Seven Lady Godivas: The True Facts Concerning History's Barest Family Info

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Reviews for Seven Lady Godivas: The True Facts Concerning History's Barest Family:

2

Aug 26, 2008

Dr. Seuss stories are often very silly which is highly amusing if you are under 7 or the adult enjoying the child's laughter. Part of the amusement is derived from how ridiculous some of the rhymes are when the books are read aloud. This book, a retelling of the Lady Godiva story (with Peeping Tom worked in) is meant for adults but the silliness is childish and not having the benefit of either outlandish rhymes or being written to be read aloud, it rather falls flat. I'm glad Dr. Seuss stuck to Dr. Seuss stories are often very silly which is highly amusing if you are under 7 or the adult enjoying the child's laughter. Part of the amusement is derived from how ridiculous some of the rhymes are when the books are read aloud. This book, a retelling of the Lady Godiva story (with Peeping Tom worked in) is meant for adults but the silliness is childish and not having the benefit of either outlandish rhymes or being written to be read aloud, it rather falls flat. I'm glad Dr. Seuss stuck to children's books, they really were his genre. ...more
3

Oct 16, 2017

Perhaps you knew that beloved children's author Shel Silverstein (Where the Sidewalk Ends, The Giving Tree) was also famous to readers/viewers of Playboy for decades of slightly naughty cartoons, sometimes of a sexual nature. He also wrote plays, worked on film, composed music. But most parents/readers think of him for this one thing, quirky kid poems.

Dr. Seuss, well, you know what he is famous for, too. And here, as with Silverstein, we see he is not just a one-trick pony (pun intended). This Perhaps you knew that beloved children's author Shel Silverstein (Where the Sidewalk Ends, The Giving Tree) was also famous to readers/viewers of Playboy for decades of slightly naughty cartoons, sometimes of a sexual nature. He also wrote plays, worked on film, composed music. But most parents/readers think of him for this one thing, quirky kid poems.

Dr. Seuss, well, you know what he is famous for, too. And here, as with Silverstein, we see he is not just a one-trick pony (pun intended). This is his first "adult" graphic novel or picture book for adults and older kids, published in 1939, though if you are rushing out to get it for its prurient content, save your energy: There IS nudity in this one, but it's pretty innocent Dr. Seuss-style nudity, and not for the purpose of titillation (you want to call up some old joke here, don't you?).

This is a long and pretty convoluted story of not one but seven lady Godivas (who almost never ride!) and seven Tom Peepings (who never really peep in that heavy-breathing way, I'll disappoint you). Lord Godiva is flung from his horse and killed, and each Godiva sister agrees to delay marriage to a Peeping, Tom, until they can warn them of the dangers of horses. Each Lady Godiva gets a story, with a "horse-truth" punchline. So that's a little disappointing, because the very idea of Lady Godiva is her slowly parading naked on a horse to protest the excessive taxation her husband had imposed on villagers, and you get here neither lust nor politics. It's just a silly alternative tale, not his best work.

Click on the link to see some images of Lady Godiva as conceived by artists over the ages. And by the way the origin of a "peeping Tom" developed over time as a cautionary moral tale, based on a made-up story about a guy named Tom who had the temerity to look at the passing naked woman and was supposedly struck blind as punishment. As if. I mean, I have looked at such things and can still see. . .

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_Go... ...more
3

Mar 02, 2015

This one doesn't rhyme and it's not for the kiddies.

You can almost feel the waves of sexual frustration as seven inexplicably naked gals vow not to wed their sweeties until they learn some horse sense. (Or maybe I'm just projecting...)

I'm somewhat surprised no one chose to emulate Catherine the Great. She seemed to know something about equine attributes.

