The 4 Hour Body: An Uncommon Guide to Rapid Fat Loss, Incredible Sex and Becoming Superhuman Info

Check out fan reviews for The 4 Hour Body: An Uncommon Guide to Rapid Fat Loss, Incredible Sex and Becoming Superhuman. Explore titles in Home Improvement & Design, Gardening, and Pets & Animal Care. Check out Timothy Ferriss books and read our community reviews and ratings before downloading The 4 Hour Body: An Uncommon Guide to Rapid Fat Loss, Incredible Sex and Becoming Superhuman Read&Download The 4 Hour Body: An Uncommon Guide to Rapid Fat Loss, Incredible Sex and Becoming Superhuman by Timothy Ferriss Online


Thinner, bigger, faster, stronger... which 150 pages will you
read?
Is it possible to:
Reach your genetic potential in 6
months?
Sleep 2 hours per day and perform better than on 8
hours?
Lose more fat than a marathoner by bingeing?

Indeed,
and much more. This is not just another diet and fitness book.


The 4-Hour Body is the result of an obsessive quest, spanning
more than a decade, to hack the human body. It contains the collective
wisdom of hundreds of elite athletes, dozens of MDs, and thousands of
hours of jaw-dropping personal experimentation. From Olympic training
centers to black-market laboratories, from Silicon Valley to South
Africa, Tim Ferriss, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of
The 4-Hour Workweek, fixated on one life-changing question:


For all things physical, what are the tiniest changes that produce
the biggest results?

Thousands of tests later, this book
contains the answers for both men and women. From the gym to the
bedroom, it’s all here, and it all works.
You Will Learn
(in less than 30 minutes each):
* How to lose those last 5-10 pounds
(or 100+ pounds) with odd combinations of food and safe chemical
cocktails.
* How to prevent fat gain while bingeing (X-mas,
holidays, weekends)
* How to increase fat-loss 300% with a few bags
of ice
* How Tim gained 34 pounds of muscle in 28 days, without
steroids, and in four hours of total gym time
* How to sleep 2
hours per day and feel fully rested
* How to produce 15-minute
female orgasms
* How to triple testosterone and double sperm
count
* How to go from running 5 kilometers to 50 kilometers in 12
weeks
* How to reverse “permanent” injuries
* How to
add 150+ pounds to your lifts in 6 months
* How to pay for a beach
vacation with one hospital visit

       
And that's just the tip
of the iceberg.  There are more than 50 topics covered, all with
real-world experiments, many including more than 200 test subjects.


You don't need better genetics or more discipline. You need
immediate results that compel you to continue.

That’s
exactly what The 4-Hour Body delivers.

Average Ratings and Reviews
review-bg

3.89

31098 Ratings

5

4

3

2

1


Ratings and Reviews From Market


client-img 4.3
2170
534
267
167
200
client-img 3.6
364
359
94
4
0
client-img 3.76
10395
9871
3067
5
0

Reviews for The 4 Hour Body: An Uncommon Guide to Rapid Fat Loss, Incredible Sex and Becoming Superhuman:

4

May 09, 2011

I know no one reads my math or exercise book reviews, but f*ck you guys because books that I can leave on the back of my toilet and read from a few pages at a time are the only books that I have been able to get through for the past six months. Do not judge me.

I mean, I do know it's kind of embarrassing. No one wants to like a self-help book. Not on here anyway. Because we're all educated, self-aware goodreaders, and when we hear that cloying, mutually congratulatory snake-oil rhetoric, we see I know no one reads my math or exercise book reviews, but f*ck you guys because books that I can leave on the back of my toilet and read from a few pages at a time are the only books that I have been able to get through for the past six months. Do not judge me.

I mean, I do know it's kind of embarrassing. No one wants to like a self-help book. Not on here anyway. Because we're all educated, self-aware goodreaders, and when we hear that cloying, mutually congratulatory snake-oil rhetoric, we see right through it. And least of all do we want to like a guy like Timothy Ferriss. Because not only is he disarmingly comfortable with wielding the ingratiating confidence of the self-help franchise, but he's also completely fucking insane.

But that's cool with me. Do you know why? Because when I walk into a gym, I want to punch people. I want to punch almost everyone. No, not because I'm on a roid rage. And not because anyone in a gym does anything to offend me, but because exercise is so achingly simple, and almost everyone does it wrong. And so when I see girls sitting for 90 minutes on an exercise bike (at 60% max HR! Fat-burning zone!! LoL!) and then complaining that they work out 2 hours a day and can't lose weight, or when I see meatheads doing bicep curls and shrugs when they have quadriceps that look like they should be in a weelchair, I am filled with righteous indignation at whatever exercise and beauty industry brainwashed these people into thinking that these were the pathways to strength and health.

On the other hand, the principles that Ferriss uses to develop his crazy ideas are all perfectly sound. If you disagree, I will fight you.

