The Facts on File Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins, 4th Edition (Facts on File Writer's Library) Info

Find the best books In Reference - best sellers and hot new Releases. Check out our top gifted and best rated books this year. Take a look at hundreds of reviews before you download The Facts on File Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins, 4th Edition (Facts on File Writer's Library) by Robert Hendrickson. Read&Download The Facts on File Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins, 4th Edition (Facts on File Writer's Library) by Robert Hendrickson Online


More than 15,000 entriesover 2,000 of which are new to this
editionprovide information and anecdotes on the origin and development
of a wide range of words and phrases, including:

Fellini named the
hyperactive photographer in La Dolce Vita Signor Paparazzo, after the
Italian slang for mosquito, which lead to the popularity of the term,
paparazzi.

Argentina takes its name from the Latin argentum meaning
silver. Legend says that llamas grazing on Mount Posi in 1545 uprooted
some shrubbery, beneath which was a vein of silver ore.

Conjurer's
assistants in the 17th century would eat toads so the magicians could
demonstrate their miraculous healing powers. The assistants came to be
known as "toad eaters," which became our modern insult,
"toady."


Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for The Facts on File Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins, 4th Edition (Facts on File Writer's Library):

4

Oct 12, 2007

This book is FILLED with random little nuggets of history concerning where and when Words themselves were created. Most are pretty straight forward but some are downright funny. The word "Kangaroo" was invented when explorers asks the natives of Australia what the strage creatures that jumped around on two legs was called and the natives responded with three words that sound like "Kan-Gah-Roo." The explorers naturally thoughts this is what the animals were called...but in reality the natives This book is FILLED with random little nuggets of history concerning where and when Words themselves were created. Most are pretty straight forward but some are downright funny. The word "Kangaroo" was invented when explorers asks the natives of Australia what the strage creatures that jumped around on two legs was called and the natives responded with three words that sound like "Kan-Gah-Roo." The explorers naturally thoughts this is what the animals were called...but in reality the natives were trying to say "I Don't Know" and convey that they simply didn't understand what they were saying. This book is great to leave on the shelf and pull down whenever you hear something strange in a day or just feel like looking up where the word "Okay" came from. Enjoy. ...more
5

Apr 30, 2008

My only complaint is that this book is too big. Can't cuddle up in bed with it.
1

Apr 07, 2013

Your Name: Sandra Smith
Type of Reference: Dictionary / Handbook
Call Number: Ref. Desk 422.03 HEN
Brief description: This book has over 15,000 peculiar words and phrases that cover everything from slang, acronyms, and numerous other literary references.
Citation for where the item has been reviewed: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22...
Criteria This book didnt impress me, but due to several people seeking it out on two different occasions, I guess it must be used for some assignments or some Your Name: Sandra Smith
Type of Reference: Dictionary / Handbook
Call Number: Ref. Desk 422.03 HEN
Brief description: This book has over 15,000 peculiar words and phrases that cover everything from slang, acronyms, and numerous other literary references.
Citation for where the item has been reviewed: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22...
Criteria – This book didn’t impress me, but due to several people seeking it out on two different occasions, I guess it must be used for some assignments or some sort of literary need. It’s scope is humorous at times and seems to cover the content. It appears to be accurate and authoritative. The presentation leaves much to be desired. As far as relation to similar works, I couldn’t find anything that seemed to compare. Due to the fact it covers things such as slang and acronyms, I would think that it would become outdated rather quickly. The diversity of this book would cover many cultures due to the fact it examines slang and other lingo across the board. The costs is less than $50.00. ...more
4

Apr 27, 2008

I love this book. I wish, of course, that it was a little more exhaustive; I also tend to think that its "scholarship" is a little Americentric and recent (as in 1900 and later); but it's pretty good as is.

You know what I'd really like to see? A book sort of like this, but different; a book dedicated to diagramming and naming subcomponents of things.

Do you ever, say, look at a sailboat or a horse or a car or something else that's not a conveyance, and notice something about it, an accoutrement I love this book. I wish, of course, that it was a little more exhaustive; I also tend to think that its "scholarship" is a little Americentric and recent (as in 1900 and later); but it's pretty good as is.

You know what I'd really like to see? A book sort of like this, but different; a book dedicated to diagramming and naming subcomponents of things.

Do you ever, say, look at a sailboat or a horse or a car or something else that's not a conveyance, and notice something about it, an accoutrement or feature or, and wonder to yourself: "What's that little thing called?" I would like to have a book where I could reference all of my curiosity about things I know little about. How do you describe something particular to a particular squid if you do not know the words for the make-up of a squid generally? How do you speak of houses having never built one? ...more
5

Nov 17, 2007

Wow--so much to learn here! Did you know that G-string was a term originally applied to Indian loin cloths? Also, eavesdrop comes from the legal space between houses in ancient English law. All houses had to be at least 2 feet apart to prevent one house's rainwater from falling on the other. Standing in the space between--the "eavesdrip"--was a way to stand close enough to your neighbor to overhear conversations. Fascinating!

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