The How Can It Be Gluten Free Cookbook: Revolutionary Techniques. Groundbreaking Recipes. Info

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Gluten free recipes perfected
Successful gluten
free recipes require more than just new ingredients. You need new
techniques and that's where our test kitchen team can help. We tried
thousands of recipes (most were pretty awful) before we figured out the
secrets to making favorite foods without gluten. In this landmark book,
we tell what works (and why) so you can successfully prepare lasagna,
fried chicken, and fresh pasta in your kitchen. And we have reinvented
the rules of baking to produce amazing cookies, cakes, breads, biscuits
and more.

Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for The How Can It Be Gluten Free Cookbook: Revolutionary Techniques. Groundbreaking Recipes.:

5

March 13, 2014

If you have a gluten intolerance and love to cook, this is a must buy book!
I've been a subscriber to Cooks Illustrated for years now. I've always adjusted their recipes containing gluten for my Celiac husband, and avoiding their baking recipes has been disappointing. So I was thrilled to see this cookbook in my Amazon suggestions.

I've so far flipped through many recipes and reviewed the recipe for sandwich bread and pizza crust, and am looking forward to trying both out this weekend. What I love about this book is the science and testing for each recipe is recorded with the recipe so you know why certain ingredients are added or omitted. Then if you want to adjust a bit you can do so with the knowledge of why a recipe is built the way it is.

The big bonus in this book: there is a recipe for a gluten free flour mix, but weights and measurements for two other popular store bought flour mixes are provided for each recipe. If you've ever tried to buy ingredients for a gluten free flour mix in a regular grocery store you know it can be tough to find some, but easier to find pre-packaged mixes, so this is a huge bonus.

The only drawback I can see is for someone who is not a more seasoned cook/doesn't enjoy cooking, some of the recipes are advanced. The directions are always easy to follow, but the outcome can vary depending on your take on the directions. For instance, instructions are provided on how to measure flour for the gluten free flour mix. Part of the instructions include tapping or lightly packing the flour as you scoop it into the measuring cup. My tap vs my husband's tap are completely different levels of pressure, and would result in slightly different flour mixes which could vary a recipe enough to be noticeable. Luckily weights are included, which is the best way to measure baking ingredients, but there are other directions included that could be taken differently.

Really looking forward to trying many of the recipes in this book! If you have a gluten intolerance and love to cook, this is a must buy book! Or if you're fed up with the yucky pre-packaged gluten free foods, give some of the recipes in this book a try.

UPDATE: The sandwich bread recipe in this book makes THE BEST gluten free sandwich bread I've ever had. I don't have to eat gluten free, so I know what real sandwich bread taste like, and this is pretty darn close in taste. It's right on the money with texture, not gritty or dry at all, and only a bit denser with a nice, crisp crust. Plus its a really easy recipe. Most of the ingredients are easy to find even at your local supermarket. The powdered psyllium husk was the hardest to locate. Check your grocers health supplements aisle, or stop by a vitamin shop. It's used as a laxative. I ate two pieces of this bread on the same night and didn't have any issues, so don't worry about accidental laxative effects. Also, the only 4.5" x 8.5" loaf pan I had is glass, and that worked great.

UPDATE 2: I continue to try recipes in this book and haven't had a bad one yet. I haven't delved heavily into the baking section other than making several loaves of the sandwich bread (which is still amazing), but I did try the arepas recipe which was great. The Almost Hands-Free Risotto can be found in back issues of Cooks Illustrated and likely in their other cook books, and is fantastic as always.
5

March 31, 2015

My Family Favorite
*This isn't "dairy or sugar free" or aka Paleo Diet friendly book. ATK never claims it to be. So stop complaining, if you are. This is a book for people who are Gluten Free but wants maximum flavor and "gluten like foods."

I watched ATK on TV since I was in college when I first starting cooking my own meals. I love the how to chips and the science behind all the recipes. I discovered I am gluten sensitive about six months ago and I wanted some REAL TASTING bake goods. I bake often for friends and families. The thought of never baking again, was depressing. I borrowed several GF cookbooks from the library to test run some recipes before purchasing ATK's How Can It Be Gluten Free . So far, my whole family loved the bake goods from this book.