I found myself writing down the following, aphoristically, a few days ago. The tag line was "Be one of the top 5% of healthiest Americans, in 75 words and 3 hours a week:"

Sit up straight. Whether male or female, do deadlifts, bench press, muscle-ups, and 400m sprints 3-4 times a week for about 45 minutes. Progressively increase loads. If you feel injured, stop doing that for a while. Eat lean meats, healthy oils, nuts, legumes, and a ton of vegetables. Avoid white starches, sugar in any form, and sodas like the plague. Drink lots of water. Get some sleep. Take cold showers. Stop being afraid of things.

And in a lot of ways what Ferriss has done is elaborate on this formula for 545 pages in order to make a lot of money. Which is fine by me, frankly. There's so much garbage and so many confused messages out there that anyone writing on these incredibly simple principles is on my good side.

But what Ferriss has done to make this a 4-star book instead of a 3-star book is experiment on his own body to push the envelope of what this formula circumscribes. Where he can't cite his own experience, he recounts anecdotes of prominent athletes or the highly suspect, uncontrolled experimentation of partially mad physiologists. I think this is awesome. Without modifying the essential formula, he wonders, "just how far can we take or tweak the principle?"

In some cases this results in some really weird experiments. Like torturous ice baths to exploit the thermic metabolic effect; or overdosing on cinnamon, cod liver oil, and cissus quadrangularis (I don't recommend any of these, by the way) to rapidly reconstitute the body's insulinic or testosterone response.

But in other cases, the experiments are more useful to the non-insane. For example, he cites a lot of evidence that in traditional progressive strength training and mass building, the body only needs a bare minimum of load to stimulate the desired hormonal and hypertrophic responses. In other words, if done correctly you can spend way less time in the gym for the same physiological response. I have been experimenting with this myself; so far, for hypertrophy, I have reduced the number of exercises I do to just TWO (deadlifts and bench press), and spend on them less than 30 minutes at a time, 3 times a week. So far the results have been excellent.

Now, I know this isn't science. Those who criticize Ferriss for not being scientific in his approach are missing the whole point entirely. And Ferriss even dedicates a portion of his introductory chapter to emphasize that he isn't trying to do science. He's trying to do anecdotes. In some ways, he's just presenting a Jackson Pollock of shit he's tried on his body (shit tied to sound principles, mind you), and explain what he found to work, and the quantitative evidence that suggested to him it was working. If you want to try one or two things for yourself, great! Here's a grab bag of tips and tricks.

I've had fun thinking about what physiologic pathways and mechanisms might be involved if some of the outrageous claims Ferriss makes are actually true. But more than that, this book's main effect has been a rather counterintuitive one: by providing me with a few creative, non-traditional techniques, it has reminded me just how simple the principles really are. ...more
5

November 23, 2017

6 weeks into the diet: Total cholesterol 165, triglycerides 386. Before diet: Cholesterol 286, Triglycerides 1800. It works.
TLDR: I'm 37. After following the diet, total cholesterol 165, triglycerides 386. Not on diet: Cholesterol 286, Triglycerides 1800. The diet works and it's super simple.

A friend of mine recommended this book after being on the diet. I was really skeptical about the claims in the book. I've got metabolic syndrome and I've been on statins for a long time. I'm by no means generally super fat or unhealthy in terms of diet or weight: 5'11 200 lbs and I don't eat a lot of junk. A large part of this is genetics.

I read the chapters of the book focused on the diet and honestly I rolled my eyes and said things like "no way" but I decided to give it a shot. I followed an even more simplified form of the book because I have 2 kids, my wife and I work fulltime and I'm always tired and have no time. I went to costco and bought 2 types of canned beans, stew meat, and frozen costco vegetables. I slow cooked the stew meat by literraly unloading the package into the slow cooker and salting it and letting it cook for 5 hours once a week. I put it in tupperware to keep for the week. For a meal I'd open a can of beans (used about half a can per-meal), pour out some frozen vegetables and microwave them for 3 minutes, then combine it all and heat for another minute. I'd have a meal ready in about 5 minutes. For breakfast I'd eat the same thing except I'd eat about half as much meat and add about 4 eggs. I used salt or sriracha chili paste for flavor.

I ate that 6 days a week, 3 times a day, and on Saturday I'd eat like an absolute pig. After 6 weeks I had my blood tested again and the results are better than when I was on statins. I also just generally felt better. I also lost like 15 pounds or so but that wasn't really my focus.

So the claims in the book about the effects on cholesterol are completely true as crazy as it sounds. Highly recommend this.
1

Jan 10, 2011

Tim Ferriss, time management guru/guy on the internet I love to hate, followed up his first book, The 4 Hour Workweek, with a book designed to teach people how to hack their bodies. It's a hodgepodge of advice on everything from weight loss, bodybuilding, sex, running, sleep, and nutrition, and attempts to eschew conventional wisdom in these areas in favor of small (except not really), easily done (except not really), often overlooked (except not really) hacks that anyone can employ. Now, I Tim Ferriss, time management guru/guy on the internet I love to hate, followed up his first book, The 4 Hour Workweek, with a book designed to teach people how to hack their bodies. It's a hodgepodge of advice on everything from weight loss, bodybuilding, sex, running, sleep, and nutrition, and attempts to eschew conventional wisdom in these areas in favor of small (except not really), easily done (except not really), often overlooked (except not really) hacks that anyone can employ. Now, I expected to eye roll a lot at this book (and I did), but I thought it would be interesting. Instead of mild interest, though, I spent the entire read alternating between spitting anger and abject boredom.