Neigh!
4

Jul 27, 2015

***Review posted on The Eater of Books! blog***

The Seven Lady Godivas by Dr. Seuss
Publisher: Random House
Publication Date: 1939 (Re-Issued in 1987)
Rating: 4 stars
Source: Copy sent by the publisher

Summary (from Goodreads):

The book recounts in prose the tale of not one, but seven Godiva sisters, none of whom ever wear clothing. The explanation for their nakedness, even when walking in snow, is that "they were simply themselves and chose not to disguise it." The story opens with the sisters' ***Review posted on The Eater of Books! blog***

The Seven Lady Godivas by Dr. Seuss
Publisher: Random House
Publication Date: 1939 (Re-Issued in 1987)
Rating: 4 stars
Source: Copy sent by the publisher

Summary (from Goodreads):

The book recounts in prose the tale of not one, but seven Godiva sisters, none of whom ever wear clothing. The explanation for their nakedness, even when walking in snow, is that "they were simply themselves and chose not to disguise it." The story opens with the sisters' father, Lord Godiva, deciding to leave for the Battle of Hastings on horseback. This upsets the sisters, as horses are wild and untamed animals. Sure enough, before Lord Godiva even manages to leave the castle walls, he is flung from his horse and killed. As a tribute to their father's fate, the Godiva sisters agree to never marry—despite the fact that each is courting one of seven brothers named Peeping—until they can warn their countrymen of the dangers of horses. The book then follows the sisters as they set out on individual quests for "horse truths", which turn out to be well-known sayings involving horses.

What I Liked:

This book was hilarious. And adorable. It is Dr. Seuss's first adult novel, which is why I chose it for the blog tour for review. It's unique to all of his other books, which are generally for children. This book could definitely be read by a younger audience, but I see why it's an adult novel. Check out the cover, for starters!

The story follows the seven naked Godiva sisters, daughters of Lord Godiva, Earl of Coventry. The seven Peeping Brothers and the seven Godiva sisters are in love (each a pair), but when a horse throws the Earl and the Earl dies, the sisters make an oath: each of them must find a "Horse Truth" or they can never act on their love and get married. The Horse Truth must be something that warns others about the mysterious nature of horses - because in 1066, not much was known about horses specifically! Will the ladies find these "horse truths", and true love?

Like I said, this book was hilarious. In classic Dr. Seuss style, the story is both simple and complex, with a deeper meaning than what is on the page. The sisters are naked (think about why - this is open to interpretation, and it's also a legend!), and they swear off marrying until they can do some good for the world. The seven sisters stick to their oath - either they find a Horse Truth, or they don't get married.

I love how Dr. Seuss took an old legend, with Lady Godiva and Peeping Tom. Don't know what I'm talking about? Check out the Wikipedia page on Lady Godiva. Legend has it that she rode around on a horse naked, taking a stand against the high taxes that her husband imposed on the people. She sided with the people, and rode on the horse naked to oppose her husband's policies. A man named Tom was punished for watching her ride naked (either blind or dead). Interesting, no?

Dr. Seuss takes this legend and spins it differently - Peeping is the family name for seven brothers - Tom is one of them. Instead of one Lady Godiva, there are seven, who are always naked. When a horse kills their father, they swear to learn more about horses before they can ever get married. It is quite an intriguing story! And historical fiction, at that! I love medieval historical fiction.

And it's a funny one, despite the grim nature. Trust me, Dr. Seuss gets dark. Horses are dangerous... someone should have told the Godiva sisters and their father that. Thus, it is very adult. But it is funny, heartwarming, and ends well!

What I Did Not Like:

Nothing for here! I enjoyed the book, and would love to give it to my baby cousins when they get older. It is a classic!

Would I Recommend It:

I would recommend this one to any Dr. Seuss fan! It's one of his oldest novels, and his first adult novel (not many adult ones), and it's probably among my favorites of Dr. Seuss!

Rating:

4 stars. I'm sad to see that this one is pretty much out of print! It is such a great novel. Check out the prices for copies of this book - it's practically rare! I urge anyone who likes Dr. Seuss's books to read it though - his adult books are just as fun as his children books! ...more
2

Jan 06, 2014

Here's something I bet you never saw on Mulberry Street...