I have a few notes before I get to my favorite recipes:

1. You do have to understand you will need to make your own GF "flour mix" but the upside is, there is only ONE FORMULA for everything in this book. Another book I tried had five mixes and I haven't been able to gather all the items needed for that book.
2. You must read the intro to each recipes at least once. It gives you important information. Sometimes, you must read tips of similar recipes to get all the info. For example, under Chocolate Chip cookies, there is a tip on how to make your own frozen cookie dough.
3. If you want real tasting box pasta, read the test kitchen recommendation. IT IS SO GOOD!
4. Bread recipes need a standing mixer. Most recipes mix by hands. Some call for a blender or a food processor.

I bought the book for the bake goods so those are the recipes I tried multiple times with success:

Banana Bread: My husband brought a loaf to work and they are asking for more.
Lemon Pound Cake: Brought it to a party and no one suspected.
Applesauce Snack Cakes: THE BEST and EASY RECIPE in the BOOK. My twins would eat it for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
Chocolate Chip Cookies: Moist and Chewy. Brought it to several parties and everyone love it.
Chewy Sugar Cookies: Perfect texture, maybe a bit lack in favor but my kids love it.
Classic Sandwich Bread (which I also made hamburger buns): Taste better than anything store bought but it does dry out fast.
Dinner Roll: My husband loves it with lots of butter, but it already has a lot of butter in it!
Cheddar Cheese Bread: If you miss a good cheesy bagel taste, this is a similar in flavor. The texture is slightly crumbly. Yeast Free.
Multigrain Sandwich Bread: BEST BREAD recipe that I tried so far, moist and flavorful. It kept moist for four days in an airtight glass container.

Recipe tried but need to try again:
Oatmeal Cookies: I thought they were dry. When it ran out before the chocolate chip cookies which I thought was better. So what do it know.
Blueberry Muffins: They were pasty and pale but my husband and the neighbors thought they were pretty good.
Brazilian cheese Bread Roll: They have a Asian Mochi like texture. My family did not find it appealing so I ate most of it myself.

I am yet to tried the pie crust and pizza crust recipe but soon, I hope. It will be Thanksgiving before you know it.
5

September 21, 2014

Rediculously, stupidly good recipes in this cookbook!
I worked my way through college as a cook and sous chef at some of the nicest restaurants in my area. I loved it, but there were few good work opportunities, and using my degree was the much better option, when I finished my degree. I love to cook as a method to de-stress, and I'm still a pretty d@#n good cook. When I found out I had wheat allergies, and a short time later, my son had celiac, I had a lot of baking, frying, sauce-making, just all kinds of stuff to re-think and learn to do in another way.

America's Test Kitchen is often used by friends (who still work in restaurants) and myself to settle arguments about the right way to make something. As we learned long ago, taste is paramount, and ATK spends an enormous amount of time developing each recipe. When they get it right, they usually kill it. They are based in the northeast, and their taste is often a bit blander than my Southern sensibilities, but their pursuit of clean, fresh flavors and honest cooking methods (only getting complicated with the preparation when it makes a significant difference in the final product) is widely respected by professionals.

I bought this as soon as I saw it on Amazon. My wife wants simple recipes she can make in the bread machine or crock pot, and this is NOT that cookbook. However, if you want gluten free recipes that rival the best 'regular' recipes you've ever had, this is the book you want. If you really want to understand what each ingredient or step in a recipe adds to the final dish, this is also the cookbook you want. We rarely eat any sort of fried food, because it wasn't a priority. When I read through the fried chicken recipe in this cookbook, I had an 'a-ha!' moment, and I made Chicken Fried Steak for the first time in two years. I thought my wife was going to cry, and both of our boys were super-excited. I don't cook out of this book all the time, because they're out to create the best recipes, not the quickest recipes (there are some that can be made in less time, but many of the recipes we like best have longer, more complex preparation).

I HIGHLY recommend this book, if you have sensitivities, allergies, or celiac-related disease and are tired of not-quite-satisfying copies of dishes you loved before discovering your health issues.
5

November 20, 2016

None better, you won't regret it (assuming you can have dairy)
Fan-freaking-tastic. This old celiac has learned to bake! I have tested these recipes on family and friends who are not gluten free. In many cases they say these recipes are indistinguishable from traditional flour. In one case, the Sugar Cookie, they say it's the best they ever had, bar none.

