The Complete Sherlock Holmes (Knickerbocker Classics) Info

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Part of the elegant Knickerbocker Classics series,
The Complete Sherlock Holmes is comprised of 4 full-length novels
and 56 short stories featuring the world's most famous pipe-smoking
detective. For Sherlock Holmes fans worldwide, this stunning gift
edition has a full cloth binding and ribbon marker, all packaged
neatly in an elegant slipcase.


Written by Sir Arthur
Conan Doyle between the years 1867 and 1927, the legendary Sherlock
Holmes employed his mastery of deductive reasoning and expert sleuthing
to solve an array of complex and harrowing cases. From his
home—221B Baker Street in London—the legendary Sherlock
Holmes
(accompanied by his loyal companion and chronicler, Dr.
Watson) baffled policemen and became famous worldwide for his
remarkable observations and even more eccentric habits
.


Featuring a foreword from renowned Holmes scholar Daniel
Stashower, (author of A Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan
Doyle
and Sherlock Holmes in America), The Complete
Sherlock Holmes
contains every known Sherlock Holmes tale ever
written
. From Holmes’ first appearance in “A Study in
Scarlet” (1887) and The Hound of the Baskervilles
(1901–1902), through the collection of stories in the The
Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes
, this deluxe edition boasts the entire
Holmes catalogue.

The Knickerbocker Classics bring
together the works of classic authors from around the world. Complete
and unabridged, these elegantly designed, cloth-bound hardcovers feature
a slipcase and ribbon marker, as well as a comprehensive introduction
providing the reader with enlightening information on the author's
life and works.

Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for The Complete Sherlock Holmes (Knickerbocker Classics):

4

Oct 31, 2007

A few of the things I learned:

Once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth

Never theorize before you have all the evidence. It biases the judgment.

Also, I now sometimes try to analyze people based on their shoes and pants when sitting on the subway. I have yet to ask anyone if I was accurate about my predictions.
5

Oct 20, 2016

Time does not change great literature This was completely entertaining and no matter how old you are it's still great to read over the ones you enjoyed the first time. Several I had not remembered reading. I bought this book at special price from here:
https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Sherl...
5

Oct 31, 2007

My copy of this book is a wreck, I have read it so often. My dad gave it to me, I can't remember if it was a birthday or Christmas gift, but regardless it's one of the best books I've ever been given. You just have to read a couple of pages and you fall right into Holmes and Watson's world; it's wonderful.
4

Oct 25, 2017

Holmes, who loathed every form of society with his whole Bohemian soul, remained in our lodgings in Baker Street, buried among his old books, and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition, the drowsiness of the drug and the fierce energy of his own keen nature. Holmes was still, as ever, deeply attracted by the study of crime, and occupied his immense faculties and extraordinary powers of observation in following out those clues and clearing up those mysteries which had been Holmes, who loathed every form of society with his whole Bohemian soul, remained in our lodgings in Baker Street, buried among his old books, and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition, the drowsiness of the drug and the fierce energy of his own keen nature. Holmes was still, as ever, deeply attracted by the study of crime, and occupied his immense faculties and extraordinary powers of observation in following out those clues and clearing up those mysteries which had been abandoned as hopeless by the official police.

--“A Scandal in Bohemia”

Watson's not wasting any time here. So we learn, in two sentences, that Holmes is: not fond of other people, ridiculously smart, kind of a drug addict, working unofficially to fight crime and, as if I couldn’t say it enough -- ridiculously smart!

Arthur Conan Doyle emphasizes Holmes' magnificent brain in many ways: he uses Watson's admiration to reinforce the reader's own; he gives Holmes lots of foils, including incompetent cops and the criminals he's hunting; and perhaps the best trick of all, Holmes frequently gets to show off his smarts by wowing his clients with how much he can guess about them just by looking at their outward appearances.

So it’s obvious that Sherlock Holmes is beyond intelligent, but I find this other side of him more interesting:

That any civilized human being in this nineteenth century should not be aware that the earth travelled round the sun appeared to be to me such an extraordinary fact that I could hardly realize it.

“You appear to be astonished,” he said, smiling at my expression of surprise. “Now that I do know it I shall do my best to forget it.”

-- “A Study in Scarlet”

Holmes is, in a nutshell, single-minded in his detection. In that respect, it makes sense that all emotions, particularly love, are abhorrent to his cold, precise, but admirably balanced mind. He's basically an instrument for finding out criminal stuff. I actually appreciated this, since Doyle didn't risk all the soap opera-ish entanglements that make long-running serials hard to follow without a map. He conceived each of his stories as both united by Holmes' character, and yet still potentially interesting to people who had never read any other of his stories.

As a private detective, Holmes totally uses his powers for good. Everyone in Victorian London, from the lowliest governess to the highest nobleman, eventually comes to see him when they need help. It's reassuring to read about a guy who just goes around making sure that life is fair for the little guy. Sure, he may be in his business of private detective work mostly for the intellectual work rather than the moral judgment -- but for me, reading each of his stories is like reading “Chicken Soup for the Nerdy Soul”! He's so sure, and so good at getting things right, that reading his stories leaves you with a comfortable glow.

John Watson, the narrator, is definitely a main character in these stories. He is telling his own story, sure, but only in so far as that story relates to Mr. Sherlock Holmes. The thing is though, he is awesome in his own right. He was an army doctor in Afghanistan, he's the one who always carries the gun in his and Holmes's most dangerous encounters,and what's more -- he is actually able to sustain a job and engage in healthy human relationships with more than one person. By also making Watson a strong character, with both medical and literary proficiency, Doyle makes Watson's admiration of Holmes' intelligence even more meaningful. He fills in gaps that Holmes lack: he provides medical assistance that Holmes can't handle and he's the one who adds human interest to Holmes' stories. Above all, he makes cold, calculating Holmes…human. Sure, he keeps mentioning that Holmes despises feelings and what-not but at the same time, the clear bromance that ties the two guys together -- their mutual friendship and respect --really speaks well of both of them as sympathetic, cool human beings. Watson also manages to bring out the passionate side of Holmes' supremely intellectual work.

