Save Me from Myself: How I Found God, Quit Korn, Kicked Drugs, and Lived to Tell My Story Info

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The amazing true story of an out-of-control rock star, his
devastating addiction to drugs, and his miraculous redemption through
Jesus Christ.
In February 2005, more than ten thousand people in
Bakersfield, California, watched as Brian ''Head'' Welch -- the former
lead guitarist of the controversial rock band Korn -- was saved by Jesus
Christ. The event set off a media frenzy as observers from around the
world sought to understand what led this rock star out of the darkness
and into the light.
Now, in this courageous memoir, Head talks
for the first time about his shocking embrace of God and the tumultuous
decade that led him into the arms of Jesus Christ. Offering a backstage
pass to his time with Korn, Head tells the inside story of his years in
the band and explains how his rock star lifestyle resulted in an
all-consuming addiction to methamphetamine. Writing openly about the
tour bus mayhem of Ozzfest and the Family Values Tour, he provides a
candid look at how the routine of recording, traveling, and partying
placed him in a cycle of addiction that he could not break on his own.

Speaking honestly about his addiction, Head details his
struggles with the drug that ultimately led him to seek a higher power.
Despite his numerous attempts to free himself from meth, nothing -- not
even the birth of his daughter -- could spur him to kick it for good.
Here Head addresses how, with the help of God, he emerged from his
dangerous lifestyle and found a path that was not only right for his
daughter, it was right for him. Discussing the chaotic end to his time
in Korn and how his newfound faith has influenced his relationship with
his daughter, his life, and his music, Head describes the challenging
but rewarding events of previous years, exposing the truth about how his
moments of doubt and his hardships have only deepened his faith.
Candid, compelling, and inspirational, Save Me from Myself is a
rock n roll journey unlike any other.

Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for Save Me from Myself: How I Found God, Quit Korn, Kicked Drugs, and Lived to Tell My Story:

5

Sep 26, 2010

I loved, loved, loved this book! Even more so because my brother, who was an Atheist, went through something very similar and was saved. Between my brother's and Brian's spiritual journey, I have also accepted Christ into my life and my faith grows each day. God is good!
1

Feb 22, 2013

I was a big Korn fan in my early teens. I lost interest after I decided they had become shit (namely with the release of "Take A Look In The Mirror"), and haven't really followed them since. So, it came as news to me when I was browsing Amazon and discovered Head's book. Apparently Head had left Korn and found Jesus somewhere, how curious.
I abandoned this book after 100 pages, I couldn't read anymore self-pity from a dysfunctional millionaire. This guy is a selfish jackass. I believe it takes I was a big Korn fan in my early teens. I lost interest after I decided they had become shit (namely with the release of "Take A Look In The Mirror"), and haven't really followed them since. So, it came as news to me when I was browsing Amazon and discovered Head's book. Apparently Head had left Korn and found Jesus somewhere, how curious.
I abandoned this book after 100 pages, I couldn't read anymore self-pity from a dysfunctional millionaire. This guy is a selfish jackass. I believe it takes a certain kind of jackass to "find God" when you're 35 and a millionaire, but even if you forget that bit, he's still a jackass. From the early pages he tells you about his troubled home life, where his Dad used to shout a lot. His dad also bought him a guitar, gave him a job in the garage they owned, paid for him to go to college, and let him use his "mancave" which had all sorts of traumatic amenities, like a pool table. Then he tells you he was an alcoholic and a drug addict for 90 pages. Starting when he was in high school and he had alcohol problems that would cause him to get drunk. On the weekends. Then he takes drugs sometimes. And then he tells us he beat his girlfriend. Not only that, he tells us it was premeditated. He planned to have sex with her, and then beat her with his new skateboard. Which is exactly what he proceeded to do. There's very little in-depth content in this book about Korn really, it's all about Head and his "Issues". See what I did there?
I have far too many books to read to force myself to finish this rubbish. I didn't even get to the "Save Me Jesus" bit, but I'm sure it was nonsense. He comes across as delusional and selfish, and I regret giving him (however indirectly) anymore of my money. This one is off to the charity shop. To the Jesus brigade charity shop in fact so they can keep it... all in the family...
...more
4

Aug 29, 2007

I liked the story of Brian Welch's conversion. It is always a reason to rejoice when someone repents of their sins and commits their life to God.