The recipes are a bit complex at first. But over time the prep becomes second nature. When I try a new recipe, it doesn't feel complex now. In fact many of the steps are similar across similar recipes.

I've made all of these over and over again. All of them are better than anything from the store or even a professional gluten free bakery. I've been to dozen of bakeries across multiple states. I thought many of them were fantastic. They all pale in comparison to what I can make at home now, and for much less.

The flour this book taught me to make costs me less than $2 a lb. I used to purchase mixes that were $6-8 per lb. Quite a savings and much better than any other I've tried.

Recipes that others love and ask about:
Sugar Cookie
Chocolate chip cookie
Brownie
Pie Crust
Pancakes
Pumpkin bread - all the sweet breads
muffins
meatballs

Recipes that are at least better than store bought:
Bread
Pizza crust - I hear volume 2 has a better recipe
breading for fried foods

This was all off the top of my head.

Some people can't have dairy. I've heard volume 2 is better in this regard. There are many recipes in volume 1 that require milk products and don't have substitutions that work as well.
5

May 13, 2014

Highly, HIGHLY recommend this for all GF eaters!
Pre-diagnosis (wheat allergy, among other things), I considered myself quite the chef/baker. Immediately following a diagnosis, I felt really lost and, after a few devastating GF baking failures, I felt like I would never be able to bake or enjoy my old favorites again. Since getting this cookbook, all that has changed. God bless the people at ATK for working so hard to get every recipes in here just right - and have your family saying, "Is this REALLY gluten-free??" They really worked through the mechanics and technicalities of gluten-free baking, and exhausted the options to make every recipe taste truly delicious. (No more "just good enough" - these recipes are delicious all on their own.) I haven't had a single letdown (not so with other GF cookbooks). This isn't meant to be a terribly thorough cookbook (hey, ATK: PLEASE release a part II!!), but does give the newly GF eater a good start, and the seasoned pro a new view on the traditionally dry, crumbly GF foods. Try the pancakes (oh, my gosh - divine, even after being frozen!), the pizza dough, the blueberry muffins, the drunken noodles (I have non-GF eaters raving over these every time I make them!), the Brazilian cheese bread rolls, the yellow cake, the brownies - and you'll see what I mean. If I could go back in time, I would tell my newly-diagnosed self to start here before branching out!
1

June 17, 2015

So disappointed. It *could have been* game changing.
No game changer here; bait and switch?

I made the mistake of buying the Kindle version, only to find recipe after recipe that yes, are gluten free, but at the enormous cost of my health. These recipes appear to be on par with junk food, nutritionally. What a shame, they could have used *real, whole nutritious, and actually healthy food* and hit one out of the park. Instead, people will end up trading one sickness for many others. So sad.

No nutritional info? No wonder. The publishers aren't going to highlight how nutritionally devoid these recipes are; that would be like waving a giant red flag: Here, come have your serving of high blood sugar, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, neurological disorders, and a whole host of other issues that begin in the gut. What happened to that old fashioned but effective adage, "Junk in, junk out." Applies here.
4

Mar 20, 2014

What I liked the most about this cookbook is its approach to gluten-free cooking. Instead of just providing recipes, America's Test Kitchen explains what they tried that didn't work as they developed each recipe. Maybe that doesn't sound like a big deal, but gluten-free cooking (especially baking) requires a completely different sort of cooking chemistry than what most people are familiar with. Because they explained what the challenges of each recipes were, what they tried, why they tried it, What I liked the most about this cookbook is its approach to gluten-free cooking. Instead of just providing recipes, America's Test Kitchen explains what they tried that didn't work as they developed each recipe. Maybe that doesn't sound like a big deal, but gluten-free cooking (especially baking) requires a completely different sort of cooking chemistry than what most people are familiar with. Because they explained what the challenges of each recipes were, what they tried, why they tried it, and how successful the results were, I learned more about gluten-free cooking from this cookbook than I'd learned in my previous 18 years of being gluten-free. While the baking recipes use a flour blend developed by America's Test Kitchen (which can be made in bulk for less than buying flour blends), each recipe also includes adaptations for using two different commercially available flour blends. ...more
5