Watson provides a frame for each story: an introductory series of paragraphs sketching some dialogue with Holmes, or setting the scene of the investigation. His narration doesn't wander off into passages of thick description very often, which makes their impact all the more powerful when he does.

The focus of each story is on solving a central problem, and that means there's suspense, and there's resolution. So, it's probably not a shock to many of you that detective stories usually end with, you know, the solution to a mystery. That's part of the pleasure of reading them in the first place! Something that's kind of interesting about Doyle's endings though, is that the solution is not always accompanied by legal punishment. Like, a satisfying conclusion to a “Bones” episode would be an arrest, right? Or “Law and Order” and its spinoffs are all about convicting the criminals they track down. Holmes though, is a private detective above all, and because he is not part of an official police force, he gets some choice in how things are handled once he's solved a case. He's more interested in fairness than in observing bureaucratic technicalities. As our parents have told us time and time again, “life isn't fair.” But, by the end of a good Holmes story, you feel like it can be. The good are rewarded, the bad punished and each man gets what he deserves.

If these are somehow not enough to convince you that Sherlock Holmes is worth caring about, let me add that the bromance is top notch in these stories!

“Some people without possessing genius have a remarkable power of stimulating it. ”

--The Hound of the Baskervilles

Sherlock and John restored my faith in (platonic) love. I hope I will be as excited to spend time with my friends fifteen years down the line as these two seem to be during their later adventures. The guys may not be romantic partners in the least, but they are life partners --and I must admit, reading about their adventures left me a little choked up! ...more
5

Oct 07, 2016

I have no idea how I let myself get so long in the tooth before finally settling down and reading this collection. Suffice to say I am glad I finally came to my senses.

It is all here, every Sherlock Holmes story ever penned by Arthur Conan Doyle. There are four complete novels and five books of case studies. Relax I am not going to even attempt to review every one of these. That would be tedious for me as well as you.

There is no doubt that my hands down favourite of the entire collection was The I have no idea how I let myself get so long in the tooth before finally settling down and reading this collection.  Suffice to say I am glad I finally came to my senses.

It is all here, every Sherlock Holmes story ever penned by Arthur Conan Doyle.  There are four complete novels and five books of case studies.  Relax I am not going to even attempt to review every one of these.  That would be tedious for me as well as you.

There is no doubt that my hands down favourite of the entire collection was The Hound of the Baskervilles, but make no mistake I loved it all.

According to Goodreads I started reading this collection on June 23 of this year and I am just now able to close off my review.  With the exception of the novels which I read straight through once I had started them, the balance of the case files I read in between other books.  I must say I truly enjoyed this approach and looked forward to dropping in to see what Sherlock was up to every now and again.  

Sadly all good things must come to an end.  It was however an experience I shall never forget and I shall certainly miss Watson and Holmes.  I may have to go back and pay them a visit again sometime.   ...more
3

Aug 16, 2018

Most of the stories are similar to one another, but it was nice to read about old England. In my opinion the novels are better than the shorts since Doyle had the opportunity to expand the story into other areas which gave depth and breadth to the stories.
5

Oct 25, 2016

Most people in the world know who is Sherlock Holmes as the matter of fact, he is one of the most popular fictional characters.

'The Complete stories of Sherlock Holmes with original illustrations the 'strand' magazine'.

4 novels:

'A Study in Scarlet'
'The Sign of the Four'
'The Hound of the Baskervilles'
'The Valley of Fear'

5 books of 56 short stories:

'The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes':
'A Scandal in Bohenia'
'The Red-Headed League'
'A Case of Identity'
'The Boscombe Valley Mystery'
'The Five Orange Most people in the world know who is Sherlock Holmes as the matter of fact, he is one of the most popular fictional characters.

'The Complete stories of Sherlock Holmes with original illustrations the 'strand' magazine'.

4 novels:

'A Study in Scarlet'
'The Sign of the Four'
'The Hound of the Baskervilles'
'The Valley of Fear'

5 books of 56 short stories:

'The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes':
'A Scandal in Bohenia'
'The Red-Headed League'
'A Case of Identity'
'The Boscombe Valley Mystery'
'The Five Orange Pips'
'The Man with the Twisted Lip'
'The Blue Carbunde'
'The Speckled Band'
'The Engineer's Thumb'
'The Noble Bachelor'
'The Beryl Coronet'
'The Copper Beeches'

'The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes':
'Silver Blaze'
'The Yellow Face'
'The Stockbroker's Clerk'
'The Gloria Scott'
'The Reigate Squires'
'The Crooked Man'
'The Resident Patient'
'The Greek Interpreter'
'The Naval Treaty'
'The Final Problem'

'The Return of Sherlock Holmes':
'The Empty House'
'The Norwood Builder'
'The Dancing Men'
'The Solitary Cyclist'
'The Priory School'
'Black Peter'
'Charles Augustus Milverton'
'The Six Napoleons'
'The Three Students'
'The Golden Pince-Nez'
'The Missing Three-Quarter'
'The Abbey Grange'
'The Second Stain'

'His Last Bow':
'Wisteria Lodge'
'The Cardboard Box'
'The Red Circle'
'The Bruce-Partington Plans'
'The Dying Detective'
'The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax'
'The Devil's Foot'
'His Last Bow'

'The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes':
'The Mazarin Stone'
'The Problem of Thor Bridge'
'The Creeping Man'
'The Sussex Vampire'
'The Three Garridebs'
'The Illustrious Client'
'The Three Gables'
'The Blanched Soldier'
'The Lion Mane'
'The Retired Colourman'
'The Veiled Lodger'
'Shoscombe Old Place'

31st August-1st September 2015

'A Study in Scarlet'

I love this story. There are lots of twists. Alhamdulillah!

11 October-18 October 2015

'The Sign of the Four'

It is a very good story. Alhamdulillah!

22 October-25 October 2015

'The Hound of the Baskervilles'

It is a stupendous story! Alhamdulillah! I thought 'The Hound of Baskervilles' is spooky story.

