sailing atop bloated corpses)
3. Joshua and the Battle of Jericho (prostitution, warfare)
4. David and Goliath ("its ok to hit bad people as long as God tells you The more I read and understand the Bible, the more I find it difficult to teach certain stories to kids and feel that I'm being honest to the meaning. Think of the stories that we teach in Sunday School:

1. the garden of eden (nudity, disobedience, stealing)
2. Noah's ark (death and distruction on an epic scale with a smiling family sailing atop bloated corpses)
3. Joshua and the Battle of Jericho (prostitution, warfare)
4. David and Goliath ("its ok to hit bad people as long as God tells you too...")
etc, etc.

You get the picture. Many Children's Bibles have sanitized them so that they have to make up morals or lessons to impose on the story. "When you are afraid, little Billy, be brave like David was..."

What I love about this Bible is that it tries to uncover the underlying theology in each story and tie it back to Jesus. I Don't agree with all the choices but it ties together the grand narrative of Scripture in a way few if any children's Bibles do. Excellent. ...more
5

Mar 15, 2015

This is a truly lovely children's Bible that does SO many things right.

The best thing it does is trace the story of Jesus through the whole Bible--it shows how every story points to the Ultimate Story in a way that is very graspable.

The illustrations are SO well done--it's so relieving to see diversity in color of skin and body type. It isn't a Bible full of Middle Eastern inexplicable white people like the children's Bible I grew up with.

I am not what you would call this Bible's typical This is a truly lovely children's Bible that does SO many things right.

The best thing it does is trace the story of Jesus through the whole Bible--it shows how every story points to the Ultimate Story in a way that is very graspable.

The illustrations are SO well done--it's so relieving to see diversity in color of skin and body type. It isn't a Bible full of Middle Eastern inexplicable white people like the children's Bible I grew up with.

I am not what you would call this Bible's typical audience (no babies) but I really enjoyed my time reading this work just as, like, a person. Anyone can learn something from this work from any walk of life. ...more
5

Nov 11, 2012

Phenomenal. It's really astonishing how good this is. Recently, we started reading straight through it, one story a night, with our son who will be five at the end of November 2012. His questions and understanding of our covenant faith have matured a lot during this family time. He wants to start it over from the beginning. I can't recommend this highly enough for parents of small children, and even for new Christians. I've benefited greatly from it myself, and I've been a Christian my whole Phenomenal. It's really astonishing how good this is. Recently, we started reading straight through it, one story a night, with our son who will be five at the end of November 2012. His questions and understanding of our covenant faith have matured a lot during this family time. He wants to start it over from the beginning. I can't recommend this highly enough for parents of small children, and even for new Christians. I've benefited greatly from it myself, and I've been a Christian my whole life. Get this book. ...more
5

Dec 11, 2017

Winston and I enjoyed reading this over the last year. I love how The Jesus Storybook Bible brings every chapter back to God's never stopping, never giving up, unbreakable, always and forever love. The book says ages 4 and up. Even though my 2 year old didn't understand every story, he did understand who Jesus was in each story and that Jesus loved him. We finished every chapter with singing Jesus Loves Me.
5

Dec 27, 2012

The Jesus Storybook Bible by author Sally Lloyd-Jones is a Bible book for children in which every story points to Christ. The Collector’s Edition includes the book plus three audio CDs of narration and a DVD of animated stories. There is also an Italian Duo-Tone leather edition of The Jesus Storybook Bible that is beautiful and would be perfect for a gift.

My husband and I absolutely loved the first book that we read by Sally Lloyd-Jones, Song of the Stars, so we were excited to read this The Jesus Storybook Bible by author Sally Lloyd-Jones is a Bible book for children in which every story points to Christ. The Collector’s Edition includes the book plus three audio CDs of narration and a DVD of animated stories. There is also an Italian Duo-Tone leather edition of The Jesus Storybook Bible that is beautiful and would be perfect for a gift.

My husband and I absolutely loved the first book that we read by Sally Lloyd-Jones, Song of the Stars, so we were excited to read this storybook Bible. I had also had many recommendations from friends who told me how much they liked the first edition of this Bible storybook.

So as soon as we received this book, we started reading a story every night to our three-year-old daughter. From the beginning, we were pleased. Everything in the Bible points to Christ as our Savior, and that is exactly what this Bible storybook does. It makes you think so much more about some of the Old Testament accounts because of how clearly each story shows how Christ has been there from the beginning and will continue to be there through the end.

Read my complete review here - http://shoopettesbookreviews.blogspot... ...more
5

Sep 23, 2016

This children's bible story is unique because it doesn't just retell the stories of the bible, but also links them to the greater gospel story. This helps primary school aged children understand how God's plan of redemption unfolds from the Old Testament stories to the New, putting it all into context. The bright quirky illustrations complement the text and the conversational story-telling style make this a fun and engaging read.
1

September 18, 2019

Aweful book.
This is aweful, Goliath said to the Philistines, "chickens, I'll rip your heads off and have you on toast." This is not appropriate for young children. This is supposed to be for children??

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