McElligot's Pool (Classic Seuss) Info

Browse best sellers, historical fiction, literary fiction and find out our top picks in Literature & Fiction. Check out our top reviews in Literature & Fiction books and see what other readers have to say about McElligot's Pool (Classic Seuss) Read&Download McElligot's Pool (Classic Seuss) by Dr. Seuss Online


Imagination runs wild in this Caldecott Honor-winning tale
featuring Dr. Seuss's inimitable voice and hysterical illustrations. The
first Seuss title to feature full-color art on every other page, this
adventurous picture book tells of Marco-who first imagined an
extraordinary parade in And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry
Street
-as he daydreams of all the possibilities that await him while
he fishes in McElligot's Pool. Optimistic and exciting, this tale is
the perfect bait, and readers young and old will be hooked on this
fish-tastic favorite.

Average Ratings and Reviews
review-bg

4.49

4887 Ratings

5

4

3

2

1


Ratings and Reviews From Market


client-img 4.8
181
8
2
2
4
client-img 4.7
4
3
2
2
0
client-img 4.06
1953
1833
580
5
0
client-img 4.4
14
16
9
1
0

Reviews for McElligot's Pool (Classic Seuss):

5

Mar 31, 2017

Superb reading!


A POOL OF READING

’Cause you never can tell.

What goes on down below.

This pool might be bigger.

Than you or I know!

A wonderful tale, the only one that Dr. Seuss colored using watercolor technique (used by Dr. Seuss only here and in another tale, Happy Birthday to You!), that since it’s about the possibilities of catching all kind of wacko fishes in a little pond...

...I think it was just perfect.

In my humble opinion, of this kind of “Dream Bigger” trilogy (my point of Superb reading!


A POOL OF READING

’Cause you never can tell.

What goes on down below.

This pool might be bigger.

Than you or I know!

A wonderful tale, the only one that Dr. Seuss colored using watercolor technique (used by Dr. Seuss only here and in another tale, Happy Birthday to You!), that since it’s about the possibilities of catching all kind of wacko fishes in a little pond...

...I think it was just perfect.

In my humble opinion, of this kind of “Dream Bigger” trilogy (my point of view, not that they’d ever enlisted as such by anybody else): And to Think that I saw i ton Mulberry Street, McElligot’s Pool (this one), and If I ran the Zoo,...

...I believe that it’s this very tale which better exemplifies the concept, presenting the right choice of coloring style, a mindblowing and funny shoal of wacko fishes, and a charming ending with endless possibilities.

Also, it’s relevant to mention that thanks to this very tale, the world has too The Berenstain Bears since its creators, Stan and Jan Berenstain got the idea of creating their own series of children’s tales when their kid asked them to buy him this book, that at that moment, they didn’t have a clue who was Dr. Seuss… and years later HE edited it their first book.

...more
5

Aug 05, 2017

Fascinating Marco's imagination is because he was able to imagine all those kind of places, fishes and sea creatures while waiting for a fish to take his bait in that tiny pool.

Plain and simple, the moral lesson is just about patience. But despite the simplicity of the lesson that it wants to convey, the entirety of the story is exceptionally good.
3

Dec 16, 2019

It's fun reading some of these oldies. McElligot's Pool is even older than my parents! It's one of the first Dr. Seuss books I've seen that uses full-colour illustrations along with black-and-white ones.

This book is first and foremost a celebration of imagination. When Marco is told that he won't catch any fish in McElligot's Pool, he spins a wild tale about how the pool might be connected to a river or even the ocean, and from there he muses about all the various fish he might catch: everything It's fun reading some of these oldies. McElligot's Pool is even older than my parents! It's one of the first Dr. Seuss books I've seen that uses full-colour illustrations along with black-and-white ones.

This book is first and foremost a celebration of imagination. When Marco is told that he won't catch any fish in McElligot's Pool, he spins a wild tale about how the pool might be connected to a river or even the ocean, and from there he muses about all the various fish he might catch: everything from fish with checkerboard bellies to two-headed eels.

While it was interesting to see what Marco would come up with next, I found the book just a little too long for my taste. It's also slightly dated with the stereotypical depiction of Inuit, going so far as to use the term "Eskimo". But it was 1947, and it's unfair to judge books from the past against our current standards. (Look at it as a mini history lesson instead.)