12 November-22 November 2015

'The Valley of Fear'

It is a brilliant story Alhamdulillah!

5th December 2015-4 March 2016

'The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes'

I have taken a long break from reading this story. AlhamdulIllah, I love it! These twelve short stories are awesome!

7th March 2016-9th March 2016

'The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes'

Alhamdulillah! These stories were atupendous stories I love it!

13th March 2016-17th March 2016

'The Return of Sherlock Holmes'

These stories are awesome! Alhamdulillah!

8th April 2016-9th April 2016

'His Last Bow'

These stories are fantastic stories! Alhamdulillah!

9th April 2016-10 April

'The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes'

These stories are very good. Alhamdulillah!

in the conclusion, It has taken me to finish read this book between seven and eight months. All of the novels and short stories of The Complete of Sherlock Holmes are stupendous Alhamdulillah! I am really enjoyed reading this book.

My name is Sherlock Holmes and the address is 221B Baker Street. ...more
4

Aug 28, 2011

So, I'm now done with reading this whole 2-volume 1,796-page Sherlock Holmes canon. I spent 10 months reading all the 4 novels and 56 short stories contained herein.

I really liked the experience and I am proud of this accomplishment. My first time to read a canon. Before reading this, I thought that the word canon only applied to biblical works. Well, that was the first thing I learned upon adding this book in my currently-reading folder.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote in a classy classic manner So, I'm now done with reading this whole 2-volume 1,796-page Sherlock Holmes canon. I spent 10 months reading all the 4 novels and 56 short stories contained herein.

I really liked the experience and I am proud of this accomplishment. My first time to read a canon. Before reading this, I thought that the word canon only applied to biblical works. Well, that was the first thing I learned upon adding this book in my currently-reading folder.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote in a classy classic manner and even if his settings were not familiar to me as a Filipino, I appreciated his stories because of the universal messages in them: love of a husband to a wife, a son to a father, a father to his child, etc; the evil in greed especially when it comes to riches and money; that men can be truly friends without homosexuality getting in-between; that we have to respect the people we work with; always be wary of the people around you; and that, if used in moderation, cocaine and morphine can actually make you sharper. I cringed while typing the last one.

So, what are my takeaways from Sherlock Holmes? There are three:1. Logical reasoning. He is a keen observer. In almost every company I joined with, there is a safety program and one of the things they teach in the training is to stop and closely look up, down, left, right, front, back for every thing that we see that can cause an accident. I think that if all of us in the company will have that power of keen observation, all factories will have zero unsafe incidents. Not only that, because Holmes has that keen observation, he uses those things that he sees to link them to his hypotheses and when he applies his knowledge in forensics (having a background on medicine), to the things he observes, it results to his power of deduction.

2. Ability to disguise. I am still to see any Sherlock Holmes television episodes or movies but this one makes the story unbelievable for a middle age man like me but interesting enough to engage me while reading. Sherlock Holmes can be anybody: a pheasant, a woman, an old man, a soldier, a dead person, etc. Not only that, some of his characters put disguises too. This fantasy element in the story is entertaining in my mind but it is the least in terms of the practical application of what I learned from Sherlock Holmes. For one, I could not freaking imagine myself dressed like a woman.

3. Forensic skills. From the first few pages of the A Study in Scarlet when the very young Sherlock Holmes told Dr. Watson how to detect blood from the scene, I was mesmerized. Oh, I thought I knew it from my medical technology readings way back 3 decades ago. However, I am not practicing that profession so at times I already forget what I learned before. Sir Conan Doyle really puts his passion into each novel and short story because he incorporated what he learned from medical books but even history, travel and other sciences such as anthropology, handwriting analysis, weaponry, zoology and botany (I still remember the giant jellyfish). He must have been a very well-read gentlemen.My favorite novel of course is The Hound of the Baskervilles followed by The Sign of Four. My top 10 favorite stories are below. Interestingly, while typing this, I checked a website and all, except #1, of my choices are not among the Top 12 Sherlockians' choices haha.1.The Final Problem (Memoirs) - 5 stars
2. His Last Bow (Last Bow) - 5 stars
3. The Adventure of the Retired Colourman (Case Book) - 5 stars
4. The Five Orange Pips (Adventures) - 4 stars
5. The Copper Beeches (Adventures) - 4 stars
6. The Naval Treaty (Memoirs) - 4 stars
7. The Adventure of the Empty House (Return) - 4 stars
8. The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton (Return) - 4 stars
9. The Adventure of the Three Students (Return) - 4 stars
10. The Adventure of the Devil's Foot (Last Bow) - 4 starsMaybe I am just strange but I always enjoy stories that either "speak" to me or at least "surprise" me.

Anyway, I will definitely miss Sherlock Holmes. But I have to move on to Samuel Beckett. ...more
4

Sep 20, 2011

For the Celebrity Death Match Review Tournament, Le Petit Prince (14) versus The Complete Sherlock Holmes (19)

It was some time during the summer of 19__ that I received an urgent telegram from Holmes. Arriving at 221B, Baker Street, I was struck by how little he had changed. He was older, to be sure; but his eye was as keen as ever, and his enthusiasm not one whit abated by the passage of the years.

"I trust you have brought your passport, Watson?" he said, in lieu of greeting. "We depart for For the Celebrity Death Match Review Tournament, Le Petit Prince (14) versus The Complete Sherlock Holmes (19)

It was some time during the summer of 19__ that I received an urgent telegram from Holmes. Arriving at 221B, Baker Street, I was struck by how little he had changed. He was older, to be sure; but his eye was as keen as ever, and his enthusiasm not one whit abated by the passage of the years.

"I trust you have brought your passport, Watson?" he said, in lieu of greeting. "We depart for Algeria this evening. The cab will be here momentarily."

"But Holmes!" I protested, as he hurried me down the stairs. "What -"

"We can discuss that once we are on the train," replied Holmes firmly. And, true to his word, he said no more until we were comfortably ensconced in the First Class carriage of the Dover Express.

