Paris Letters Info

Fan Club Reviews of best titles on art fashion, artists, history, photography. Check out our top reviews and see what others have to say about the best art and photography books of the year. Check out Paris Letters Community Reviews - Find out where to download Paris Letters available in multiple formats:Paperback,Kindle,Audible Audiobook,MP3 CD Paris Letters Author:Janice MacLeod Formats:Paperback,Kindle,Audible Audiobook,MP3 CD Publication Date:Feb 4, 2014


A New York Times
bestseller

Finding love and freedom in a pen, a
paintbrush...and Paris

How much money does it take to
quit your job?

Exhausted and on the verge of burnout,
Janice poses this questions to herself as she doodles on a notepad at
her desk. Surprisingly, the answer isn't as daunting as she expected.
With a little math and a lot of determination, Janice cuts back, saves
up, and buys herself two years of freedom in Europe.

A few days
into her stop in Paris, Janice meets Christophe, the cute butcher down
the street-who doesn't speak English. Through a combination of sign
language and franglais, they embark on a whirlwind Paris romance. She
soon realizes that she can never return to the world of twelve-hour
workdays and greasy corporate lingo. But her dwindling savings force her
to find a way to fund her dreams again. So Janice turns to her three
loves-words, art, and Christophe-to figure out a way to make her
happily-ever-after in Paris last forever.


Average Ratings and Reviews
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4.21

5389 Ratings

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Ratings and Reviews From Market


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Reviews for Paris Letters:

3

Mar 22, 2014

There is a certain type of story which I love love love (love love). It involves a woman, usually a journalist or a writer, moving to Paris and falling in love, both with the city and with the man of her dreams. These stories always involve lots of cheese and bread, amusing descriptions of adapting to French life (the kitchens are so small! Women are so good at wearing scarves!) and, always, at the end there is a moment when the journalist/writer realises she is perfectly, truly happy. My There is a certain type of story which I love love love (love love). It involves a woman, usually a journalist or a writer, moving to Paris and falling in love, both with the city and with the man of her dreams. These stories always involve lots of cheese and bread, amusing descriptions of adapting to French life (the kitchens are so small! Women are so good at wearing scarves!) and, always, at the end there is a moment when the journalist/writer realises she is perfectly, truly happy. My favourite of these stories is Sarah Turnbull’s Almost French. The year it came out I got three copies of it for Christmas (and I kept all three, I loved it that much). Paris Letters sits in that same literary subgenre, with one key difference: rather than being a journalist or novelist, the Janice Mcleod is a blogger. As I shall show you, that has a huge effect on the final product.

Janice Mcleod works in advertising in Los Angeles. She has a good job and a nice house, but she’s just not happy. One day, sitting at her office, she starts to think – how much money would it take to quit her job and live in Paris for a year? She randomly picks the figure of $100 a day and she saves up $65,000, quits her job and moves to Paris.

I like the idea of everything Mcleod writes about, but I found myself increasingly irritated by its execution. For example, she picks a figure of $100 a day as the necessary amount she needs to have to live overseas. It would have taken like 10 minutes to google the average costs of living in Europe, but instead she just picks a number that feels right to her. What’s more, after seeing how she went about saving this money, it felt to me like she was constructing her story so it would read well, rather than telling the truth. She says that she saved money by cutting back on expenses and selling her stuff, in the process decluttering her apartment. But then, in one paragraph at the very end of the chapter, she reveals that in fact she made a bit of money on the stock market with help from some friends. So, how much of the giant amount she was able to save – US $65,000 – came from actually saving and being frugal and how much from playing on the stock market?

She gets to Paris and meets a butcher and falls in love. She was a vegan in California, but once she gets to Paris she is just…not a vegan anymore. No explanation, but I was left with the strong impression that if a bunch of Mcleod’s friends started jumping off a cliff, she wouldn’t hesitate in joining them. At this stage, I realised that there was something a bit strange about how this memoir was written and, when Mcloed mentions she was blogging her experience, I realised what it was – the book is written like a series of really long blog posts. It has the overuse of the word “I” and the telescope-like focus on the self that is typical of much personal blog writing. Now this is not necessarily a bad thing – this writing style can be hugely popular, as the success of blogs such as Mcleod’s illustrate – but it’s not just one I enjoy very much. I realised I had incorrectly placed Paris Letters in the “foreign woman moves to Paris” subgenre instead of the “adapted from a popular personal blog” subgenre. Once I realised that, I enjoyed the book a lot more because, instead of questioning motivation and causality (like unsurprisingly, $100 a day wasn’t enough to live on) I just rolled with it. It would have been a better book if the secondary characters had been fleshed out more or if Mcleod had at any stage acknowledge the privilege that allowed her to do the things she did, but it was a as a book-from-blog memoir, it’s fine.
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4