This isn't my favourite Dr. Seuss title. It's okay, but the length is a little tiresome. (Picture books from this era seem to be about twice the length of our current standard of around 32 pages. Parents: you've been warned.) ...more
4

Apr 26, 2018

This was my favorite Dr. Seuss book as a kid. I loved all the things he might possibly catch in McElligot's Pool. The imagination is great - also the hope of possibility. When I finished reading it to my mentee, he said, "But it doesn't say if he catches anything!" I told him that was great, because the reader gets to decide the outcome of the book. Until reading Seuss's books more recently as an adult, I'd no idea the hidden depth in what seemed to be meaningless, fun-sounding, inventive rhymes This was my favorite Dr. Seuss book as a kid. I loved all the things he might possibly catch in McElligot's Pool. The imagination is great - also the hope of possibility. When I finished reading it to my mentee, he said, "But it doesn't say if he catches anything!" I told him that was great, because the reader gets to decide the outcome of the book. Until reading Seuss's books more recently as an adult, I'd no idea the hidden depth in what seemed to be meaningless, fun-sounding, inventive rhymes when I was a child. ...more
5

Mar 25, 2015

A cute book about a young boy who is fishing in McElligot's Pool. A man comes and tells him, he won't be catching anything in the pool and the young boy tells him what he could be catching and where all that water comes from. Who knows, the child might be right?
4

Jan 12, 2016

Wonderful rhyming and so many odd fish which means great fun Goodling them to see what ones are real. Cat fish, whatever next! Nice illustrations too, lots going on in the background. Ended up reading this book twice as it was such good fun.
5

Jan 04, 2016

One of the earlier Seuss books that I've somehow never heard of before, this was a fun read with MicroMort. No "message" just ever more fantastic fish a boy imagines he can catch in a tiny pond, which is exactly the kind of magical thinking I remember having as a boy. Fun.
4

Mar 22, 2012

Loved it, and it cracked the kids up! Madeline chose it from the school library, and we really enjoyed it - I'd not read it before.
5

Oct 20, 2010

Imagination. Hope. Wonder. A revelation that we live in a world limited only by our perspective. This book inspires me to this day.
5

Dec 05, 2010

Creativity at its best! As one of Dr. Seuss early masterpieces, this book tells a tale of many kinds of fish in McElligot's pool. I can imagine this being a good story for writer's workshop to create the strangest and most colorful fish in the pool or as a story to read before visiting the aquarium. Encourages creative minds that think outside the box.
4

Aug 24, 2012

AppleBlossom read this one aloud to us all. This is a Memoria Press Second grade literature choice.
5

Mar 15, 2014

**** Caldecott Honor (1948) ****

Beautiful colored pencil drawing show the early creative genius in the early years. His style is unique and evident.
4

Jul 20, 2013

1948 Caldecott Honor. I didn't know much about McElligot's Pool when we checked it out this morning. I didn't read it as a child. My first impression was that the artwork is different than other Seuss books. It alternates between black-and-white and beautiful multicolored drawings. Apparently, he used color pencils for this one instead of his more typical pen-and-ink. The result for me is that the drawings in McElligot's Pool are among my favorite of any of Seuss' works I've read to-date.

I 1948 Caldecott Honor. I didn't know much about McElligot's Pool when we checked it out this morning. I didn't read it as a child. My first impression was that the artwork is different than other Seuss books. It alternates between black-and-white and beautiful multicolored drawings. Apparently, he used color pencils for this one instead of his more typical pen-and-ink. The result for me is that the drawings in McElligot's Pool are among my favorite of any of Seuss' works I've read to-date.

I really liked the main character Marco. He refuses to let the humble, polluted appearance of the tiny pool deter him from fishing there. Marco's mind takes him past the visible limits of the pool, imagining all types of real and not-even-close-to-real fish that he might catch in the pathetic little puddle. Marco represents optimism and hope, while the farmer who calls the boy a fool for wasting his time fishing at McElligot's Pool is a realist. The farmer's mind can't get past appearances. The worlds of endless possibility and limitation collide once again, with possibility once again trumping impossibility in Seuss' universe.