"Now, Watson," said Holmes, after he had carefully packed and lit his pipe, "I wonder if you have heard of a young Frenchman called Saint-E_____. An author and aviator."

The rest of this review is available elsewhere (the location cannot be given for Goodreads policy reasons)

...more
5

Feb 24, 2008

I was so sad when I finished this book. Nothing new to read ever again about Sherlock Holmes ... hmmmm *sigh*
5

Apr 28, 2011

I can't remember how often I've read and reread this book collection. More than 20 times since elementary school. Literally the only book that never quit on me, and it was a used book I picked up for 10 cents. Sherlock was my first crush I guess. Even now I simply cannot be objective on any level in regards to this character. It's probably a good thing I moved on to the Man From U.N.C.L.E. Well, maybe not.
5

Oct 07, 2008

I don't know if anyone else does this, but in times of stress or when I have exceptional trouble falling asleep, I find myself re-reading a favorite book. One of these used to be my complete Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series but alas, it *is* in fact possible to read those books too many times. Lately this book has been the Complete Sherlock Holmes.

What amazes me the most about these stories is that, despite having read through the entire collection a number of times, I seem to find I don't know if anyone else does this, but in times of stress or when I have exceptional trouble falling asleep, I find myself re-reading a favorite book. One of these used to be my complete Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series but alas, it *is* in fact possible to read those books too many times. Lately this book has been the Complete Sherlock Holmes.

What amazes me the most about these stories is that, despite having read through the entire collection a number of times, I seem to find something new each time I read it. Knowing the solution to the mysteries, doesn't seem to diminish the excitement at getting to Holmes' big reveal each time. The characters of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson become character studies, making you long for the little tidbits that provide more insight into their inner workings.

This time around I took the time to look up some of the odder Victorian words and thereby expanded my vocabulary with words like shaw (a small wood or thicket), chandler (a retailer of provisions) and extravasate (to force out from the proper vessels, as blood, so as to diffuse through the surrounding tissues).

There are other details that seem impossible to not notice: the fact that, despite Holmes and Watson being clearly hetersexual, their relationship is nevertheless odd, that Holmes was a high-functioning autistic (Asperger's, my guess), and that Watson was a terrible doctor, seeing as how he treated every patient with brandy regardless of their ailment.

But it is indeed these quirks that make the characters seem more real, and make the tales and deductions that much more enjoyable. ...more
5

Apr 03, 2017

One sentence until I turn up with a more powerful review :

5

Mar 14, 2019

I love Sherlock, and it was great to finally read the collection all the way through. : )
4

Jan 03, 2018

*My overall rating is 4.5 stars for the entire bind up. I do list each story and my rating individually, as well as my average rating for each collection.*

A Study in Scarlet : 4 stars

The Sign of the Four : 4.5 stars

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes : 3.9 stars
-"A Scandal in Bohemia": 4 stars
-"The Red-Headed League": 3.5 stars
-"A Case of Identity": 4.5 stars
-"The Boscombe Valley Mystery": 5 stars
-"The Five Orange Pips": 4 stars
-"The Man with the Twisted Lip": 3.75 stars
-"The Blue Carbuncle": *My overall rating is 4.5 stars for the entire bind up. I do list each story and my rating individually, as well as my average rating for each collection.*

A Study in Scarlet : 4 stars

The Sign of the Four : 4.5 stars

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes : 3.9 stars
-"A Scandal in Bohemia": 4 stars
-"The Red-Headed League": 3.5 stars
-"A Case of Identity": 4.5 stars
-"The Boscombe Valley Mystery": 5 stars
-"The Five Orange Pips": 4 stars
-"The Man with the Twisted Lip": 3.75 stars
-"The Blue Carbuncle": 3.5 stars
-"The Speckled Band": 3 stars
-"The Engineer's Thumb": 4 stars
-"The Noble Bachelor": 4.5 stars
-"The Beryl Coronet": 3.5 stars
-"The Copper Beeches": 4 stars

The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes : 3.6 stars
-"Silver Blaze": 3 stars
-"The Yellow Face": 3.5 stars
-"The Stockbroker's Clerk": 3.5 stars
-"The Gloria Scott": 3 stars
-"The Musgrave Ritual": 4.5 stars
-"The Reigate Squire": 3 stars
-"The Crooked Man": 3 stars
-"The Resident Patient": 4 stars
-"The Greek Interpreter": 4.5 stars
-"The Naval Treaty": 4 stars
-"The Final Problem": 4 stars

The Return of Sherlock Holmes : 3.2 stars
-"The Empty House": 3 stars
-"The Norwood Builder": 3 stars
-"The Dancing Men": 4 stars
-"The Solitary Cyclist": 3.5 stars
-"The Priory School": 4.25 stars
-"Black Peter": 3.75 stars
-"Charles Augustus Milverton": 3.5 stars
-"The Six Napoleons": 3.75 stars
-"The Three Students": 3.25 stars
-"The Golden Pince-Nez": 3 stars
-"The Missing Three-Quarter": 3.25 stars
-"The Abbey Grange": 3.5 stars
-"The Second Stain": 3.25 stars

The Hound of the Baskervilles : 4.5 stars

The Valley of Fear : 3.5 stars

His Last Bow : 3.6 stars
-"Wisteria Lodge": 3.75 stars
-"The Cardboard Box": 4 stars
-"The Red Circle": 3.75 stars
-"The Bruce-Partington Plans": 3.25 stars
-"The Dying Detective": 3 stars
-"The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax": 3 stars
-"The Devil's Foot": 3.5 stars
-"His Last Bow": 4.25 stars

The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes : 3.9 stars
-"The Illustrious Client": 3.75 stars
-"The Blanched Soldier": 3.75 stars
-"The Mazarin Stones": 4 stars
-"The Three Gables": 3.75 stars
-"The Sussex Vampire": 4.5 stars
-"The Three Garridebs": 3.75 stars
-"Thor Bridge": 4.25 stars
-"The Creeping Man": 3.75 stars
-"The Lion's Mane": 3.75 stars
-"The Veiled Lodger": 4 stars
-"Shoscombe Old Place": 3.75 stars
-"The Retired Colourman": 3.5 stars

Average Rating Overall: 4.3 stars - rounded up to a 4.5 stars


This was a great collection of short stories and novels (novellas?). It had its ups and downs, but overall I really enjoyed my time reading this massive bind up of the entire series. ...more
0

Apr 06, 2013

My impression of what a Sherlock Holmes' story is actually like.

