Taking Charge of ADHD: The Complete, Authoritative Guide for Parents (Revised Edition) Info

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A treasured parent resource since its publication, Taking
Charge of ADHD
provides authoritative information on ADHD and its
treatment. From internationally renowned ADHD expert Russell A. Barkley,
the book empowers parents by arming them with the knowledge, expert
guidance, and confidence they need. Included are:

*A
step-by-step plan for behavior management that has helped thousands of
children.
*Current information on medications, including
coverage of Strattera and extended-release
stimulants.
*Strategies that help children succeed at school
and in social situations.
*Advances in research on the causes
of ADHD.
*Practical advice on managing stress and keeping
peace in the family.
*Descriptions of books, organizations,
and Internet resources that families can trust.


Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for Taking Charge of ADHD: The Complete, Authoritative Guide for Parents (Revised Edition):

1

April 2, 2002

Chemical Restraints and Chips and Points
There are several far better researched books than this one on the market concerning ADHD. There are serious and learned differences of opinion on the treatment for ADHD and far more than just some ill-conceived "controversy", as Dr. Barkley would have us believe, on the subject of the epidemic proportions of stimulant therapy for this condition. Please, do not read this book and proceed on with your decision making process on behalf of your child without reading some of those other books...
This book is being called "The Complete Authoritative Guide For Parents," which it most assuredly is NOT. This book dismisses the idea that the unbridled and irresponsible wholesale dissemination of stimulants is a bad thing for our children. He systematically takes each serious concern about chemical restraints and dismisses them in a few short sentences with a flippant attitude that these concerns are "mythological." He makes the unfounded claim that stimulants are effective in treating ADHD in 50-95% of patients. That claim is almost criminal in its inaccuracy, and could only be considered truthful if using a highly skewed definition of the word "effective." The typical "chips and points" or Token System is highly touted as another effective tool and while it may be useful for some children, it too, has come in to serious question as to it's actual effectiveness and in fact, is seen as a highly ineffective, abnormal, and in fact damaging method of handling the ADHD child or adolescent. My main problem with this book is that the author takes an arrogant, end-all and be-all approach to this complex condition. He makes it seem like this book is the definitive answer and by doing that he is cheating people out of possibly finding alternatives that are healthier and more effective at healing and helping children become effective human beings. This does not even take into consideration that there is vast controversy over the very idea that so many children actually even have ADHD. This book rather than encouraging dialogue or encouraging further study takes a paternalistic, and in my opinion destructive attitude concerning the parenting and nurture of ADHD children, and sadly of children in general. I suggest that rather than buying into the controlling and disabling policies and principles that this book offers as THE way, rather than looking at "Taking Charge of ADHD," we should consider taking charge of ADHD drug pushing and abuse. We should, instead, consider taking charge of our schools and our physicians and making them accountable to us, the individual children and parents who are being victimized by the type of system this book promotes. Start by NOT relying solely on this book if you feel you must buy it, borrow or buy as well at least one of the other books I have mentioned, and form your own considered opinion. Our children are not lab rats and they are not "problem children." They deserve better than this book offers.
1

