Making Sense of Phonics, First Edition: The Hows and Whys (Solving Problems in the Teaching of Literacy) Info

Find the best books In Reference - best sellers and hot new Releases. Check out our top gifted and best rated books this year. Take a look at hundreds of reviews before you download Making Sense of Phonics, First Edition: The Hows and Whys (Solving Problems in the Teaching of Literacy) by Isabel L. Beck. Read&Download Making Sense of Phonics, First Edition: The Hows and Whys (Solving Problems in the Teaching of Literacy) by Isabel L. Beck Online


Average Ratings and Reviews
review-bg

4.12

139 Ratings

5

4

3

2

1


Ratings and Reviews From Market


client-img 4
12
4
2
0
3
client-img 4.24
42
50
29
1
1

Reviews for Making Sense of Phonics, First Edition: The Hows and Whys (Solving Problems in the Teaching of Literacy):

1

Jul 26, 2018

Do not bother with this book. I was looking for some fresh perspectives, ideas, strategies, and resources. You will find none of that in this book. If you need convincing heres a list of some of the problems I had with this book.

- It is written with an air of condescension. The authors portray teachers as confused and undereducated rather than professionals.
- The authors present the long and controversial history of reading instruction from a very one sided perspective. Obviously the book is Do not bother with this book. I was looking for some fresh perspectives, ideas, strategies, and resources. You will find none of that in this book. If you need convincing here’s a list of some of the problems I had with this book.

- It is written with an air of condescension. The authors portray teachers as confused and undereducated rather than professionals.
- The authors present the long and controversial history of reading instruction from a very one sided perspective. Obviously the book is about phonics but I expect current resources to be well rounded, unbiased, and current.
- Much research has been conducted regarding phonics, especially in the 1970s-1990s. The author relies on that research. If there isn’t enough current research is there a need for the book? I’m not sure which educators at this point haven’t already been trained with the benefit of that research.
- The one and only digital resource that was mentioned was a computer program developed in...wait for it...1987 and was created by the author. That’s 31 years ago.
- Almost all proposed strategies are teacher directed. They are so terrible the authors have been compelled to include classroom managements tips bc they admit that it will be hard to keep student’s attention.
- In that same vein the authors say, when trying to show that reading is a very complex task, “that reading appears to be such a mundane endeavor”. Don’t worry, they follow that comment with an explanation from 1987. ...more
5

