StrengthsFinder 2.0 Info

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Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for StrengthsFinder 2.0:

1

Oct 02, 2011

Starts with a cool idea: instead of spending time trying to get better at things you have no talent for, why not work at being great at things you have a natural affinity for? Each of us has things they tend to be good at (talents), and things they tend to not be good at (let's call them handicaps). Why should we spend time and energy overcoming our handicaps, at the expense of our talents? At most, we'll be average at them for a lot of effort. Instead, we should spend our efforts in line with Starts with a cool idea: instead of spending time trying to get better at things you have no talent for, why not work at being great at things you have a natural affinity for? Each of us has things they tend to be good at (talents), and things they tend to not be good at (let's call them handicaps). Why should we spend time and energy overcoming our handicaps, at the expense of our talents? At most, we'll be average at them for a lot of effort. Instead, we should spend our efforts in line with our talents and become really great at them.

The book outlines 34 themes, or areas of strength that Gallup has identified after looking at millions of profiles. It also gives you access to an online assessment that will magically tell you your top five strengths. Each theme has a nice description that makes you warm and fuzzy inside. Each also has activities to help you develop it. It's kinda like astrology, really: the descriptions are so fuzzy and use such powerful words that no matter which one you happen to read, you'll find that it matches you at some level and will sound like something you'd want to get better at. Luckily, there's the online assessment to make sure you only bother with five of them so you don't get too confused.

Of course, you cannot take the assessment without first purchasing the book. The entire intro reads like a pressure sales pitch for a psychic hotline. I'm very suspicious of opaque claims supported by pseudo-science with made-up names that come complete with a dead founder with a ludicrous made-up title that must be repeated in full every single time: Father of Strengths Psychology, Dr. Donald O. Clifton.

I like the premise of pursuing your own strengths, but the execution feels more like a religious cult than an exercise in reason. I went along, just for the sake of entertainment. My top five strengths are: Input, Context, Individualization, Intellection, and Adaptability. A few of the others sounded good to me, like Futuristic, for example. But the magical assessment program did not pick it when it used a whole slew of weird questions to somehow plumb my subconscious and decide on what my top five strengths were.

The book is essentially a sales pitch for the website. It tells you precious little about anything. It's only real value is in the code to take the online assessment. The book is definitely not worth $20, and I would not pay $20 for a self-help test. To me, it's barely a step above the get-rich-quick scam where you make a video on how to get rich in which you tell people to make a video on how to get rich.
...more
1

Mar 16, 2012

While I spent comparatively little for this copy, I'm angry now that I spent anything on it at all. I feel as if I've been suckered into a scam.

I bought this book hoping it would be useful in helping my teenagers determine their personal strengths, so they might use that knowledge when making decisions about both their future education and careers. What a waste of time and money. I made the mistake of judging by the total overall Amazon rating, rather than looking at individual reviews. Had I While I spent comparatively little for this copy, I'm angry now that I spent anything on it at all. I feel as if I've been suckered into a scam.

I bought this book hoping it would be useful in helping my teenagers determine their personal strengths, so they might use that knowledge when making decisions about both their future education and careers. What a waste of time and money. I made the mistake of judging by the total overall Amazon rating, rather than looking at individual reviews. Had I done the latter, I never would have bought it.

This book is nothing but an unnecessary syllabus for Gallup's online test. It includes discussion of the test, a list defining each of the 34 supposed themes and a code for taking the online test.

Just to try it out, I took the test myself, only then to discover that no one else could use the one included code. There's no way to add other profiles to your account. If I wanted my kids to be able to use Strengths Finder, I'd have to shell out more money and buy copies of the book for each of them. Are you kidding me? Why on earth would I want multiple copies of this nigh-useless book lying around?

Moreover, the test itself was exceedingly non-specific, the supposed strengths listed were just generic overviews of broad personality traits, and the "Ideas for Action" it offered were really quite vague. For example:

"Wise forethought can remove obstacles before they appear."

"Trust your insights, and use them to ensure the success of your efforts."

"Find people who like to talk about the same issues you do. Organize a discussion group
that addresses your subjects of interest."

Translation? Think before you act. Trust your instincts. Make friends with like-minded people.

Honestly, I've gotten more personal insight from fortune cookies. ...more
5

Aug 08, 2008

Total awesomeness!