The book was very graphic, and is therefore not for everyone to read. Brian goes deep in his description of his vices, only for the benefit of showing people that with God's help you can overcome your problems.

I disagreed with Brian's view on speaking in tongues. I do not believe that you have to speak in tongues in order to get closer to God.

I am so I liked the story of Brian Welch's conversion. It is always a reason to rejoice when someone repents of their sins and commits their life to God.

The book was very graphic, and is therefore not for everyone to read. Brian goes deep in his description of his vices, only for the benefit of showing people that with God's help you can overcome your problems.

I disagreed with Brian's view on speaking in tongues. I do not believe that you have to speak in tongues in order to get closer to God.

I am so glad that Brian is staying faithful to God, and being a good father for his daughter. ...more
2

Apr 08, 2008

The author is very honest and sincere about his experiences, both with Korn and his conversion to Christianity. Welch wasn't the most stable or happy person to begin with, and being a rock star took a serious toll on him. Some people find it weak that Welch was unable to reconcile sobriety to rock n' roll (particularly since his ex-bandmate Jon Davis was able to do just that). However, everyone is different. It took a lot of courage for Welch to recognize his own limitations, and make the The author is very honest and sincere about his experiences, both with Korn and his conversion to Christianity. Welch wasn't the most stable or happy person to begin with, and being a rock star took a serious toll on him. Some people find it weak that Welch was unable to reconcile sobriety to rock n' roll (particularly since his ex-bandmate Jon Davis was able to do just that). However, everyone is different. It took a lot of courage for Welch to recognize his own limitations, and make the changes he needed.

And that's where the book starts getting a tad freaky. Although Welch liberally sprinkles the "I don't want to sound weird" caveats, I found the Christian half of his story unsettling (it's why I couldn't give the book more than two stars). It's sickening how some of the ministries Welch got involved with treated him like a celebrity prize, rather than a troubled soul searching desperately for peace.

Of course, I recommend this to Korn fans. Even if you think Welch is a freak (on a Jesus leash?), the book is a quick read. Although I don't personally agree with Welch's Christian philosophy, I genuinely hope his journey with Christ gives him the lasting peace he deserves. ...more
3

Jun 06, 2019

This memoir was really told in two parts. There is the 'Before Finding Christ' and the 'After Finding Christ'. I will admit to enjoying the first part of the story more than the second. I have a fascination with rock star lives so that really isn't a surprise. For that part I give 4 stars. Brian was honest about his life and his flaws with no boasting of how great he was. It was more real since he shared those insecurities of growing up that most of us feel.

The second part is where I had This memoir was really told in two parts. There is the 'Before Finding Christ' and the 'After Finding Christ'. I will admit to enjoying the first part of the story more than the second. I have a fascination with rock star lives so that really isn't a surprise. For that part I give 4 stars. Brian was honest about his life and his flaws with no boasting of how great he was. It was more real since he shared those insecurities of growing up that most of us feel.

The second part is where I had issues, not because I am Anti-Christ, but because it didn't make sense. God took away his meth addiction in 2 days but as soon as he found more in his closet he took the opportunity to do it again. After he became a Christian and God "spoke" to him, it was conflicting advice. God told him to quit Korn completely, with no source of income (because he was addicted to money?), make friends with certain people and give money to those people, learn to speak in tongues to get closer to him, be a good father and travel to India. Then God told him to make music again, move away and live in hotels with his daughter and end his friendships with those people he told him to be close to. Meanwhile he was still the bitter, angry and violent person he has always been. I'm not sure how Christianity changed him all that much as a person. He started out with 4 tattoos that were meaningful to him. After finding Christ he became fully tatted with Christ-like images and passages, this included his face. I am all for artistic expression, I myself have been inked, but he was still conflicted about God when he did it, even yelling, "Fuck off God!" at times.

I do commend Brian for getting off drugs, creating an Orphanage in India and getting other people to think of other options in their life by introducing them to religion.