January 21, 2004

A misguided, debilitating approach to ADHD
Back in 1996 I was at a CE seminar presented by Barkley, a smooth talker with lots of fancy graphics and research references, not to mention ties with pharmaceutical drug marketers. However, most of what he presents is distorted, superficial, and contains numerous false statements about the implications of research and about the causes and treatments of ADHD symptoms. Barkley is still "bark"ing up the same tree he was several years ago, making money by telling people what they wish to hear to absolve themselves of any responsibility in having fostered ADHD behaviors, or having to do anything more than use some fancy reward system sold by Barkley's associates or dispense some pill marketed by Barkley's benefactors. Barkley's approach has become widely adopted, thereby perpetuating the patterns of behavior labeled ADHD. Barkley's behavioral approach discourages thinking and creativity in children, instead making them focus on rewards and discipline, making their lives more stressful. The reward systems he recommends are also flawed from a behavioral psychology perspective, as psychologist David Stein has observed, and actually promote continued ADHD behaviors in a significant portion of children. This system is so flawed it's no wonder that the studies show drugs suppress ADHD behaviors better than Barkley's behavior management approaches. Unfortunately, the drugs can either aggravate ADHD symptoms over the long term or promote depression, bipolar, or obsessive-compulsive symptoms, depending upon the individual's internal reaction to the ingestion of disruptive chemicals. Barkley ignores better behavioral and parenting approaches as well as research confirming the benefits of approaches like neurofeedback, massage, acupuncture, nutritional supplements, sensory integration therapies, progressive educational settings, and treating for adverse reactions to exposure to environmental hazards, such as heavy metals, allergens, processed food ingredients, and synthetic chemicals. ADHD is a label for a pattern of behavior that is typical of a tendency to not filter stimuli as social settings often require, with a great many factors influencing the development of this pattern, and a great many factors having the potential to help the individual shift toward a more socially acceptable pattern of filtering stimuli, without suppressing one's ability to be creative, intuitive, or spontaneous. Barkley's approach does nothing about underyling factors contributing to the dominant pattern of diminished filtering, and directs the person to be highly reliant on external controls and manipulations, since Barkley assumes there is some inherent biological abnormality in people labeled ADHD, ignoring the interaction between the individual's personality, genetic potentials, social environment, biochemical environment, and educational environment. If you took a brain scan of someone with an ADHD label you could match it with patterns found in scans of anyone, depending upon what mood, activity, or state of focus they are in at the moment of the scan. Only 24 hour monitoring of brain activity would have any relevance to assessing ADHD patterns, and even then it would only show a pattern of brain activity initiated by psychological and chemical factors, which are variable, just like behaviors are. Barkley has no clue what the brain really is - a transceiver/transducer for information processing between the mind/spirit and the body embedded in the physical reality matrix. Conscious and subconscious psychological factors greatly influence the pattern of activity exhibited in the brain, as do nutrition and drug ingestion. Barkley promotes external locus of control, assuming something is inherently/genetically "wrong" in persons exhibiting ADHD patterns of behavior and attentional filtering. More enlightened approaches help the individual develop self-mastery in balancing their body, mind, and emotions to facilitate any desired state of consciousness, recognizing that taking in great amounts of stumuli data or seeking out the most exciting or novel stimulus to focus attention on is not a defect, but a way of interacting with the environment that may need to be used less frequently in order to function in some settings. If you want your child to be a drug dependent, order-following worker, then follow Barkley's approach. If you want your child to be intelligent, creative, thoughtful, and self-empowered, then I suggest you look at some holistic approaches.
1

November 28, 2001

Depressing View of ADHD
This book by Barkley is very old news dressed up in a new cover. Barkley has been trumpeting this tired message for years in previous books and I found this one to be no different. If you want to be depressed about your ADHD or your child's ADHD, then by all means read this book.
If you want some hopeful news about attention and behavior problems, then there are many books by better informed authors who have more balanced perspectives on this issue.
Barkely focuses on drug interventions for controlling children and adults with ADHD and gives the impression that current research supports his contention that drugs are the only way to help struggling kids.
Fortunately this is just not the case. There are many hopeful approaches that do not use drugs and that have solid research support. (...) Barkley is first in line to cast a dark cloud over those who don't easily fit into the regimented classroom environment. Drugs do work to make kids more cooperative and more attentive but often at the expense of their ability to be creative and spontaneous.
Do a search for ADHD here on the Amazon site and you will find many positive books. This one is too limited to be of much use to most people.
A couple of suggestions are: Hartmann's Complete Book on ADD, Hallowell and Ratey's DRIVEN TO DISTRACTION, Sears and Thompson's THE ADD BOOK and for EEG biofeedback, you can read Jim Robbins' book, A Symphony in the Brain.
Hope this helps.
1

November 29, 2001

Author is biased and negative toward children with ADHD
I feel this author has consistently demonstrated his bias that drugs are necessary to treat ADHD. This is not what I have found in treating ADHD with EEG biofeedback, which hundreds of other practitioners also report successfully using. Drugs don't always change symptoms of ADHD. Drugs may be necessary in some case in conjunction with other approaches, but are not the magic pill we all wish we had to reverse the problems ADHD is belived to cause.
[In my opinion] the Barkley book reflects the authors bias and he fails to allow that so many researchers have had very good results with EEG biofeedback. I would suggest reading another book such as J. Ratey's "Driven to Distraction" or Joel Sears et al. "The ADD Book". Read one of these first if you must read Barkley.
Joseph Kaye, Dr.P.H.
2