This book and the included test (be sure to buy a new copy) inspired me for months. Finding out my top 5 strengths made who I am make so much more sense. I love their approach of focusing on what you are "designed" to do, rather than trying to shore up your weaknesses. They have specific suggestions for each strength which includes which kinds of folks you should pair up with and how others will react to your strength. For instance my top one is "Ideation" - a love for and Total awesomeness!

This book and the included test (be sure to buy a new copy) inspired me for months. Finding out my top 5 strengths made who I am make so much more sense. I love their approach of focusing on what you are "designed" to do, rather than trying to shore up your weaknesses. They have specific suggestions for each strength which includes which kinds of folks you should pair up with and how others will react to your strength. For instance my top one is "Ideation" - a love for and facility with ideas - and it suggests that some folks might not follow my leaping train of thought so I'll need to connect the dots for them. That's good to remember.

I love the whole mindset of it - it's a way to celebrate diversity and understand that we all have different strengths and we need to work together so we can benefit from things we don't have and vice versa. A great model for teamwork and for managers. ...more
5

Jul 09, 2009

Why I Read this Book: Knowing and living ones natural talents and strengths is on of the keys to lasting fulfillment. This book is the answer to discovering those strengths.

Topics Covered:

* Understanding your unique strengths
* Working effectively with others
* Achieving lasting fulfillment
* Time management

Review:

This ones short and sweet. To get 90% of the value out of this will take you about two hours. I see it more as a tool than a book, a tool to foster success, fulfillment and enjoyment. Why I Read this Book: Knowing and living one’s natural talents and strengths is on of the keys to lasting fulfillment. This book is the answer to discovering those strengths.

Topics Covered:

* Understanding your unique strengths
* Working effectively with others
* Achieving lasting fulfillment
* Time management

Review:

This one’s short and sweet. To get 90% of the value out of this will take you about two hours. I see it more as a tool than a book, a tool to foster success, fulfillment and enjoyment. My coach recommended Strengths Finder 2.0 about a month ago and since then I have personally spread the word to about 15 of my close friends.

Have you ever been told by a boss or colleague that you could use some work in a specific department, say public speaking, research, strategic thinking or negotiating? They’ve noticed where you are weak and suggest that you work on improving those areas. So much of our go-get-em and super-achiever success-driven society is focused on doing everything as absolute best as possible. If you aren’t good at something, then go get good at it. Seems like a decent idea, right? Maybe not.

Tom Rath and Gallop, as an organization, feel differently and I couldn’t agree more. Instead of spending your time on improving what you aren’t that good at and therefore don’t usually enjoy that much, why not focus your time on the few things that you are better at than most anyone and the things that light that fire inside of you? Odds are there isn’t much more of a satisfying and fulfilling way to spend your time than to focus on your natural talents. Strengths Finder 2.0 is the latest edition in a series of books written over the years to help people discover and spend time working with their very best skills.

Key points to take away:

* A life spent focusing on improving our weaknesses leads to dissatisfaction and mediocrity
* Spending time doing what we love and are best at is what drives success
* We cannot be great at everything, so get over it
* Everyday should be filled doing what one believes are their true gifts
* Opposing strengths can lead to the strongest partnerships

Those of you who have heard of the Gallop Organization, know how deep and research driven their ideas are. They have data to back up most everything they do, and a ton of it. Have you ever noticed the name that comes along with most new ground breaking polls or studies? That’s Gallop. My point is they do things based on science and what they learn from many thousands of test subjects.

They took this laser-like focus and applied it to building a program dedicated to analyzing people’s strengths and finding what skills they posses and do better than anything else in their life–what springs them out of bed in the morning and drives them working until late at night in pure excitement. The result was a list of 34 unique strengths that a person can possess, five of which tend to dominate one’s talents. The majority of the book explains each strength and how it’s applied to life, however the huge value comes from the 30 minute online strengths assessment/test that comes with the book.

I don’t joke when I say this is a 30 minute test that could easily change your life. Once complete, your five top strengths will be computed along with twenty or so pages worth of tasks, ideas and suggestions on how to best lead a life and career that fully values your gifts. The road map I was provided was enlightening to say the least and happened to be right on. No surprise that it recommended I find a career that involves lots of writing, teaching, reading and interacting with people. What do you know? The suggestions were amazing. Some were obvious and others went off like a light bulb when I read them.

Imagine a world where people only spent their time doing what they are best at and enjoy? How much less stress and anger would there be? How much more productivity, excitement and passion would there be to jump out of bed and tackle today’s serving of life? This is the starting point.