After writing this book Brian did end up rejoining Korn again. I probably won't read his second book to find out how God told him it was where his life needed to be or whether he just ran out of money and needed to fill his bank account again. ...more
5

3 June 2015

I read this in jail and had struggles with Meth it spoke to me
5

1 February 2015

He overcame so much and I recommend this book to anyone!!
5

21 March 2015

Despite being a lifelong follower of Jesus, this book smashed me around in spots, challenging my apathy & shining light on my own issues similar to Head's. His candid honesty & willingness to use his story to glorify God's ultimate love has had a profound impact on me. I've purchased his other booksFull Review
2

Feb 17, 2015

"The road to hell is paved with good intentions."

Brian "Head" Welch's conversion to Christianity is a textbook example of a miracle, but by his own admission, not perfect.

Welch disclaims at the beginning of his book that he said and did a lot of bad things, so the autobiography was truly going to be warts and all. However, I believe this could have been accomplished without all of the sordid details. Like in the movies, it is enough for me to see a couple walk into the bedroom and shut the door, "The road to hell is paved with good intentions."

Brian "Head" Welch's conversion to Christianity is a textbook example of a miracle, but by his own admission, not perfect.

Welch disclaims at the beginning of his book that he said and did a lot of bad things, so the autobiography was truly going to be warts and all. However, I believe this could have been accomplished without all of the sordid details. Like in the movies, it is enough for me to see a couple walk into the bedroom and shut the door, I don't need more than. Given his audience Welch certainly is appealing to youth and I believe his story could have great influence on many teens who found themselves now feeling as he did in his early years, and that those kinds of details will push teens or others away from the life he once lived, I don't know, but for myself, I could have done without them.

I can't imagine what it's like to write this kind of work knowing that the players are alive and possibly going to read the account, if not at least hear of it. Were I one of his former bandmates, ex-girlfriend or wife, or even an employee or acquaintance, I'm not sure that my reception of this book would be positive. "Save Me From Myself" isn't just warts and all for Welch, it's warts and all for everyone mentioned, and that might sting, or worse, deeply hurt, which I imagine is the opposite of Welch's and God's desire.

Which leads to my last point: What is God's Will? It's an open-ended question and one that each individual has to surmise on his own, but Welch plays it a little too fast and loose for my liking. Many times he takes an action that I think was self-serving and inconsiderate of the lives of others, all under the auspices of it being God's Will and what God had told him to do. As an example, the timing of Welch's announcement about leaving the band (taken by himself) hindered the rest of the band's negotiations with another label. If he had been thinking of others as more significant than himself (Philippians 2.3) then he could have delayed his announcement, causing no noticeable harm to the Kingdom of Christ, yet showing care for those in his sphere of influence. it also might have gone a long way with his former bandmates. I would be dubious of his religion based on many of the actions he took.

All-in-all the Kingdom of God and the world itself is a better place for Welch coming to a saving faith in Christ. I guess I just wish there didn't have to be so many bodies on the battlefield.

A footnote– Welch falls into the easy temptation of bashing "organized religion" and "[mainstream] denominations" that is too common in contemporary Christianity. It is an easy thing to place oneself outside of something and to highlight its fault while downplaying or ignoring its merits. ...more
3

Aug 25, 2012

I read this in two sittings. The first was Brian's telling of his life before he came to the Lord and the second was after. The first part was difficult to read, as it took me back a bit to my own prodigal times before the Lord pulled me out of the pit. Of course, I was never a rock star doing thousands of $$ of drugs daily. But I was exposed enough to many of the things he wrote about to know the chaos and darkness Brian describes. It can sometimes feel a bit "icky" to think back on things you I read this in two sittings. The first was Brian's telling of his life before he came to the Lord and the second was after. The first part was difficult to read, as it took me back a bit to my own prodigal times before the Lord pulled me out of the pit. Of course, I was never a rock star doing thousands of $$ of drugs daily. But I was exposed enough to many of the things he wrote about to know the chaos and darkness Brian describes. It can sometimes feel a bit "icky" to think back on things you did or felt while trying to fill the hole in your soul with things other than God. But reading the second half of the book was truly inspiring, as it reminded me of how God redeemed my life. I love how Brian's story shows how lives are generally not magically perfect and pain-free when you become a Christian. You still have "issues" and sin to work out of your life. Once you stop being "numb" you truly feel both joy and pain. But it is truly worth it! Thanks, Brian. And thank you,Jesus. ...more
3