June 8, 2017

Success with every recipe.
Finally!!!!! I can bake a cake for friends without the angst before the first bite....when I tasted the chocolate layer cake I was almost in tears. Yum. Amazingly fudgy, moist cake...period. You won't find yourself saying "It's good for gluten free" with any of their recipes. They are great. The crumb is not sandy, dense, cookies are not gritty, muffins rise and cakes are perfection. Pancakes....oh how I have missed pancakes....I could kiss the feet of everyone who made this cookbook. The genius is in their flour blend. Make it. It costs less than the blends and it's truely the secret to success. I've tried Pamelas, Bob's Red Mill, Namaste, cup4cup, King Arthur Flour, Trader Joes, and Paleo blends of almond and coconut flour. Nothing has come near the texture and rise of their blend and recipes. The cherry millet muffins were lovely, The linzer cookies were good, but there is a typo in recipe so I had to guess the flour amount. It’s the only recipe error I’ve found so far. I also love their savoury recipes....all the comfort recipes that you miss. Drunken noodles with chicken, fresh pasta, corn tortillas, golden cornbread and sausage stuffing, Tamale pie, Singapore noodles with shrimp. Breaded favorites will turn out perfectly. Crispy chicken fingers, pan fried pork chops, fried chicken. For the breads... I always change the psyllium husk powder to xantham gum...I have better luck with it. The pizza recipe is long, and requires a lot of time, but the crust is fanstastic. It’s very flavorful and crisp, a bit chewy....my pizza obsessed son loves it. I’m not a fan of the quick bread tasting crusts, paper thin crusts, or soggy middles....this recipe avoids all three. Be sure to roll out pie crust dough thin-ish and bake until very golden brown. It’s only good crisp.
Oh, and I should really add that I appreciate the "Why this works" for each recipe. Their explainations have really helped me to tweak my own gluten free recipes. Also included are evaluations on ingredients, and other gluten free products. After purchasing almost everything mentioned, I can say that I agreed with almost all of their recommendations. They also have a little G-F testing lab box which will tell you how to substitute gluten free flour blends. I would not recommend substitutions, aside from subtle seasoning, however it is nice to have. This is such a great cookbook...not just great recipes. There's so much instruction. I immediately bought volume 2 and their Mexican cookbook. I'm sorry that I didn't have these years ago when my son was diagnosed with his wheat allergy. Note- the skillet cornbread is a nightmare to make...lifting a hot cast iron skillet in and out of the oven a few times. The cornbread is perfect, I didn’t like balancing a hot cast iron pan full of batter.
1

December 22, 2015

A tragic waste of trees
A tragic waste of trees. When I heard the authors of this thing describe, in a radio interview, how they had developed their recipes I immediately bought a copy thinking that, at last, I could start making really good GF foods. Then I tried a sampling of their recipes, all of which ended up in my compost pile. The authors go into great detail about the differences between wheat flour and gluten free (GF) flours and how GF flours don't absorb fats and liquids the way wheat flour does. You'd think that this wisdom would be reflected in their recipes. Take a look at the recipe for shortbread cookies. The fat to GF flour ratio is higher than the traditional wheat flour-based recipe. A greasy mess! Their taste testers are also suspect in my opinion. Their highest-rated GF pastas are low on my list (yeah, I'm Italian and got to know good pasta before discovering my gluten sensitivity). While none of the GF pastas can stand up to wheat based pasta, there are GF pastas that are better and less expensive than those recommended by ATK.

My recommendation is don't waste your money on this thing. There are GF recipes available on the internet. Not only are they better recipes...they're free!
1

April 26, 2016

American's Test Kitchen is generally Fantastic. This book tells me to buy gluten free ...
Very disappointing. American's Test Kitchen is generally Fantastic. This book tells me to buy gluten free noodles, and gluten free flour. I can figure that out..
4

Mar 26, 2014

Have been experiencing mild depression after adopting a gluten-free diet for an auto-immune thyroid disorder. This book SAVED me. Goodbye wheat, and good riddance--there really is something to this wheat belly business--but I honestly can't live on quinoa alone, and America's Test Kitchen says, yes, even though you shouldn't (for reasons having nothing to do with wheat), you can still eat pancakes! and cookies! and a piece of bread once in a while! And it's good!
5

May 3, 2015

At last! Gluten-free recipes that really work
We've all been taken in by the extravagant claims and promises on various Web sites: "Amazing Gluten-Free Cookies!" "The Best Gluten-Free Sandwich Bread!" "You'll Love These Gluten-Free Muffins!" And then you try the recipe and end up throwing it out because the results taste and look horrible.