And the learning does not end with yourself. Even more powerful are the synergies created when colleagues and co-workers know both their strengths and those of the people around them so they work together in a balanced and efficient way. I’m sure you’ve heard the saying that if two founders of a company agree on everything then someone isn’t necessary. That’s exactly the point. Work with people with different strengths. Instead of dwelling on what you aren’t best at, find someone who’s strengths are your weaknesses and get to work on a project with them or go out and start a business. You’ll likely be unstoppable. The issue in the past is that these things are very difficult to intuitively know. Strengths Finder will guide you. I just gave a copy to my partner and co-founder today and I can’t wait to see how we can fill any voids and keep our venture rock solid. With tools like these, it’s hard to imagine a path to success without them.

As I hope many of you know by now, success only goes as far as our enjoyment, freedom and satisfaction will allow it. The sad reality is that many of us spend the majority of our time doing things we are not particularly good at and that we don’t particularly enjoy. And this is all with the goal of great success at the end of the rainbow. Seems odd, doesn’t it? But if we stop to think that success is not a destination but more so a way of life, we realize we’ve had it all backwards. We should be spending our time doing what we are best at, most enjoy and love. The first step is discovering our unique strengths and then living a life abundant in them. That is the path to fulfillment. That is success.

My top five strengths are Achiever, Maximizer, Input, Positivity and Discipline. What are yours? I look forward to hearing your top 5, so please leave it in the comments section below. Who knows, maybe we’ll be a good match for a venture some day.

~Reading for Your Success ...more
2

Jul 03, 2012

I agree with the premise of this book 100%. Rath hypothesizes that instead of spending most of our time trying to improve our areas of weakness (as most of us in the U.S. public school systems learn to do), we should instead focus our energies on cultivating our areas of strength. The formula that the author uses is Talent x Investment = Strength. This is the gist of the first 28 pages.

Here comes the rub. At Page 29 you read "Parting Thoughts." This is basically where the book ends and you're I agree with the premise of this book 100%. Rath hypothesizes that instead of spending most of our time trying to improve our areas of weakness (as most of us in the U.S. public school systems learn to do), we should instead focus our energies on cultivating our areas of strength. The formula that the author uses is Talent x Investment = Strength. This is the gist of the first 28 pages.

Here comes the rub. At Page 29 you read "Parting Thoughts." This is basically where the book ends and you're pointed to a website where you must register to take a test to help you identify your strengths.

Each book contains a unique access code that can only be used by one person. Do not buy this book if you want to share it and compare what you've learned with a friend. I also thought about donating the book to my public library system since it's a hardcover copy, but I know it would be completely useless to anyone checking it out. Essentially, you're paying $24.95 to take a test, not for a book. The remaining pages of the book are merely descriptions of the 34 themes, only five of which apply to you, based on the results of the online test.

In my case, the test results seem accurate, but not revelatory. I'm not sure the action ideas are truly helpful in telling me what to do with the information about my identified strengths.

It seems like the two goals of StrengthsFinder 2.0 are to (1) collect data and (2) sell research. The author works for Gallup, so I guess I should have seen that coming. ...more
3

Jul 06, 2012

So, the managers at my store are reading this.

And I was like, haha!, I will read this too and see what you are up to.

Yeah, this isn't that kind of book.

I've taken Myers-Briggs Personality-type tests before (I'm an ISTJ) so the evaluation tool you take at the Gallup site is pretty similar. And worth the purchase of the book because that gives you the code to take the test to find your top five strengths (check in the back of the book to make sure no one's stolen the code before you buy it). The So, the managers at my store are reading this.

And I was like, haha!, I will read this too and see what you are up to.

Yeah, this isn't that kind of book.

I've taken Myers-Briggs Personality-type tests before (I'm an ISTJ) so the evaluation tool you take at the Gallup site is pretty similar. And worth the purchase of the book because that gives you the code to take the test to find your top five strengths (check in the back of the book to make sure no one's stolen the code before you buy it). The majority of the book is the description of the 34 strengths and action goals - which are all available at the StrengthsFinder2.0 site which is a bit repetitive.

My strengths are:
1. Input
2. Learner
3. Consistency
4. Intellection
5. Responsibility

Pretty spot on. But what about the next five or ten strengths? And how do these interact with one another?

Oh, snap. You have to pay for a coaching session (about $550) to get the 6-34 list.

So I read the 29 strengths and found ten that resonated with me so it's safe to assume they rank as the 6-15 crowd. But there's nothing in the assessment spit out by the website or anywhere in the book about how your strengths interact with one another. No "If you've got these two strong strengths be careful you don't come across as a severe hardass" or "Manage your time so people don't think you're a lazybones" type material.