Mar 15, 2014

Whether or not you find Heads message uplifting, it definitely makes for a fascinating read. Unlike most people likely to pick up this book, I was not a fan of Heads music until he quit Korn and went solo, and I never had any feelings one way or the other about the manner in which he left the band.
SAVE ME FROM MYSELF is more honest and self-aware than the typical rock star autobiography. Head generally comes across as likable, but his anger problems and frequent violent outbursts diminish my Whether or not you find Head’s message uplifting, it definitely makes for a fascinating read. Unlike most people likely to pick up this book, I was not a fan of Head’s music until he quit Korn and went solo, and I never had any feelings one way or the other about the manner in which he left the band.
SAVE ME FROM MYSELF is more honest and self-aware than the typical rock star autobiography. Head generally comes across as likable, but his anger problems and frequent violent outbursts diminish my respect for him. His newfound passion for Christ is admirable, but I question the way he attributes God’s guiding hand as an influence over every decision he makes. Don’t get me wrong; I’m convinced God is working through his life. But, for example, when Head claims that God “downloaded” certain songs directly into his brain, I can’t help but wonder why God is such a second-rate lyricist. I’m not saying that God wasn’t somehow involved, but let’s not go overboard, OK?
I also feel that Head’s spiritual immaturity makes him susceptible to some wrong-headed notions. A primary is example is his misunderstanding of what the Bible actually teaches about speaking in tongues. Speaking in tongues is NOT making up your own babbling language for use in your own private prayer. Also, I think Head should be more reluctant to surround himself with people claiming to be prophets—especially ones who believe they have a direct line to Christ himself. Head relates a story in which one such “prophecy” turns out to be almost correct. Sorry, but “almost” doesn’t cut it when it comes to legit prophecy.
By Christian standards, SAVE ME FROM MYSELF is a very edgy book. The excesses involved in touring with Korn are often shocking (for those not familiar with the heavy metal lifestyle) and occasionally even hard to stomach. Head doesn’t go into too much detail, but neither does he shy away from the degenerate nature of his pre-Christian life. The book also contains some very strong language for something you can (presumably) pick up at a Christian bookstore.
Interestingly, Head is now back with Korn (and the band has never sounded better, in my opinion). Good for him. Like Alice Cooper, he continues to defy the Christian stereotype that I find so obnoxious. I can’t wait to see what the future has in store for him.
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3

Sep 06, 2012

The book is sort of a mixture of Head's memoir, and his Christian testimony. It comes out as sort of an odd mixture.

As a memoir of his life and time with Korn it was interesting, and informative. Having grown up in the era of Korn, and having been a fan of their music in High School, I recall being thrilled when I learned that Head had became a Christian (a few years after I had), and was interested in learning more. In this book Head tells briefly of his childhood, his early musical endeavors The book is sort of a mixture of Head's memoir, and his Christian testimony. It comes out as sort of an odd mixture.

As a memoir of his life and time with Korn it was interesting, and informative. Having grown up in the era of Korn, and having been a fan of their music in High School, I recall being thrilled when I learned that Head had became a Christian (a few years after I had), and was interested in learning more. In this book Head tells briefly of his childhood, his early musical endeavors (largely centering around the other members of the band until the final gelling and creation of Korn when Jonathan Davis became their vocalist), his family development, the span of Korn's career, and finally his own salvation, and his leaving the band.