December 5, 2001

Getting Better, but Still Limited
Dr. Barkley's book covers many important areas, and does so competently. However, he also promulgates some important misinformation. Although to a lesser degree in the revised edition, he still ignores a significant literature showing utility of EEG biofeedback for remediating symptoms of ADHD. He ignores early case study data, group series data, and recent controlled study data. This suggests at minimum, scientific negligence of an entire field of study. Further, he fails to adequately consider recent reviews that are unfavorable regarding utility of Ritalin. Although criticism can be rendered for most books, given Dr. Barkley's stature, and the responsibilty owed to a public sorely in need of information and direction, we should expect greater attempt at objectivity. (...)
1

January 13, 2008

I hated this!
Just a brief note to throw an opposing opinion in the ring about this book. To be completely honest I couldn't even get through the whole book. I had to bounce around from chapter to chapter. I felt the author had the most condescending, he knows it all attitude towards the reader ever.
He makes several negative comments towards Christian fundalmentalists & Hillary Clinton. I don't think this sort of book needed that type of comments.
And I also though the chip reward system was an absolute joke. Who has time for such an elaborate behavior campaign? What about the other siblings? My mind would spin just thinking about it.
5

Jan 27, 2016

I wish I had read this three years ago. This has become an invaluable resource for me in getting a gameplan together to manage my son's ADHD. I recommend this for anyone with a child who has trouble in the classroom. It doesn't touch on any learning disabilities, but gives plenty of arrows to point you in the right direction.
3

Jul 06, 2013

Hm. Don't know where to start on this one. Some chapters were certainly worth it. Others were very clinical and scary. Lots of statistics to make it Loud and Clear what kids and parents are up against. It was a good cautionary tale in some respects, validations about some of the things I'm already doing in other respects...and some good basic medical information. But, as a good friend reminded me recently, this isn't the book that is going to give me hope. This book will give me facts and Hm. Don't know where to start on this one. Some chapters were certainly worth it. Others were very clinical and scary. Lots of statistics to make it Loud and Clear what kids and parents are up against. It was a good cautionary tale in some respects, validations about some of the things I'm already doing in other respects...and some good basic medical information. But, as a good friend reminded me recently, this isn't the book that is going to give me hope. This book will give me facts and truths. The hope I must find from the heart of my boy and my faith. ...more
1

June 5, 2014

Not crazy about this book
As a parent of a newly diagnosed ADHD child, I purchased this book because it was recommended to me. The book does give very helpful facts and information; however, I feel like it has a negative undertone and lacks compassion. I have read several other ADHD books because naturally my first instinct was to educate myself once my son was diagnosed. The author focuses a lot on the negative aspects of ADHD and set backs. I got halfway through the book and had to stop reading it for awhile because it was so discouraging. Maybe the newer third edition of this book is better, who knows. I do like the fact that the author pushes you to be an advocate for your child which is very important. There are more positive books and resources (yes, that are scientific based) out there that are available for parents.
2

March 17, 2009

This book is out of date
I recently bought this book to help me with my own ADHD child. I thought I knew what ADHD was and this book only confused me. When I brought up the issues in the book that concerned me, my child's psychotherapist told me that the book is out of date and the theory's held in this book are views that are no longer held by the medical community.
The issues that are out of date:
1.) That ADHD is merely a problem of behavior inhibition.
2.) That ADHD children to not have an "inner voice" that helps guide their behavior.
3.) People with ADHD do not have the ability to look towards the future.
If you are looking for help with your child, find a great therapist that will teach your child coping skills and look for a book that is current with all of the new research that there is on ADHD. It will help you tremendously. This book will not.
1

December 12, 2006

Thanks to negative reviewers
Just want to say thank you to all the reviewers who gave this one star and explained why.
5