I'm a good cook and baker (my friends and family say "great," but I'm trying to be modest here). And when I try a new recipe, I almost always follow the recipe to the letter so I can see how it works. But none of the gluten-free recipes I've tried have ever worked. I sometimes wonder whether the people posting those recipes ever actually tested the recipes.

Baking is all about chemistry. You can't just substitute a gluten-free flour in a recipe that calls for wheat flour and expect the same results. The folks at America's Test Kitchen knows this, and devoted quite a bit of their expert resources to sussing out how to create gluten-free versions of our favorite recipes. They explain the science behind it, too, so you understand why each recipe works.

I've tried several recipes in this cookbook, and they are all delicious. If you want to make pie crusts, cookies, bread, etc., you start by putting together a gluten-free flour blend (I got everything I needed from VitaCost), and then following the recipes. So far my favorite is the chocolate chip cookie recipe, which I have made twice. My daughter, who is sensitive to gluten, loves them and of course doesn't have to suffer the after-effects that normal chocolate chip cookies impose.

Although you might expect this cookbook to contain only gluten-free equivalents of baked goods, it also includes other gluten-free recipes, such as recipes containing quinoa.

If you are looking for an easy way to transition to gluten-free baking and cooking, this is a great book to use. With the explanations of why each recipe works, you'll be a lot more informed about how to adapt your own favorite recipes as well.
5

September 21, 2017

Surprisingly good.
I do love gluten, and everything that has gluten in it. It does not seem to love me as well, though. This book has some very good choices for finding enjoyable substitutions for many things you should not have. A non-wheat bread will not taste the same as a wheat bread. You just can't get past that true fact. Regular bread in its most basic is wheat flour, water, salt and yeast. Using rice instead of wheat just will not have the same flavor. The bread recipe here, however makes a very tasty loaf: nice loft, nice texture, nicely browned crust and good even without the flavor of wheat.

They use a basic gluten free flour blend of their own, and recipes are tested with their flour as well as a couple other name brand GF flours for comparison so those could be substituted. There is a very wide range of recipes from trying different grains to pasta, comfort foods (fried chicken), bread, cake, cookies and pies. The techniques used are very different from what might be expected, but they do say why they have used them. The pizza crust for instance is so wet that it must be shaped using a cover of plastic wrap. It has a long, slow bake to set the crust, then the pre-baked crusts are either frozen or topped and baked again. Delicious, slightly nutty, and I may try making it even thinner to experiment with making crackers.
5

Feb 09, 2017

America's Test Kitchen does this thing where they introduce each recipe by explaining the process they used to develop it, and thus share with you their toil and heartache. It goes something like this: "We wanted to maximize the flavor so we doubled the thing, but our first attempt came out too flat, so we added more stuff, but then it rose too much and collapsed, so we added an extra round thing for protein and lift and it turned out perfectly," and at first I'm like, Oh, what a happy ending! America's Test Kitchen does this thing where they introduce each recipe by explaining the process they used to develop it, and thus share with you their toil and heartache. It goes something like this: "We wanted to maximize the flavor so we doubled the thing, but our first attempt came out too flat, so we added more stuff, but then it rose too much and collapsed, so we added an extra round thing for protein and lift and it turned out perfectly," and at first I'm like, Oh, what a happy ending! But after half a book of that I shifted straight into Thank god it's you spending five weeks in the kitchen trying to perfect a gluten-free layer cake and not me because after the third time it didn't come out I would straight up murder the next person to set foot in my kitchen.

So, thank god for ATK, is all I'm saying. I love them in all their forms, so I was very excited to see that they'd turned their formidable attention towards cooking without gluten. This book has an emphasis on baking and things that normally depend on wheat flours, but there are also chapters on savory dishes that use rice and grains, sauces and pastas (including homemade), and meatloaf and breaded items like chicken and pork chops. I'm mostly here for the baked stuff, but it's nice to know I could bread something if I had to. The chapter on grains felt a little forced, but it does include good information about the various ways to cook them, and it doesn't take up much room.