As strictly a testimony, I think that it often dwelt too long on past negatives of his life, with not enough spiritual payoff. It's not that he delved too deeply into his past life as to expound too much on the grizzly details; he did a fairly good job at painting the picture without being too vile (though there was some swearing in the book, which (sort of) surprised me - mostly quotations from conversations he'd had with people), but it seemed like the greater substance of the book was of his negative actions and former lifestyle, and it took a while to get to some of the redeeming content.
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2

Jan 19, 2019

Send a doctor

This guy is all over the place. Good on you for finding God, now go find a psychopharmacologist and a therapist.
5

Mar 14, 2015

Inspiring, Encouraging, Insightful & Fascinating! I Loved It!
4

Dec 21, 2012

This book was a good read that I couldn't put down. Usually when I finish a book, I feel a sense of accomplishment and am glad that I finished the journey. But, with this book, I really wished it would have went on for another three hundred pages. It was just so engaging. Brian's life will have you shocked, awed, and inspired, ready to start up that old garage band again. He talks about his days on tour and his days cleaning up from a major rockstar sized drug addiction. Both sides of the tale, This book was a good read that I couldn't put down. Usually when I finish a book, I feel a sense of accomplishment and am glad that I finished the journey. But, with this book, I really wished it would have went on for another three hundred pages. It was just so engaging. Brian's life will have you shocked, awed, and inspired, ready to start up that old garage band again. He talks about his days on tour and his days cleaning up from a major rockstar sized drug addiction. Both sides of the tale, I couldn't get enough of. Then I got to be a backstage security guard at one of his shows here in clarksville. That was awesome! I was in the same small room with him and his new band. I was so starstruck, kind of funny. They rocked the stage that night!!!

I would recommend this book to any adult who enjoys rock and roll and spiritual journey. Reading about the days of Korn brought me back to my grade school days. Korn was great! I remember so much of who they were, what they did musically, and how they smashed the hits at woodstock 1999. ...more
4

Jun 23, 2013

Well, first of all, it took me a few hours to read this book. That is... I started in the evening, got some sleep at night and then right after waking up early in the morning, I went back to reading and finished the book.

I liked it for being quite honest and open - and not even the part before Brian got saved, but after he surrendered his life to God. It's one thing to just want to change one's life dramatically (and often, accepting Christ is such a change), but a lot of biographies end up Well, first of all, it took me a few hours to read this book. That is... I started in the evening, got some sleep at night and then right after waking up early in the morning, I went back to reading and finished the book.

I liked it for being quite honest and open - and not even the part before Brian got saved, but after he surrendered his life to God. It's one thing to just want to change one's life dramatically (and often, accepting Christ is such a change), but a lot of biographies end up "They lived happily ever after" and leave out the actual struggle of REMAINING true to one's beliefs when life is not all white and fluffy.

The only thing that got me somewhat sidetracked was the topic of speaking in tongues. I... well... yeah. While I believe that speaking in tongues can be a gift that God gives to people, I don't believe everyone should "work" on getting that gift. Perhaps I lack personal experience of speaking in tongues, but... yeah. IMHO.

Otherwise the book is quite a page-turner and it's full of hope and encouragement. ...more
5

Dec 07, 2010

This was quite a book. First, I have to say that I have never been a fan of Korn (I do like some pretty raucous music, but they are just too heavy metal for my tastes) and although I was raised as a Lutheran I can't say I am a practicing Christian. However ... I loved this book. I added it to my Kindle reading list several months ago after hearing the author interviewed on an NPR show, and wanting to learn more about his story, because it sounded fascinating to me. From what little I knew of the This was quite a book. First, I have to say that I have never been a fan of Korn (I do like some pretty raucous music, but they are just too heavy metal for my tastes) and although I was raised as a Lutheran I can't say I am a practicing Christian. However ... I loved this book. I added it to my Kindle reading list several months ago after hearing the author interviewed on an NPR show, and wanting to learn more about his story, because it sounded fascinating to me. From what little I knew of the hard rock/heavy metal/mega-rock-star world, I could not imagine how someone who was so integrated into and successful in that world and everything that goes along with it could possibly make such a drastic change in his life ... or even why he would want to do that.

The book answers all of those questions. It's fairly obvious the author is not a writer (and, in fact, in the epilogue he says he's never written anything other than papers in high school ... although he HAS written a lot of music.) But, that doesn't matter in the least because this is less like reading a book and more like having a conversation with a friend ... a friend who wants to bare his soul, confess everything bad he's ever done in his life, wail, gnash his teeth, laugh, cry, scream ... and finally explain how and why he's following a different path now.