I came down to breakfast one morning to find my dear friend, Sherlock Holmes disembowelling a gerbil with a teaspoon.

"My dear Holmes," said I, "is that really necessary?"

Barely glancing up from his gruesome task, he told me that it was. "You see, Watson," he continued, "there is matter that I believe may soon become illuminated not only to you but the whole of London society."

"Good God, Holmes!" I cried. "Whatever is this?"

"Have My impression of what a Sherlock Holmes' story is actually like.

I came down to breakfast one morning to find my dear friend, Sherlock Holmes disembowelling a gerbil with a teaspoon.

"My dear Holmes," said I, "is that really necessary?"

Barely glancing up from his gruesome task, he told me that it was. "You see, Watson," he continued, "there is matter that I believe may soon become illuminated not only to you but the whole of London society."

"Good God, Holmes!" I cried. "Whatever is this?"

"Have patience, Watson," returned he. "You will understand directly."

Two days later, I came down to breakfast to discover my dear friend, Sherlock Holmes, dressed as a goldfish.

"Ah Watson," he greeted me. "You remember the matter we spoke of the other day?"

"I do, Holmes, I do!"

"Well, it is even darker and more disturbing than even I at first realised."

The next day, I came down to breakfast to discover my friend lying disconsolately among the bacon.

"Are you quite well, Holmes?" I enquired.

"I have solved the case, Watson." He sat up, brushing a fried egg from the lapel of his dressing gown. "Allow me to elucidate."

By which I mean, everything happens very statically and in a quintessentially Victorian way.

Holmes is a prick and Watson is a sycophant. The theory of deductive is bobbins and I feel genuinely sorry for Lestrade.

However ... this is motherfucking Sherlock Holmes.

And I enjoy the hell out of it. Maybe precisely because it is completely stupid. ...more
4

May 30, 2016

Phew… I finished this whole thing in twelve days (except for The Hound of the Baskervilles which I had read before). I was in a very restless mood while reading and couldn’t stop. The focus, precision and energy of the stories kept me alert throughout and I never tired. As soon as I finished a story I was immediately hungry for more. I think the stories actually gained something by being consumed in succession in a short time. It made me aware of the structure of the stories, about similarities Phew… I finished this whole thing in twelve days (except for The Hound of the Baskervilles which I had read before). I was in a very restless mood while reading and couldn’t stop. The focus, precision and energy of the stories kept me alert throughout and I never tired. As soon as I finished a story I was immediately hungry for more. I think the stories actually gained something by being consumed in succession in a short time. It made me aware of the structure of the stories, about similarities and patterns, and also about the relation between the original stories and the multitude of adaptations out there. Inevitably you come to these stories with a lot of preconceptions. What struck me the most was how close many of the adaptations are to the original stories. Even those that turn them into adventure stories aren’t that far off the mark. After all, Holmes has some real swashbuckling potential as both an able fencer and a boxer, this is contradicted, though, by his view of himself as a brain, the rest being mere appendix. ...more
5

Jan 15, 2013

Jan. 15, 2013: I received this as a gift when I was 20 years old. I had already read it but I must have read again, because the cover wore off. I tucked the front and back piece of the cover in the back of the book, and that's how I know it was this edition. I loved Sherlock Holmes. I own a Sherlock Holmes sweatshirt at this very time.

I also liked Arthur & George by Julian Barnes, which was about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

Added after I saw one of my friends was going to read Sherlock Holmes.
I Jan. 15, 2013: I received this as a gift when I was 20 years old. I had already read it but I must have read again, because the cover wore off. I tucked the front and back piece of the cover in the back of the book, and that's how I know it was this edition. I loved Sherlock Holmes. I own a Sherlock Holmes sweatshirt at this very time.

I also liked Arthur & George by Julian Barnes, which was about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

Added after I saw one of my friends was going to read Sherlock Holmes.
I see Goodreads is showing an ISBN for this edition. It must have been added later.

Aug. 14, 2014 update: There had been ongoing problems dealing with the Conan Doyle estate, now resolved. Who knew?
More info at http://free-sherlock.com/

Aug. 20, 2014 update: In reading Steven Pinker about the romanticized and favorable views of war that prevailed for most of history, I discovered that even the fictional Sherlock Holmes was part of the culturally accepted insanity of the WWI era re war's being necessary and desirable. His creator had him say, "It will be cold and bitter, Watson, and a good many of us may wither before its blast. But it's God's own wind none the less, and a cleaner, better, stronger land will lie in the sunshine when the storm has cleared" (The Last Bow). ...more
5

Nov 02, 2017

This book is nothing short of brilliant.

Arthur Conan Doyle is a master writer; there never was a dull moment in every story, and there are only a handful of characters that I would love as dearly as I love Sherlock and Watson.
3

Jan 13, 2018

I'M DONE! I'M FINALLY DONE. I'M FREAKING DONE YAYYYY. IT TOOK ME ABOUT 8 1/2 MONTHS OF SLAVING AWAY AND I AM SO HAPPY THAT I AM FREED OF THIS BURDEN. YOU CAN'T IMAGINE HOW FRUSTRATED I WAS WITH MY SLOW PROGRESS, BUT I JUST DECIDED TO PUSH THROUGH AND FINISHED IT ONCE AND FOR ALL.

Look, I don't hate this book! Of course not. But like all story collections, it contains Good stories, Marvelous stories, Dull stories and Awful stories. So I am giving it an overall rating of 3 stars (Plus it took me I'M DONE! I'M FINALLY DONE. I'M FREAKING DONE YAYYYY. IT TOOK ME ABOUT 8 1/2 MONTHS OF SLAVING AWAY AND I AM SO HAPPY THAT I AM FREED OF THIS BURDEN. YOU CAN'T IMAGINE HOW FRUSTRATED I WAS WITH MY SLOW PROGRESS, BUT I JUST DECIDED TO PUSH THROUGH AND FINISHED IT ONCE AND FOR ALL.

