The Holographic Universe: The Revolutionary Theory of Reality Info

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Reviews for The Holographic Universe: The Revolutionary Theory of Reality:

3

Sep 07, 2008

I have decided to add a new shelf called 'slowly reading'. I am reading this book slowly and carefully. Sometimes a paragraph or two is enough for me to stop and digest. Also, often I want to 'spin off' from a section and read related stuff, in books or on the internet. I am reading this in conjunction with Murray Gell-Mann's 'The Quark and the Jaguar', and as happens sometimes they seem to make a good pair. Both are very different in content and approach, yet they are similar in that they show I have decided to add a new shelf called 'slowly reading'. I am reading this book slowly and carefully. Sometimes a paragraph or two is enough for me to stop and digest. Also, often I want to 'spin off' from a section and read related stuff, in books or on the internet. I am reading this in conjunction with Murray Gell-Mann's 'The Quark and the Jaguar', and as happens sometimes they seem to make a good pair. Both are very different in content and approach, yet they are similar in that they show a great interest in how we interpret scientific data, the metaphors we use, the nature of theory and so. Both do deal with similar physics topics too.

A month later: One of the reasons I could not proceed with the book in one sitting reflects what to me is its strength and weakness. Weakness, in that it has no sustaining line of theory building although it relies for what it does say not only on anecdotal evidence but also some quite complex theory; its strength is in its accretion of many points of view, hints, nudges, interesting examples and insights, so that it builds an accretion of suggestion. It is particularly strong in being aware of the importance of classification and naming, metaphor and analogy in the processes of scientific discovery, and, implicitly, the excitement of imaginative approaches at the furefront of explanation (thereby emphasising, what any scientist would agree with, the strict parameters of scientific approaches: to a large extent science work comes after speculation without boundaries). While I do not share the author's (or anyone's) enthusiasm for supernatural phenomena, most of what he covers comes under the heading of unexplained or inexplicable phenomena. It is a useful and entertaining read, and a reference for future return. ...more
1

Dec 13, 2015

I thought this would be heavier on the quantum physics, and way less 'Hey, a poltergeist materialized cold spaghetti on my chest once in New York and a holographic universe explains everything'

When your 'evidence' for the paranormal includes Sathya Sai Baba then this is not my book, my friends.
3

Jun 17, 2019

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.


Fooking Physics: "The Holographic Universe" by Michael Talbot



Some say there exists only one interpretation of quantum mechanics, and that is the many-worlds interpretation. But there exists another explanation as described by Michael Talbot in his book Holographic Universe; here is an excerpt where he writes of Karl Pribram a neurophysiologist at Stanford:

'... Pribam realised that the objective world does not exist, at least not in the If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.


Fooking Physics: "The Holographic Universe" by Michael Talbot



Some say there exists only one interpretation of quantum mechanics, and that is the many-worlds interpretation. But there exists another explanation as described by Michael Talbot in his book “Holographic Universe”; here is an excerpt where he writes of Karl Pribram a neurophysiologist at Stanford:

'... Pribam realised that the objective world does not exist, at least not in the way we are accustomed to believing. What is 'out there' is a vast ocean of waves and frequencies and reality looks concrete to us only because our brains are able to take this holographic blur and convert it into sticks and stones and other familiar objects that make up our world...'

'...In other words, the smoothness of a piece of fine china and the feel of beach sand beneath our feet are really just elaborate versions of the phantom limb syndrome (when amputees 'feel' a limb long after it has been removed)..'

'According to Pribram, this does not mean there aren't china cups and grains of sand out there. It simply means that a china cup has two very different aspects to its reality. When it is filtered through the lens of our brains it manifests as a cup. But if we could get rid of our lenses, we'd experience it as an interference pattern. Which is real and which is illusion? "Both are real to me," says Pribham, "or, if you want to say, neither of them are real". ...more
5

May 06, 2009

The Holographic Universe

This must be one of the most fascinating, if not the most fascinating book I have ever read, and it is a must-read for anyone who is even remotely curious about who and what we really are or who wants to see spirituality meeting science. The claims that are made are backed up by numerous scientific studies, but it doesn't blow you away with scientific jargon. It's written in an easy-to-read style and the different chapters are split up into subsections, which also helps. The Holographic Universe