So I'm not sure what this will get the managers. Because I don't see how this will improve one manager's ability to slack off, take extra breaks, and "pretend" to work when we all know she's dickering around calling her grown children. Or another manager's propensity to treat the booksellers like dirt because of his own issues.

Maybe they'll have to read Strengths-Based Leadership to figure that out. ...more
5

Mar 07, 2009

I read this book to show my former boss that I was willing to work with her in her efforts to find out how all of her "beans'" strengths could mesh (which could only happen after everyone knew what strengths they had to contribute and when each bean had shared his/her strengths with the rest of the team). By the way, I worked at Starbucks.

I like the organization of the book, the detailed information about strengths, and even the online test you take to find out what strengths you have. I believe I read this book to show my former boss that I was willing to work with her in her efforts to find out how all of her "beans'" strengths could mesh (which could only happen after everyone knew what strengths they had to contribute and when each bean had shared his/her strengths with the rest of the team). By the way, I worked at Starbucks.

I like the organization of the book, the detailed information about strengths, and even the online test you take to find out what strengths you have. I believe the test is thorough and accurate. However,while I am happy that I got results and found out more about myself, what kind of persons I should collaborate with (as far as strengths go)I resent having to buy the book to complete the test online.

This is a very quick read and sharable, apart from the one time use online Strengths Finder test. ...more
4

Mar 23, 2013

Don't get this book from the library if you haven't taken the StrengthsFinder test, because each book only comes with one code. I had taken the test already and been provided with the supplementary material, so this doesn't have a lot to add except for advice on how to work with people with the strengths you don't have. I read the suggestions for my boss's strength, and I was like, "Preach!"

Other than that, I found StrengthsFinder to be far more useful and practical than older tests like the Don't get this book from the library if you haven't taken the StrengthsFinder test, because each book only comes with one code. I had taken the test already and been provided with the supplementary material, so this doesn't have a lot to add except for advice on how to work with people with the strengths you don't have. I read the suggestions for my boss's strength, and I was like, "Preach!"

Other than that, I found StrengthsFinder to be far more useful and practical than older tests like the Myers-Briggs, in fact it helped me see a change I needed to make in my own career, just gave me clarity I really needed. It also pointed out what I could/should be contributing at work based on the strengths, making me want more time for reflection and reading at work. I do these things at home, but not at work!

So basically, DO buy yourself this book or talk your workplace into doing StrengthsFinder. ...more
5

Dec 08, 2013

I love this book. I pick it up often and re-discover things about myself and my peers. Essential for anyone working on interpersonal relationships, or just trying to do their jobs better.
3

Nov 06, 2017

This book was required reading for a Strengths Finder class I took at work. I was actually surprised after doing the survey how much was revealed about my strengths. My top 5 strengths are: Input (I collect - knowledge and stuff), Intellection (I think about stuff), Learner (I learn from all this stuff I've collected and thought about), Analytical (well, duh, that was a no brainer Ms. Number Balancer/Data Reconciler) and Consistency (wanting everything to be FAIR).

In the class, we of course This book was required reading for a Strengths Finder class I took at work. I was actually surprised after doing the survey how much was revealed about my strengths. My top 5 strengths are: Input (I collect - knowledge and stuff), Intellection (I think about stuff), Learner (I learn from all this stuff I've collected and thought about), Analytical (well, duh, that was a no brainer Ms. Number Balancer/Data Reconciler) and Consistency (wanting everything to be FAIR).

In the class, we of course compared strengths. Learned about how people work together. The end result was that we should look for a job that plays to our strengths, not necessarily waste a lot of time trying to improve our weaknesses.

When I think of new career paths, I play around with reptile pet sitter or hazmat crime scene cleaner. I will probably continue analyzing with the financial realm, though. We'll see. ...more
3

Jun 03, 2018

Generally helpful and intriguing but the book on its own didn't entirely sell me. The more personalized test came a little closer.
Slightly skeptical that my number one strength came up as strategy.
Also, strengths aren't supposed to shift but I took the test twice and within a year four of my top five strengths changed. Granted, I went through a lot this past year. But still, doesn't that seem rather dramatic considering this test purports to measure your generally unchanging personality?
BUT Generally helpful and intriguing but the book on its own didn't entirely sell me. The more personalized test came a little closer.
Slightly skeptical that my number one strength came up as strategy.
Also, strengths aren't supposed to shift but I took the test twice and within a year four of my top five strengths changed. Granted, I went through a lot this past year. But still, doesn't that seem rather dramatic considering this test purports to measure your generally unchanging personality?
BUT critiques aside, a useful test that I appreciated and will use going forward. ...more
1

Jun 27, 2011

Like so many of the books in its genre, StrengthsFinder wastes a ridiculous number of (small, double-spaced, large-print) pages restating its fundamental principle in a variety of different ways. This tedium is compounded by the author's irritatingly self-satisfied tone.

