The 6 Most Important Decisions You'll Ever Make: A Guide for Teens Info

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From Sean Covey, the author of the international bestseller >The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens, this bestselling follow-up
book builds upon the legacy of the 7 Habits and shows teens how to make
smart choices about the six most crucial choices they’ll face
during these turbulent years.

The challenges teens face today are
tougher than at any time in history: academic stress, parent
communication, media bombardment, dating drama, abuse, bullying,
addictions, depression, and peer pressure, just to name a few. And, like
it or not, the choices teens make while navigating these challenges can
make or break their futures.

In The 6 Most Important
Decisions You’ll Ever Make
, Sean Covey, author of the
international bestseller The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens,
gives teens the strong advice they need to make informed and wise
decisions. Using real stories from teens around the world, Sean shows
teens how to succeed in school, make good friends, get along with
parents, wisely handle dating and sex issues, avoid or overcome
addictions, build self-esteem, and much more. Jam-packed with original
cartoons, inspiring quotes, and fun quizzes, this innovative book will
help teens not only survive but thrive during their teen years and
beyond.

Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for The 6 Most Important Decisions You'll Ever Make: A Guide for Teens:

2

August 28, 2009

Well intentioned but off the mark
As an individual who has worked with at-risk youth for a considerable amount of time I can respect what Covey was trying to accomplish with this book. It is to the point and attempts to communicate to young teens the nuances of difficult decisions that have to navigate as they make the journey into adulthood. In a few points it does well at making the argument, particularly around study skills, education, and its relevance to finding success.

However in other points it is radically off the mark. The section on safer sex only promotes abstinence and even goes as far as saying that safer sex is an oxy-moron (p. 206). This not only is misleading, it plants a seed for a dangerous sexual activity well into adulthood. Stating that abstinence until marriage is the only means of protection is a dated notion that has not been shown to have any great success in preventing new infection or reducing incidence of teen sexual activity (Santelli, J. et al., 2006).

This is not the only section that Covey plays fast and loose with the facts. For some young people this may give the impression that this is just another manifestation of adults talking down to them and not-respecting their intelligence, leading only to further disenfranchisement.

I would only recommend giving this to a teen if you are prepared to tell them to investigate for themselves whether or not they believe the claims are valid. If you use this book as a source for absolutely credible knowledge on the only path towards success, be prepared to be deal with some healthy resistance towards its unqualified claims.
2

May 17, 2007

Unimpressive and Slanted Book
To say nothing of the book's content, Sean Covey opens the text with an almost subtextual level of condescention; perhaps he truly intended to be friendly, but his introduction speaks down to anyone who has surpassed an early adolescent reading level. This is both the genre's fault (for perpetuating the myth that a writer should make friends with his readership) and the author's (for falling prey to this myth).

Although I am still within the age bracket to which the book is marketed, I found it terribly unappealing. Could this be because I am at the very end of my adolescence and long finished with my secondary education? Perhaps. But even when I was fourteen, I believe I was old enough to read books without pictures and flashy graphics.

In addition to the flaws in Covey's tone and design, the content of his book is slanted. Throughout the chapter on sex, he emphasizes -- albeit without saying it outright -- that the only "right" decision is abstaining until marriage. All the teens whose letters and stories were printed either regretted their past sexual encounters or were praised for their abstinence. I would respect Covey far more if he said outright that HE believes waiting until marriage is the best option rather than implying it throughout. Where were his sources when he claimed that teenage sex leads to depression? And who is he to say that long-term high school relationships are not commitments? Certainly, they lack the depth of adult relationships, but he noted that he met his wife in college and university students are hardly full adults.

His reliance on the "gateway drug" theory regarding marijuana is fallible, given (again) his selectiveness in printing only the stories that pushed his agenda forward. That he expanded the theory to include alcohol and tobacco only makes it more ridiculous; because he never discusses his definition of "drinking," the undiscerning reader might infer that even the occasional glass of wine sets him or her down the path to depravity and weak self-esteem (the "low road," in Covey's vernacular). Again, where are his sources? And where are the moderate stories? Just as it is possible to be a healthy and sexually active adolescent, it is possible to smoke or drink moderately and succeed in life.

The slant and the author's dishonesty regarding it, as well as the unimpressive writing and childish design made it a wholly unappetizing read. I recommend it only to people discerning enough to detect its flaws who want a good laugh.
3

July 26, 2014

Be ready to answer questions about oral sex...
Perhaps the age group is off for some teens?

I read this book AFTER my daughter returned from A teen STEAM camp where they used it as a focus item in group. She is 12, and for her I felt it was a bit detailed, particularly the discussion of STDs and oral sex. Those were questions I wasn't quite ready to answer, and didn't feel for all teens, this was an appropriate read.