Dr. Seuss's tale of the seven naked Godiva sisters and their quest for horse truth is a curiosity and worth seeking out if you're a fan like I am, but, alas, it's not particularly funny or clever or even all that interesting, truth be told.

Written in uncharacteristically stiff prose, the story just clunks along, but in places you can hear Seuss's future anapestic tetrameter just itching to bust out: "This gig she rigged up she called Here's something I bet you never saw on Mulberry Street...

Dr. Seuss's tale of the seven naked Godiva sisters and their quest for horse truth is a curiosity and worth seeking out if you're a fan like I am, but, alas, it's not particularly funny or clever or even all that interesting, truth be told.

Written in uncharacteristically stiff prose, the story just clunks along, but in places you can hear Seuss's future anapestic tetrameter just itching to bust out: "This gig she rigged up she called "Wagon Anterior." But that promising line collapses into the awful: "Never, from a horse's point of view, had a vehicle been constructed with less consideration. The whole crazy business was backside to." Yeah, and I don't know what that "to" is doing there. Here, in 1939, Seuss is just starting to get a feel for the rhythms of language that he masters over the next 20 years.

Maybe the most humorous part of the whole book for me is seeing my childhood hero draw nekkid ladies (especially the very large Teenie Godiva), although the good doctor (certainly not a gynecologist) has a real reticence in addressing anatomical accuracy. Some precious vandal went and helpfully added nipples to Hedwig Godiva on an early page of my copy of the book. I had to look carefully before I figured out it wasn't the work of the doctor himself there.

Big G, little g, what begins with "G"?

Giaquinta giving the Godiva girls two stars on a cold winter's day! ...more
5

Mar 12, 2012

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Here is the true story about the Godiva family, and the seven sisters who are each far too intelligent to waste time worrying about frivolous things like doing their hair, makeup, or you know, clothes. When their father is killed by a horse, they take it upon themselves to discover seven Horse Truths, one from each sister, before any of them will ever know true love. What follows is a clever, funny and sometimes touching story that is a little different from your average Dr. Seuss book.

I had Here is the true story about the Godiva family, and the seven sisters who are each far too intelligent to waste time worrying about frivolous things like doing their hair, makeup, or you know, clothes. When their father is killed by a horse, they take it upon themselves to discover seven Horse Truths, one from each sister, before any of them will ever know true love. What follows is a clever, funny and sometimes touching story that is a little different from your average Dr. Seuss book.

I had first heard about the Seven Lady Godivas at the end of last year, after a visit to the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago for an exhibit on the work of Dr. Seuss. This past Friday on Dr. Seuss' birthday, I came across this link with more information about the book, so on a whim thought I'd check Amazon to see if they had a copy, and much to my surprise, they had a used copy at a reasonable price, so I picked it up.

I found the book a little hard to read, only because it's a prose story, but I kept trying to read it in rhyme, since it is a Dr. Seuss book after all. There's nothing challenging here, although I found the Horse Truths to be very clever, and the illustrations range so far into the absurd that the nudity doesn't really come across as anything more than silly.

A fun little addition for a fan of Dr. Seuss, but probably nothing a general reader would find appealing. ...more
0

Jun 28, 2014

The Dr. Seuss pornography is one of those rumored media that everyone seems to know something about but few if any people have actually seen. Typically with media like that, the end result is rather disappointing. By that I mean, a person can search high and low to get a hold of The Star Wars Holiday Special (for example) only to watch a lackluster variety show stitched together with a bizarre and stupid plot.

So before I go any further, let's get one thing straight: The Seven Lady Godivas is not The Dr. Seuss pornography is one of those rumored media that everyone seems to know something about but few if any people have actually seen. Typically with media like that, the end result is rather disappointing. By that I mean, a person can search high and low to get a hold of The Star Wars Holiday Special (for example) only to watch a lackluster variety show stitched together with a bizarre and stupid plot.