The cornerstone of the book is Ferriss' self-experimentation. As he says, he's gone out and tried all the crazy treatments and bought all dangerous products so you don't have to. And that's very nice of him, certainly, though I suspect he's really only indulging his own neuroses and OCD issues rather than doing these things out of any sense of altruism, but whatever. And I do believe that there is a ton of value in self-experimentation. Self-experimentation is where the big theories and scientific discoveries start, take shape, and get you thinking about the world in ways you hadn't before. It's is not, however, science. Science is what you do after you've come up with all these great ideas and interesting observations. Ferriss doesn't seem to understand this, though, skips the middle science part all together, and goes straight to doling out advice on what the reader should be doing to change themselves. The result is contradictory recommendations that are at best benign and at worse dangerous to the user on a physical and mental level.

And then I got to the sex chapter. Ferriss, you see, decides to teach the world (men) how to give a woman a 15 minute orgasm. As though they too are something to be hacked and experimented on so that men can feel better about themselves and their mad skillz. So he talks about his 'experiments' in female sexuality while nudgenudgewinkwinking his way through the parts where he finds his 'test subjects' and talks to 'experts'. And, you know, as disgusted as I was with the whole tone and objectification throughout the chapter, I think I could've forgiven a small part of it if I had learned something interesting or been presented with a novel sexual technique. But no. Ferriss' road to mindblowing orgasms is...manual clitoral masturbation. And I'm still not sure where the 15 minutes comes in. Ugh.

"No, I was more concerned with increasing sperm count than isolating variables."

And that, my friends, pretty much sums up the book for me. ...more
2

Oct 06, 2012

Two stars instead of one, because it was so amazingly bad I just couldn't stop reading.
Reader's digest version:

"I'm Tim Ferris. Last week I tracked the weather for five days and noticed that it rained on the four days when I didn't carry an umbrella. But on the day when I did bring an umbrella, it stayed dry out. So obviously, carrying an umbrella prevents rain.
Now, some scientists may scoff and say that this flies in the face of known science and conventional wisdom, or that at least they'd Two stars instead of one, because it was so amazingly bad I just couldn't stop reading.
Reader's digest version:

"I'm Tim Ferris. Last week I tracked the weather for five days and noticed that it rained on the four days when I didn't carry an umbrella. But on the day when I did bring an umbrella, it stayed dry out. So obviously, carrying an umbrella prevents rain.
Now, some scientists may scoff and say that this flies in the face of known science and conventional wisdom, or that at least they'd need more data in order to be convinced. But I have no problem writing a whole book insisting to readers, through a stream-of-consciousness narrative told in OCD-level detail, that my umbrella-carrying behavior is what controls my weather.
Of course, if you want to really track the weather around you, you'll have to be willing to pay hundreds of dollars a week on expensive and time-consuming diagnostic tests to keep tracking your weather in minute detail, so that you can adjust your umbrella-carrying behavior in case the weather starts getting out of hand.
Also, I, Tim Ferris, am constantly having sex with models and partying with rockstars, as my 8 billion Twitter followers can avow. The book will continually remind you, just so you don't forget this even for a second.
In the introduction I'll tell you to be skeptical, to cover my ass; but I'll fill the rest of the book with overenthusiastic claims and dismissal of skepticism."

He does have a few decent tips, especially in the interviews with professional athletic trainers who actually get many people to do a program over time and see their results. I do admire the focus on doing the minimal workout to get results, rather than overdoing it unnecessarily.
(...although every chapter's advice contradicts itself: Work your muscles to failure every time. No, lift lighter weights for just a few reps, and workout right before eating every meal. No, eat breakfast as soon as you get up, before working out, and make sure it's all protein. No, avoid too much protein and have a glass of grapefruit juice with breakfast. No, avoid all fruits like the plague... I guess that's why the introduction tells you to read one segment at a time, not the whole book from start to finish. Oops.)

And I agree that obsessively-recorded self-experimentation might lead to changed habits that are right *for you*, individually. But the anecdote ("a few times I've had great sex after eating some almonds") does not translate into the general recommendation ("according to my in-depth research, guys should always eat almonds a few hours before sex"). I was not surprised to see a chapter here by Seth Roberts, who specializes in exaggerating the power & generality of claims he makes based on his own self-experimentation. They may be true claims for him, and they may be worth trying by others -- but he claims that if something works on him, that's enough evidence to trumpet it as reliable advice for everyone else, and I have no patience for that.
I'm also not convinced by his tracking of nutrient levels through tests that are both ridiculously expensive and unreliable from reading to reading.

I'm most impressed that Ferriss put two chapters about identifying quack medicine right before the description of his own bullshit "study." Oh, your diet program has a 100% success rate? But the participants were self-selected volunteers from your rabid Twitter followers, not a random sample of the population. And you dropped the people who didn't complete the diet -- you don't know how many tried it and failed without bothering to report their failure on your survey. And the 200 reports were those who "responded to all questions" -- so it sounds like you dropped out the failures who skipped a question or two. And you break it up by subgroups that would be too small to compare even if the study design *were* statistically sound.
The diet may happen to be perfectly good, but the report here simply provides no evidence, whether in favor or against.