I was particularly touched by the obvious love, care and concern Brian has for his daughter; some of the passages about how horrible he felt about his early relationship with her literally brought me to tears (as did some of the photographs of the two of them, because they are SO touching and beautiful.) He even managed to possibly convince me that SOME members of the Pentecostal Church MIGHT not be TOTALLY insane, and that's quite a feat because, frankly that is what I have always thought. (And it's unclear to me whether that church is where he ultimately ended up, but he did spend some time there.)

I am so impressed by this man's story. In spite of some of the sheer raw awfulness of his past life, I find it incredibly uplifting that he has succeeded in his struggles to turn it all around. It's a very inspiring, hopeful book. ...more
3

Oct 12, 2019

I'll admit first to not being a Korn fan. I remember them, I was in my final high school years and I had friends who liked them, and I remember thinking their name seemed like a play on the word "porn" (not validated by Welch in this book though I still think that) and I've never even heard a song by Korn. I don't really intend to start. They aren't my style.

However, I do like memoirs, especially musician memoirs, and I do like ones that do something drastic (like leaving Scientology or I'll admit first to not being a Korn fan. I remember them, I was in my final high school years and I had friends who liked them, and I remember thinking their name seemed like a play on the word "porn" (not validated by Welch in this book though I still think that) and I've never even heard a song by Korn. I don't really intend to start. They aren't my style.

However, I do like memoirs, especially musician memoirs, and I do like ones that do something drastic (like leaving Scientology or something) and in this case, Welch becomes a Christian. Which is pretty drastic considering the lifestyle he is leaving.

I suppose Korn fans will appreciate this more and the details he goes into of his life on the road and in becoming the band. I was interested most in his conversion, which is about second half of the book. I appreciate that he began charity and did his best to clean up his act, literally.

It all seems kind of soured though, now that a reader knows he went BACK to Korn a few years ago. How do you go back to that environment and stay clean? His daughter is even older now, she has to be more affected by his decisions. She was the main reason he seemed to change his lifestyle to become a Christian and live a cleaner life.

Also, I appreciate Welch cleaning up his story. Not literal this time, like his act, but his book isn't filthy and exhausting, like reading the Motley Crue memoir, where you felt like you needed a Hazmat shower and a bucket to burn your clothes after reading it. ...more
4

Aug 23, 2019

Confused but saved

Brian has been a mess, but God is in the mess redeeming business. His book is painfully honest and I noticed it prompted one reviewer to stop reading the book because Welch was such a jerk. But that is rather the point. God will only heal those who need a physician.

It's funny that the most personally offensive thing in the whole book is Welch's flippant dismissal of religion and doctrine as divisive "crap." This, in spite of the fact that he spouts plenty of doctrine himself. Confused but saved

Brian has been a mess, but God is in the mess redeeming business. His book is painfully honest and I noticed it prompted one reviewer to stop reading the book because Welch was such a jerk. But that is rather the point. God will only heal those who need a physician.

It's funny that the most personally offensive thing in the whole book is Welch's flippant dismissal of religion and doctrine as divisive "crap." This, in spite of the fact that he spouts plenty of doctrine himself. Tongues, the Trinity, propitiation (a. k. a. washed in the blood, ) substitutionary atonement, grace, forgiveness, and on and on. Doctrine is perfectly fine as long as he's the one using it, evidently. His confusion remains and he should therefore temper his emphatic pronouncements about that which he hasn't given enough thought. This "doctrine crap" is rather important. I think he's heading in the right direction, however, and it took no small amount of courage to do what he has done and pour out his story as honestly and self deprecatingly as he has. It deserves a read and certainly deserves four stars. ...more
5

May 29, 2019

This might be one of the best books Ive ever read. It is so inspiring... (thats an understatement)and encouraging. No matter what you or someone you love is going through or what ever your belief system is I highly recommend this book. I never listened to the type of music that Brian Head Welch was a part of , just came across his testimony accidentally on YouTube . Never read a book so fast! This might be one of the best books I’ve ever read. It is so inspiring... (that’s an understatement)and encouraging. No matter what you or someone you love is going through or what ever your belief system is I highly recommend this book. I never listened to the type of music that Brian Head Welch was a part of , just came across his testimony accidentally on YouTube . Never read a book so fast! ...more
5