Their recipes are developed based on their own gluten-free all-purpose flour mix, which is a little different from others I've seen because it includes fat-free milk powder. Most of their baked goods also call for xanthan gum, and they'll tell you when you absolutely can't replace or leave out the gum or milk powder. It talks about substitutions for these up front in the introduction, so there's not a lot of that in each recipe, but otherwise, it has all the information you need to know each time you need it, and all recipes have measurements by volume and weight.

Each recipe also has a little GF Testing Lab chart where it talks about whether substitutions are an option or not and explains what'll happen if you use GF flour mixes from King Arthur or Bob's Red Mill; usually there will be textural differences, with some grittiness from Arthur and some level of bean flavor with Bob. Sometimes they recommend you don't use either mix because the results were so poor. That more than anything convinced me to try mixing up some of their own flour blend. I trust ATK, and this book is a good resource with a lot of basic recipes for things I'm likely to make, like waffles, pancakes, pizza, some sandwich breads that look amazing, cookies, pies, cakes, and tarts.

There are color photos for nearly every recipe, an index, the kind of methodical explanations you expect from an ATK publication, an introduction that goes through the science of baking with and without gluten and rates some common gluten-free products like bread, pasta, and flour mixes, as well as a guide to gluten-free flours, grains, and leaveners.

Assuming their flour mix works out, I'll definitely be buying this. ...more
1

October 16, 2015

I was very disappointed. This cook book is just like every other ...
I was very disappointed. This cook book is just like every other gluten free cookbook. I think is was expecting a better quality from American's test kitchen.
1

November 1, 2015

have to use premade flours
"Simply substituting a gluten-free flour blend for regular flour doesn't work. We needed to completely rethink each and every recipe, employing tricks and techniques to get the results we wanted. We started with our own unique blend of flours and starches. (You can use gluten-free flour blends made by King Arthur or Bob's Red Mill if you like, although in some instances the results will be a bit different.)"

This is what is said in the Preface text of the book. It notes that they use their own custom blend of gluten free starches and flours to make the recipes in the book. However, if you want, you can also "substitue" a premade gluten free blend to make life easier or faster. Though your results may differ from what was intended.

If you have this book already you likely already have seen the bread section. Its likely the first part everyone wants to look at as bread is the number one gluten free food that is at the top of everyone's list. If you don't have the book what is contained in the pages is not what the Preface says. The recipes specifically call for either King Arthur OR Bobs Red Mill flour plus other ingredients. This goes against what is being stated as it is neither a unique to "America's Test Kitchen blend" nor is it a choice of "premade vs individual ingredients".

Its obvious that America's Test Kitchen didn't go far enough in their testing if all they did was buy premade flours. The recipes should not require this.
3

January 6, 2018

Good recipes. Book's durability disappointing.
I like the recipes that I have tried. Some are a bit fussy--the banana bread recipe tells you to cook the bananas in a pan on the stove before stirring them into the batter! But Cook's Illustrated is that way... I was disappointed in the quality of the book. The cover detached from the body of the book in a matter of months.

The cornbread stuffing is one of my family's favorite recipes from this book.
5

Sep 19, 2014

It's not very often that I talk about the gluten-free cookbooks that I try out, but if I were to recommend only one book to the baker who is missing their cookies and crepes, it would be America's Test Kitchen's How Can It Be Gluten-Free.

I've read enough cookbooks now where the question, "Why?" is incredibly important to me. This book provides all the information possible on why your cupcakes will come out better with some white chocolate in the batter. You have to think by bizzaro baker logic It's not very often that I talk about the gluten-free cookbooks that I try out, but if I were to recommend only one book to the baker who is missing their cookies and crepes, it would be America's Test Kitchen's How Can It Be Gluten-Free.

I've read enough cookbooks now where the question, "Why?" is incredibly important to me. This book provides all the information possible on why your cupcakes will come out better with some white chocolate in the batter. You have to think by bizzaro baker logic with gluten-free recipes. Did you know that gluten-free flours don't absorb fat as well as wheat flour? No, I didn't either, and you'll find yourself using less butter than you could imagine.