Dear Mr Ferriss, you do a far better job with the inspirational writing in the closing thoughts:
"Most of us have resigned ourselves to a partial completeness... The beauty is, almost all of it can be changed... Your body is almost always within your control... take an inventory of all the things in the physical realm that you've resigned yourself to being poor at. Now ask: if I couldn't fail, what would I want to be exceptional at?"
Lovely. Stick to that, please.

PS -- the author's bio says he is "a tango world record holder." I'm not sure what about tango you can measure and hold records in... but if that's your approach to a dance of emotional connection, then dude, you're doing it wrong. ...more
5

September 17, 2017

Love this book, gift it often
Love this book, gift it often.
I've lost significant weight on its protocol (went from 28%MBI to 16% in 10weeks)
It's improved my sex life - cannot speak more highly of kettlebell swings for this and below
Mass gains were meh but still good for the total gym time
sleep manipulation didn't work for me but know it has for others
helped a ton with injury recovery
1

May 7, 2018

0-2 here T. Ferriss
Didn't work for my wife or I - sorry T. Ferriss I guess I'm not one of those freebie grabbing people that got a free book and gave you 5 stars.
3 weeks, nada. 4th week? I think the saying goes "First week is the trial, second the proof and if the 3rd week don't work toss the book!"
5

November 20, 2017

GAME CHANGER...RIGHT HERE!
I absolutely love this book. It is broken down into easy to understand sections with straightforward information which is easy to understand. I have had good results after implementing some of the authors recommendations. The slow carb diet and cold showers are, in my experience, especially beneficial. The book is much larger than I anticipated, apparently, I ignored the page count when I placed my order. Don't think of this resource as a book that you read cover-to-cover. You can read it however you want but I have found it most useful as a reference book that I can consume topic-by-topic.
5

April 26, 2018

Solid Advice
At first the information seemed a little unorganized to me, as I was expecting more of a step-by-step guide, but after extracting all pieces that were valuable to me, I was able to set a solid regiment for myself.

Important side note about the slow card diet - listen to your body. Eating the amount of protein at the four meal a day frequency he recommended was always way too much for me if I was also having a small serving of beans and spinach or other veggies too (I'm 5'3 and 138 lb), so I wasn't losing weight until I reduced my intake to three meals a day with the equivalent of one egg of protein per meal. I'm also doing the recommended minimum amount of exercise he discusses, eating my meals slowly, following cheat day to a T, doing the PAGG and CQ supplements as recommended, and drinking more than enough water, so it really was just eating too much. Having a decent amount of hunger before a meal helps a lot.
0

Dec 29, 2010

Anyone who read my review of 4 Hour Work Week knows that I think that Tim Ferriss is a total smug dick. That said, he is a smug dick who really seems to kinda know what he is talking about. There were a ton of super useful tips in 4HWW and he really spells things out to you to total dummy level. So when I found out he had a diet book, I figured I should check it out. This dude is the king of of shortcuts, SO if anyone was going to be helpful (and most efficient) in helping me achieve my meager Anyone who read my review of 4 Hour Work Week knows that I think that Tim Ferriss is a total smug dick. That said, he is a smug dick who really seems to kinda know what he is talking about. There were a ton of super useful tips in 4HWW and he really spells things out to you to total dummy level. So when I found out he had a diet book, I figured I should check it out. This dude is the king of of shortcuts, SO if anyone was going to be helpful (and most efficient) in helping me achieve my meager weight loss goals, I figured it'd be him. At the moment I am trying out his slow-carb method, which means I eat protein, veg, and beans for 6 days on and then one mega "refeeding" (read: binge) day a week. I'm hopeful that this structure is going to work since the binge day will keep me from all the cheats through the week that keep me from achieving my goals. In addition to this, I am also regularly doing the WODs from Bodyrock.tv (which I was already doing anyway). Keep in mind, I am not on a short term diet. I am already pretty committed to eating this way (primal) and I love fitness and working out, especially weightlifting and HIIT (not so much into those other activities that are fun but slow and don't really give me that 'worked out' feeling). I hope to be back here in a few weeks with some positive results!

As for the sex part of the book, I have to take a pass. The idea of taking sex tips from someone like Tim Feriss makes me vomit in my mouth a little. ...more
5

June 24, 2017

Good book, lost a lot of weight quickly.
Good book, lost a lot of weight quickly. I lost 4-5 lbs a week easy, had a ton more energy then ever before. Unfortunately I returned to my evil ways and gained it all back over a few months but I know that when I go back on this diet I will lose it quickly again.
1

September 9, 2018

I'm really sad that it didn't work
As much as I like the "rogue science" approach of the book, being a health scientist myself, I'm currently on the diet that this book talks about, have been for almost 3 weeks, and haven't lost even 1% body fat... I was so excited to finally adhere to something to see results, but I'm only disappointed now... Wish I could have my money back. Mr. Ferriss, it didn't work...
2

Jan 24, 2011

This is my longest review to date, I have a lot to say about this. Let's begin, shall we?