Mar 30, 2020


From colonial times through the 1920s, reading instruction was done phonetically or reading by the code. Sometimes this was very tedious drilling and did not include much reading until rules were learned. From the 1920s to the 1950s, the Dick and Jane readers prevailed with a whole word approach. After the watershed book by Rudolph Flesch, Why Johnny Cant Read, (1955), a return to phonics instruction was called for. At this time, theoretically, educators had all they needed for reading
From colonial times through the 1920s, reading instruction was done phonetically or reading by the code. Sometimes this was very tedious drilling and did not include much reading until rules were learned. From the 1920s to the 1950s, the Dick and Jane readers prevailed with a whole word approach. After the watershed book by Rudolph Flesch, Why Johnny Can’t Read, (1955), a return to phonics instruction was called for. At this time, theoretically, educators had all they needed for reading instruction- teaching for meaning and teaching linguistically with phonics. In spite of the call to return to phonics instruction, the whole language approach was the norm for much of the country through the mid-1990s. Congress created the National Reading Panel (NRP) in 1997 to examine scientific research on how children learn to read. One of the NRP’s five main conclusions was that explicit and systematic phonics instruction was necessary. This led to the No Child Left Behind Act of 2002 and to date most schools include this phonics instruction in teaching early readers.
All human societies have an oral language showing that oral language is an innate human skill. Written language is much more complex. Written language allows society to pass on its discoveries and thoughts to future cultures. The alphabet, based on individual sounds, or phonemes, is key to the alphabetic principle. A perfect alphabet would have a one to one match of the phoneme to grapheme(letter). Spanish is a nearly perfect alphabet, English is not! Phonics is associating the phoneme to a grapheme and the rules for why it is so. More than half of early readers pick up phonics innately and learn the alphabetic code. But for the rest, explicit phonics instruction is needed to pay attention to the letter and sound relationships.
Examples are given of- decoding only the first or first and last letter in a word-
Using limited alphabetic principle and then relying on context and pictures over phonics.
Decoding first few sounds in a multi-syllable word and the guessing or making up a word that fits the letter shape or similar spelling. Depending on visual orthography vs phonics. Research has shown that readers need to be able to understand and use the alphabetic principle, know grapheme and phoneme connections, decode, have a good sense of English orthography and have rapid word recognition.
Phonemic Awareness is the ability to hear and manipulate the individual phonemes in a word. Some children do not hear the separate sounds in a word but hear the word as a unit. The authors suggest teaching phonemic awareness and decoding side by side so that the orthography is taught along with the phoneme and that these skills support each other.
Reading and blending nonsense words and building words are two activities that improve both phonemic awareness and decoding. Both skills can be greatly strengthened by using small letter manipulatives. Phonemic awareness is a “means to an end”. Once children have the alphabetic code and understand its relationships they do not need to practice PA.
Phonics instruction includes explicit teaching of individual consonants, short vowels, consonant blends, consonant digraphs, CVCe words, vowel teams and vowel digraphs, r controlled vowels, and diphthongs. (I would add syllable types-as they are inferred in this). The order of introducing letters is determined by ease of pronunciation, visual discrimination and being able to build words with meaning. One should separate the introduction of visually similar letters like b/d, g and p etc., as well as similar-sounding phonemes like /a/ and /e/. Our phonics curriculums often allow the same amount of time 1 week or so for each new concept. The Becks suggest that not all grapheme-phoneme correspondences are created equal and should not be given the same emphasis. For instance, when teaching CVCe, you might spend a week on each long vowel, but there are very few English words that have the pattern E_e. This is not an efficient use of time. All of this time is taught emphasizing the rules of English reading/spelling. Don’t forget to teach sight words-the rule breakers.
When teaching, explicitly introduce the letter names and the corresponding letter sound-two correlating ideas. Authors believe that letter names should be taught and firmly established prior to teaching letter sounds. When teaching the sounds, do use a structured, sequential approach as mentioned in the above paragraph. This allows for immediate blending and application of the sounds for early word reading. When blending teach initial, middle and ending sounds from the beginning. Letter and sound position are important!
Chapter 5 gives lesson scripts on how to explicitly introduce letter-sound correspondence for the concepts of initial, medial and ending sounds, consonants, blends, and vowel teams while using manipulative letters and pocket charts to build phonetic skills and phonemic awareness simultaneously.
Sometimes problems with blending for young children are really problems with short term memory. They must be taught to blend in a way that does not tax the short- term memory by successive or cumulative blending. An example given is:
/c/ /r/ /cr/ /u/ /cru//s//crus//t//crust/. This should be presented with letter cards in an I do, we do, you do method.
Word Building exercises allow students to physically manipulate letter cards and build and read words with minimum contrasts. Students learn to pay attention to each individual letter/sound in a word. Again this exercise simultaneously teaches phonemic awareness and phonics skills. Doing this with a full class or a reading group allows the teacher to see who has the skill, who is learning it and who does not have a clue! The Becks suggest that for correcting an answer, print or build the word as a child did with a mistake and then directly under it, print or build the correctly spelled word to help the child find their mistake. They also suggest using decodable text, dictation, and 2 silly questions that use the pattern being taught, so for short "a" ask Can a cat rap?
Specific Phonics Assessments (SPA’s) can be used to discern what skills a student has mastered, which skills they might need to work on and what skills should be taught next. They include an assessment of the specific skill with real words, then with nonsense words and a recap. The benefits of them are above- identifying what a student does and does not know. They do not assess fluency, automaticity, or sight words.
Teach syllable division to aid in reading and spelling multisyllabic words. Initial guidelines include
VC/CV -When a word has two adjacent consonants, one usually divides the word between the two consonants. Bas/ket, happen, Rabbit words
When a word has one consonant between 2 vowels, the division is usually after the first vowel. Baker, pilot I call these TIGER words.
-cle words. When a word ends with -le, usually put the consonant with the le. Giggle, simple, uncle,
Single vowels can be their own syllable like el-e-phant, cell-o-phane.
Next, teach the 6 types of syllables. Closed- CVC, silent E words VCe, r-controlled VR , consonant le -cle, open syllables, CVVC.
Lastly, when blending syllables in a multi-syllabic word use cumulative blending. So for the word confederate, students would blend /con/ /fed/ /confed/ /er/ confeder/ /ate/ confederate. This uses syllables or chunking and helps with short memory.
Students can practice the above to fight the often normal feeling of helplessness they feel when called upon to read multi-syllabic words.
Syllasearch is a useful intervention tool to assist in reading multi-syllabic words. Several lists of syllables are given to play this game.
Orthography is boosted by much reading in context. However, there are games that can build up orthography also. Practice sheets- of word families or mixed. Do this with choral reading – having a secret confederate who will make a mistake, and the class as a whole says “oops”; speed drills of these are good and results can be graphed. A visual search for specific word parts or blends in a list of words helps train the eye and ear. Play hangman/Wheel of Fortune game. Teach how to find little words in big words for example the words get, table, able are in the word vegetable. Show anagrams.
Practice and repetition are essential for building automaticity ( which basically is fluency). In a small group setting, have one student read a page aloud, followed by all students rereading that page. Then have students whisper read the entire book to self. Students will have read the text 3 times. Rewriting a story into a Reader’s Theater presentation gives repeated readings also.
My earliest reading memories are sitting in my dad’s lap in the rocking chair while he read mother goose nursery rhymes. I also remember my Bedtime bible storybook read by him. My siblings and I listened to many books and stories on records as soon as we could attend to do so or in the background while playing. From Kindergarten to at least 2nd grade (late 60’s to early 70) my reading instruction was phonics-based (Open Court) and by 3rd grade, I was an established reader. Also, after dinner, we often read children and family chapter books while seated around the table. I do not remember having phonics teaching instruction in college, but I do remember using systematic and explicit phonics instruction with Abekka, Saxon and Rowland reading for teaching K-2nd grade from the late 1980s through the first decade of 2000s.
Many of the excellent scripts and short lesson plans are examples similar to parts of an Orton Gillingham lesson. The cumulative blending is a new twist that I will be including with my students who have short memory struggles. In teaching syllables, I teach 5 syllable types and considered CVVC a syllable division skill. The appendices of this book include many useful tools to immediately implement with one-on-one, small and whole group phonics instruction. I borrowed this book from the library but look forward to purchasing it for these valuable resources.
...more
5