This must be one of the most fascinating, if not the most fascinating book I have ever read, and it is a must-read for anyone who is even remotely curious about who and what we really are or who wants to see spirituality meeting science. The claims that are made are backed up by numerous scientific studies, but it doesn't blow you away with scientific jargon. It's written in an easy-to-read style and the different chapters are split up into subsections, which also helps. Michael Talbot explains what a hologram is and then goes on to argue that the holographic model can be used to explain multiple personality disorders (extraordinary! - if you know nothing about MPD, then you absolutely must read this section), psychokinesis, miracles, the human energy field (or energy bodies), past/present/future existing seemlessly together, near death experiences (NDEs), UFO sightings and much more. Whether you accept the holographic theory or not, just reading the results of the various scientific studies mentioned in the book is fascinating and for me, personally, as a poet and author, it was also inspiring. The idea that everything is interconnected in this holographic universe of ours and is part of the same continuum inspired me, for example, to write a poem called 'My Life' to try and make sense of it ('...all that I see and don't see, hear and don't hear, touch and don't touch, smell and don't smell, taste and don't taste I am - I am the eternal energy of everything...'), whilst the story of the woman in the NDE chapter who said that 'she hadn't danced enough yet', making the being of light she was talking to laugh heartily and enabling her to return to physical life, gave me an idea for a children's story. In short, I found the book riveting and inspirational - jam-packed full of extraordinary scientific fact way more mind-blowing and thrilling than any science fiction I've ever read - and I am now reading it for a second time and will probably read it a third and fourth time as well! ...more
4

Jul 27, 2008

Q: So the Universe is one enormous holograph aye?
A: Uh-huh.

Q: Does that mean that all those AmRep Dope, Guns, and F*$@ing in the Streets cassettes aren't as good as I remember?
A: No. And I'm not sure how they directly relate to the book.

So every part of a holograph contains the entirety of the holograph. So if you were to cut it in two, each piece would contain the whole "image." Suddenly you would have two pictures of a dolphin jumping over a rainbow. Then four! Et cetera!!! This books likens Q: So the Universe is one enormous holograph aye?
A: Uh-huh.

Q: Does that mean that all those AmRep Dope, Guns, and F*$@ing in the Streets cassettes aren't as good as I remember?
A: No. And I'm not sure how they directly relate to the book.

So every part of a holograph contains the entirety of the holograph. So if you were to cut it in two, each piece would contain the whole "image." Suddenly you would have two pictures of a dolphin jumping over a rainbow. Then four! Et cetera!!! This books likens not only the Universe, but the individual human brain to the nature of the holograph. I will now demonstrate by cutting my brain into four segments for your consideration. I'll just make the first cut...doon doon fwoos ged. Twooos.kflbnvskkkkggggggggg ...more
2

Jun 01, 2013

There is much fascinating material in Michael Talbot's book, including discussion of scientific theories of the nature of reality and our perception thereof, as well as anecdotal accounts and clinical data regarding a vast array of parapsychological phenomena. Talbot believes that the holographic model of space-time and consciousness developed by David Bohm, Karl Pribram, and others can explain phenomena ranging from UFO encounters to psychic abilities and religious miracles, all of which, it is There is much fascinating material in Michael Talbot's book, including discussion of scientific theories of the nature of reality and our perception thereof, as well as anecdotal accounts and clinical data regarding a vast array of parapsychological phenomena. Talbot believes that the holographic model of space-time and consciousness developed by David Bohm, Karl Pribram, and others can explain phenomena ranging from UFO encounters to psychic abilities and religious miracles, all of which, it is argued, may in fact be periodic glimpses of a more fundamental level of reality wherein consciousness and matter form a continuum of interacting wave-structures.

Frustratingly, Talbot seems to uncritically accept any and all such reports, indiscriminate of source, as not only genuine, but also self-evidently supporting his favored , decidedly New Age, interpretation of the holographic model. Indeed, if taken at face value, much of the evidence does allow for such an interpretation, but the univocal manner in which it is presented makes independent assessment impossible. Nevertheless, Talbot's argument that scientists must seriously address claims of parapsychological phenomena is well taken. I would counter, however, that this should mean an expansion of the methods of objective observation and falsifiable hypothesis, not their abandonment in favor of subjective phenomenology. ...more
5

Aug 31, 2008

The book that will change your life. Without wanting to spoil the read, or without the urge to get to in-depth about the subject matter in a simple review, I can sum the book up as an alternate view on both quantum physics and neuro-science, and the postulations that the book makes throughout its course are simply marvelous to read about. If there were 6-stars, I'd give this a 6.
3