Look, I don't hate this book! Of course not. But like all story collections, it contains Good stories, Marvelous stories, Dull stories and Awful stories. So I am giving it an overall rating of 3 stars (Plus it took me so long to read.)

By the second volume I really couldn't care less, which discouraged me from reading anymore. I :) seriously :) didn't :) give :) a :) crap. SO I HAD TO FORCE MYSELF TO FINISH IT AH.

The first part was much better than the second and my honest opinion is that there are too many Sherlock Holmes stories. A lot of them seemed similar to each other, awfully so. I could feel that sometimes Doyle had run out of plot ideas and was reusing old ones (or so it felt like).

Overall this was really good! And some of the stories were indeed great and well crafted and some were very boring and stupid.

I'm still so mad at how long this took me to read!!!! I don't do that, I literally don't read books over the span of more than 3 months. I am a speedy reader and this collection should have taken me about 3 months to complete?!? But it was so slow........ ...more
5

August 14, 2016

It is very good book and a very famous book I loved it very much
4

Dec 29, 2016

It took a while, but I have finally finished this huge book. I am both glad and a little sad that it ended, I really enjoyed reading these stories, I like Sherlock and Watson very much and also I liked that the cases weren't all about murders. There were a variety of problems in which Sherlock Holmes was asked to help.

I rated each individual story below.

A study in scarlet - 4/5

The sign of the four - 4/5

The hound of the Baskervilles 5/5

The valley of fear 3/5

The adventures of Sherlock Holmes
- A It took a while, but I have finally finished this huge book. I am both glad and a little sad that it ended, I really enjoyed reading these stories, I like Sherlock and Watson very much and also I liked that the cases weren't all about murders. There were a variety of problems in which Sherlock Holmes was asked to help.

I rated each individual story below.

A study in scarlet - 4/5

The sign of the four - 4/5

The hound of the Baskervilles 5/5

The valley of fear 3/5

The adventures of Sherlock Holmes
- A scandal in Bohemia 3/5
- The red headed league 4/5
- A case of identity 4/5
- The Boscombe Valley Mystery 4/5
- The Five Orange Pips 5/5
- The Man with the Twisted Lip 4/5
- The Blue Carbuncle 5/5
- The Speckled Band 5/5
- The Engineer's Thumb 4/5
- The Noble Bachelor 4/5
- The Beryl Coronet 4/5
- The Copper Beeches 5/5

The memoirs of Sherlock Holmes
- Silver Blaze 3/5
- The Yellow Face 4/5
- The Stock-Broker's Clerk 4/5
- The "Gloria Scott" 4/5
- The Musgrave Ritual 4/5
- The Reigate Squires 5/5
- The Crooked Man 4/5
- The Resident Patient 4/5
- The Greek Interpreter 5/5
- The Naval Treaty 5/5
- The Final Problem 3/5

The return of Sherlock Holmes
- The Empty House 4/5
- The Norwood Builder 5/5
- The Dancing Men 5/5
- The Solitary Cyclist 4/5
- The Priory School 4/5
- Black Peter 3/5
- Charles Augustus Milverton 5/5
- The Six Napoleons 4/5
- The Three Students 3/5
- The Golden Prince-Nez 3/5
- The Missing Three-Quarter 3/5
- The Abbey Grange 4/5
- The Second Stain 3/5

His last bow
- Wisteria Lodge 3/5
- The Cardboard Box 3/5
- The Red Circle 4/5
- The Bruce-Partington Plans 5/5
- The Dying Detective 4/5
- The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax 4/5
- The Devil's Foot 4/5
- His Last Bow 5/5

The casebook of Sherlock Holmes
- The Illustrious Client 5/5
- The Blanched Soldier 4/5
- The Mazarin Stone 5/5
- The Three Gables 3/5
- The Sussex Vampire 4/5
- The Three Garridebs 4/5
- Thor Bridge 5/5
- The Creeping Man 3/5
- The Lion's Mane 4/5
- The Veiled Lodger 4/5
- Shoscombe Old Place 3/5
- The Retired Colourman 5/5

Overall, I really enjoyed reading this book and one day I actually see myself rereading it. Would recommend!
------------------------------------
Asta e o carte care mi s-a părut destul de intimidantă înainte să încep să o citesc. Pentru că e scrisă acum destul de mult timp și pentru că am decis să o citesc în original, în engleză. Am găsit volumul ăsta, care conține toate poveștile cu Sherlock Holmes, în 2016 și nu am putut să rezist. Dar, spre surprinderea mea, această carte a fost chiar foarte citibilă. În afară de faptul că din când în când trebuia să îmi amintesc în ce perioadă se desfășoară poveștile, nu am întâmpinat nicio problemă în timp ce o citeam.

Am vrut să o citesc după ce am văzut serialul făcut de BBC, Sherlock, iar acum chiar mă bucur că am citit poveștile originale. Acum, cartea asta, cu tot cu cele patru romane, conține șaizeci de povești diferite, deci voi vorbi despre acestă carte la modul general. Cred că toată lumea știe cine este personajul.

Sunt două lucruri care m-au suprins, făcând comparația dintre această carte și serial. Cele două personaje care îi pun probleme lui Holmes în serial și care mie mi-au plăcut foarte mult, anume Iren Adler și Moriarty, nu prea apar în cartea asta. Adler apare într-o singură poveste, iar Moriarty în una singură, deși cred că mai este menționat în vreo două alte povești. Asta mi s-a părut un pic dezamăgitor, având în vedere mai ales faptul că Moriarty mereu e portretizat ca cel mai dificil inamic a lui Holmes. Dar asta are a face cu percepția mea din cauza filmelor și serialului și nu are legătură cu volumul de față.