Apr 19, 2014

I didn't really know what to expect when I opened this book (I never read the synopsis). The title is what drew me to it. I read it in 1.5 days. Paris Letters made me feel happiness and hope, it gave me inspiration, encouragement and advice. I found it enjoyable because I can really relate to Janice, I love art, painting, letter writing and adventure. I could actually see myself doing what Janice has done. It really inspired me. At the moment I'm stuck completing my degree, not earning much I didn't really know what to expect when I opened this book (I never read the synopsis). The title is what drew me to it. I read it in 1.5 days. Paris Letters made me feel happiness and hope, it gave me inspiration, encouragement and advice. I found it enjoyable because I can really relate to Janice, I love art, painting, letter writing and adventure. I could actually see myself doing what Janice has done. It really inspired me. At the moment I'm stuck completing my degree, not earning much money and waiting to graduate. Janice's story made realising my dream of being a world traveller and being free, so much more attainable. Just figure out how much money you will need and do whatever you can to make it. And you will make it as long as you follow through. Her relationship advice was also spot on. Be yourself. Be happy. C'est la vie. Thank you Janice. Much love. Jx ...more
5

Jan 05, 2015

Maybe it was because I read most of Paris Letters while on a quick jaunt (48 hrs!) to Paris. Or, maybe it is because I'm between jobs and dream of running away and doing something entirely different. But, I really enjoyed this book, which read like a fantasy, but was in fact the author's reality. I will use some of what I learned as a future Paris travel guide and some as a guide for life.
3

Jan 08, 2014

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I definitely have the travel bug and because of that I did enjoy parts of this book. It was fun to read about Janice's adventures in Paris and during her other travels. This book reminded me of many other fictional and non-fictional accounts of people who escape their jobs, move to another country and find love, how is it that that always seems to happen? I suppose people probably wouldn't want to read a book about someone who tries to restart their life and struggles or fails… but to me that I definitely have the travel bug and because of that I did enjoy parts of this book. It was fun to read about Janice's adventures in Paris and during her other travels. This book reminded me of many other fictional and non-fictional accounts of people who escape their jobs, move to another country and find love, how is it that that always seems to happen? I suppose people probably wouldn't want to read a book about someone who tries to restart their life and struggles or fails… but to me that seems more realistic. I wish more time had been spent on the difficulties Janice faced - being in a relationship with someone she couldn't communicate with well, how she navigated moving away from her family and friends, any struggles she faced financially. Instead, many of these details are glossed over in favor of a more fairy tale-esque story where the author doesn't mind the language barriers, or at least doesn't find them to be too much of a difficulty. She seemingly leaves her family and friends without a second thought - writing to them occasionally, but otherwise not really mentioning them. Even the financial difficulties Macleod faced are painted in a creative, but easily solved light as she realizes she could paint letters to people on Etsy, starts doing it and is almost instantly successful. I imagine many people will enjoy this read for escapism, but to me it all came off as a bit too easy and unrealistic. A quick, light read that admittedly did make me want to up and move to Europe, but also made me think about all the difficulties that would come with that decision too. ...more
1