The real meat of the book is actually online, where the assessment instrument itself resides. The instrument's engaging enough, but it's got one glaring flaw: it gave me a result that doesn't fit me well, and it offers no Like so many of the books in its genre, StrengthsFinder wastes a ridiculous number of (small, double-spaced, large-print) pages restating its fundamental principle in a variety of different ways. This tedium is compounded by the author's irritatingly self-satisfied tone.

The real meat of the book is actually online, where the assessment instrument itself resides. The instrument's engaging enough, but it's got one glaring flaw: it gave me a result that doesn't fit me well, and it offers no recourse. The site doesn't explain how it arrived at this particular result. It doesn't allow me to take the assessment again. All I can do is go back to the book and hunt through the various strengths to find one that fits better.

What's the point of an assessment instrument that's less accurate than a self-directed review of all the possible outcomes? Beats me. The strengths themselves are worth a read for pure intellectual value, I suppose, but only if you can get the book for free. ...more
2

Oct 02, 2013

Read this for a work committee. You get to take a test which identifies your top five themes. You are then provided an action plan to use these themes to capitalize on your strengths in the workplace. I'm a Scorpio.
4

Jul 29, 2010

Alright I had:

Maximizer - "Excellence, not average, is your measure. Taking something from below average to slightly above average takes a great deal of effort and in your opinion is not very rewarding. Transforming something strong into something superb takes just as much effort but is much more thrilling.' That is way me. I've always said that trying to be well rounded is a waste of time but being amazing at something should be the goal. I know what my flaws are and I simply don't care.

Relator Alright I had:

Maximizer - "Excellence, not average, is your measure. Taking something from below average to slightly above average takes a great deal of effort and in your opinion is not very rewarding. Transforming something strong into something superb takes just as much effort but is much more thrilling.' That is way me. I've always said that trying to be well rounded is a waste of time but being amazing at something should be the goal. I know what my flaws are and I simply don't care.

Relator - Relator describes your attitude toward your relationships. In simple terms, the Relator theme pulls you toward people you already know. You do not necessarily shy away from meeting new people but you do derive a great deal of pleasure and strength from being around your close friends. You are comfortable with intimacy. Once the initial connection has been made, you deliberately encourage a deepening of the relationship. Wow, I'm freaked out. I am totally this. I have very little interest in having a lot of friends. I am only interested in having a very small group of extremely close friends. And with those close friends I am very open.

Input - You are inquisitive. You collect things. You might collect information - words, facts, books and quotations - or you might collect tangible objects. Whatever you collect, you collect it because it interests you. And yours is the kind of mind that finds so many things interesting. Yeah I collect books. This makes perfect sense. However, the description goes on to make this sound like a hoarder and I am not a hoarder. I throw everything away except written information. I have all my old text books.

Ideation - You are fascinated by ideas. What is an idea? And idea is a concept, the best explanation of the most events. You are delighted when you discover beneath the complex surface an elegantly simple concept to explain why things are the way they are. An idea is a connection. Yours is the kind of mind that is always looking for connections, and so you are intrigues when seemingly disparate phenomena can be linked by an obscure connection.
Yep. That me.

Adaptability - You live in the moment. You don't see the future as a fixed destination. Instead, you see it as a place that you create out of the choices that you make right now. And so you discover your future one choice at a time. We share this one. I don't think the description sounds flighty and wishy-washy. But this is also me and from my 'Maximizer' side I don't see this strength as having any kind of downside. :)

I actually think this applies more to me now than it did in college. ...more
5

Aug 06, 2017

I, personally, loved this book. I have a tendency to focus on my weaknesses and ignore my strengths. I appreciate that this book showed me where I am strong and how I can utilize those to my benefit! I also liked how it offered my complementary workmates. I work in team environment and we read this together. I am excited to learn their strengths and for us to grow as a team!
1

Jul 25, 2011

Took the test and discovered the 5 strengths that I should be leveraging on. But I found the questions asked and the results a bit questionable.