So before I go any further, let's get one thing straight: The Seven Lady Godivas is not a pornography. It takes its name from the legendary nudist Lady Godiva, and as such features drawings of naked women. However, if nudity is tantamount to pornography then we need to take a complex and time consuming re-assessment of all art history. They did a Simpsons about it. Furthermore, the nudity in the book is as unassuming as possible. The naked women don't have visible genitalia, nipples, or even intergluteal clefts. The naughty parts simply aren't drawn on where they would normally be. If you're looking for pornography done up in a style typically intended for children, you'll be much more satisfied with Edward Gorey's The Curious Sofa: A Pornographic Work by Ogdred Weary.

Now that we've got that out of the way, the book itself is delightful. It's clever and creative in its re-imagining of the classic legend. From the foreward note by Seuss about how he intends to set the record straight about the historically misunderstood sisters, to the imaginative ways the Godiva sisters come to discover various horse related idioms, it's, quite surprisingly, one of the best Seuss books I've read. ...more
3

Jun 23, 2008

This one has been sitting on my shelf since 1991 when I bought the late 80s reprint of this 1939 book (I know because I left the Waldenbooks receipt inside it). It was remaindered so I only spent $3.98 and to this day it's in near-mint condition. I was aware at the time that the original 1939 printing was rare and valuable (which is pointed out in the dust jacket text of the reprint). The idea of having a Dr. Seuss book with nudity in it was irresistible, although the nudes are very tamely This one has been sitting on my shelf since 1991 when I bought the late 80s reprint of this 1939 book (I know because I left the Waldenbooks receipt inside it). It was remaindered so I only spent $3.98 and to this day it's in near-mint condition. I was aware at the time that the original 1939 printing was rare and valuable (which is pointed out in the dust jacket text of the reprint). The idea of having a Dr. Seuss book with nudity in it was irresistible, although the nudes are very tamely rendered (no nips or vagina, lots of butts and mannequin-style breasts). The text is far more ample than is usual with Seuss and there is no staccato rhyming (indeed, no rhyming at all), although at this stage his books did tend to have more copy than they would later. He had not refined his style yet, though his sensibility is fully formed. The tale told here is a typically whimsical one; and maybe a little forced as Seuss tries to reinterpret the Lady Godiva tale into something a little more proper and domesticated (there are no Peeping Toms of ill intent, just a family of brothers named Peeping who seek legitimate marriage with the 7 lady Godivas.) The sisters make a pact to find a "truth" about horses, which turn out to be common aphorisms or proverbs we're all familiar with ("don't look a gift horse in the mouth," don't put the cart before the horse," etc.) Like all Seuss, the skewed and unique style of illustration is fascinating and delightful. There are cheap used copies of this out there on Amazon, so it's no longer a real rarity, though I noticed a Half Price bookstore trying to fob a reprint off for big bucks, which is a real rook. -EG ...more
5

Sep 07, 2015

Some books are meant to be devoured. Others you want to take your time and enjoy every nuance. This was one of the latter. If you're like me you've read to your siblings and your children, every Dr. Seuss, you could find. So when this came along from my friends in the Reno BookCrossing group, I had to grab it. I've had it in my possession for far too long. But when I finally settled into my new house. I decided this would be one of the first reads.

In a world, where the common sense that we all Some books are meant to be devoured. Others you want to take your time and enjoy every nuance. This was one of the latter. If you're like me you've read to your siblings and your children, every Dr. Seuss, you could find. So when this came along from my friends in the Reno BookCrossing group, I had to grab it. I've had it in my possession for far too long. But when I finally settled into my new house. I decided this would be one of the first reads.

In a world, where the common sense that we all know and love, is totally missing, it's nice to get back to just plain old horse sense. You know those old sayings and wondered where they came from? Dr. Seuss tries to explain in this book. What a strange, and humorous book this is!

For some fuddy-duddies, this book might not be so good. It has cartoon nudity, okay? But there's a reason for that. Dr. Seuss explains it quite well as he goes along. So 'don't get your tidy Whitey's' in a knot as my husband says. Enjoy this book for the prize it is.