I needn't have been concerned that Sigourney would rebel at the length of the book. She was fascinated by the increasingly strange fish imagined by Marco. She particularly loved the massive Thing-a-ma-jigger that made a whale look like a minnow. Her face stayed about two inches from the page throughout the read. I suspect she'd give 5 stars without a blink. ...more
5

Aug 19, 2016

This story comes after And to Think That I Saw it on Mulberry Street and revolves around the amazingly imaginative Marco.

In 1950, McElligot's Pool won the Pacific Northwest Library Association Young Reader's Choice Award, and in 1948, it won the Caldecott Honor.

My Take
I had barely started before I knew the graphics would be such a very Seuss-ian delight, *grin*

The odd thing, though, is that the color graphics alternate with the gray-and-white ones, and I don't understand why. I did love the This story comes after And to Think That I Saw it on Mulberry Street and revolves around the amazingly imaginative Marco.

In 1950, McElligot's Pool won the Pacific Northwest Library Association Young Reader's Choice Award, and in 1948, it won the Caldecott Honor.

My Take
I had barely started before I knew the graphics would be such a very Seuss-ian delight, *grin*

The odd thing, though, is that the color graphics alternate with the gray-and-white ones, and I don't understand why. I did love the one with the "flexible" strut holding up a whale of an outcropping of land on which sits the town, LOL.

It does make for an interesting contrast between the wise, all-knowing farmer who warns Marco he'll never catch a fish in this solitary pool, and the imaginative enthusiasm Marco shows. It also provides Seuss with the opportunity to provide a geological lesson as well as one on the denizens of the sea. And lots of opportunities for Mom and the kids to exercise their own imaginations. Lord knows, Seuss was amazingly creative with the kinds of fish Marco thinks might be catchable.

Brilliantly done with its own reality.

The Story
Young Marco may find a fish here in McElligot's Pool despite what any old farmer might say.

The Characters
Marco is a young boy with an imagination and a farmer.

Oh, yeah, and lots and lots and lots of fish.

The Cover and Title
The background for the cover is an elliptical swirl of blues and grays as an orange and green fish greedily eyes a worm on a hook that's attached to a bobber floating in the water. The title and author's name is in a soft fuchsia with the title outlined in black.

The title could possibly be a portal to the sea, oh, yes, who knows how far McElligot's Pool may flee. ...more
5

Aug 17, 2015

If you would like to see more of Marco then you should definitely check out Dr. Seuss's first children books which is And to Think I Saw it on Mulberry Street

I honestly believe this book is precursor to One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish and could possibly be Dr. Seuss's experimental book. What I mean by experimental is by the time Dr. Seuss becomes a sensation, he already discover his talent and the different formats of writing a children's book, the illustrations, and the colors. In this If you would like to see more of Marco then you should definitely check out Dr. Seuss's first children books which is And to Think I Saw it on Mulberry Street

I honestly believe this book is precursor to One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish and could possibly be Dr. Seuss's experimental book. What I mean by experimental is by the time Dr. Seuss becomes a sensation, he already discover his talent and the different formats of writing a children's book, the illustrations, and the colors. In this book the illustrations vary differently in each page.

One moment it is black and white, the next is water-color drawings, another is the usual Dr. Seuss drawings. I did not have a problem with it especially since this is one of earlier works but I can definitely see how others may not enjoy it especially the constant shift to black and white.

In this story we get to meet Marco from Dr. Seuss's first book and he is at McElligot's pool. He goes there one day to simply catch a fish and the farmer tells him that he will never catch a fish. He tells him that that is the location where people dump cans and bottles but no fish. Marco realizes while that may be true it is still possible to catch fish, all you have to do is be patient. When that idea comes in, his imagination goes wild like in the first book and goes into details of the different type of fishes that may come up to the surface of McElligot's pool.

If you see the marvelous illustrations I see great examples of different fishes that appear in his other works like I saw a larger version of the goldfish that he uses in the Cat in the Hat. I really enjoyed this book especially the rhymes and I felt like Dr. Seuss didn't have any pressures about this book and just wrote it for fun and to be free with creativity. ...more
4

Jun 06, 2010

“McElligot’s Pool” is one of Dr. Seuss’ earlier books and it is about how a young boy explains to an old man how he imagines that there will be millions of fish of different shapes and colors in McElligot’s Pool. “McElligot’s Pool” may be a bit behind for today’s kids, but it is truly a creative book that started up Dr. Seuss’ popular line of rhyming books.