The developers of the test assumes that those taking the test have complete and truthful knowledge of themselves. Several times during the test, I did wonder whether my responses were really accurate. Were they really a true reflection of me?

Another quibble is the online offerings. Yeah, I signed up to take the test. But the results and action plan Took the test and discovered the 5 strengths that I should be leveraging on. But I found the questions asked and the results a bit questionable.

The developers of the test assumes that those taking the test have complete and truthful knowledge of themselves. Several times during the test, I did wonder whether my responses were really accurate. Were they really a true reflection of me?

Another quibble is the online offerings. Yeah, I signed up to take the test. But the results and action plan available online were mere regurgitations of the book, spliced and put together according to the results! I do not see any added value of signing up on the site other than taking the test and the results and action plan to me seemed like an anti-climax.

Did the results feel accurate? In some ways, yes. I picked up this book to discover more about myself. And yet in the new learnings, I discovered that I am already doing what I'm supposed to be doing...the problem is I'm unhappy doing it.

This test tells you about your strengths but it doesn't tell you how to find happiness in your strengths. ...more
3

Apr 13, 2013

More like a reference & you must take the test for it to be useful!

After reading the first book in this topic, "Now, Discover Your Strengths", I was rejuvenated. I learned the 5 areas of my greatest potential strengths. I felt them to be quite accurate. Tom Rath wrote the sequel, "StrengthFinder 2.0" soon after the publication of Buckingham and Clifton's book and I wanted to read this book for two reasons:

First I wanted a free pass to Strengthfinder 2.0 assessment to check my results against More like a reference & you must take the test for it to be useful!

After reading the first book in this topic, "Now, Discover Your Strengths", I was rejuvenated. I learned the 5 areas of my greatest potential strengths. I felt them to be quite accurate. Tom Rath wrote the sequel, "StrengthFinder 2.0" soon after the publication of Buckingham and Clifton's book and I wanted to read this book for two reasons:

First I wanted a free pass to Strengthfinder 2.0 assessment to check my results against my initial score. Despite the accuracy of my 5 themes, I wanted to challenge the fool-proofness of the test.

Second, I wanted to delve more deeply into practical applications of my strengths.

Funny enough, things hardly go as planned. As for my first reason, curiosity got the best of me and I made my husband take the test instead. What would it be like to know your partner's strengths? Would that help or challenge the relationship? Would opposite strengths be likely to weaken or strengthen the relationship? Would similar partners be compatible or boring?

As for the book, it is more of a reference than something you read cover to cover. You want to first take the test, which is a lot of fun but needs focus and undivided attention, and then learn all about your own strengths, then maybe compare yours to others to better understand them and find ways to do things in such a way as to benefit your relationship with them.

Overall, I do believe and recommend the StrengthFinder program. ...more
1

Mar 16, 2012

Whilst the ideas in the book may be great - brilliant even, I think the whole book is a scam!
It had come up as a recommendation on Amazon and the initial blurb interested me as I do believe we tend to live up to whatever label we are given. So I read some of the inside pages - and added the book to my order. No where was I given the impression that for the book to of any use at all I would have to register with a website to take a test.

the book arrived and I started reading First a short Whilst the ideas in the book may be great - brilliant even, I think the whole book is a scam!
It had come up as a recommendation on Amazon and the initial blurb interested me as I do believe we tend to live up to whatever label we are given. So I read some of the inside pages - and added the book to my order. No where was I given the impression that for the book to of any use at all I would have to register with a website to take a test.

the book arrived and I started reading First a short chapter extolling the value of understanding your strengths briefly mentioning the online test. Then an introduction, which seemed to me to the slightly longer version of the the first chapter. Then the rest was useless information without the test. I had read this in half an hour.

The access code for the online was a one time use so cannot be used for my husband. (If you are buying this make sure you have a new printed version apparently it's not in the kindle version.)

So then the test - takes about 30mins but you have to register on the site first - so yet another password, like I need more of those. There is a demographic section for which I failed to see much relevance at all but they now know where I was born, what year and where I live now. Not real happy about needing to do that and wouldn't have bothered with the book had I realised that.

The test I thought had some pretty loaded questions and I don't think they were that well considered. eg Do I spend lot of time alone. Not whether I liked to do that but do I?

At the end there is a detailed report and also a pdf version of the bulk of the book to download.