This book is a little unique. You can think of it as a collection of short essays (my understanding is that the book started life as a collection of blog posts by author Tim Ferris) that attempt to “hack” the human body using little tricks and unexpected methods. Ferris likes to quote the 80/20 principle, and in this book, he's trying to find the least amount of effort, that 20% or less of work, that yields This is my longest review to date, I have a lot to say about this. Let's begin, shall we?

This book is a little unique. You can think of it as a collection of short essays (my understanding is that the book started life as a collection of blog posts by author Tim Ferris) that attempt to “hack” the human body using little tricks and unexpected methods. Ferris likes to quote the 80/20 principle, and in this book, he's trying to find the least amount of effort, that 20% or less of work, that yields 80% or more of the result. So what we end up with is a loosely organized collection of experiments that Ferris performed on himself. While this is fascinating reading, it's also almost entirely anecdotal.

I feel like there are two ways to evaluate this book. While it gets mega style points (I really enjoyed Ferris' writing style and general conceptual approach), that ultimately won't tell you anything about how useful the book is. So, we can evaluate it by how well researched and tested it is (hint: it isn't), or we can actually try to recreate some of his experiments and see what happens. Which, I did.

To the first point, Ferris only conducted these experiments on himself. He occasionally mentions other test subjects, like his parents, and a few other acquaintances, but we are far from talking about clinical trials here. He leaves out vast amounts of information about his purported “test subjects” so it's impossible to get an idea of what was actually going on. While some of these methods might work really well for some people, there's a huge portion of people for whom they likely would be completely ineffective, but Ferris makes it sound like these methods are universal to the human condition. Just because something worked for him and his mom doesn't mean it will work for me and you. While some of his information is backed up by great interviews with highly trained specialists, you have to keep in mind, they are specialists, and while some of them are incredibly outstanding in their fields, they do have a bias which Ferris doesn't try to balance out. He keeps his sources very limited, the scope of perspective extremely narrow, which, again, might work for him, but not necessarily anyone else.

Some of the methods he prescribes are cutting edge, known to be effective for most people, and backed up by studies (which he may or may not be citing). Some of his methods have been proven to be minimally effective, and are way behind the curve when it comes to current science. This doesn't mean they don't work at all, obviously they kinda worked at one point in the past, and obviously they worked for him, but again, that doesn't mean they work for everyone, or that they are the best practices. And, as any gym rat will tell you, you shouldn't listen to a guy who tells you to do curls in the squat rack. That's just asking for trouble.

Jokes aside, we could end the review there, saying that yes, it's a very entertaining book with some nuggets of wisdom, and some other nuggets of crap, but I have more to say here. Because I actually tried some of this stuff.

I'm always eager to try new weight loss methods, especially ones making the claims he did: that you don't have to count calories, that you can have a cheat day once a week in which you are encouraged to eat literally whatever you want, even to the point of making yourself sick. These sounded great. So I tried it.

His diet plan is basic: eat protein, legumes (black beans, lentils, etc.), and veggies at every meal. This isn't that far off from my normal diet anyway, I just don't have nearly as many legumes normally as he calls for. One of his big rules was: Don't count the calories. In fact, he goes far out of his way to drive the point home that you shouldn't restrict too much. He often talked about not eating enough, warning that we should be sure to eat plenty of these foods. So I did. I followed his PGAA supplementation routine (a mix of a few supplements for fat loss. Nothing weird, things like garlic and green tea extract, etc.). I did the cheat day where I followed his protocols for helping to lessen the damage of a binge day. Then I went a step further. He talks a lot about increasing fat loss through cold exposure. So I tried this. I used ice packs, took two cold showers a day, and even took ice baths, all because Tim Ferris' “science” said I should burn fat much faster through these methods. Ferris also went out of his way to say that exercise is not necessary for losing fat on this protocol, and actually warned against doing too much. So I did some kettlebell swings, and thats it.

The first big result I noticed is that I felt like complete crap, all the time. I was sluggish, tired, irritable, and just felt a general malaise that made me miserable. On top of the the beans made me feel bloated and gaseous all day long. It was pretty awful. I kept thinking that even if this worked, it wouldn't be worth it. I got into health, fitness and weight loss because I wanted to feel better, not like this.

After 5 days of feeling like this, I weighed in. I had gained five pounds. Now, normally, to be fair, you should give a new program about 4 weeks to see if it's really working. But I knew that after 5 days, if I felt this bad, and was gaining literally a pound a day, that something was terribly wrong. So I cut it short. No more ice baths, no more of the bean heavy diet. I'm back to a normal workout schedule and eating normally (for me, which means like mostly protein, lots of veggies, very few carbs or dairy, occasional nuts, fruit, and oatmeal). Within a day I felt much better and started losing weight again.