Oct 18, 2018

I absolutely loved Brians testimony in this book! It was so powerful and raw, and so very inspirational as well! I literally could not put this down; it was such a captivating read, looking at what his life was like before and after finding God. I already look forward to reading his next book. I absolutely loved Brian’s testimony in this book! It was so powerful and raw, and so very inspirational as well! I literally could not put this down; it was such a captivating read, looking at what his life was like before and after finding God. I already look forward to reading his next book. ...more
3

Aug 14, 2018

I am giving this 3.5 stars. I found the book pretty interesting. It is not a literary masterpiece but I felt that the author did well explaining himself. I appreciated his honesty about his life and what finally gave him some peace. He wrote another book that I will probably read.
5

May 11, 2017

This. Book. Do yourselves a favor and go buy this book. It's for the lost and the found. God confirmed so much to me in reading Welch's story, about my own personal ministry, my music, where I am in my walk with Him, answers to questions only God could've known, they were buried so deep in my heart. It's a fast, easy read--only took me about three days. You're going to love how conversational it is and, while there is a bit of language in it, it's REAL and it's RAW and Holy Spirit shines through This. Book. Do yourselves a favor and go buy this book. It's for the lost and the found. God confirmed so much to me in reading Welch's story, about my own personal ministry, my music, where I am in my walk with Him, answers to questions only God could've known, they were buried so deep in my heart. It's a fast, easy read--only took me about three days. You're going to love how conversational it is and, while there is a bit of language in it, it's REAL and it's RAW and Holy Spirit shines through it. It's bathed in truth and anointing. God's grace through Welch's story will rock your socks off. Go get it and you can thank me later.

As for technicalities, like I said, it's an easy read. It's probably at about a 6th grade level, so don't go into expecting a Macarthur, Edwards, or Piper type of read--which is part of the reason why the book is so great. Don't get me wrong; a thoroughly enjoy the above authors, but Welch has a way of making theology so simple and pure, showcasing that there is indeed no need for bells nd whistles.

The first half of the book chronicles Welch's life before Christ. The second details his salvation experience and the growth therein. I love the obvious shift as readers move from "old man" to "new creation in Christ" that we can actually read and feel in Welch's writing. In the first half, it's as if we can feel the pain and hopelessness he experienced. With moving on to the second half, however, we then feel the lift and the entrance of light.

For those new to the salvation journey, Welch explains every little detail. I never felt talked down to or as if Welch was acting high and mighty, which brings me to another important point. While Welch's mission in his writing is to reach the lost, I believe his book captures the very essence of what it's like for Christians, those already in Christ, to struggle in this journey, and how real this relationship is for anyone in it.

welch is so descriptive and detailed that he pulls his readers into the hole with him in an effort to better help them understand just how far Christ went to save him and them. Then he takes them along for the ride of a lifetime as he discovers more and more of who our Triune God really is.

I noticed few reviews about the chapter on tongues. I personally don't carry an issue with tongues; I pray in tongues myself. Welch is correct in that it's biblical and I do believe it strengthens our faith because this is one way the Holy Spirit intercedes on our behalf. This is also biblical and he cites biblical reference MANY times throughout the book, including in this chapter. But I don't think one is required to speak in tongues in order to be closer to God. This is simply because not every single person will tap into this gift, which I'm sure Welch is aware of. It's not a deal-breaker for God if one doesn't speak in tongues. However, I don't feel that that's Welch's message in the first place. Whether you believe in tongues or not, go into this chapter with an open mind, and do your own exegesis on 1 Corinthians 14; ask the Holy Spirit to guide your reading and understanding. Throughout the book's entire, I encourage readers, in general, to listen to Welch's heart.