May 25, 2015

Unhappy because she only gets two weeks off work per year from her once-a-dream-job-no-longer-is-job, a 30-something decides to sell all her things, quit her job and move to Europe a la Eat, Pray, Love. It sounds like the makings of a good story, but the difference here is that Janice Macleod isn't the tortured, heartbroken soul that Elizabeth Gilbert was. There was no colossal break-up or some other tragic event that spurred her into action. No, Macleod is just incensed because she only gets Unhappy because she only gets two weeks off work per year from her once-a-dream-job-no-longer-is-job, a 30-something decides to sell all her things, quit her job and move to Europe a la Eat, Pray, Love. It sounds like the makings of a good story, but the difference here is that Janice Macleod isn't the tortured, heartbroken soul that Elizabeth Gilbert was. There was no colossal break-up or some other tragic event that spurred her into action. No, Macleod is just incensed because she only gets two weeks off work per year from her assistant director copywriting job. And her beach side adjacent apartment in Santa Monica and California-dreaming life in general just isn't cutting it anymore. If she sounds entitled, spoiled, and a bit bratty, it's because she is. And if I sound annoyed and a little peeved it's because I am. I just didn't get this chick's story. Mainly because there was no story. She's the type of person who was a vegan in LA because Alicia Silverstone convinced her to be, but as soon as she spied a cute butcher in Paris, all views on veganism were gone. I'm not a vegan, but in the words of Abe Lincoln, "Whatever you are, be a good one." She also constantly has conversations with Mr. Miyagi. At first this didn't bother me. But by the 8th or 9th time of her gleaning wisdom from revelations and conversations that she was having with the fictional karate master from The Karate Kid, I began to wonder if perhaps she shouldn't check herself into a psych unit instead of traipsing around Europe. Apparently she's a blogger (I have no idea what the url is and I don't plan to find out) which probably explains why I just didn't get or like this book (I refuse to call it a memoir). Don't get me wrong, I read plenty of blogs but this book was written very self indulgently as if it were a blog post. Works on a blog in real time, not in audiobook form.

Also, I listened to this on audio. It was narrated by Tavia Gilbert which probably didn't help my feelings toward the book. As any avid listener of audiobooks knows, some narrators work for you and some don't. Tavia Gilbert is firmly filed under my do-not-listen-read-instead list of narrators. ...more
3

Mar 06, 2014


With a single suitcase in hand, former Californian copywriter Janice Macleod abandons her stultifying career and heads off to Europe sharing her journey in this memoir, Paris Letters.

Thirty four and single Macleod realised that despite her successful career as middle management in an advertising agency affording her a (more than) comfortable lifestyle, she was dissatisfied with her life. In 2010 inspired by The Artist's Way written by Julie Cameron and a comment from a colleague, Janice began
With a single suitcase in hand, former Californian copywriter Janice Macleod abandons her stultifying career and heads off to Europe sharing her journey in this memoir, Paris Letters.

Thirty four and single Macleod realised that despite her successful career as middle management in an advertising agency affording her a (more than) comfortable lifestyle, she was dissatisfied with her life. In 2010 inspired by The Artist's Way written by Julie Cameron and a comment from a colleague, Janice began making plans to reinvent her life. She began by journaling (and blogging) every day and devising ways to save $100 a day to fund a years travel. A year later she quit her job and took off to explore Europe.

Paris Letters is a record of Janice Macleod's journey which includes brief treks through Scotland and Italy before she decides to settle in France, having met a French-speaking Polish butcher on the streets of Paris and fallen in love. Having found happiness but needing a way to fund her prolonged stay in Paris, she takes inspiration from artist Percy Kelly and his illustrated letters to his penpal. Utilising an Etsy store front begins creating and selling letters adorned with her watercolour paintings of Paris scenery quickly amassing over 1,000 subscribers. By the end of 2012, Janice is engaged to Christophe, has a book deal and is living her dream.

In many ways this is an inspirational memoir of a woman who has changed her life for the better, in others I feel that Paris Letters is somewhat disingenuous. It could be that I'm jealous. Macleod manages to save in a year (nearly US$65,000), more than my husband earns to support our family of six, while still paying for rent, utilities, car payments, a housekeeper(!) and general living expenses, despite her pared down lifestyle. While I do admire Macleod's commitment to her goal, which was achieved with some sacrifice and hard work, few would have the opportunity to emulate her success and the author fails to acknowledge her privileged position. It's also clear that Macleod always intended to write a book about her experience (she has previously co-authored two books) but it would be mean spirited to begrudge the author her success, and happiness.

Paris Letters is a charming memoir, an inspiration for office drones everywhere and ideal for Francophiles who dream of escaping the daily grind to live in City of Light.

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5

May 16, 2015

This was a lovely adventure, and totally inspiring to the artist lurking inside. Maybe someday I will quit my job, but probably only visit Paris.