There was another side effect, though. Telling someone like me to have a cheat day and go hog wild is like telling an alcoholic he can only drink on saturday. It doesn't end well. In an effort to maximize my hedonistic enjoyment of cheat days, I actually fell into horrible patterns. I was overeating to an extreme, falling into a binge eating session that I never used to be guilty of, even when I was at my biggest, most unhealthy stage of my former fat life. The cheat day method prescribed here, while some people can handle it, people like me can't. It can easily change from a nice reprieve from dieting and become psychologically damaging. My relationship with food was twisted into something incredibly unhealthy, and it made me feel horrible, not just physically, but emotionally. I cannot stress enough how much I do not recommend this approach. While allowing some “cheating” and flexibility every once in a while can be great, and should probably happen, it should not be the binge style that Ferris outlines here. Atleast not for people like me.

I will keep using his PGAA supplement routine (partially because they are similar to what I was doing before anyway, and hell, I bought all this stuff) since it will probably need a longer term test to truly judge it. I'll also say this: I think that diet (sans the cheat binge) would have worked really well for me when I was first starting out in my weight loss. It's an easy way to stay full while cutting calories down to a manageable level, cutting junk food and most bad carb sources, and staying satiated. It's also easy to follow even when eating out, which is not normally the case for my chosen diet. The problem for me is it actually caused an increase in normal caloric consumption, combined with the lack of exercise, which led to fast gains. So, if you're bigger, and looking to start cutting, this wouldn't be a bad place to start, although I wouldn't recommend it for the long term.

As for the cold exposure, the science behind it makes a lot of sense, and maybe it would have worked if my diet and exercise had been different. But man was it miserable. Ferris talks about how cold showers are supposed to be uplifting, calling them a treatment for depression. As someone who was once clinically diagnosed with depression, I can tell you thats probably not the case. That never came up with any of the doctors I talked to about depression treatments. I found them to be the opposite. Cold showers in the morning, and the ice baths at night just pissed me off and made me irritable and lethargic.

Thats all I tried from the book. At some point I want to experiment with polyphasic sleep (but I've been wanting to do that long before I read this book) and I'm trying to use some of the total immersion swimming techniques he espouses (mostly because others in the triathlon community swear by it) but thats it as far as experiments for me. I was interested in his endurance hacks. He spends a lot of time detailing a very odd training program for endurance (read: marathon) running that has surprisingly little running in it. But when it comes time to share the results, Ferris says that the book had to go to print, that we should check his blog for the update on whether the marathon experiment worked or not. As of this writing, he has not yet updated this section of his blog.

So there you have it. The four hour body has a few nuggets of wisdom in there, and a lot of junky crap as well. Sift through it if you wish, as it is a very entertaining read, but ultimately, it's just a big pile of personal anecdotal evidence that worked well for one dude, and it's results for anyone else are dubious at best. ...more
1

December 13, 2018

your tipical self help book with too many personal stories.
boring, simple and not useful. Extremely dull to read.Just a guy giving tips with long personal stories. I do not recommend
5

March 26, 2018

This works
This book has changed my life. After a decade of steady weight gain and many failed diets and fads, this book has succeeded. I have lost weight and inches without feeling like I am deprived. My well being has improved. My relationship with food and sugar has become much healthier.
5

Feb 05, 2011

II'd never read a health book which starts out by describing being backstage at a NIN concert.

I knew I was in for a wild ride.

In the 4-Hour Body, Tim Ferriss chronicles his eclectic experiences at hacking his body: weight loss & muscle gain, perfect abs and perfect baseball swing, tripling his testosterone, holding his breath for three minutes, & more.

As a family physician, I can tell you that most of his material is not that revolutionary: his diet is just a simple variant of a low II'd never read a health book which starts out by describing being backstage at a NIN concert.

I knew I was in for a wild ride.

In the 4-Hour Body, Tim Ferriss chronicles his eclectic experiences at hacking his body: weight loss & muscle gain, perfect abs and perfect baseball swing, tripling his testosterone, holding his breath for three minutes, & more.

As a family physician, I can tell you that most of his material is not that revolutionary: his diet is just a simple variant of a low glycemic load diet, and many trainers will tell you that kettle bells rock as an exercise. But Tim is a showman at heart, as well as probably being just a little bit crazy, and this book reflects his devil-may-care take-life-by-the-throat until it screams for mercy approach to living. The book is intentionally designed to give you a potpouri of ideas and projects to pick from, and he encourages you to find something that you want to change about your body and go for it.

Even if you don't implement a single thing in this book, you'll have a barrel of fun reading it. And most everyone will find at least one chapter that they will find intruiging enough to implement his concepts to try on their own. He's motivated me to get back to my ideal weight, and I'm already half way there by implementing some of his regimen. Trippiest health book of the year. ...more
4

Jun 20, 2013

Book is simultaneously brilliant and insane. I have heard of Ferriss and his experimentation and "4-Hour" approach to life for years, but this was my first foray into his brand of "research". Dude is thorough and committed, that's for sure.

It is important to note that this is not a conventional read - the book is meant to be skimmed, only reading sections that interest to you. In that way, it seems more like a "Choose Your Own Adventure" book: you want to lose fat? build muscle? increase Book is simultaneously brilliant and insane. I have heard of Ferriss and his experimentation and "4-Hour" approach to life for years, but this was my first foray into his brand of "research". Dude is thorough and committed, that's for sure.