Ce mi-a plăcut foarte mult e că nu toate cazurile de care se ocupă Holmes sunt crime. Sunt și genul acela de povești, destul de multe aș zice, dar sunt și alte tipuri de cazuri. Nu o să dau spoilere, voiam doar să zic că mi-a plăcut că există o varietate de cazuri, iar poveștile nu devin foarte repetitive. Câteva spre final tind să semene un pic cu unele dinainte, dar sunt totuși suficiente deosebiri cât să nu mă pot plânge foarte tare. Unele povești mi-au plăcut mai mult ca altele, dar per total calitatea lor mi se pare destul de constantă pe parcursul volumului.

Cât despre personaje, Sherlock și Watson mi s-au părut geniali! Mi-a plăcut să văd cum s-au întâlnit pentru prima dată în A study in scarlet și apoi să îi urmăresc rezolvând cazuri împreună. Poveștile nu sunt neapărat în ordine cronologică, se mai revine la evenimente din trecut, dar per total cred că se poate urmări modul cum evoluează relația lor. Ce mi s-a părut un pic ciudat a fost faptul că soția lui Watson, Mary, deși e introdusă în unul din cele patru romane de la început, nu prea e prezentă în restul cărții, doar mai e menționată din când în când.

Per total, eu chiar aș recomanda această carte, sau orice altă colecție cu poveștile lui Sherlock Holmes, mai ales dacă vă place Agatha Christie. Dintre cei doi autori, chiar prefer poveștile lui Doyle, sunt un pic mai palpitante decât ce am citit de Agatha Christie până acum, deși și cărțile ei îmi plac. ...more
5

Jun 05, 2008

What first got me hooked on reading.
[That sounds corny, like 'Hooked on Phonics' or something...]
Either way, I found a seriously abridged and illustrated version of a few stories when I was in 3rd grade. And I've never looked back. Hands down my favorite reads ever.
3

Dec 07, 2015

As it turns out, I don't like Sherlock Holmes very much. The idea? Some of the writing? The kernel of the character and Watson and 221B and Mrs. Hudson and so on?

Absolutely. Holmes himself and his mysteries?

Oh, God.

I'm sure it was in some small part down to the fact that I listened to the entire blessed Holmes canon in an Audible "Complete" edition. I was happy about it, because it was narrated by Simon Vance, who has done such a magnificent job voicing Holmes in sequels by other authors. As it turns out, I don't like Sherlock Holmes very much. The idea? Some of the writing? The kernel of the character and Watson and 221B and Mrs. Hudson and so on?

Absolutely. Holmes himself and his mysteries?

Oh, God.

I'm sure it was in some small part down to the fact that I listened to the entire blessed Holmes canon in an Audible "Complete" edition. I was happy about it, because it was narrated by Simon Vance, who has done such a magnificent job voicing Holmes in sequels by other authors. And I can in no way fault the audio. Simon Vance was excellent (except when he tried to sound American). The production was dandy. It just … seemed… endless.

And apparently I had never read some of the canon before. I was under the impression I had, but I can state for fact that when suddenly "A Study in Scarlet" wandered off (for an eternity) into what was supposed to be the American Wild West… put it this way: if I had been reading this in print I would have been constantly checking the number of pages until the story got back to where it should be, Victorian London. It wasn't terrible – but dear lord was I uninterested.

Then it happened again in "The Valley of Fear" – in some ways, almost identically: good man mixed up in a cult of heartless killers, but prevails to win the love of his woman – and I thought I'd lose my mind. Again, it might not have been so bad on paper, but listening to these two stories set in a poorly imagined and (I love you, Simon Vance, but) rather horribly accented America was stultifying. Too-late note to all the dead British authors I've been reading lately: all Americans didn't speak like that. (And, particularly, black Americans did not speak like that.)

The biggest thing I find I do not like about Sherlock Holmes, the canon, is… Sherlock Holmes. I lost track of how many times listening to these stories that I muttered "You bitch!" under my breath. He is an obnoxious piece of work, Holmes is. Yes, of course he's brilliant. Yes, of course he is capable of levels of observation that most people are not. Know how I know this? BECAUSE HE TOLD ME. Over and over. Usually in the context of pointing out to someone either how pathetically inferior a third party was – or, often, pointing out to someone how pathetically inferior THEY were. Tact? Not Holmes's strong suit. To put it mildly. In fact, by the end of this long slog I decided that Holmes's strongest character trait was not his skill at observation or deduction but his pure hubris.

He swans through these stories pointing out how he has developed his skills by working at them and honing them – and then constantly uses that as a brickbat with which to pummel those around him, especially the police, and most especially Watson. Modern adaptations aside, as I listened to his arrogance in his dealings with the police I kept picturing him in the setting of a modern non-Holmes adaptation cop show. Ever seen the tv show Blue Bloods? I'm picturing Donny Wahlberg's character faced with Holmes's high-handedness and insistence on primacy and contempt for everyone operating at a lower level. (Try it – it's funny.)

And, in the end, it hit me: where exactly did all this much-touted supremacy get him? If these tales purportedly selected by Watson are the choicest among Holmes's non-classified cases, I'm … not impressed. Where Holmes's gifts seem to be most showcased is in his introductions to clients and police, and in showing off for the always admiring Watson: you came in on this train, you have a medium-sized dog, you play the harpsichord. But his case track record … isn't great, is it? I don't have the time or energy to run down the list to make an accurate count, but I was astonished at the number of cases in which Holmes's client does not survive the story. It seemed to happen over and over – nice young man comes to 221B, frantic and afraid; Holmes tells him all about himself before letting him tell his story, during which Holmes acts bored; Holmes tells him that yes, there is some interest in your story, I'll get around to it in a day or two, keep me posted on developments; young man goes off reassured that the great man is on the case (rather than utterly pissed off over the way he's been treated), and shortly dies. Then and only then does Holmes descend from his ivory tower to find the killer.

Then there were a surprising number of cases in which Holmes does not actually contribute that much to discovering the solution to the mystery. Facts emerge independently of anything he does, or someone confesses, and he stands back nodding smugly – he knew that.