Jul 31, 2007

by michael talbot. this is a fun forray into the grand theory of everything. basically, everything is a hologram acording to physicist David Bohm ("Wholeness and the Implicate Order"): waves interfere with each other to form images, objects, everything. that which we can perceive is the explicate order and that which we cannot is the implicate. the implicate contains the explicate, and the boundaries are also constantly wavering. the interesting thing about a hologram is that every part of the by michael talbot. this is a fun forray into the grand theory of everything. basically, everything is a hologram acording to physicist David Bohm ("Wholeness and the Implicate Order"): waves interfere with each other to form images, objects, everything. that which we can perceive is the explicate order and that which we cannot is the implicate. the implicate contains the explicate, and the boundaries are also constantly wavering. the interesting thing about a hologram is that every part of the hologram contains all parts of itself. therefore if you take a piece of holographic film and split it in half, the image does not split, but remains as two whole images. the results are quite profound: the normal distinctions we draw don't actually exist. you and i don't exist as separate entities but are just an interference pattern from the same cosmic unity. moreover, time doesn't exist in the linear sense that we think it does, the "past" and "future" are equally accessible as the present.

talbot starts from the interesting results of quantum mechanics (nonlocality, uncertainty, conscious observer effect) and moves on to note findings in not only physics, but neurobiology, dreaming, psychokinesis, near death experiences, out of body experiences, religious miracles, reincarnation, psychic powers, and even ghosts. see? fun! what's more interesting is that people are starting to study things like psychokinesis and the results are startling - it seems that we all have the ability (at least to some degree) to control and effect the world around us with our beliefs and minds.

moreover, there is a bias or trend in science to discount these experiences as not testable or verifiable, which means they are often not studied or simply ignored. it has also been shown that the belief of the scientist running the "new agey" experiments influences the actual results of the experiment. children often experience these "other dimensions" more often than adults perhaps because adults have had so much conditioning as to what "is possible."

some interesting notes:
*an ink drop spun in a glycerine tube undergoes reverse entropy
* stigmata is manifest through deep belief: stigmatists portray wounds on the palms instead of the more accurate location of the wrists. this is likely due to artistic interpretation of crucifiction occuring on the palm.
*when we dream, we typically have access to information that is beyond our waking knowledge (i.e., we can learn new things when dreaming).
*in chinese medicine, the method of mapping the entire body to the foot, or the ear is an example of a hologram
* people being able to see with with the tips of their fingers, ear lobes, tip of the nose, and even, yes, armpits.
* Immanuel Kant's *Dreams of a Spirit-Seer* an account of Swedenborg: "we are constituted by the intersection of two flows: one direct from the divine, and one indirect from the divine through our environment."
* The Conibo Indians of the Peruvian Amazon use of ayahuasca ("soul vine") - a hallucinogenic plant that when taken transports even lay people to exceedingly similar dimensions that the Conibo shamans visit regularly. ...more
5

Apr 28, 2012

With The Holographic Universe Michael Talbot has created his Masterpiece.
For anyone even remotely interested in the convergence of Science and Metaphysics, this book is a must-read. Talbot masterfully combines science, research, theories on Human Consciousness, and eloquence into a colorful collage which in my opinion remains un-rivaled as the pinnacle of its genre. His narrative is factually detailed while remaining unpretentious; at times he is capable of reducing the empyrean to the mundane. With The Holographic Universe Michael Talbot has created his Masterpiece.
For anyone even remotely interested in the convergence of Science and Metaphysics, this book is a must-read. Talbot masterfully combines science, research, theories on Human Consciousness, and eloquence into a colorful collage which in my opinion remains un-rivaled as the pinnacle of its genre. His narrative is factually detailed while remaining unpretentious; at times he is capable of reducing the empyrean to the mundane. The reader comes away feeling awe-struck, with a new understanding of the nature of subjective Reality. Our perceptions of Reality influence its' structure, a structure fractally repeated throughout all nature. From the largest cosmic structures to the smallest sub-atomic particles, this fractal pattern is enfolded within itself time and time again. I have read this book several times, and on each occasion I have gained something new. I plan to read it once again in the near future, and hope that someone writes a worthy follow-up. Read this book, you won't be disappointed. ...more
2

Oct 17, 2008

In this book, the presentation of numerous historical accounts of the miraculous from the point of view of a believer is the central theme. Out-of body, near-death, and otherwise supernatural experiences are discussed, and the uniting theme is that the "natural laws" within which physics operates cannot explain all that we observe. What does, you ask? Well, imagine that everything is actually a pan-dimensional interference pattern stemming from a truly holographic universe. What does that mean, In this book, the presentation of numerous historical accounts of the miraculous from the point of view of a believer is the central theme. Out-of body, near-death, and otherwise supernatural experiences are discussed, and the uniting theme is that the "natural laws" within which physics operates cannot explain all that we observe. What does, you ask? Well, imagine that everything is actually a pan-dimensional interference pattern stemming from a truly holographic universe. What does that mean, precisely? I've no idea, and I've already read the book. Every bizarre encounter is rapidly chaulked up as further proof to the holographic nature of existence, but without much explanation leaving me to wonder precisely how it supports anything other than the lunacy of the author - he retells a story in which, during his college days, spaghetti noodles suddenly materialized mid-air and plopped down on his chest. Oh sure, he checked for open windows, someone else around, the presence of boiling water, but to no avail. Talbot concludes that this random pasta must have come from the mental manifestation of a holographic interference vision. I don't get it either, but I'm now convinced that it'd be hysterical to throw wet noodles at someone as a messy, if confusing, prank.