As for the recipes, I just baked a batch of chocolate-chip cookies that satisfied me on a level that has been foreign since I stopped eating gluten. Many gluten-free books focus solely on taste, sometimes on texture but not to a dedicated level as America's Test Kitchen. Yes, you can have your cookies and your pies and your cakes again but you also won't feel as though you're consuming a lesser product. I can't even get over how perfect the texture of my cookies were.

So thank you, America's Test Kitchen, for really figuring out how flours work and how they can benefit our baking. As well as allowing me to make cookies that taste as if the recipe came from my grandmother. ...more
5

Jun 11, 2014

I've been a fan of the America's Test Kitchen for over a decade. I've always loved how they get into the science behind their cooking and explain why recipes work. Even so, I've never bought a cookbook from them--been tempted in the past, but haven't done it. Until now. After previewing this cookbook from my library, I knew I'd have to have it since I went gluten-free last year. I'm a baker at heart, and have missed making breads and goodies that I can partake in--or even simple things that I've been a fan of the America's Test Kitchen for over a decade. I've always loved how they get into the science behind their cooking and explain why recipes work. Even so, I've never bought a cookbook from them--been tempted in the past, but haven't done it. Until now. After previewing this cookbook from my library, I knew I'd have to have it since I went gluten-free last year. I'm a baker at heart, and have missed making breads and goodies that I can partake in--or even simple things that suddenly became more complicated like fried chicken.

So far, I've actually tried three of the recipes--the chocolate chip cookies, the crispy chicken strips, and the fudgy brownies. All are superb. The flavor is great, and they generally have the look, feel, and taste of their non-GF counterparts. I'm very pleased. I'm excited to try more of the recipes out of this cookbook as I'm able. Up next will probably be their sandwich bread. As much as I like Udi's (who they recommend highly), nothing beats homemade bread. If you're new to the GF lifestyle, this cookbook is a must-have. But be sure you follow their guidelines to a T. Read the hints and tips, and the story behind the final product of the recipes. They'll save you heartache--or just gritty cookies. ...more
1

February 17, 2019

WORST Cake Recipe I’ve Ever Made
I made the chocolate cake and it was a complete flop. It didn’t rise (no surprise, I could tell before I put it in the oven that there wasn’t enough xanthum gum and there was way too much moisture). I got much better results from using the regular test kitchen cake recipe and just using a gluten free flour instead of a gluten one. This cake was such a disaster that I’m not going to throw good money after bad and attempt anything else from this book when there are so many good recipes out there. These books are going straight to half price books (but if you see them there don’t buy them).
2

November 6, 2016

It's not that useful They concentrate on the flour blend that seems to ...
I gave this book as Xmas presents and regretted it. It's not that useful They concentrate on the flour blend that seems to me like glorified talcum powder. There's not much use of alternative grains. The recipes are complicated and have a lot of steps. I end up up using mixes or getting recipes online. I wanted to like this book, unfortunately, none of the gift recipients use this book and neither do I.
4

October 17, 2018

How good can gluten free really be?
America's Test Kitchen is, by far, the ultimate on everything cooking and baking. The only thing, is that gluten free baked goods can not stand up to their gluten filled counterparts. The texture is so different...just not right. You know, the mouth feel of the delectable cakes and cookies you've always known? Just as they always do, ATM tests their recipes over and over... it's just that these didn't get all the way to perfection. That are though better than other GF recipes.

The biscuits in my picture were a total bomb. They were super heavy, dry and didn't taste right (ATM has specific guidelines about baking times, so they'll be cooked properly). I didn't eat any of them... my eggs were naked. I've decided that I'm going to just continue to do what I've been over the last couple of years. I eat gluten free without having any cookies, cakes, bread, etc. I used to be a diehard of consuming baked goods. Honestly, since I took them out of my diet, I don't miss them one bit. Really....
1

August 11, 2018

if you have celiac this is not for you
Not as informative or as accurate for someone who has celiac. recipes do not taste as expected in some of recipes.
1

June 20, 2015

One Star
Nit what I expected
2

July 13, 2018

Could be better
There are no nutrient values given for any of the recipes. Considering this is ATK, I had definitely expected that.

Also, disappointed to find that there are NO recipes using coconut flour or almond meal in place of regular flour even in part.
I am going to be giving this away... To me it's just another cookbook.

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