Three stars only so folks will consider all the content and understand there is very little this book misses ... be ready :)!
4

January 22, 2014

Happy to see my school require this!
My 9th grade twins needed this for a required reading. I am only giving it four stars because I didn't see them "glued" to the book and reading it cover to cover. However, it has such great advice for kids and is written in their language. They happened to be reading it when my husband and I announced that we were divorcing, I found one of the boys laying in his bed reading it that night with a few tears in his eyes and it helped us start a conversation. I think it has helped them deal with what life brings.
5

August 29, 2016

Highly recommend!
My son will be 14 next month. He's an eighth grader. This book couldn't have come at a better time. My son is very receptive to the information. We have been reading together every night for about a half hour and he actually looks forward to it. Sean Covey writes on a level to which teens can relate. He doesn't sugar coat anything. It's straight forward and factual, yet it's written with tact and not too graphic. I would highly recommend this book for kids in late middle school and early high school. At the rate we are going, they are hearing about or even seeing so much of this in school already. Far better this education be lead by the parent instead of other kids at school.
2

May 1, 2017

Some good advice, but undermined by the assumption of spirituality and faith in a god and by the perpetuation of myths
Written from a very conservative religious viewpoint. The book contains some good advice about living a good life, but has a tendency to tie that in with needing spirituality and faith in a god. There is an assumption that the reader is religious in the Christian tradition and the advice comes off as relying on that faith as a reason to make those decisions. This is most obvious in the section about media where, instead of offering advice on how to deal with the easy availability of sexually explicit content, it suggests avoidance as a strategy and then goes on to perpetuate the myth that viewing that type of media leads to sexual violence.
2

Apr 27, 2013

This isn't really a review. This is more of a rant. I enjoyed this book until I got to the "dating and sex" chapter. It angers me so much that the only thing he was saying in here is "SEX IS BAD AND YOU SHOULDN'T DO IT IF YOU'RE A TEEN OR YOU AREN'T MARRIED. ABSTINENCE OR REGRET IT" and that makes me so angry. I literally had to force myself to read the whole chapter, and I still ended up throwing it against the wall and screaming with rage and fury. Yes, abstinence can be a good thing, and a This isn't really a review. This is more of a rant. I enjoyed this book until I got to the "dating and sex" chapter. It angers me so much that the only thing he was saying in here is "SEX IS BAD AND YOU SHOULDN'T DO IT IF YOU'RE A TEEN OR YOU AREN'T MARRIED. ABSTINENCE OR REGRET IT" and that makes me so angry. I literally had to force myself to read the whole chapter, and I still ended up throwing it against the wall and screaming with rage and fury. Yes, abstinence can be a good thing, and a good decision as well, but if there are teens having sex (which I'm not against) then you should educate them about knowing if they're ready or not, contraceptions, and whatever else, instead of shoving chastity bread down their throats. ...more
1

August 11, 2015

Puritanical, dull, condescending
This book is condescending, preachy, and very biased. His style is to lecture all teens to be just like he was, and leaves no room for any other ideas. His information about gateway drugs and behavior is a slippery-slope logical fallacy in the extreme, and paints a picture that if you have one sip of beer or one good kiss you are on the path to becoming a crack whore who lives in the gutter. He writes to teens as if they are five year olds and panders to conservative parents who must feel good about themselves if they can only buy this book and give it to Johnny or Jill. Basically he is telling teens "You are incompetent and simply cannot rely on your own brain so do what I say." It's a huge turn-off to both teens and intelligent parents.
5

October 25, 2017

Highly recommended to all teens.
Great book. Some good advice and pertinent reflection. The book speaks to the teens and approach subjects that some teens do not like or feel uncomfortable to share with parents in details (such as sex life, alcohol and addictions). Our teens usually look at the sky whenever we talk about these subjects (so boring Rrrr!) but Sean Covey manages to explain how important their choices on this matter are and how it can influence the rest of their existence. Also, the vocabulary is straight forward and accessible to any teen. Highly recommended.
5

September 1, 2014

Great for any 12-25 year old!
I purchased two copies, one for each of my children/teens. They both and myself read this book cover to cover and my teens will re-read it when the need arises. Just another tool for parenting without sounding like a preaching parent.
1

October 17, 2015

This CD does NOT follow the book!!!
I am very disappointed with this purchase. I bought this book on cd to use in my classroom. All the students are given a copy of the book to use in class and I bought this book on cd so that I could play it while the students follow along in their books. Well needless to say, this book on cd does not follow the book! We were on page 4 and all of a sudden the reader (the author) jumps and starts reading on page 8. We find where he is reading on page 8 and start following along again. Then he jumps again from the middle of page 8 and starts reading on page 13. It was RIDICULOUS! DO NOT buy this book on CD if you plan to follow along in the book! It looks like we will be doing it the good old fashion way and reading the book out loud as a class :( = BORING!!! :( I listen to books on CD all the time and this is the first time I have ever encountered this problem! Sooooo Disappointed!!! :(
5

April 8, 2017

Good advice for all ages.
A gift for my 15-yr old grandson. I read it before giving it to him - pre-qualify. Good advice for everyone.
1