This book was recommended to me by a good friend, and I'm sorry to have to say, I didn't get it. I did, however, particularly enjoy one passage in the beginning which stated, and I'm paraphrasing, "we find ourselves compelled to accept the words of scientists as the truth, despite our knowing that they are as equally fallible as ourselves." No we're not. ...more
1

Dec 26, 2013

This is probably the first time I buy a book thinking about a subject and discovering a total different text.
Apparently this book should talk about the theory of holographic universe, explaining what it means for the reality to appear three-dimensional while it really is bi-dimensional. This should be about information theory, black hole entropy and so on.

Surprisingly this book is totally different: it just take some holographic principles for granted and start by discussing each and every kind This is probably the first time I buy a book thinking about a subject and discovering a total different text.
Apparently this book should talk about the theory of holographic universe, explaining what it means for the reality to appear three-dimensional while it really is bi-dimensional. This should be about information theory, black hole entropy and so on.

Surprisingly this book is totally different: it just take some holographic principles for granted and start by discussing each and every kind of para-normal, supernatural event or perception.
In the very beginning of the book there is some small scientific diversions, but in the rest of the volume, every non-scientific phenomenon is just assumed as real and explainable by the holographic principle.
In the final parts of the book, it became almost anti-scientific and I can't justify in any possible way the results the book presumes to explain. ...more
5

Dec 18, 2013

I started reading this book about a decade ago and, for reasons that I can't remember anymore (gave it to a friend?), left it not even half-way through.

I shall finish it someday.

However, even the first part--with the theory of memory as a holographic film--has vastly influenced my perception of the way we human beings think.

Highly recommended: it resonates with basically all my observations of the world around. So much so that I hardly know where to start if someone asks for a more specific I started reading this book about a decade ago and, for reasons that I can't remember anymore (gave it to a friend?), left it not even half-way through.

I shall finish it someday.

However, even the first part--with the theory of memory as a holographic film--has vastly influenced my perception of the way we human beings think.

Highly recommended: it resonates with basically all my observations of the world around. So much so that I hardly know where to start if someone asks for a more specific recommendation. ...more
5

Sep 03, 2010

Thought-provoking book, and one of my all time faves. I have purchased this book a few times and after reading it I always loan it to someone with no expectation that I'll ever get it back...and I never have. An absolute must read!
4

Apr 29, 2013

I have to admit, when I first encountered the idea of us being holograms in a holographic universe it rocked my world. This book builds a case for it being perhaps the most logical theory about the universe shared by many, though certainly not all, physicists. Physics dominates the first third of the book. Talbot makes this portion fairly easy to follow, with some included diagrams.

A holographic universe can account for psychics, clairvoyants, out-of-body and near-death experiences, and other I have to admit, when I first encountered the idea of us being holograms in a holographic universe it rocked my world. This book builds a case for it being perhaps the most logical theory about the universe shared by many, though certainly not all, physicists. Physics dominates the first third of the book. Talbot makes this portion fairly easy to follow, with some included diagrams.

A holographic universe can account for psychics, clairvoyants, out-of-body and near-death experiences, and other oddities not dealt with in our current view. This makes up the latter two-thirds of the book. It got pretty 'out there', sometimes, yet seemed plausible. My world continued to rock with a lot of outside-the-box thinking that I found, frankly, exciting.

I haven't been this captivated since I started reading about Tibetan Buddhism. ...more
4

Jan 29, 2016


I would say the first third of this book was very good and captivating. The book then drifted into more of a vast amount of cherry picked anecdotal support for mysticism. I understand this is the author's forte, belief and according to himself, personal experiences. But I thought the book would have used the unexplainable types of paranormal events that some people have experienced and/or witnessed to help support or explain the "holographic universe" theory principles analogously. Instead, the
I would say the first third of this book was very good and captivating. The book then drifted into more of a vast amount of cherry picked anecdotal support for mysticism. I understand this is the author's forte, belief and according to himself, personal experiences. But I thought the book would have used the unexplainable types of paranormal events that some people have experienced and/or witnessed to help support or explain the "holographic universe" theory principles analogously. Instead, the book dove into the weeds of the paranormal and reshaped the constructs of the "holographic universe" theory to better fit his interpretations of both the paranormal and holographic theory.