February 15, 2012

Taking Charge of ADHD
I can't begin to tell you how many books I have read on ADHD since my daughter was diagnosed back in 2005. I can't even begin to tell you how many books are out there that have totally false and misleading information. What I can tell you, however, is that Dr. Barkley really gets it! I mean he really has studied this disorder and will even admit that even he doesn't know everything about the disorder but he does his best to shed light on a very complex disorder and gives many parents hope in a struggle that is never-ending. When my daughter's therapist first recommended this book, I will be honest, I thought "oh great another self help guru that is going to lead me nowhere" but I bought the book per her recommendation and decided to give the book a try, albeit with a very narrow-minded attitude. Since I have gotten this book, I have had several 'aha' moments. It has even helped me to understand things about my daughter that I had no idea were related to her condition. Dr. Barkley is even wise enough to admit that he doesn't know everything and that you, the parent, know far more about your child than any 'professional' out there. I strongly recommend this book to any parent who has a child with ADHD or anyone struggling with the disorder themselves.
4

May 22, 2013

I found this book to be both informative and insightful. However, in my opinion, it also reads like a textbook and was at times a bit of a chore to get through.
4

May 6, 2008

Good reference material
I'm a year into the search for help for my 8 year old son with AD/HD. Reading this book at first was a drag....I have been on the internet and learned a lot about the whys and the hows. However, what was very helpful were the parts about how to handle social situations and others reactions to the situation. It's hard to explain over and over why your kid is on drugs to your friends when they don't "see" the problem. At least this book gave me some vindication that I am in fact doing the right thing. I guess you could say it's a good security blanket.
3

March 18, 2013

OK - but way too negative.
I found this book helpful in some ways but much to much negative. ADHD and ADD can have its challenges but it also can be a gift. The book did give some useful tips on parenting or changing behavior, dealing with evaluations and knowing your rights in terms of special education. However, it gave a lot of statistics about how many adhd kids don't graduate, have no friends, usually have learning disabilities and while that might be true I know TONS of people who have ADD/ADHD who have VERY successful lives. I would recommend Edward Halloway's books over this book.
3

June 19, 2009

A good reference
Making the Connection: A Parent's Guide to Medication in ADHDDr.Barkley is a recognized expert in the field of ADHD. Taking Charge of ADHD has been around for several years as an essential reference for many parents. Even though this book is outdated regarding the latest research and the current available medications, it is still an excellent reference for parents looking for good reliable information on ADHD. Part 1 is an overview of ADHD. Dr. Barkley addresses many of the myths that surround the diagnosis as well as provide good basic information. The other parts of the book address a variety of topics including some common sense behavioral approaches. Overall this is a good reference that is a bit outdated.
4

Oct 28, 2019

Disclaimer: This is probably more a rant about my son’s ADHD than a review. You’ve been warned.

Not too long ago, while reading a description of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, I was struck by its similarities to my child. Having been around for 100% of his fetal development, I know I ingested nothing worse than Ramen Noodles, but the similarities led me to the suspicion that my son’s more concerning behaviors and traits are related to some type of early brain damage. This took me down a rabbit hole Disclaimer: This is probably more a rant about my son’s ADHD than a review. You’ve been warned.

Not too long ago, while reading a description of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, I was struck by its similarities to my child. Having been around for 100% of his fetal development, I know I ingested nothing worse than Ramen Noodles, but the similarities led me to the suspicion that my son’s more concerning behaviors and traits are related to some type of early brain damage. This took me down a rabbit hole that led me back to his diagnosis of ADHD from 3-4 years ago, which then led me to this book.

I don’t know why the pediatrician who diagnosed him didn’t explain that there is so much more to ADHD than inattentiveness. I hadn’t realized how valid “Blame It on My ADD” could be. This book explained so much about my son’s behavior, so many aha moments. It was like watching the end of Sixth Sense and reframing all those scenes in light of the big reveal. Some of the bigger ahas:

* Pre-natal developmental problems are linked to ADHD. I have a pet theory about mold in the chronically flooded basement I lived in while pregnant, but this is not one of the known factors listed in the book. What I do know is that my baby was so small en utero that the doctor decided I must have been confused about my dates and pushed out the due date a full month (which made no sense because that meant I wasn’t pregnant when I took my first positive pregnancy test, but hey, I’m no doctor). Lo and behold, my son was born “early” and very small.
* Temperament in infancy and early childhood is connected to ADHD. People would tell me my colicky baby had to be in pain to cry so much, but I secretly wondered if he was just bored. He could never get enough stimulation. I became a human Disneyland ride, bouncing and pacing and swinging simultaneously to keep him happy. The study about ADHD children playing with each toy for less time really hit home. As a toddler (through NOW), he couldn’t (can’t) entertain himself for long. I remember one particular weekend rushing him from one activity to the next — the zoo, the park, several playdates, and more — and coming home exhausted only to find my 5-year-old couldn’t entertain himself for even the one unstructured hour of the day. Still waiting for that selective hyper-focus everyone talks about ADHD-ers having to kick in.
* Deficiencies in fine motor skills are linked to ADHD. Around age 4, he was concerned about who would spoon-feed him when his baby brother needed the same service. When he was starting kindergarten, I remember trying to explain to a teacher that he couldn’t put on his own jacket. She kept thinking I meant he couldn’t zip it, but he literally could not put it on. Another teacher warned me he would fail kindergarten if he couldn’t form more legible letters. (We moved, so I never found out if he progressed enough to pass that school district’s standards.)
* More than an attention problem, ADHD is an issue with self-regulation and executive function. I think the book uses the term “self-inhibition,” but it made more sense for me to think of it as “self-control.” I truly believe my son wants to be “good” but has cognitive deficiencies that make carrying out that resolve difficult. I remember his pre-school self staring wistfully at a mall Santa and saying, “Santa won’t bring me anything. I’m not good.”
* ADHD brains have difficulty processing long-term consequences. Only days before I read this, my son had tried to explain, when asked why he did X when he knew the consequence would be Y, “I’m not a future person. I’m a now person.” He wasn’t presenting it as an excuse, just an explanation. I don’t know if I’m mixing up this book with other studies I’ve read, but I guess ADHD brains don’t get much, if any, of a chemical rush of pleasure from anticipating a reward, making it more difficult to work towards that reward. This explains why all his sticker charts remained empty growing up. I assume it works the same way in reverse, where he doesn’t get the same reaction to anticipated negative consequences as everyone else does.
* ADHD is one ginormous sleep problem. I’d already learned that ADHD and sleep problems are connected, but this book further explained that those with ADHD move more physically during sleep as well as during the day, and they don’t have the same structured circadian rhythms as others. I’ve read elsewhere that when sleep problems are solved, ADHD symptoms go away entirely. But since ADHD causes the sleep problems to begin with…
* ADHD is a disability. I remember trying to explain to a therapist that our son was “high maintenance” and required a lot of energy from me. The therapist interpreted this as him having “special needs,” and I corrected her, but maybe that wasn’t the wrong way to put it. However, the author is firm that this particular disability requires MORE accountability of the disabled, not less, in order to mitigate the disability.
* ADHD is linked to Oppositional Defiance Order. My son doesn’t have an ODD diagnosis, but that would explain A LOT.

One thing the author did well was make me, the parent, feel validated. I’ve gotten so burned out on parenting books, with their condescending assurance that you were doing everything ridiculously wrong until you found this book. I was whining to my sister about this when she said, “Maybe all the normal parenting books don’t work because you aren’t parenting a normal child.” (Mind blown.) If this can be called a parenting book, it’s not a normal one, thank goodness. The author reassures us that we aren’t bad parents. One study is cited to show that the differences between parents of ADHD children and others is probably a reaction to the child, not a cause. The author walks a fine line between not blaming parents and showing it’s still within the parents’ power to make it better. (It was sobering to hear that the big distinguishing factor between whether difficult toddlers are later diagnosed with ADHD is the primary caregiver.) He even understands that parents have their own crap to deal with, with ADHD parents being more likely to have depression and anxiety and even ADHD themselves, something that “normal” parenting books never seem to grasp. When the author expresses understanding of how exhausting parenting an ADHD child is...strumming my pain with his fingers. He notes that parents of ADHD children have the same stress levels as parents of children with severe developmental disabilities. And I thought I was just a wuss. He even includes a chapter on how to take care of yourself as a parent, with the takeaway that your child doesn’t need you to be a martyr. 