Dr. Seuss’ illustrations are truly creative as the fishes are shown in many different colors and shapes, especially when the boy starts “McElligot’s Pool” is one of Dr. Seuss’ earlier books and it is about how a young boy explains to an old man how he imagines that there will be millions of fish of different shapes and colors in McElligot’s Pool. “McElligot’s Pool” may be a bit behind for today’s kids, but it is truly a creative book that started up Dr. Seuss’ popular line of rhyming books.

Dr. Seuss’ illustrations are truly creative as the fishes are shown in many different colors and shapes, especially when the boy starts describing about the cat fishes in the water and the images of the cat fish are truly hilarious as the cat fish have cat heads and fish bodies and also the image of the fish with the checkerboard belly is also hilarious as the fish literally has a checkerboard belly. Also, the images in the book are structured where two pages of the book have colored images while the next two pages are in black and white which was similar to some of the “Madeline” books. Dr. Seuss’ story is extremely creative and full of optimism as the boy believes that fish will come to McElligot’s Pool no matter what the old man said which will give many children a good impression that anything is possible if you believe in it. Also, the way that the boy describes each fish in McElligot’s Pool in a creative way such as mentioning a cat fish, a stout fish, and a fish that rides on skis and many children will love the wacky mentioning of each fish.

Some smaller children might think that this book is a bit too old-fashioned since it was one of Dr. Seuss’ earlier books and the images are a bit outdated since some of the images are in black and white and the images are not brightly colored like Dr. Seuss’ later books are. Also, this book is a bit lengthier than Dr. Seuss’s later books and many small children might lose interest in a book that is too long for their liking.

“McElligot’s Pool” is a very creative book about the power of using your imagination and anything would be possible. I would recommend this book to children ages five and up since there is nothing inappropriate about this book, but smaller children might be a little bored with this book since it is a bit too outdated but it all depends on your child if he or she likes outdated books. ...more
4

Sep 16, 2019

Another Dr. Seuss book in my mission to read them all.

My daughter read this one to me. I enjoyed it because of all the creative and wacky fish. Marco, the narrator, has a great imagination which he shares with his readers. More than ever, it's important for children to remember how fun it is to have an imagination!

I marked this one 4 stars because only some of the pictures were colored and I felt that took away a bit from this story. It wouldn't have bothered me if the black and white drawings Another Dr. Seuss book in my mission to read them all.

My daughter read this one to me. I enjoyed it because of all the creative and wacky fish. Marco, the narrator, has a great imagination which he shares with his readers. More than ever, it's important for children to remember how fun it is to have an imagination!

I marked this one 4 stars because only some of the pictures were colored and I felt that took away a bit from this story. It wouldn't have bothered me if the black and white drawings were life and the color represented Marco's imagination but it seemed there was no rhyme or reason. ...more
4

Dec 22, 2017

• 1948 Caldecott Honor Book •

Something about Dr. Seuss’ children’s books have never quite appealed to me. The pictures are just so out there. I love all his advertising work - maybe his children’s books are too overwhelming and his advertising work is easier to take in. But I recognize his talent and his importance in children’s literature, and after recently reading other Caldecott books from the ‘40s this was a relief.