For example, instead of taking an objective and observable occurrence with regards to sub-atomic particles, such as how electrons can behave as both a wave form and a particle form, and trying to figure out how a mystic performing a miracle, like healing someone just by touching the sufferer, relates with respect to the phenomena of an electron shape shifting from a wave to a particle and back again; he try's to demonstrate how the principle theories behind why electrons can do this as reason to believe and to some degree support these paranormal occurrences. I know what I just said sounds like six in one hand and a half dozen in the other but look at it this way.

He seems to be saying, in my opinion, that the "holographic theory" supports, gives reason and meaning to miracles and paranormal events-rather than-supernatural events simply being a part of a misinterpretation of the witnessing and experiencing of the holographic model.

In a simple analogy. Many years ago people thought gods caused volcanos to erupt. Now we know the science of why they erupt. What I think the author does with his application of the "holographic theory" is this. Currently we don't have any concrete explanation for why miracles seem to happen or precisely why sub-atomic particles behave the way they do in quantum physics when observed just like ancient people couldn't explain an eruption.

The author's logic works something like this. Paranormal events are "real" but unexplainable until you draw, far stretched in my opinion, comparisons and conclusions from the holographic universe model to paranormal occurrences. In other words, it's like using modern science to explain why the gods got angry and how the gods made the volcano erupt. You first have to believe that most every paranormal and supernatural event that has allegedly taken place was "real" and the "holographic theory" supports it. Same as believing angry gods DO exist and geological science proves how these gods make eruptions happen.

This is MY primitive grasp of the "holographic universe" theory in my own words:

Colors are just various wavelengths and how we interpret these waves are also various so think about this. With regards to the "string theory" all matter breaks down into strings that are so small our current technology can't detect them. These strings vibrate or resonate differently from one another. Example, the element iron may resonate/vibrate differently from the element carbon. Both elements, in theory, are made of the same "strings" but depending on their vibration frequency is what determines how the sub atomic particles interact with each other and therefore determines what "kind" of matter it will be and how much energy it will have.

Just as we interpret various wavelengths with light we also do with sound. What we hear and see and sometimes feel are these wavelengths. When matter changes, for example, iron to rust forming iron oxide, the only thing that happened was an exchange in each elements electron configuration . Oxygen and iron take and release these electrons and now we have a "new" matter that has neither properties from which elements it came from. Possibly, with the increase and decrease of each elements electron configuration during the process of iron and oxygen combining, the vibrations of the strings are also altered because if the strings influence the sub atomic particles then the particles may influence the strings resonating.

Now back to the different light waves. Depending on the atomic structure (electron configuration) of a given piece of matter, environment, perception and which light wave frequency hits an object mostly determines what light waves will be either absorbed, reflected or scattered thus, its color, will be perceived in our mind. If the change in the particles change the the strings vibrations and therefore change the properties in this "new" matter then it's color also changes and it does. Possibly, then, everything we perceive is just an interpretation of these vibrating strings. Nothing actually exists but everything is perceived.

What is a hologram? Possibly, it's our perception of an arrangement of light that has been manipulated by the specific arrangement of vibrating strings. But I can touch a "real" thing. I can't touch a hologram you might say. Well, What if that touch is just a perception brought on by a more complex combination of vibrating strings much in the way you feel the heat radiating from a hot stove.

If we are all connected to the cosmos in some way then our energy can be felt and the light that brings these perceptions can be seen.

Color and pain are some of the biggest tricks our mind plays on us. Nether really exist but one gives us a very vivid image and the other gives us a very intense feeling.

Our brain assigned colors to different light wavelengths much in the way we color code things for easier reference. Pink for example does not exist in any light wave. Our mind analyzes the percentages of blue, green and red sent to it from the eye and imagines a color pink. When you stub your toe it hurts but the pain is just a sensation and nothing more. This is why some people get ghost pains from addiction to pain pills. Your mind is using this sensation to get what it wants; more narcotics.