Re-read May 2016 - I enjoyed this just as much upon a second read. I love everything about this book; her journey into minimalism and being frugal to get out of debt, travelling to Paris, learning French, embracing her artist-self, and falling in love. I really hope that Janice MacLeod will write another book soon, I want to know more of her story!
4

Nov 05, 2014

I love memoirs, and I love France, so this book was right up my alley. I didn't know when I started the book that there would also be a sizeable section at the beginning of the book on uncluttering, which is also something I love. The author starts paring down her possessions in preparation for quitting her day job and having an adventure. Happily, reading that section coincided with my husband being out of town, so I was free to let the inspiration of the book spur me to pull everything out of I love memoirs, and I love France, so this book was right up my alley. I didn't know when I started the book that there would also be a sizeable section at the beginning of the book on uncluttering, which is also something I love. The author starts paring down her possessions in preparation for quitting her day job and having an adventure. Happily, reading that section coincided with my husband being out of town, so I was free to let the inspiration of the book spur me to pull everything out of our closets and start organizing. This delayed my reading the rest of the book for a couple of days, but was nevertheless a good thing.

After getting our little house in better shape, I could read the rest of the Parisian story and enjoy the author's adventures in getting to know the city of Paris and her new Polish/French boyfriend. Loved hearing about her visits to some of my favorite places (like Shakespeare and Co) and the good food she finds. I can tell that I'll enjoy looking at MacLeod's blog online, and hearing more about her as time goes on... ...more
4

Feb 09, 2014

Have you ever wanted to leave your crappy job and just get away? That's the dream for many of us and Janice MacLeod's "Paris Letters" is not only a way to escape from the daily drudgery of office life, it's a kick in the pants to actually do it yourself.

MacLeod's story starts off with her time working a job she doesn't like, failing in the dating department and wishing for a life somewhere else. By cutting costs and following her dream we see that not only is it possible to live the dream, it's Have you ever wanted to leave your crappy job and just get away? That's the dream for many of us and Janice MacLeod's "Paris Letters" is not only a way to escape from the daily drudgery of office life, it's a kick in the pants to actually do it yourself.

MacLeod's story starts off with her time working a job she doesn't like, failing in the dating department and wishing for a life somewhere else. By cutting costs and following her dream we see that not only is it possible to live the dream, it's magically unpredictable once you get there. Once in Paris life, and love, intervene and change everything she thought she knew.

Sure, the premise seems like something out of the next romantic comedy, but once you read it you realize how human she is. She's swept up into a romance that she openly admits seems like a horrible idea, but she goes with it. Admitting her concerns and showing that the relationship, though extremely adorable at times, isn't perfect creates a kind of bond between reader and author. By seeing her faults, the essential humanity of her story, we see that pursuing a dream can be rewarding, but that it also comes with a heaping helping of reality.

Throughout the book we get to read her Paris Letters, the ones that she created for her Etsy followers to help fund her travels. The detail in the painted letters makes the book feel like an adult picture book at times. You know an illustration will be there at the end of the chapter, and you eagerly await turning the next page to see what masterpiece it will be.

I think I'm particularly drawn to this story because I can relate to the author so much; I don't like my office jobs, I don't want to live where I'm living, I'm not dating a man resembling the latest James Bond.... Reading this book when I was feeling particularly low about all of this actually gave me the boost I needed. I immediately took her money-saving advice and give myself daily reminders about the goals I have. Following a dream isn't easy, or perfect, as MacLeod can attest to, but it's an adventure we all deserve. ...more
4

Jan 04, 2014


There are lots of reasons that you shouldn’t bother reading this review of Paris Letters if you really want to read an honest review. I can’t write honest reviews of books that are set in Paris. I can’t write honest reviews of books that have illustrations. And this book has both. I love wholeheartedly books about Paris. Even awful ones. I love wholeheartedly books with illustrations. Even awful ones. Paris Letters is set in Paris and Paris Letters has illustrations.


I loved Paris Letters.


So you’
There are lots of reasons that you shouldn’t bother reading this review of Paris Letters if you really want to read an honest review. I can’t write honest reviews of books that are set in Paris. I can’t write honest reviews of books that have illustrations. And this book has both. I love wholeheartedly books about Paris. Even awful ones. I love wholeheartedly books with illustrations. Even awful ones. Paris Letters is set in Paris and Paris Letters has illustrations.


I loved Paris Letters.


So you’ve ignored my warning and now you’ve wasted your time reading this review of Paris Letters.