It is important to note that this is not a conventional read - the book is meant to be skimmed, only reading sections that interest to you. In that way, it seems more like a "Choose Your Own Adventure" book: you want to lose fat? build muscle? increase strength? here's a formula. You want to train for endurance and/or speed? here's a different one. You want to sleep better? The book is nearly 600 pages, with several appendices to boot, so reading cover to cover just isn't the way to go.

Life is one big experiment for Ferriss - so in that way, I admire his approach. He has a very open mind, but seems to fall into the correlation-implies-causation fallacy in several aspects. It is also worth saying that just because something worked for him does NOT mean that it will work for everyone, no matter how many times he tested.

The chapters that I chose to focus on were fat loss, building strength, and injury prevention. The fat loss chapter in particular had me vacillating on whether his advice is snakeoil or panacea - ridiculous or gospel truth... Is this some secret that no one talks about? Take this concoction of supplements and see amazing results (all natural things like green tea extract and garlic pills) or is this some crazy money pit? After reading the chapter and more information about his Slow Carb Diet, I am still not sure what to think. The reader is intended to experiment along with Ferriss, and I am giving his diet a try (with adaptations to my own dietary ethics and guidelines). The strength and muscle building chapter is more forward and actually quite simple: less is more. You don't need to spend hours at the gym. Max weight, low reps/sets, proscribed power moves, low frequency with a focus on recovery. He outlines some training programs, and the advice is scientifically sound. The injury-proofing chapters were my favorite - focusing on therapy, correcting imbalances, rehabilitative movements. I am planning to incorporate some of the injury-proofing strength work into my own regimen.

I realize that this review is all over the place - and that is a reflection of the book itself. It's written to be a guide to optimize your physical self in nearly every way. (Including a somewhat displaced single chapter on improving your sex life, but this focuses almost single-handedly - oops, no pun intended! - on the female orgasm). A book with a thesis that broad is bound to be all over the place.

In the end, this book needs to be read critically, but with an open mind (does that make sense?) If this sounds like something that you would like to do - this interactive approach - then I totally recommend it. ...more
4

Jan 03, 2012

After knowing so many people that have successfully changed their eating habits with the help of this book, and then watching "Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead" and "Food, Inc." on Netflix, I finally had to try it myself.

Going into week three of 4HB style eating, and I've lost 4lbs with minimal effort. The much bigger deal? Since dropping gluten & high-fructose corn syrup from my diet, my allergies have all but disappeared, and my inflammation has dropped so much that most of my shoulder pain After knowing so many people that have successfully changed their eating habits with the help of this book, and then watching "Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead" and "Food, Inc." on Netflix, I finally had to try it myself.

Going into week three of 4HB style eating, and I've lost 4lbs with minimal effort. The much bigger deal? Since dropping gluten & high-fructose corn syrup from my diet, my allergies have all but disappeared, and my inflammation has dropped so much that most of my shoulder pain (which I've had for 10+ years) is gone!

Knowing how much pain I'm missing out on has kept me motivated to continue the positive diet change and life-hacking my body, 4 Hour Body style!

*I marked that I've "finished" the book -- I've finished the sections for my personal goals. You do not have to read the full book - just the parts you need! ...more
3

Dec 27, 2018

What a fascinating book this was. I've heard a few people talking about the "slow carb diet" and "bulletproof coffee" and decided to read up on this trend.

I won't bore you by describing Timothy Ferriss' entire diet program (you can find good summaries online for his slow-carb diet), but the short-short version is to eat a high protein & high veggie diet six days of the week, and then have one cheat day. His book also has a bunch of exercise tips, supplement tips, and other hacks for What a fascinating book this was. I've heard a few people talking about the "slow carb diet" and "bulletproof coffee" and decided to read up on this trend.

I won't bore you by describing Timothy Ferriss' entire diet program (you can find good summaries online for his slow-carb diet), but the short-short version is to eat a high protein & high veggie diet six days of the week, and then have one cheat day. His book also has a bunch of exercise tips, supplement tips, and other hacks for boosting weight loss.

What makes this book more interesting to read than your typical diet book is how much experimenting Ferriss has done on his own body. He's a bit of a madman, to be honest. Besides weight loss, he also has chapters on adding more muscle, getting better sleep, running faster, etc. Recommended.

Meaningful Quotes
[from someone who lost 70 pounds in one year, on what inspired him to begin]
"'For me, it doesn't even matter what I wear; I'm not going to look good anyway' ... I heard myself say those words and I recognized them not for their content, but for their tone of helplessness. I am, in most of my endeavors, a solidly successful person. I decide I want things to be a certain way, and I make it happen ... If I want a better-than-average career, I can't simply 'go with the flow' and get it. Most people do just that: they wish for an outcome but make no intention-driven actions toward that outcome. If they would just do something most people would find that they get some version of that outcome they're looking for. That's been my secret. Stop wishing and start doing."

"Your body is almost always within your control. This is rare in life, perhaps unique. Simply focusing on some measurable element of your physical nature can prevent you from becoming a 'Dow Joneser,' someone whose self-worth is dependent on things largely outside of their control. Job not going well? Company having issues? Some idiot making life difficult? If you had ten laps to your swimming, or if you cut five seconds off your best mile time, it can still be a great week. Controlling your body puts you in life's driver's seat."