Death could be just a rational perception but as elusive in reality as the concept/feeling of heartbreak. ...more
5

May 27, 2008

Very fun book to read! This book presents anecdotal and scientific evidence in the argument that the universe is actually a combination of various frequencies which our brains then interpret into what we experience as reality. The author uses examples ranging from Near Death Experiences to salamander brain experiments to argue his point.
Overall, I believe a lot of what he is presenting. He does a good job of noting references, but near the end he starts getting a bit more personal in presenting Very fun book to read! This book presents anecdotal and scientific evidence in the argument that the universe is actually a combination of various frequencies which our brains then interpret into what we experience as reality. The author uses examples ranging from Near Death Experiences to salamander brain experiments to argue his point.
Overall, I believe a lot of what he is presenting. He does a good job of noting references, but near the end he starts getting a bit more personal in presenting what he believes without as much scientific backing.
Fun to read and challenges you to think about things very differently. ...more
4

May 22, 2008

Basically, a mind-blowing book that should be a requirement for anyone interested in the universe, themselves, others, and how they are all really the same thing. Explains paranormal abilities incredibly well...enough to make the skeptic take note. Incidently, also explains how BodyTalk works...i.e. there is truly only one person in the room during a session. Muscle testing is used to confirm what the practitioner already knows.
4

Jul 29, 2009

This book is a popular treatment of the ideas of psychologist Karl Pribram and physicist David Bohm, which in turn are based on the concept of holography. Hungarian scientist Dennis Gabor invented (discovered?) holography, and was awarded the Nobel Prize the development of the laser allowed University of Michigan scientists to verify Gabor's theory in the laboratory. Holography produces, in thin air, the three-dimensional image (a hologram) of an object. This is accomplished by splitting a laser This book is a popular treatment of the ideas of psychologist Karl Pribram and physicist David Bohm, which in turn are based on the concept of holography. Hungarian scientist Dennis Gabor invented (discovered?) holography, and was awarded the Nobel Prize the development of the laser allowed University of Michigan scientists to verify Gabor's theory in the laboratory. Holography produces, in thin air, the three-dimensional image (a hologram) of an object. This is accomplished by splitting a laser beam, with one of the split beams directly illuminating the object to be photographed, and the other beam illuminating the image of the object on a photographic plate. Where the two beams of light overlap on the plate, they produce a so-called interference pattern, and it is this pattern that (when re-illuminated) creates the three-dimensional image (the hologram) of the object. Interestingly, the whole hologram can be re-created from any portion of the holographic image—a phenomenon reminiscent of Mandelbrot's fractals (which for some reason Talbot fails to mention).
Trying to understand how memory works, psychologist Karl Pribram hit on the hologram as the best theory to account for the fact that memories are not localized in the brain (each memory stored in a separate group or circuit of neurons), but rather are distributed throughout the brain so that, for example, rats that have literally had their brains minced still retain memories for learned behaviors, and among humans, even after massive strokes that have incapacitated large areas of a cerebral hemisphere, many people continue to retain a remarkable store of memories. By retaining only scattered pieces of a memory, a damaged brain might still be able to reproduce (holographically) the whole memory.
Physicist David Bohm hit on holography while trying to understand how the universe works in the light of quantum theory, about which he was a leading, textbook-writing expert. It bothered him that quantum theory left many things unexplained:

*How can a quantum of energy be both a particle and a wave?
*Since we interfere with subatomic particles when we try to measure
them, how can we know with certainty what that nanoworld is really like?
*How is it that two photons in different locations can influence each other faster than the speed of light?

According to Bohm, the universe consists of energy waves. The physical reality that we perceive "out there" is our brains' translation of those waves (via mathematical equations called Fourier transforms) into sensory images. Well, not a translation of the waves themselves, but of the very interference patterns that produce holograms. So we live in a "holographic universe" teeming with energy waves that our fertile brains convert into the world we (think we) know.
That's not all: Bohm holds that the world we normally perceive, what he calls the "explicate order," continually arises out of a background world that we normally do not perceive, called the "implicate order." In the implicate order, time and space do not exist: the past, present and future freely intermix, and everything is everywhere. The implicate order, the matrix of existence where everything is possible, continually expresses itself by "unfolding" new configurations of energy waves.
And there's more. The implicate order is more like mind than like matter: for Bohm, matter arises from mind rather than vice versa, although mind and matter are really two apsects of the same substratum. With this view he enters an age-old dispute more on the side of Plato and the major religions, east and west, than on the side of conventional materialistic science (for a recent example of the materialistic position, see Daniel C. Dennett's Consciousness Explained ). Bohm's approach focuses on the whole, while modern materialistic science tends to focus on the parts, which are easier to model and analyze. Scientists have generally assumed that if you learn enough about the parts, you will automatically come to understand the whole. For complex systems, this has proved questionable—as any chaos or complexity theorist will tell you.
Bohm's implicate order accounts for the phenomena—nonlocality, indeterminacy—unexplained by quantum theory. It also accounts for psi phenomena such as telepathy, clairvoyance (remote viewing), clairaudience, precognition, retrocognition and psychokinesis. How? Since the implicate order is exempt from the conventional rules of time and space, it can "unfold" the same phenomenon in minds and places that are far apart physically or separated in time.
These are the basic ideas. Author Talbot elaborates with a lot of anecdotal evidence—some of it very engaging—that seems to support the holographic universe, and he cites (but not systematically) some of the more rigorous research that seems to support the theory. He also cites the usual New Age suspects: Robert Monroe on OBEs, Kenneth Ring on NDEs, Larry Dossey on remote healing, Deepak Chopra on correspondence between quantum physics and eastern religion, etc. I found the book interesting and thought-provoking, obviously written by an enthusiast who is trying to appear objective, fairly persuasive, somewhat repetitious, and strewn with fascinating anecdotal cases. I say "fairly persuasive" because for one thing, some research has challenged Pribram's notion of non-localized memory (see, for example, Joseph LeDoux’s The Emotional Brain), and for another thing, throughout the book I was nagged by the notion that Bohm's theory is really a modern-vocabulary version of the shamanic and vedic worldviews, and that while intellectually cogent and intuitively resonant, most of the theory is unverifiable in the scientific sense. Which doesn't invalidate it, but also doesn't allow us to advance much past speculation—and where speculation is unverifiable, one is never far from Ockham's supersharp razor. I'm not talking about the phenomena themselves (for example, psi)—these, I believe, have been well demonstrated (see, for example Dean I. Radin’s The Conscious Universe). Rather I'm talking about the theory that purports to explain them.
Overall: Highly recommended, but I would advise skeptics to read Radin's The Conscious Universe first.