As I said before, this is a BookCrossing edition. BCID 639-13580476 If there are no objections from my group. I plan to set this book free at Christmas Valley Library. ...more
3

Jun 11, 2014

So, I saw something about this book on the internet, and at first, I wondered if it was for real. A Dr. Seuss book about the naked lady Godivas? Really? So, I borrowed it from the library, and it was for real. It was written in 1939, surprisingly, and contained some innuendo, but not as much as you might expect. The story was jokey, the illustrations were all Dr. Suess. I would not read it with my young children - too weird. But, I am glad I found out about it, glad I checked it out - I like So, I saw something about this book on the internet, and at first, I wondered if it was for real. A Dr. Seuss book about the naked lady Godivas? Really? So, I borrowed it from the library, and it was for real. It was written in 1939, surprisingly, and contained some innuendo, but not as much as you might expect. The story was jokey, the illustrations were all Dr. Suess. I would not read it with my young children - too weird. But, I am glad I found out about it, glad I checked it out - I like knowing what all the fuss is about, and that's about all. ...more
2

Aug 20, 2015

*WARNING: This is not a children's book. It is cleverly disguised as a children's illustrated book but the last time I checked having naked women and peeping tom's aren't suitable for children.

I wanted to love this book so bad because it was Dr. Seuss but I believe this book is absolutely terrible. I do not know what was going on in his rightful head but I felt like slitting my wrist then to read this 80 paged book. Between the illustrations and the way he writes in this book made it feel like *WARNING: This is not a children's book. It is cleverly disguised as a children's illustrated book but the last time I checked having naked women and peeping tom's aren't suitable for children.

I wanted to love this book so bad because it was Dr. Seuss but I believe this book is absolutely terrible. I do not know what was going on in his rightful head but I felt like slitting my wrist then to read this 80 paged book. Between the illustrations and the way he writes in this book made it feel like a children's story but there were certain comments and undertones that suggested that this is mostly for adults.

I am perfectly fine with nudity and never had an issue of watching it especially since I love HBO, going to the beach and seeing naked or topless, or having to change in front of people. But when it comes to young children I tend to disagree that a child should be reading a book full of naked women even though you don't see any privates or nipples in this book. So I highly not recommend this book for children.

What is the point of the story? Welcome to the year 1066 where apparently women didn't have clothes. We are introduced to Lord Godiva who is heading off to the Battle of Hastings where he immediately crashes to his death as the horse threw him off his hump when leaving Castle Godiva. He has seven daughters and they mourn and grieve his death. But ofcourse the daughters take it to a whole different level in which they are not allowed to get married to their "Peeping Toms" until they discover a horse truth. So over the course of the story we learn how each daughter figures out a truth about a horse and they leave and happily get married even though you never hear from them again.

The story is fairly simple and the illustrations are okay but I was fairly disappointed in this book. This was Dr. Seuss fourth book and I believe since he attended Oxford, he wanted to pay tribute to his experiences of England through this book. There are ton of words that I do not understand because it is either extremely english and put into poor context for me to understand. Plus since he wanted to rhyme a sentence or two, the misspelling of a word confused me in its pronunciation. I researched online and discover that this book is one of the two books that became epic failures in terms of sales for Dr. Seuss and this one particular is his greatest failure.