Materials used: unlisted
Typeface used: unlisted
5

Oct 11, 2015

Title: McElligot's Pool
Author: Theodore Seuss Giesel
Illustrator:
Genre: Picture Book
Theme(s): Patience, hope, believing, imagination
Opening line/sentence: "Young man," laughed the farmer, "You're sort of a fool! You'll never catch fish in McElligot's pool!"
Brief Book Summary: This book starts off with an adult farmer trying to discourage a boy from fishing in McElligot's pool, because he believes there are no fish in there. The boy proceeds to his imagination and fantasizes over the fish that he Title: McElligot's Pool
Author: Theodore Seuss Giesel
Illustrator:
Genre: Picture Book
Theme(s): Patience, hope, believing, imagination
Opening line/sentence: "Young man," laughed the farmer, "You're sort of a fool! You'll never catch fish in McElligot's pool!"
Brief Book Summary: This book starts off with an adult farmer trying to discourage a boy from fishing in McElligot's pool, because he believes there are no fish in there. The boy proceeds to his imagination and fantasizes over the fish that he could possibly catch, completely disregarding the farmer's comment. There are realistic fish and fish that are completely a result of his imagination displayed throughout the rest of the story.
Professional Recommendation/Review #1:In this colorful picture book, a boy named Marco goes fishing in a small pond called McElligot's Pool. As he sits waiting for a bite, a farmer calls him a fool and says "You'll never catch fish in McElligot's Pool!" Marco, however, refuses to be discouraged and spends the rest of the story describing all the fish that could be coming to McElligot's Pool from the ocean. The story ends with Marco still fishing and the farmer scratching his beard and looking confused. The use of color and illustrations blur the line between fantasy and reality during Marco's story, creating one of the most interesting aspects of the book. The text is made up of catchy rhymes and intriguing fish descriptions. The pictures complement the text and make the fish descriptions seem real. Interestingly, Seuss illustrates every other page in black and white. At the beginning of the story when Marco sits by the pond, the black and white emphasizes the concrete reality of the Marco talking to the farmer. After page one, every other page is in color. The color magnifies Marco's fantasy about all of the fish, making them seem beautiful and real. At the same time, the black and white pages make Marco's fish descriptions seem realistic. Seuss's use of the black-and-white pictures during Marco's whimsical descriptions in the text could be his way of toning down the fantasy and bringing it into the context of every day life. The use of color to blend reality and fantasy also emphasizes optimism in the story. The farmer was probably right in telling Marco that he will "never catch fish in McElligot's Pool." With the clever use of color and illustrations, however, Dr. Seuss undermines the fisherman's certainty and makes Marco's claim that there might be fish in McElligot's Pool believable. McElligot's Pool sends the message that life is not always as it seems, that it is not as simple as black and white. It portrays the optimistic and hopeful message that miracles can happen, even in a place like McElligot's Pool. Without Dr. Suess's expert use of color in his illustrations to emphasize the text, this message would not have been nearly as effective. 1996 (orig. 1947), Random House,
— Jenny Pendleton
Professional Recommendation/Review #2:Kirkis Review
Utterly enchanting nonsense tale, which children and grown-ups will equally claim. Particularly fishermen, of any age. A small boy drops a fishing line in a farmer's pool and ignores the farmer's scornful comment on the kinds of things he will find in the pool. His imagination plays, instead, with the kinds of things the pool might provide -- and the pictures are wonderful,- superb drawing, beautiful color, lots of humor in double page spreads throughout.
Professional Recommendation/Review #1:Children's Literature
Response to Two Professional Reviews: Both reviews mention the imagination that comes into play during this book. However, Kirkis Review definitely goes more in-depth with HOW the imagination is depicted in the story: through Dr. Seuss's play with colors. The book shifts back and forth from fantasy to reality, and the fantasy is displayed through the colorful pages whereas reality is in all black and white. Through the pictures and colors, the book successfully shows the boy's imagination as opposed to the farmer's reality.
Evaluation of Literary Elements: The use of color definitely plays a huge role in this book, as it shifts back and forth from black and white to color as the story shifts from reality to fantasy and imagination. This is an interesting element, however it starts to get confusing as the color change keeps shifting. The color shifts towards the middle of the book make it hard to tell whether or not the boy really will catch fish from the pool. This book also plays on a reader's patience, as the boy waits the entire story to catch a fish and the reader never finds out of the boy catches a fish.
Consideration of Instructional Application: This can be used to teach children to use their imagination, and to show them that there really are no boundaries to what they can do or what they might find out in the world. The teacher can have them draw their own pond and draw what type of fish they think they might catch. The teacher can also evoke the children's imagination by asking the students what fish they think the boy will catch (if any), and how much longer is he going to wait after the book until he catches it.
...more
5