Key concepts:

Explicate order
Hologram
Holography
Implicate order
Indeterminacy
NDEs
Nonlocality
OBEs
Precognition
Psi Phenomena
Psychokinetics
Remote Viewing (clairvoyance)
Retrocognition
Synchronicity
Telepathy
Unfolding

...more
3

Aug 01, 2010

"Considered together, Bohm and Pribram's theories provide a profound new way of looking at the world: Our brains mathematically construct objective reality by interpreting frequencies that are ultimately projections from another dimension, a deeper order of existence that is beyond both space and time: The brain is a hologram enfolded in a holographic universe." (p. 54)

As you may imagine, I was fascinated with this book when I began reading it in 1994 at the suggestion of a respected friend. At "Considered together, Bohm and Pribram's theories provide a profound new way of looking at the world: Our brains mathematically construct objective reality by interpreting frequencies that are ultimately projections from another dimension, a deeper order of existence that is beyond both space and time: The brain is a hologram enfolded in a holographic universe." (p. 54)

As you may imagine, I was fascinated with this book when I began reading it in 1994 at the suggestion of a respected friend. At about the sixth chapter--right where the author started discussing auras, astral bodies, and chakras--I hit a snag, and put the book down with the intention of finishing it "soon." Sixteen years later and tens of thousands of other pages later, and I again got bogged down in the exact same section (at this point I guess I felt like the book was attempting to shoehorn every single new age trope into the author's new "paradigm.") This time, though, I persevered through what I considered two-star material, and got to the final chapter which unveils Talbot's image of a holographic universe where the part and the whole comprise one another, where everything literally "inter-is" everything else. On the whole, a fascinating--if nowhere near convincing--speculation on the nature of reality and a theoretical framework for what Greg Egan has elsewhere decried as "quantum mysticism" and what I consider really awesome if we could provide substantial evidence for it.

"Indeed, the holographic model itself is highly controversial and is by no means accepted by a majority of scientists. Nonetheless, and as we shall see, many important and impressive thinkers do support it and believe it may be the most accurate picture of reality we have to date." (p. 3)

"We are indeed on a shaman's journey, mere children struggling to become technicians of the sacred. We are learning how to deal with the plasticity that is part and parcel of a universe in which mind and reality are a continuum, and in this journey one lesson stands out from above all others. As long as the formlessness and breathtaking freedom of the beyond remain frightening to us, we will continue to dream for ourselves that is comfortably solid and well defined." (p. 302) ...more
4