A lot of the parenting suggestions in the book rang true to me, such as:
* Reward and punish immediately so they can more easily connect their behavior with its consequence. (I think of this as treating them like Pavlov’s dogs.)
* Lecture sparingly. The kid probably isn’t listening anyway. If you have to lecture, keep it short and sweet.
* Never issue a command without enforcing it. So think carefully before issuing a command.
* Focus on one behavior at a time. Decide what the biggest problem is and work on that. I don’t know why I never gave myself permission to do this, but it’s very freeing to think I don’t have to address every problem at once.
* Don’t expect perfect grades, or homework perfectly completed. I already resigned myself to Bs, but I was still insistent that homework be perfect because it was done on my watch. Like several parents in the book, I’ve let homework impair our relationship. Grades are definitely not the biggest problem we should be working on, and if I’ve learned anything from parenting it’s that I need to save my strength for the battles that actually matter.

On the other hand, the suggestions for dealing with schools seem like helicopter parenting to me. Teachers do not get paid enough to do give as much individualized attention to my child as the author thinks parents should demand. However, that’s my perspective as the parent of a kid who’s bright enough (or at least at the older end of his class enough) to eek by despite his ADHD (albeit below his potential), and maybe I’d feel differently if he wasn’t doing so okay. It’s probably useful for students who already have IEPs, and maybe I’ll revisit that chapter if we ever get to that point.

I’m also a bit skeptical about reward programs, having set up and discarded many over the years. The nature of ADHD, as the author explained, requires bigger-than-usual rewards, so even small rewards have to be relatively large. I was pleasantly surprised when I realized he could be bribed, at 5, to not fight with his little brother for 24 hours in exchange for the backpack he wanted for school. But I don’t feel I should buy him a $10 something for every day he doesn’t hit his brother, and giving him tokens (e.g., sticker charts, money) to work up to a bigger reward has almost never worked with him. Further, often when I’ve offered him a reward and he doesn’t earn it, he’s thrown a tantrum about not being given the reward anyway, so I’m stuck with even worse behavior than I started with. I’m not sure how to apply a reward system in conjunction with other science that suggests too many rewards and even praise can backfire into entitlement and a lack of motivation to perform without an arbitrary/extrinsic reward. I don’t want to raise a Naomi Campbell: “I don't get out of bed for less than $10,000 a day.”

As other reviewers have noted, there is certainly a bleak, almost hopeless tone to the book. I’d been taking comfort that kids “grow out of it,” as evidenced by their frontal lobes developing into normal size by adulthood, but the author shatters this by observing that an increase in size is not necessarily an increase in grey matter. And sure, 50% of kids “grow out of” ADHD by adulthood, but according to the author only 10% of kids DON’T have a some sort of mental disorder (depression, ADHD, anti-social, etc.) in adulthood.

But it’s what I needed — realistic explanations and expectations, not empty platitudes or promises about what a wonderful gift ADHD is if only it were understood. Maybe I’ll want to read that type of book later, but right now I want to know what I’m up against.

It’s helped to remind myself, when hearing that ADHD teens are however-many-more times likely to crash a car or get someone pregnant, that 4 times a very small percentage is still a small percentage. (Side note: I thought it was a little hypocritical of the author to scare us about how much more likely our child is to do all manner of shenanigans, then later lecture us not to catastrophize about our teen doing those shenanigans.)

I would have liked to see more optimism about neurofeedback and neuroplasticity in general, with evaluations of the effectiveness of exercises for developing white and grey matter in the prefrontal lobe (e.g, piano, “brain games,” Brain Balance), but I realize this book was written a while ago. I’d love to see an updated version. ...more
5

Jul 15, 2019

I haven't read every page (yet) but this has been an invaluable resource in helping me understand the best way to parent my son.
5

Oct 30, 2013

Best book that I've read on this topic. Recent science, excellent advice. One downside for me: less attention (ha!) to inattentive type than to hyperactive and combined types. Barkley is a blunt guy, calling the myths about ADHD "fallacies" and those holding them to be "scientifically illiterate." This is also the first book I've read that addresses the true seriousness of ADHD, that even the term ADHD (which he thinks should be changed) "trivializes the disorder, since it grossly understates Best book that I've read on this topic. Recent science, excellent advice. One downside for me: less attention (ha!) to inattentive type than to hyperactive and combined types. Barkley is a blunt guy, calling the myths about ADHD "fallacies" and those holding them to be "scientifically illiterate." This is also the first book I've read that addresses the true seriousness of ADHD, that even the term ADHD (which he thinks should be changed) "trivializes the disorder, since it grossly understates the substantial and dramatic problems" it can cause. Kind of a bummer to read cuz ADHD ain't pretty, but I do prefer facts to fallacies, so I recommend it. ...more
2