Seems to be a dishonest way to market a website paid survey! I could get a really detailed analysis for heaps of money too! Whoopee! ...more
4

Apr 07, 2019

I may write a proper review for this later, but for now, this will be a placeholder. I liked it - I had to take this "Strengths Finder" as a part of my work enhancement/assessment - ended up getting a lot out of it. For the most part, it was spot on for attributes/strengths/interests I have, though with a few caveats.
1

Jun 21, 2017

I started off skeptical of this book, but willing to give it a chance, especially as it was recommended to me by a friend. It starts off pretty good - why do we put so much effort in things we are not good at while letting our natural strengths go to waste? Not that I think it is healthy to ignore our weaknesses completely as this theory seems to imply, but we do live in a society and world where weaknesses are Way over-analyzed and flaws are the main focus. So sweet, something new - learn how I started off skeptical of this book, but willing to give it a chance, especially as it was recommended to me by a friend. It starts off pretty good - why do we put so much effort in things we are not good at while letting our natural strengths go to waste? Not that I think it is healthy to ignore our weaknesses completely as this theory seems to imply, but we do live in a society and world where weaknesses are Way over-analyzed and flaws are the main focus. So sweet, something new - learn how to recognize your strengths. But then it tells me that people are most likely to like their jobs if they get positive feedback instead of being ignored or always told what they do wrong. Um, ok, this took a lot of research to learn? But whatever, most theories have these common-sense-seeming findings backed up by Research because that makes it Legit! So let's go learn our strengths so we can grow as a person and be our best selves!

But uh-oh! The only way to learn your strengths is to buy this book (make sure it's not pre-used or else that code in the back is useless to you!) and then take a sketchy test that gives you a randomly generated analysis with Magic 8 Ball answers mixed with fortune cookie sayings dressed up with business jargon. Seriously, the test is pretty bogus. Rate yourself between the following two phrases: "I like happiness" or "I like joy". There were quite a few questions that I felt were basically on that level, but how you rate yourself on the scale determines your answers (which one do you strongly agree with? You can only choose one!). Hmm. It does not inspire me with confidence. And then you are saddled with 5 strengths out of 34 - no which ones follow, no scale of how they compare, just assigned 5 Traits.

So let's look at these results, your Supposed Strengths. Like other people have said, the descriptions are vague and horoscope-like, although there are some I most definitely am Not (Maximizer? No way, not for me). I read through them all, thinking that maybe it would be fun to try to see hints of these traits in the people around me because I'm an optimist like that, but all of it is basically the same. And then I started thinking about these traits in the extreme and it just became unbearable. Please do not develop these traits to the exclusion of all else - that makes you insufferable in many different ways.

My supposed strengths were:
Adaptability (I go with the flow)
Connectedness (everything is connected - no coincidences! We're all in this together!)
Positivity (everything is awesome)
Developer (see potential in everything)
Belief (strong core values determine everything)

And while I can be like, sure, I can go with those, I feel that there are others that should have been stronger.

All in all, while this book has a few mildly interesting points, in the end game it is a money-making scam. If these people were truly interested in starting "a global conversation about what's right with people" (p. i), they would make their test and results a Lot more accessible. But I'm pretty ok with this test getting buried under all of the buzzfeed, playbuzz, zimbio, and 50 million-sh other sites that are pretty much all Free! And a lot more fun. Go to any of those other options; don't waste your time here. ...more
4

Dec 29, 2012

I believe this book's philosophy makes for a happier and more productive life--that it's more rewarding to spend time honing my strengths than trying to improve my weaknesses. This book and its philosophy help me not to feel like a square peg in a round hole, that I "should" be more like this or that. Instead, I came away from this book and the related test feeling like I was pretty well "pegged" and that I had a toolbox of strengths which I can build upon and explore more, both professionally I believe this book's philosophy makes for a happier and more productive life--that it's more rewarding to spend time honing my strengths than trying to improve my weaknesses. This book and its philosophy help me not to feel like a square peg in a round hole, that I "should" be more like this or that. Instead, I came away from this book and the related test feeling like I was pretty well "pegged" and that I had a toolbox of strengths which I can build upon and explore more, both professionally and personally.

I read StrengthsFinder 2.0 in 2012 for the second time, as my workplace had all employees read the book and take the assessment. I was glad to have the chance to read and take the test again, because I thought I had "gamed" the test the first go-round in 2008 or 2009 and didn't trust my test results. I was interested to see how my results would compare this time. The book says that it's normal to have your strengths vary slightly each time you take the test, but that you should always have three of the five in common. The other strengths theoretically show you what is "below the fold", in your top 10 but not necessarily top five. The idea that different strengths manifest more in one's life at different times makes sense to me.