And even in the cases where he does put his finger on the Bad Guys … they have a terrible tendency to get away. Of course, in those cases the finger of justice smooshes them like bugs – their ships sink or they otherwise pay the Ultimate Penalty.

All in all, though, the main reason I dislike Holmes is his treatment of Watson. Dr. John Watson is a man who served his country in war, was wounded, became a physician good enough to build a booming practice … but when he is around Sherlock Holmes he is like a bullied child anxious not to be left out. Holmes abuses him regularly. He consistently denigrates Watson's "little pieces", which he writes to glorify his friend (and possibly for a few extra pounds, but the only reason he ever mentions is that he wants to publicize his friend's abilities); they are ill-written, unnecessary, concentrate on all the wrong things, and really he doesn't want publicity, he works for the sake of the work. But he obviously preens himself over the praise, and it sure felt like when Watson gave up the writing Holmes was a little put out. Oh, and then of course after years of Watson saying "Well, fine, write 'em yourself", Holmes finally does – and spends a good deal of time saying how Watson would have done it better. (Ah, but did he ever say that to Watson? Pfft.)

In several cases Holmes sends Watson off to gather information. And the good doctor works his stolid behind off trying to follow Holmes's methods and cover every base. Only for Holmes to tell him A) a blindfolded chimpanzee could have done better, but B) that's okay because Holmes did it himself anyway. In some of these situations Watson was taking time away from his wife and his medical practice to oblige his friend – because any time his friend crooked a finger said medical practice and wife dwindled in importance – and the whole time was wasting his time.

The last point in this part of my rant is a large part of the "love" in my love-hate relationship with BBC's "Sherlock". Holmes disappeared two years ago, allowing the world – and Watson – to believe he was dead. And he pops up at John's side in a ridiculous disguise, and expects his old sidekick to be nothing but happy. In the tv episode, John knocks him down. And I couldn't agree more. For two years – two years – starting on that very first day the "Reichenbach Fall" happened – Holmes has left his best (only) friend to grieve, and grieve he does, book and tv series. On tv he sees a counselor. In the stories he just eats his heart out, replaying if-onlys. And the reason he is left in pain for two years? The same reason Holmes didn't share vital information with him other times: in the great detective's opinion Watson is not a good enough actor/liar to pull off a situation where he knows the truth. And okay, I get it: Holmes was in danger, and playing dead seems to have been necessary. But – really? "I almost told you but I figured you'd blow it"? I'd like to pop him in the nose myself. ("I have given you a serious shock by my unnecessarily dramatic reappearance." And suddenly Sherlock Holmes morphs into Captain Obvious.)

The phrase "healthy relationship" was not in common usage in the late 1890's and early 1900's. This relationship? Isn't healthy.

(However, I begin to understand where all the 'shippers come from. "Intimacy" had a different tenor then, but Watson does say it an awful lot. And Holmes does seem to grab his hand, put his hands on the doctor's knees, and whisk his friend off into dark corners an awful lot. The Empty House: "Holmes's cold, thin fingers closed round my wrist and led me forwards down a long hall … There was no lamp near and the window was thick with dust, so that we could only just discern each other's figures within. My companion put his hand upon my shoulder and his lips close to my ear." That's a quote that launched a thousand 'ships.)

Something else that stuck with me all through the stories: all of these illustrious clients come to Holmes, requiring utmost confidentiality … with Watson sitting there to the side taking notes?

Now that it's (finally) over, now that I've (finally) listened to all the stories… I feel a little like the child at the end of The Emperor's New Clothes: "But…" Holmes isn't naked, but pretty close, and spinning some tassels and waving some feathery fans to distract the reader.

And I wholeheartedly apologize for that image, especially to anyone with Jeremy Brett or Basil Rathbone as the Holmes in their head. Cumberbatch fans probably enjoy it.
...more
5

Jan 29, 2012

My first review... Well then... Let's get to it.

There are many things about Sherlock Holmes stories that I find to be brilliant but I will discuss only three in this review so as not to make it too long.

The first is that Holmes is actually as brilliant as his reputation would have everyone believe. Something that I find extremely annoying in fiction is when a character has a reputation for being a fantastic investigator or for being great at something else but they never do anything to prove My first review... Well then... Let's get to it.

There are many things about Sherlock Holmes stories that I find to be brilliant but I will discuss only three in this review so as not to make it too long.

The first is that Holmes is actually as brilliant as his reputation would have everyone believe. Something that I find extremely annoying in fiction is when a character has a reputation for being a fantastic investigator or for being great at something else but they never do anything to prove themselves worthy of that reputation. The character just seems to have average intelligence and the writer makes the main character look smart by making everyone else stupid. Doyle actually went to the trouble of thinking up brilliant things for Holmes to do instead of just making everyone else in the stories stupid as a lot of writers do.

The second is the way Doyle handled Holmes and Watson's relationship. Something else that I have come to detest in fiction is the typical friendship in which the characters are too often making a huge sacrifice for one another and are too frequently having big emotional scenes together. Relationships such as that eventually get to the point where they seem too unrealistic and no longer make me feel anything. But Doyle manages to convince the reader that Holmes and Watson are close friends without any of the sacrifices or emotional scenes. He uses little things to show the depth of their friendship which prevents it from ever becoming sappy or too fictional. Also, the way he wrote the characters helps a great deal to establish them as being close friends. The main thing that convinced me that Holmes and Watson must care a lot for one another was the fact that Watson put up with Holmes' arrogance, rudeness, and strange behavior and the fact that Holmes, who was a very cold and unemotional person, actually allowed Watson to be his friend.

The third is the stories themselves. Even today they are so original and unpredictable. Another complaint that I have about modern fiction is that I can usually determine the whole plot of the story at the very beginning or at least have a general idea where the writer is going to go with the story and the characters. With most of these stories I didn't have a clue as to what was going to happen next. There were a couple of the stories that I was able to predict but it was still cool to hear Holmes give a logical explanation as to how he had arrived at a conclusion that I had only arrived at by guessing.

If you've never read these stories then I would highly recommend doing so. They are absolutely wonderful. ...more

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