Apr 25, 2012

Although there are some good chapters in this book, I found that the author assumed all children with ADHD had oppositional defiance disorder (ODD) and a large portion of this book was dedicated to behavior modification and increasing compliance. This book sets out to educate parents about ADHD, but it seems a bit misinformed about all aspects of the disorder. I did appreciate the chapters on how the medications work, and all the options available.
4

Jan 23, 2014

I didn't like that they stuck fast to commonly used medical terms, like "minimal brain dysfunction" and "ADHD" even though not all cases of ADD include Hyperactivity, however I was extremely grateful for the medical explanations of what causes the inattention and for the many tips on how to use positive reinforcement to encourage attention and proper behavior.
5

Feb 19, 2015

This is the bible of ADHD resources. I appreciate how thorough it is, and how the author cites references and dates for every study, fact, or statistic. If you have a child with ADHD, this is a must read, must highlight, must memorize passages. There is a third edition out, and I highly recommend getting the most recent edition, as ADHD research is advancing all the time!
5

Feb 08, 2018

fantastic ADHD resource. I'm definitely a fact-based/science person, and if there's a why behind anything I want to know it. Some may feel this reads a bit like a text book, which it does at times, but, the information is valuable. As a parent without ADHD raising a child with ADHD there is so much to understand about this disorder & the disorders that can come along with ADHD that I never understood or knew because it wasn't a part of my life. Dr. Barkley explains why we see undesirable fantastic ADHD resource. I'm definitely a fact-based/science person, and if there's a why behind anything I want to know it. Some may feel this reads a bit like a text book, which it does at times, but, the information is valuable. As a parent without ADHD raising a child with ADHD there is so much to understand about this disorder & the disorders that can come along with ADHD that I never understood or knew because it wasn't a part of my life. Dr. Barkley explains why we see undesirable behaviors when raising a child with ADHD, the causes behind them and measures to take to help your child learn coping skills, and to help cause fewer conflicts at home ie. reward systems. Great suggestion in this book for all ages of ADHD young child through adulthood. Also, a whole lot about advocating for your child in a school setting when/if necessary, where to go for advice and what professionals to turn to for help. When we first got started with a diagnosis I knew nothing about any of these things, I should have picked this one up a while ago! This book had me nodding my head in agreement and highlighting passages that validated so much of what I see in my kid and myself as a parent to an ADHD kid. ...more
3

Jan 29, 2019

The first third of the book was pretty good: insightful, not too bogged down, explained multiple aspects well, information that is glossed over or not explained in other texts... then the book got really repetitive for a while. It picked back up a bit at the end in discussing the medications.

A bit of teacher bashing, a lot of ignorance about how to speak up or be an advocate for your child's education, as well as the realities of education in a public school - I would like a better book about The first third of the book was pretty good: insightful, not too bogged down, explained multiple aspects well, information that is glossed over or not explained in other texts... then the book got really repetitive for a while. It picked back up a bit at the end in discussing the medications.

A bit of teacher bashing, a lot of ignorance about how to speak up or be an advocate for your child's education, as well as the realities of education in a public school - I would like a better book about that. You can't choose your child's teachers in public school, interview them like candidates for a poorly paid job, and schools will rarely switch your kids class for lots of reasons, which doesn't really solve the problem or teach your child anything either - and a lot of pro-medicine/pro- pills solve all bias, but as a parent and a teacher, our daughter's medication allows her to be be herself and function, in a way she cannot without it, so I can understand this. ...more
5

Jun 01, 2018

This is definitely a complete guide to adhd. It has everything you could want to know plus lots more resources to continue the journey. I haven't yet implemented the behavior program he recommends, but have high hopes for it. I would definitely recommend this book for parents of kids with adhd. I found it so informative and helpful.

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