Apr 28, 2019

McElligot's Pool is a popular children's book written by the incomparable Dr. Suess. Much like other Dr. Suess books the pages are filled with unique creatures (in this case fish). The story starts with a young boy, Marco, that is trying to catch a fish in McElligot's Pool. An old farmer tells the boy that he is a fool for trying to catch fish in the pool because it is only filled with trash. Marco then starts to let his imagination run wild with the types of fish that he may be able to catch if McElligot's Pool is a popular children's book written by the incomparable Dr. Suess. Much like other Dr. Suess books the pages are filled with unique creatures (in this case fish). The story starts with a young boy, Marco, that is trying to catch a fish in McElligot's Pool. An old farmer tells the boy that he is a fool for trying to catch fish in the pool because it is only filled with trash. Marco then starts to let his imagination run wild with the types of fish that he may be able to catch if he is patient. This is one of my favorite Dr. Suess books because it serves as a starting point for the reader to use their own imagination and think about the most unimaginable things that they can make up. I particularly like the end where Marco rejects the advice of the old farmer and continues fishing because he is inspired by the images of the sea and the fishes that inhabit those pockets of sea life. This book reminds me a lot of a another Dr. Seuss book that I recently read, "If I Ran the Zoo." This would be a great read-aloud book as the passages are short and it would allow for the integration of art and science. ...more
5

Aug 28, 2019

This book shows the reader that even though things seem impossible to others, it is still worthwhile to try your best and discover what you might uncover.
5

Mar 02, 2018

Seuss back before he was obligated to make up nonsense words for the sake of rhyming. Great illustrations - sometimes they force you to linger much longer than the text would require.
5

Jun 19, 2008

This was one of the most influential books of my life. I read it in the first grade; possibly on my very first visit to the school's library. It was a very small library but it seemed like a wonderland to me.

This was the first book to explode my mind about the big wide world beyond my backyard and how things are interconnected. From the little pond to the stream to the river to the ocean. To this day I believe that if all children had read this, they would understand how things are related, and This was one of the most influential books of my life. I read it in the first grade; possibly on my very first visit to the school's library. It was a very small library but it seemed like a wonderland to me.

This was the first book to explode my mind about the big wide world beyond my backyard and how things are interconnected. From the little pond to the stream to the river to the ocean. To this day I believe that if all children had read this, they would understand how things are related, and there might be greater understanding of the big picture outside ourselves, and greater empathy for others.

So long ago I read this and the images from the book remain vivid in my memory. Seuss's flights of fancy are keys that open up young minds. This is an all-time favorite.

(KevinR@Ky, amended 2016) ...more
5

Apr 16, 2014

Even as a very little girl, I knew I had an unusual favourite Dr. Seuss book. Nobody knew McElligot's Pool, and if they knew it, they certainly didn't like it.

Despite the strangeness of and opposition to my choice, this one has always spoken to me. Its message of steadfast belief in the power of one's own self and the gentle allure of escape which this book offers, have both been irresistible and invaluable in my life, and they remain so.

There's no one who has not, at some point in his life, Even as a very little girl, I knew I had an unusual favourite Dr. Seuss book. Nobody knew McElligot's Pool, and if they knew it, they certainly didn't like it.

Despite the strangeness of and opposition to my choice, this one has always spoken to me. Its message of steadfast belief in the power of one's own self and the gentle allure of escape which this book offers, have both been irresistible and invaluable in my life, and they remain so.

There's no one who has not, at some point in his life, faced a taunting opponent to his dream. If he has not, he will. If he can take the advice of Poe or Seuss, though, and believe El Dorado is over the next mountain, or that a fish will swim into the tiny, garbage-ridden pool, his life will be so much easier and, more importantly, more beautiful. ...more
0

Nov 30, 2016

This book is about the overactive imagination of an adventurous little boy named Marco. Marco dreams up a magnificent parade and day dreams about fishing at McElligot’s pool and all the adventures he would have there.
K-3 would be ideal for this book.
All students would be entertained and would benefit from this book.
This would be a good whole class read rather than small groups.
A book similar to this one is Green Eyes.
There is no multimedia that I know of.

Best Books from your Favorite Authors & Publishers

compare-icon compare-icon
Thousands of books

Take your time and choose the perfect book.

review-icon review-icon
Read Reviews

Read ratings and reviews to make sure you are on the right path.

vendor-icon vendor-icon
Multiple Stores

Check price from multiple stores for a better shopping experience.

gift-icon

Enjoy Result