Still, I was skeptical. But that's totally how it worked out for me.

As a sidenote, having a common language with my coworkers around strengths and being able to analyze our strengths (and areas where we are missing strengths) organizationally has been pretty cool. Maybe even transformational. "That person bugs me" has turned into a more productive "he's an responsible achiever, I'm a strategic ideator--that's why he bugs me. I must really bug him." If you're in the position to share this book with your team (or your family, which we have), it can be a real tool of understanding and appreciation.

...more
3

Sep 15, 2010

Biggest complaint: You have to buy a copy of the book to take the quiz (so, if I want someone else to take it, i have to convince them to buy the book too... instead of just loaning them my copy. Seems a bit like a ploy to me...).

Second biggest complaint: They only tell you your top 5 strengths.

I get that the whole premise is to focus on your strengths, which means being blissfully unaware of where you scored low. But heck, I paid for the thing... give me my results! All of them!

That said, I Biggest complaint: You have to buy a copy of the book to take the quiz (so, if I want someone else to take it, i have to convince them to buy the book too... instead of just loaning them my copy. Seems a bit like a ploy to me...).

Second biggest complaint: They only tell you your top 5 strengths.

I get that the whole premise is to focus on your strengths, which means being blissfully unaware of where you scored low. But heck, I paid for the thing... give me my results! All of them!

That said, I found it entertaining, if not shocking, mind blowing, or life changing. Certain strengths were almost hilarious to read about because it seemed like the authors were really struggling to put a positive spin on what many would see as a flaw. Like... Self-Assurance (a bit past confidence and into egomania), Significance (feeling like you're special and/or need to be special), and Competitiveness, for example.

My top 5, in case you are wondering:

1. Woo (winning others over) (you know, the sort of people that make friends in check out lines and thrive on making connections with people. Not at all surprised that this was my top strength).
2. Includer
3. Adaptability (I was a bit surprised that this showed up, until I read the chapter. Their definition of "adaptable" is someone who is centered in the present (the past is the past, the future isn't worth worrying about).... so then it made sense why it would be in my top 5.
4. Positivity (horray optimism!)
5. Communication ...more
1

Jul 17, 2018

The whole point of this book is to provide a unique access code to take the online assessment. The first 31 pages are an advertisement for the assessment. The rest of the book contains a brief overview of each of the 34 "themes", which could have just been accessed on their website. This makes no sense as a book at all.

Additionally, the basis of the strengths concept comes from polls and interviews. It is not grounded in actual Psychological research (though they throw around Psychology words The whole point of this book is to provide a unique access code to take the online assessment. The first 31 pages are an advertisement for the assessment. The rest of the book contains a brief overview of each of the 34 "themes", which could have just been accessed on their website. This makes no sense as a book at all.

Additionally, the basis of the strengths concept comes from polls and interviews. It is not grounded in actual Psychological research (though they throw around Psychology words like DSM and Personality to try to legitimize their assertions). These 34 traits (like Intellection, Futuristic, and Arranger) are claimed to be innate characteristics that a person has and cannot develop past his or her natural capacity. All these are are a reflection of what you've already told the assessment you're good at. Save your money and just keep doing what you do well. ...more
5

Apr 08, 2012

Recommend for everyone, who really wants to know what you are. This is a great tool for self-assessment. Furthermore, it also recommends what you do to fully bring the best out of your potential. FYI. Facebook is applying this one. See below:

Facebook hires smart people independent of available job openings. After hiring someone it likes, engineer or business operative, Facebook will ID this person's talents with something called the Clifton StrengthsFinder, and then create a job using that Recommend for everyone, who really wants to know what you are. This is a great tool for self-assessment. Furthermore, it also recommends what you do to fully bring the best out of your potential. FYI. Facebook is applying this one. See below:

Facebook hires smart people independent of available job openings. After hiring someone it likes, engineer or business operative, Facebook will ID this person's talents with something called the Clifton StrengthsFinder, and then create a job using that information.

Read more: http://articles.businessinsider.com/2... ...more
3

Aug 23, 2011

Helpful. This is not so much a book as an assistant to the on-line tool. I'm still thinking about whether or not I got an accurate reading on my top five because this, like most personality tests, is highly subjective and there is always room for self-fulfilling prophecy or misunderstood questions. Still, it is very simple and easy to use.

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