Aug 30, 2011

This book was probably one of the first to divulgate the conceptions of Bohm about implicate/explicate order, and of Pribram about the nature of brain's activity, and to derive from them some conclusions for our daily world view. This by itself makes the book worth having, though the actual discussion it includes may not please everyone.
Bohm and Pribram agreed that our reality is in fact holographic, and so was the operational principle of the brain (a reader of information concerning the This book was probably one of the first to divulgate the conceptions of Bohm about implicate/explicate order, and of Pribram about the nature of brain's activity, and to derive from them some conclusions for our daily world view. This by itself makes the book worth having, though the actual discussion it includes may not please everyone.
Bohm and Pribram agreed that our reality is in fact holographic, and so was the operational principle of the brain (a reader of information concerning the hologram that reality supposedly is), as explained clearly in the first two chapters of the book. From then on, basically Talbot takes the lead on enlisting an impressive amount of feats (mainly historical, and some first-handedly experienced) that, while buffling our best current explanations let alone skepticism, may eventually find a reasonable support in the holographic paradigm. While it can be rather amusing and instructive to have a look at such supposedly real wonders, it is nonetheless a kind of pity that most of the books deal with miracolous healings, psychokinesis, clearvoyance, materializations and phenomena at odds with our materialistic contempt for space as time. This is still done by means of a clear and even pedantic writing style, rich in citations by alleged academic authorities and historical testimonies.
Overall, a nice read, if only disconcerting or thought-streatching. ...more
1

Nov 28, 2013

I hate to rate a book halfway through, but the only way I can continue to read this piece is by consigning it to the "science fiction" shelf. I loved the quantum theory pieces at the beginning, and spent a few pleasant mornings toying with ideas offered in the first chapters. The approach, however, has grown steadily less scientific in ways that set my analysis training into convulsions. Anecdotes are not evidence, not every study is unbiased, and credentials and supporting information have to I hate to rate a book halfway through, but the only way I can continue to read this piece is by consigning it to the "science fiction" shelf. I loved the quantum theory pieces at the beginning, and spent a few pleasant mornings toying with ideas offered in the first chapters. The approach, however, has grown steadily less scientific in ways that set my analysis training into convulsions. Anecdotes are not evidence, not every study is unbiased, and credentials and supporting information have to be in place before anything should be taken at face value. The way this book hops from idea to idea, it's amazing he was able to put a single title to the thing.

Holographic universe? Maybe, but I strongly suspect this holograph exists only in the writer's mind. Maybe affected by those LSD studies he mentioned? Sorry, but you lost me for good at "My poltergeist likes to drape socks over house plants while I sleep." ...more
5

Jul 15, 2014

Mind = blown. For those looking for a potentially scientific / rational explanation for supernatural or extra-sensory phenomena, look no further. This book is on my "five most important books I've ever read" list, perhaps right at the top. The holographic model of the universe was not dreamed up by the author, but he stands on the shoulders of others to bring a very complex and advanced concept to a non-physicist level of comprehension. The holographic model applies to the mind as well, and this Mind = blown. For those looking for a potentially scientific / rational explanation for supernatural or extra-sensory phenomena, look no further. This book is on my "five most important books I've ever read" list, perhaps right at the top. The holographic model of the universe was not dreamed up by the author, but he stands on the shoulders of others to bring a very complex and advanced concept to a non-physicist level of comprehension. The holographic model applies to the mind as well, and this is discussed thoroughly. Mainstream scientists are rapidly coming to accept the holographic model of the universe, so you should read up on it. Quantum entanglement is now a little less "spooky action at a distance," as Einstein put it. ...more
5

Jan 02, 2015

5 Mesmerizing Mindblowing- Michael Talbot- I wish-you-were-not-dead-and-I-am-madly-in-love-with-you- stars



About Michael Talbot: Michael Talbot was an openly gay writer who was highly popular among the intellecuals New York in the 80s and 90s. Many people looked up to him as a role model too. He was diagnosed with leukemia. People claimed often he joked that he wished he was infected with the more classy and sophisticated disease of Aids and be tragic about it.
In 1992, Talbot died of 5 Mesmerizing Mindblowing- Michael Talbot- I wish-you-were-not-dead-and-I-am-madly-in-love-with-you- stars



About Michael Talbot: Michael Talbot was an openly gay writer who was highly popular among the intellecuals New York in the 80s and 90s. Many people looked up to him as a role model too. He was diagnosed with leukemia. People claimed often he joked that he wished he was infected with the more classy and sophisticated disease of Aids and be tragic about it.
In 1992, Talbot died of lymphocytic leukemia at age 38.

Review coming up ...more
1

Apr 05, 2009

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book is not on science, but on the occult!
This book starts very promising, discussing the beginnings of the Holographic theory by Bohm and Pribram.

But then it turns to the dark side....dreams, precognition, auras, etc, etc, ad nauseam, ad absurdum.
The book continues with poor scholarship and unproven, pseudoscientific ramblings.

This book is all about psychic experiences.
Not scientific, not worth buying.
5

Aug 07, 2007

This foray into the new physics of the 20th century, including the most theoretical of the theoretical, the holographic model for the universe, is on the short list of books that knocked down some walls inside my brain. Maybe you have to read it when you're young, though, before you brain gets calcified with age, unbending, certain. I'm glad I read it when I did.

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