While this was a horrible book I honestly believe that this is the book that changed Dr. Seuss and made him realize that he needs to stick to children's books who would be more appreciated of his work and have an actual moral to the story. Thank God he learned through his mistakes because if not then we would never have discovered some of the greatest children stories of all time. ...more
3

Dec 18, 2016

It was cute, but definitely not my favorite dr. Seuss book. The story was ok. & The art was funny & nice, even if I didn't really get why they didn't wear clothes even in the snow. It's main problem was It didn't rhyme. :( that's the best part of any Seuss book. The rhymes, because it makes them so much fun to read out loud. Especially to kids. To have a dr. Sues book and NOT have rhymes. No wockets in Pockets or Fox in Socks... It's just a little weird. & a bit of a let down. Still It was cute, but definitely not my favorite dr. Seuss book. The story was ok. & The art was funny & nice, even if I didn't really get why they didn't wear clothes even in the snow. It's main problem was It didn't rhyme. :( that's the best part of any Seuss book. The rhymes, because it makes them so much fun to read out loud. Especially to kids. To have a dr. Sues book and NOT have rhymes. No wockets in Pockets or Fox in Socks... It's just a little weird. & a bit of a let down. Still a cute little read. Solid three stars & I'd definitely recommend it to any dr. Seuss fan who hasn't read it before. ...more
5

May 01, 2012

I can't believe I haven't reviewed this before! I just reread it, and it is probably my all time favorite book of Dr. Seuss's! Yes, that's right: Dr. Seuss wrote a book about seven naked ladies, each tasked with finding out a "horse truth" before she can marry her true love. The true loves are seven brothers, Peeping Tom, Dick, and Harry, etc. It plays off the legend/history of Lady Godiva (and yes, that IS where the term "Peeping Tom" came from) and also old adages like, "Don't put the cart I can't believe I haven't reviewed this before! I just reread it, and it is probably my all time favorite book of Dr. Seuss's! Yes, that's right: Dr. Seuss wrote a book about seven naked ladies, each tasked with finding out a "horse truth" before she can marry her true love. The true loves are seven brothers, Peeping Tom, Dick, and Harry, etc. It plays off the legend/history of Lady Godiva (and yes, that IS where the term "Peeping Tom" came from) and also old adages like, "Don't put the cart before the horse." This is a fantastic, fun book, and while yes, the ladies are naked, I don't think it's all THAT scandalous. (Not by today's standards, anyway!) ...more
3

Jul 07, 2018

Definitely the shortest book so far this year. An amusing tale of the seven Godiva sisters who are challenged to make themselves worthy of marriage to the Peeping brothers by discovering "horse truths". Not entirely sure why they had to always be in the buff, but they were unclothed throughout. Published in 1939, it predates the joke in The Wizard of Oz about a "horse of a different color" just barely. The illustrations were the best part.
0

Jan 12, 2017

Funny and wise. An fine example of Theodore Geisel's early work. Note: unlike this authors later works, this book is intended for adults.
5

Mar 08, 2017

Lovely little book! Loved the body positivity in it. Short, witty and a 'childish' book for adults by Dr. Seuss. Wonderful!
2

Jan 19, 2013

I actually found it boring, the illustrations aren't also for children in my opinion, and I would never this book to my children, they'll be sleep before I finish the fifth page.
3

Jan 12, 2008

Read at 3AM during exam week senior year.
Totally worth it.
4

Feb 23, 2019

Although I’ve never been a fan of Dr. Seuss, a well known fact among my friends and colleagues, I enjoyed this title immensely. As most have pointed out, this book was not written for children but neither were most of Seuss’ titles really. He wasn’t a big fan of the younger set. Yes, the Godivas are all naked throughout the book, but I think that the explanation was pretty forward-thinking for 1939 and I quote “for the seven daughters of Lord Godiva had brains.....They were simply themselves and Although I’ve never been a fan of Dr. Seuss, a well known fact among my friends and colleagues, I enjoyed this title immensely. As most have pointed out, this book was not written for children but neither were most of Seuss’ titles really. He wasn’t a big fan of the younger set. Yes, the Godivas are all naked throughout the book, but I think that the explanation was pretty forward-thinking for 1939 and I quote “for the seven daughters of Lord Godiva had brains.....They were simply themselves and chose not to disguise it.” Enough said! ...more
4

Aug 29, 2019

This one gave me a chuckle. I never knew Seuss wrote a book for adults, but this one was certainly not intended for children. Cheeky and fun. Recommended for grown up Seuss fans.
3