The book is beautifully written in that it's conversational, honest, and full of hope. You'll not regret reading it! ...more
3

Mar 06, 2013

Inspiring and courageous testimony! When Korn was big in the 90s, I was listening to alternative rock like REM. I was never a metal head, so when a friend gave me this book to read, I didn't even know who Korn was. As it turns out, you don't really need to know Korn to appreciate the amazing journey of faith that Brian "Head" Welch took and relates in this book.

Brian is not the best of writers, but for this book that isn't really the point. He writes well enough to give his testimony of being Inspiring and courageous testimony! When Korn was big in the 90s, I was listening to alternative rock like REM. I was never a metal head, so when a friend gave me this book to read, I didn't even know who Korn was. As it turns out, you don't really need to know Korn to appreciate the amazing journey of faith that Brian "Head" Welch took and relates in this book.

Brian is not the best of writers, but for this book that isn't really the point. He writes well enough to give his testimony of being saved from the grip of meth addiction, depression, anger, and money addictions. This book isn't really even about Brian, but about God. As a believer, I was inspired by how God worked and continues to work in Brian's life. I need to be reminded that God still performs miracles and he is still at work. That's why I liked this book. Not for the writing quality, but for the impetus it gave me to keep working on my relationship with Jesus. By the way, Brian makes it clear that he didn't find religion, he found a relationship. True Christianity isn't about how many times you go to church or which denomination you choose (if you choose one at all). The Christian walk is about a relationship with Jesus, and that relationship can save your life.

Brian's friend Eric said it well in an email to Brian when he wrote: "Going to church does not make you a Christian anymore than sitting in a garage makes you a car. A relationship with Jesus is personal" (p.125). Brian later writes about Jesus: "He deserves everything that I am, so for the rest of my life, I'm going to try and give him everything that I am" (p.147).

I think Brian best sums up his walk with Jesus when he writes: "I can't sit here and tell you that my life finally ended up perfect after sticking with God, but I can tell you this: It's all worth it because God is very real and I can get through anything and everything I have to in this life, good or bad, because god loves me, and I love God. Period" (p.217).

If you know anyone struggling with drug addiction, is a metal head of the 90s, or has questions about God and Jesus, this might just be the perfect book to recommend. The writing is simple but honest, unflinching, and real. No Bible banging, just straight up talk from a rocker whose life was radically changed when he turned it over to Jesus. ...more
4

Jan 21, 2010

The author, Brian Head Welch, was once lead guitarist of Korn, the highly-successful million-dollar-earning heavy rock (aka nu-metal) band. His story is staggering in its retelling of his past excesses. He was dangerously addicted to methamphetamines and alcohol, enslaved to a temper that led to spousal abuse, broken by selfishness and depression that poisoned all his relationships and threatened to endanger his young daughter. Plus he was soon a single father, and clueless as to how to raise The author, Brian “Head” Welch, was once lead guitarist of Korn, the highly-successful million-dollar-earning heavy rock (aka “nu-metal”) band. His story is staggering in its retelling of his past excesses. He was dangerously addicted to methamphetamines and alcohol, enslaved to a temper that led to spousal abuse, broken by selfishness and depression that poisoned all his relationships and threatened to endanger his young daughter. Plus he was soon a single father, and clueless as to how to raise his kid.

But at the same time, his story is a brilliant testimony to the power of God’s grace, how the Lord can soften even the hardest heart, and free the most enslaved prisoner to sin. From spoiled multimillionaire rock star, Welch was slowly transformed into a devoted father, from wasted addict and silent rebel to surrendered Christian.

The autobiography takes his gutter moments and shows the reader exactly how impossible his turnaround is, if looked at from a totally human perspective. You read his descriptions of the hedonistic lifestyle he was leading and understand that he was searching for peace in all the wrong places, and in all the wrong substances. In the latter half of the book, your jaw drops and your tears fall when Welch describes how he quits cold turkey relying only on God to cure his addiction, begins to learn about the Lord, attends church, finds solace in Sacred Scripture and in visiting the poor in orphanages.

Truly an astounding conversion, an intense tale told simply and without flowery phrasing, expressing the faith of someone who found Christ and eventually found his own identity within the wounds of the Savior.

originally posted on Lionel.Valdellon.com
...more

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