I apologize.
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3

Sep 21, 2014

Its a Parisian sex and the city. Bit delusional. Its a good view into the head of the type of woman I dislike. "Why did you change the floor of MY apartment after I told you not to?, Her answer: because it makes me happy and I want to be happy"

The book starts of well, I think it falls apart once she meets the guy and it becomes a chick flick.
3

Dec 03, 2015

3.5 stars
*** Review rewritten ***
I saw this book on sale and picked it up just because I found the blurb and cover interesting. I was not disappointed with my choice. I wish I could relocate to a different country and start my life all over again, make new friends and find a new profession (I have already done it once :) ). If you love to travel, you should definitely read this book. The author talks about her trips to Paris and also about her UK and Italy trip. I felt like packing my bag and 3.5 stars
*** Review rewritten ***
I saw this book on sale and picked it up just because I found the blurb and cover interesting. I was not disappointed with my choice. I wish I could relocate to a different country and start my life all over again, make new friends and find a new profession (I have already done it once :) ). If you love to travel, you should definitely read this book. The author talks about her trips to Paris and also about her UK and Italy trip. I felt like packing my bag and catching the first flight available to Europe after reading this book. She talks about the yummy food she had in Paris, about famous personalities and writers who spent their days in Paris, about French people, language and I found it all really fascinating to read.

The writing was good and it kept me interested. I did not get bored nor did I feel like keeping the book aside while reading. It had me engrossed and I enjoyed reading and learning more about France. I have only read Dan Brown’s book on France so far. I loved the idea of painted letters a lot and this book had many such letters. I loved reading these letters, one letter at the end of each chapter. The author got inspired from some paintings by Percy Kelly that she saw in UK. I had no idea about this painter. I want to get hold of a book which has a collection of his painted letters, if and when I visit Europe. I want to try it out myself someday too as I love to paint.

I ordered a Paris letter from the author’s Etsy shop and received a lovely painted letter from her in my mail. I am now planning to frame this letter and hang it on the wall. The painting is too beautiful! Janice is really talented and I am not surprised that she was able to switch her career easily to become an artist once she moved to Paris. I showed this letter to my husband and even he loved it. She has a pretty handwriting.
My Paris letter from Janice -


The author maintained a journal that helped her plan her travels and also life. I am now considering having a journal of my own. I want to start writing in a journal daily or at least weekly. Let’s see how that goes. She also had a blog where she wrote all about her plan, so she was a blogger before she became an author. I also liked the part about her uncluttering and simplifying her life before she moved from California. She gave a lot of tips on how to save money for your travels. I found that section informative.

There are many lovely quotes in the book –

“We must know how to design our lives. We are all artists, and each day is a canvas.”

“Along the way, I replaced a bad habit of being upset with a good habit of being happy. Could it really be that simple?”

“Freedom’s just another word for nothing left to lose.”

“Travelers live by this rule: collect as many experiences as you can without getting yourself killed or worse.”

“If you only accomplish one thing in a year, let it be paying something off. A student loan, a car, a credit card, a bookie, whatever.”

The only reason for liking and not loving this book is that it sounded unrealistic. The author only talks about the good stuff happening to her and never about the difficulties and challenges she faced. So it sounds almost like a fairy tale where she just happens to meet a perfect man in a new country, she never had any trouble with her finances, in settling in an unknown country all alone, or in staying away from family so far. I mean, it is a wonder that some random guy in a random country did not turn out to be a psychopath or a robber or a rapist. I hope other women don’t get inspired and try what she did – I would call it luck or fluke that everything worked out so well for her. I would have preferred it if it was more realistic and had less of the author praising her perfect man for pages together. I wish she had concentrated more on her Paris experience than her romance.

But still it is a good one time read and anyone who is interested in travel or France should read this book. I enjoyed reading it. ...more
5

Mar 26, 2014

“How much money does it take to change your life?”

That’s the question that prompted Canadian copywriter Janice to completely overhaul her life, make a plan and work at her dream to pay for her own European sabbatical. Working in a corporate firm, Janice is fed up with her job and dreams of packing up her home, submitting her resignation and jumping on a flight to Europe for an adventure. She realises there’s a lot of hard work ahead of her to get to that point but she admirably commits to her “How much money does it take to change your life?”

That’s the question that prompted Canadian copywriter Janice to completely overhaul her life, make a plan and work at her dream to pay for her own European sabbatical. Working in a corporate firm, Janice is fed up with her job and dreams of packing up her home, submitting her resignation and jumping on a flight to Europe for an adventure. She realises there’s a lot of hard work ahead of her to get to that point but she admirably commits to her goal and methodically and purposefully implements a plan to make her dream a reality.