Jul 31, 2018

The book itself is not what makes this book interesting. What makes this book interesting is the fact that Dr. Seuss made a picture book for adults starring seven nude women taking care of horses until they come up with puns (Such as "Horseshoes are Lucky" or "You can lead a horse to water..."). Seuss famously complained his original print run for Seven Lady Godivas did poorly because adults are impossible to please, that they lack imagination, that they are "obsolete children." Honestly though? The book itself is not what makes this book interesting. What makes this book interesting is the fact that Dr. Seuss made a picture book for adults starring seven nude women taking care of horses until they come up with puns (Such as "Horseshoes are Lucky" or "You can lead a horse to water..."). Seuss famously complained his original print run for Seven Lady Godivas did poorly because adults are impossible to please, that they lack imagination, that they are "obsolete children." Honestly though? The humor is just lame and the illustrations are not all that creative or wacky especially for a Dr. Seuss work. Still an interesting piece worth checking out. Imagine watching an HBO drama produced by Mr. Rogers and you'll have an idea of what reading this book is like.

...more
4

Jul 11, 2010

Seven Lady Godivas: The True Facts Concerning History's Barest Family (Hardcover)
"A beautiful story of love, honor and scientific achievement" is how Dr. Seuss, with tongue in cheek, describes this book. Touted as Dr. Seuss's first book for adults, The Seven Lady Godivas was originally published in 1939 and reissued in 1987. It tells the story of not one, but seven 11th Century Lady Godivas. They are sisters sworn not to marry their beaus, the seven Peeping brothers (yes, Tom is one of them) Seven Lady Godivas: The True Facts Concerning History's Barest Family (Hardcover)
"A beautiful story of love, honor and scientific achievement" is how Dr. Seuss, with tongue in cheek, describes this book. Touted as Dr. Seuss's first book for adults, The Seven Lady Godivas was originally published in 1939 and reissued in 1987. It tells the story of not one, but seven 11th Century Lady Godivas. They are sisters sworn not to marry their beaus, the seven Peeping brothers (yes, Tom is one of them) until each of them discover a scientific truth about horses. They were driven to this oath by the death of their father during an experiment using a horse as a means of transportation.

The history is confused, but the fun never stops. Dr. Seuss's full page drawings (in red, black and white) illustrate every other page. The end papers are a fanciful illustration of the Godiva family tree. The text, though wordier than his childrens books and not in rhyme, is thoroughly Dr. Seuss. He explains the seven sisters preference for nudity by saying they had brains and were not given to vanity. He goes on to say "they were simply themselves and chose not to disguise it." Although this is a great summation of nudist philosophy, it doesn't say much about his regard for women who choose to wear clothes. Instead of scientific truths we are treated by the author to fanciful origins for seven proverbs about horses as each sister discovers her "horse truth" and goes on to marry her boyfriend.

If you enjoy Dr. Seuss, you will find these drawings and this story delightful. Although described as an adult book, children will enjoy the story as well. Today's young folks may not be familiar with all seven of the horse proverbs that Dr. Seuss relates in a book that is over 60 years old, but it should not deter from their enjoyment of this amusing tale. The drawings are not detailed enough to offend even the youngest of readers. ...more
5

Jan 14, 2019

I absolutely LOVED this book and think that it does not merit the low average rating. One of the primary complaints was that this book was not a children's book. Although I understand that Dr. Seuss was primarily a children's author this book is clearly not meant for children based on the title and cover art alone. In my opinion, this book isn't unsuitable for children since the nudity featured is non-sexualized and never full frontal. The illustrations are by no means pornographic! Normally I absolutely LOVED this book and think that it does not merit the low average rating. One of the primary complaints was that this book was not a children's book. Although I understand that Dr. Seuss was primarily a children's author this book is clearly not meant for children based on the title and cover art alone. In my opinion, this book isn't unsuitable for children since the nudity featured is non-sexualized and never full frontal. The illustrations are by no means pornographic! Normally everything is drawn in ways that artfully cover up "points of interest" although there are some drawn breasts that oddly enough are missing nipples. I digress, the point is that it would be very hard for someone to accidentally scar their kids for life with this book which is what some of the low reviews insinuate.