January 18, 2013

Boring
I have 3 kids and can't get any of them interested in listening- even when I have them trapped in the car. The author is mostly monotone and not exciting enough- maybe a better voice would help, info can be useful
5

January 5, 2018

Very Impressive Book
Our 12 year old son loves this book. Out of the blue, the book has spawned many deep questions and conversation from him. The book is helping him sort out many of the important decisions, issues and questions kids his age face.
5

September 17, 2013

Recommend for teens
Purchased a copy for a friend whose 15 year-old son is making some questionable decisions. Time will tell if the book works for him, but after skimming a few chapters and digging into a couple more in-depth, this book will be on our preteen's must-read list. This book is not geared specifically towards "troubled teens", and I feel the advice is pertinent to every teen (well, American teens anyway). Helps kids step back and see and bigger perspective without being degrading or preachy.
1

July 22, 2015

Skips parts in the book frequently. How am I ...
Skips parts in the book frequently. How am I supposed to have my students listen and read along when it constant skips sentences or paragraphs at a time??
2

May 20, 2011

The 6 Most Important Decisions You'll Ever Make: A Guide for Teens
Not of any interest to my 16 year old granddaughter - perhaps for a younger audience. The book is being returned.
5

April 22, 2017

Great book
I wish all self help books were written this way ;) The author has done a great job. My teenage son and I are reading through this book - like our own book club. We each read the same chapter and then discuss. Very cleverly written and has real life examples. Great illustrations, a pleasure and a joy to read. It really hits the issues at our house, and hope that my son internalizes the information as a 13 year old. I plan to buy another one for my younger son as well when he is in 8th grade. It applies to the high school years.
2

December 25, 2016

Disappointed with overall message
Very old fashioned and conservative views on sex and drugs. Wouldn't recommend for any parent that wants open, consistent, communication with their teen.
1

July 15, 2015

Review of the Reviews
Since this is a book for teens, I was looking to see what teens had to say about the book before buying it for my son. I see the adults thought the book was very good, but why are there no teen reviews???
5

Jul 11, 2008

I'm reading 6 desicions! :D
Its rreeaally good! :)
I think all teens should read it.
5

February 22, 2019

Common sense ideas in a condensed package
I work with the local municipality assisting first offender youths by providing them with counseling on what they did wrong, and giving them a way to provide reparations for their actions. We have used this book as one of those means. Its straightforward, provides common issues that kids face, and it provides straightforward ways of dealing with those conflicts. I don't agree with everything in the book, but it will help the kids gain perspective and it's an easy read. I was able to read it in a couple days and be able to reference talking points from the book with the kids. (I do think if you want a child to read it, you should as well. It may help you (parent, guardian, authority figure) with some perspective as well)
1

Jun 28, 2015

My mom bought me this when I was about 15. It was utterly pointless. Covey tries way too hard to sound like "one of the cool kids." He tried, and failed, to be your understanding friend. It was embarrassing. I had to read 7 Habits the summer before the 8th grade, and I hated that book. This one wasn't much better. I completely understand where he is coming from, and I know that being a teen sucks and is full of difficult decisions, but he assumes that most teens think the same way. His thought My mom bought me this when I was about 15. It was utterly pointless. Covey tries way too hard to sound like "one of the cool kids." He tried, and failed, to be your understanding friend. It was embarrassing. I had to read 7 Habits the summer before the 8th grade, and I hated that book. This one wasn't much better. I completely understand where he is coming from, and I know that being a teen sucks and is full of difficult decisions, but he assumes that most teens think the same way. His thought processes in writing this book did not come anywhere close to matching mine. His commentary, honestly, was not helpful to teen me. 6 most important decisions? Ha! I'm almost 21 now, and I still have not been in some of these situations. Most of this book did not apply to my teenage years whatsoever. ...more
5

Mar 27, 2010

I absolutely love this book. These types of self-help books are what we need nowadays, since we all think we're the best people out there-- but in reality, we never are perfect. We human beings are naturally flawed, and as long as we try to improve on those faults, we are becoming better than we were before we tried. So that being said, this book is a great guide in helping us with becoming a more adequate teenager.
It is not a lecture book-- no one wants to buy another nagging machine, we get I absolutely love this book. These types of self-help books are what we need nowadays, since we all think we're the best people out there-- but in reality, we never are perfect. We human beings are naturally flawed, and as long as we try to improve on those faults, we are becoming better than we were before we tried. So that being said, this book is a great guide in helping us with becoming a more adequate teenager.
It is not a lecture book-- no one wants to buy another nagging machine, we get enough of those from our parents at home. But Sean Covey, author of many other self-help books, sets a tone that is advice-like and not lecture-like. He doesn't just tell you that you shouldn't have sex-- but ways to approach and react to it. (But honestly, follow the no sex ideal)
I would recommend this book to everyone who is willing to want to become a better person and prioritize their life. ...more
3

Jul 16, 2009

This is the kind of book every teenager should have. It is colorful, eye-catching on every page, fun to read, and very blunt.

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