She de-clutters her home, her mind and (some of) her emotional baggage; saves up a lot of cash to allow for 2 years of travel and is finally able to buy her tickets and depart. Her first stop is Paris and despite her battle with the language and the customs she slowly begins to fall in love with the city… and the handsome butcher on Rue Mouffetard.

Oh how I loved this book. It was just the perfect mix of humour, wonder and an engaging voice that made Janice’s memoir so interesting. With my (2013) European honeymoon still fresh in my mind, it was a joy to envision the places that Janice peruses during her time in Paris. I was also excited to recognise Rue Mouffetard where Janice meets Christophe. My husband and I stopped at one of those chicken stands and purchased a bag of those yummy baked potatoes dripping with chicken juice (I know it sounds pretty gross… but it was delicious!).

I could completely relate with her about the struggle to learn a foreign language. After taking a one-week Italian language class with my husband in Rome last year I felt completely overwhelmed by even attempting a conversation with a native speaker. Like Janice I could speak it and read it but as soon as someone spoke to me I was completely baffled as to what they were saying! It’s so hard to decipher the words spoken in a foreign language and then to actually make sense of those words! Unlike me however, Janice perseveres and her extended break in Paris allows her to practice and learn and develop her confidence in the French language.

The love story between Janice and her handsome, Daniel-Craig look-alike butcher was so lovely to see unfold. How on earth do two people who speak different languages fall in love? Well, Janice and Christophe manage to do just that and they get along perfectly fine! What I also found really interesting was the letter-writing business that Janice founds to fund her stay in Paris. She combines her love of art; writing and Paris into a job that she loves that can be shared with subscribers around the world. What a great idea!

I think this book was just good timing for me… while I sat at home on the back patio, listening to the rain patter on the tin roof and eating vegemite toast I could be transported into charming Paris. I could reminisce on my time in Europe while living vicariously through Janice’s adventures- without even leaving the comfort of my home.

It’s no secret that I’m a sucker for a good travel memoir and this one was right up my alley. Janice has a great writing voice; she’s open, insightful and honest. I think I’ll even subscribe to her blog! ...more
5

Feb 03, 2014

Read the full article complete of photos and photo contest details on MINA'S BOOKSHELF http://minadecaro.blogspot.com/2014/0...

What a delightful read! A memoir, a travel log, a romance, a self-help guide, all rolled into one exquisite and delicate confection. I breezed my way through Janice MacLeod's graceful, intimate, and humorous writing, almost oblivious to the fact that what I was reading was a piece of non-fiction. Paris Letters, in fact, hardly reads as a biography as it features all the Read the full article complete of photos and photo contest details on MINA'S BOOKSHELF http://minadecaro.blogspot.com/2014/0...

What a delightful read! A memoir, a travel log, a romance, a self-help guide, all rolled into one exquisite and delicate confection. I breezed my way through Janice MacLeod's graceful, intimate, and humorous writing, almost oblivious to the fact that what I was reading was a piece of non-fiction. Paris Letters, in fact, hardly reads as a biography as it features all the alluring traits of a modern fairy-tale: a heroine on the run to escape the 'ogre' (her dreary every-day life routine), a false hero (her ex boyfriend), a quest in foreign lands (her journey to self-discovery through France, Scotland, and Italy), a Prince Charming, and a 'happily ever after'. Occasionally fashioned in epistolary form and light-hearted in its essence, Paris Letters is the perfect Valentine's Day read, a great fit for armchair travellers and lovers of Euro glam and all things French.

***ARC review copy graciously offered by the publisher via NetGalley in return for an unbiased and honest opinion. ...more
4

Sep 26, 2016

A charming, well-written and well-illustrated memoir that reads as entertainingly as a novel. This book will make you stop and think about your own life and where it's headed. And quite possibly make you wish it were headed in the direction of Paris.
4

Jan 05, 2014

I've read a lot of memoirs set in Paris, and this one is now among my favorites. A delightful story of falling in love with a man, a city, and her true self.
5

Mar 19, 2019

This was an exceptional memoir about Paris, better than many out on the market. I appreciated the authors practical and relatable way that she saved to quit her job and travel through Europe while she decided what to do next. But in Paris, she found unexpected love, and what unfolded in that was charming and compelling. I can't wait to read her follow-up!
5

Jul 10, 2014

Read my entire review here: http://ivoryowlreviews.blogspot.com/2...