The book itself is written in prose and not the poetry we have all come to know and love from Dr. Seuss. I personally didn't mind since this is a more complex story. I loved the plot and found myself chuckling as the seven Lady Godivas went about trying to find their horse truths. It may sound silly and contrived but I think Dr. Seuss writes the plot with a certain whimsy that allows him to "get away with it."

I don't know if I would buy this book since it is relatively rare and might be expensive. I would recommend seeing if your local library has it or can get it for you via inter-library loan because The Seven Lady Godivas is a quick but amusing read that I think many people will enjoy. It may not be One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish but you can still feel Dr. Seuss in the words and illustrations. ...more
5

Jun 11, 2013

I see this thrown around as Dr. Seuss' first "adult" book, and I fear that is a bit misleading. There are a few brief references to sexuality, but it is not very "adult" in content. I would say "young adult" or "teen" would be more appropriate to today's audience. The book is inspired by the Medieval myth about Lady Godiva, who was said to ride around town completely naked in order to get her husband to lift the heavy taxes on his people. Everyone in town was supposed to keep inside and not look I see this thrown around as Dr. Seuss' first "adult" book, and I fear that is a bit misleading. There are a few brief references to sexuality, but it is not very "adult" in content. I would say "young adult" or "teen" would be more appropriate to today's audience. The book is inspired by the Medieval myth about Lady Godiva, who was said to ride around town completely naked in order to get her husband to lift the heavy taxes on his people. Everyone in town was supposed to keep inside and not look at Lady Godiva's nudity, but one man named Tom chose to peep through his window to sneak a peek. This is where the term "Peeping Tom" comes from.

Dr. Seuss takes this legend and turns its values upside down. He states that there are actually 7 Lady Godivas, and claims that they were always naked, not out of shame sacrifice, but out of virtue; they were unconcerned with material goods. And the Peeping Tom was actually a suitor for one of the Lady Godivas, along with his 6 brothers. "Peeping" was merely a family name.

The point of this book is looking at the scientific method and achievement, and has the great "moral of the story" that learning from life should not overpower living life. I do not know what inspired Dr. Seuss to write an allegory based on Lady Godiva, but I enjoyed the classic Dr. Seuss styled pictures as well as the messages behind the words. ...more
4

Mar 11, 2012

Clever and rather obscure work for adults from Dr. Seuss originally published in 1939 and pretty much ignored for years. Apparently the world was not ready for an adult picture book from Dr. Seuss filled with drawings of naked women with no nipples... go figure! The prose is actually pure Seuss, minus the rhymes, the illustrations are very nice if you like his style, and the story is amusing. Seems there were actually seven Godiva sisters, ladies one and all. And that Peeping Tom? Also one of Clever and rather obscure work for adults from Dr. Seuss originally published in 1939 and pretty much ignored for years. Apparently the world was not ready for an adult picture book from Dr. Seuss filled with drawings of naked women with no nipples... go figure! The prose is actually pure Seuss, minus the rhymes, the illustrations are very nice if you like his style, and the story is amusing. Seems there were actually seven Godiva sisters, ladies one and all. And that Peeping Tom? Also one of seven brothers for whom "Peeping" was actually a family first name rather than a description of any stalking tendencies. Following the unfortunate death of the sisters' father, Lord Godiva, at the hands of a crotchety horse, the seven make a vow that each one will eschew marriage until she has discovered a "horse fact" that will be compiled into a cautionary book for the benefit of humankind. From there the fun is figuring out from the context of each sister's story what her horse fact will turn out to be. You will be able to fit this one in anytime you have a quarter to a half hour to spare, depending upon how much time you spend enjoying the perfect Seuss illustrations throughout. ...more

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