...more
2

December 20, 2018

an absolute narcissist with an interesting idea
maybe this program works, if you're a droid, have a regular routine, and enjoy doing exactly the same thing every day. The book rambles quite a bit- as far as the wieght management, basically avoid starchy carbs, eat mostly veggies, try to do intermittent fasting, and one day a week splurge. the rest of the book wasnt much help for me but may be for you
1

May 26, 2012

Timothy Ferris clearly thinks quite highly of himself and doesn't hesitate to let you know how superior he is to you in every way in this incredibly long (592 pages) doorstop of a book. In it he professes to have the solution to many of your health woes and promises to help you accomplish such things as "Sleep 2 hours per day and perform better than on 8 hours." (I'll spare you the pain of reading his incredibly scientific and boring explanation by telling you that this requires an unbelievably Timothy Ferris clearly thinks quite highly of himself and doesn't hesitate to let you know how superior he is to you in every way in this incredibly long (592 pages) doorstop of a book. In it he professes to have the solution to many of your health woes and promises to help you accomplish such things as "Sleep 2 hours per day and perform better than on 8 hours." (I'll spare you the pain of reading his incredibly scientific and boring explanation by telling you that this requires an unbelievably complicated schedule of sleeping a few minutes at a time all day long. If you're blessed by the type of lifestyle where you don't have to work or interact with other human beings in any way, this might work for you).

Ferris' idea of a healthy life is chock full of supplements and expensive testing. He subjects himself to a myriad of experiments and has found success in his trials, but any adult with an actual job and family obligations could never afford the pills and gadgets he touts as lifesavers. I am thankful that I got this book from the library and didn't waste the $26.95 it costs to buy the book.

Besides being incredibly scientific and difficult to read, Ferris is simply too cocky and stuck on himself to gain my trust. ...more
3

September 3, 2018

Not sure this is accurate for everyone.
The author does experiments on himself under a controlled methodology. I found some of the information interesting but I could not apply it to my needs because we are all different.
4

Jan 25, 2012

A lot of people miss the point of this book. It's possibly because, as one reviewer said, Tim Ferriss comes across as a smug dick. As a writer, his voice leaves a lot to be desired.

I digress. Tim throws out a lot of factoids, many of which may be oversimplified or even wrong out of context. But his methodology is right. The point of this book that seems to get missed is to 1) use your body as a laboratory and 2) MEASURE EVERYTHING.

He records everything meticulously. He changes one variable at a A lot of people miss the point of this book. It's possibly because, as one reviewer said, Tim Ferriss comes across as a smug dick. As a writer, his voice leaves a lot to be desired.

I digress. Tim throws out a lot of factoids, many of which may be oversimplified or even wrong out of context. But his methodology is right. The point of this book that seems to get missed is to 1) use your body as a laboratory and 2) MEASURE EVERYTHING.

He records everything meticulously. He changes one variable at a time. He consults with experts. And he is not afraid to try something just to see what happens. He forms an educated theory and then shines a light on it and if it stands up it goes in the book.

THAT is the point of the 4 Hour Body. Anyone who reads it should not take his word on the specifics as anything more than "This worked for me." What they do need to take is his methodology and principles and extend them to their own lives. ...more
3

Nov 13, 2014

It's not in the same level of 'The 4 hour work week' but definitely is worth reading. Timothy is a bit crazy in this book, some of the chapters have too much technical information which looses the grip. So, i skipped the chapters which i found impractical and not applicable to my life and finished in just 2 days.
2

August 30, 2018

All over the place
Wow. This book is all over the place. The author even says to not read it from front to back. I wish I would have known that's the type of read this is. I wasn't looking for a book that I have to skim through to search for a topic. That said, there are some amazing topics in this book. I just wish it was written better.
1

Aug 10, 2012

I hated this book, mostly because it sells as
science this guy's statistically insignificant, biased and poorly designed life experiment. It's less entertaining than a car crash, but has a bit of the morbid interest about the damage it may cause to society.
Not to mention the sex bit, which is pathetic in its definition, scope, and intended results. Luckily, for the better knowing women it will probably mark him as a clueless lover.
I read the first half, abandoned it for a year, and then skimmed I hated this book, mostly because it sells as
science this guy's statistically insignificant, biased and poorly designed life experiment. It's less entertaining than a car crash, but has a bit of the morbid interest about the damage it may cause to society.
Not to mention the sex bit, which is pathetic in its definition, scope, and intended results. Luckily, for the better knowing women it will probably mark him as a clueless lover.
I read the first half, abandoned it for a year, and then skimmed through the rest: nothing to call my attention. No more Ferriss for me, ever.
...more

Best Books from your Favorite Authors & Publishers

compare-icon compare-icon
Thousands of books

Take your time and choose the perfect book.

review-icon review-icon
Read Reviews

Read ratings and reviews to make sure you are on the right path.

vendor-icon vendor-icon
Multiple Stores

Check price from multiple stores for a better shopping experience.

gift-icon

Enjoy Result