What a dreamy story. Who wouldn't love to take a two year sabbatical to Paris? *sigh* The love story is sweetly awkward and there is just enough divulged to be funny and romantic but not over-the-top fiascos like Bridget Jones. The most swoon-worthy parts were the descriptions of the parks, people, and the pastries. The title Paris Letters had me thinking that there would be a long distance love story of some kind at the Read my entire review here: http://ivoryowlreviews.blogspot.com/2...

What a dreamy story. Who wouldn't love to take a two year sabbatical to Paris? *sigh* The love story is sweetly awkward and there is just enough divulged to be funny and romantic but not over-the-top fiascos like Bridget Jones. The most swoon-worthy parts were the descriptions of the parks, people, and the pastries. The title Paris Letters had me thinking that there would be a long distance love story of some kind at the beginning, but the author actually started a small business. Her artistic abilities allow her to make an income sending hand-drawn or hand-painted letters telling subscribers about Parisian life.
I loved this story. It is hard to believe it is non-fiction because it was so transportive. It was really like a mini vacation!

** I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review **
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5

Feb 16, 2015

I loved this. What a sweet read. And funny. And simply wonderful. Ms. MacLeod-Lik has a special voice to her prose that's charming and inviting. I'd love to read the next installment about where her life takes her from here. I'm recommending this to my Canadian mom who is also from Ontario. Wonderful positivity.
5

Feb 17, 2014

A beautiful and inspiring tale. Beautifully written and full of the same passion and vibrancy for life that one would expect to find on the streets of Paris. Can't recommend it enough. It truly uplifted my spirit and made me want to get out there and make some positive changes in my life.
5

Jan 14, 2014

Such a great story, told with humor and care. I felt like I was reading letters from a very good friend, there to share with me her insight on life, love, work, and of course Paris.
4

May 13, 2017

Nice read. Now, in saying that, I don't mean to be smug or condescending but as I was finishing this one, I was simultaneously finishing Adam Smith's "The Wealth of Nations". So, as you can imagine, I've been waiting for the opportunity to be smug AND condescending. And, you know, it is just as satisfying as I pretended to not imagine it would be.

I read "Paris Letters" to "prime the pump", if you will, a term I invented a few days ago, for an upcoming trip to, you'll never guess, Paris. You can Nice read. Now, in saying that, I don't mean to be smug or condescending but as I was finishing this one, I was simultaneously finishing Adam Smith's "The Wealth of Nations". So, as you can imagine, I've been waiting for the opportunity to be smug AND condescending. And, you know, it is just as satisfying as I pretended to not imagine it would be.

I read "Paris Letters" to "prime the pump", if you will, a term I invented a few days ago, for an upcoming trip to, you'll never guess, Paris. You can only read "A Moveable Feast" so many times.* This did the job. Macleod is a good writer and crafted an interesting story. When I found out she was a blogger I was worried because it is often the case that great bloggers are terrible at lengthier endeavors. Not true in this case.

*FAKE NEWS ALERT...you could never read "A Moveable Feast" too many times. ...more
5

Jan 20, 2018

Oh how I loved this book! Janice does an amazing job of weaving her life from junk mail writer to artist in Paris, including a love story that feels like it's own true life romance novel.

One of the things I truly appreciated is that she shared HOW she did it, from a practical point of view and that included taking a while before jumping on a plane. She had a plan! Made active choices! And followed her dream, and her heart. So inspiring!

I read this via Kindle, and I also really appreciated that Oh how I loved this book! Janice does an amazing job of weaving her life from junk mail writer to artist in Paris, including a love story that feels like it's own true life romance novel.

One of the things I truly appreciated is that she shared HOW she did it, from a practical point of view and that included taking a while before jumping on a plane. She had a plan! Made active choices! And followed her dream, and her heart. So inspiring!

I read this via Kindle, and I also really appreciated that it included not only several of the Paris Letters, but also a text version of the writing so you could have the option of reading it in regular text or as the letter.

Overall, I absolutely loved this book. LOVED it. ...more
4

Jul 20, 2019

A combination of self-help, travelogue, memoir and romance. I might not have liked it so much if I had read it at another time but I just got home from Paris and desperately want to go back, if only through books.
5

Oct 22, 2018

I have discovered that I love to read memoirs about travel and lifestyle. Because of that and my great love for Paris, I found this book to be extremely appealing. It's a slow meander through someone's Journey 2 her dream of travel and exiting the corporate world for good. Along the way she finds love, adventure, a new career and a new way of living. If you liked Julia Child's my life in France you would enjoy this!

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