Nov 11, 2018

I read the 2nd edition, which is expanded significantly. This is an essential resource for teachers of early literacy. I read it on the recommendation of a colleague in preparation for a presentation to the State Board of Education on new teacher preparation standards for early elementary teachers, as we've been challenged by individuals who know little of the work of teaching or literacy development to demonstrate that the new standards incorporate the recommendations of "phonics experts." They I read the 2nd edition, which is expanded significantly. This is an essential resource for teachers of early literacy. I read it on the recommendation of a colleague in preparation for a presentation to the State Board of Education on new teacher preparation standards for early elementary teachers, as we've been challenged by individuals who know little of the work of teaching or literacy development to demonstrate that the new standards incorporate the recommendations of "phonics experts." They do, and this book reinforces that conclusion with its clear message of the central importance of sound-print matching to further achievements in reading and of the integration of phonemic awareness, phonological awareness, explicit phonics, vocabulary and spelling activities in early literacy instruction.

That said, avoid the Kindle edition of this book. As with other Guilford publications, it's in a page-image format; that is, image files replicate the look of each page of the paper edition, and do not allow for use of Kindle's powerful text formatting tools to improve readability. The font is serifed, the file is not compatible with Kindle for Windows (i.e., you have to read it on a screen smaller than actual book size), and the only recourse is to enlarge the text to a point where one must scroll in all directions to navigate a page. Unnecessary inconvenience for a $20+ ebook, or wreck one's eyes. Get it in print! ...more
3

May 22, 2017

A solidly academic book that's engagingly written? And that's fewer than 150 pages? Yes, please! This book is a great introduction toyou guessed itthe how's and why's of teaching phonics, fleshed out with personal anecdotes. In fact, I'm interested enough to read the second edition, which was expanded to include twice as much information. A solidly academic book that's engagingly written? And that's fewer than 150 pages? Yes, please! This book is a great introduction to—you guessed it—the how's and why's of teaching phonics, fleshed out with personal anecdotes. In fact, I'm interested enough to read the second edition, which was expanded to include twice as much information. ...more
4

Jun 24, 2019

Read this for a graduate course I'm taking. It was SUPER helpful in my understanding of phonics :)
5

Dec 24, 2019

A very helpful review of phonics and other language concepts for informing interventions for struggling readers.
4

Sep 25, 2019

I actually read the 2nd edition, but it provides a lot of actionable suggestions! Easy to read!
3

Sep 05, 2012

I thought this was a good book that really makes you evaluate how you are currently teaching phonics and why it is important that children can a basic understanding of how each letter sounds and how the sounds work together. The author also offers strategies that teachers can use in their classroom to teach phonics and situations where her strategies can help supplement what is already being taught. The author draws from her experience as a teacher of children and adults that were having I thought this was a good book that really makes you evaluate how you are currently teaching phonics and why it is important that children can a basic understanding of how each letter sounds and how the sounds work together. The author also offers strategies that teachers can use in their classroom to teach phonics and situations where her strategies can help supplement what is already being taught. The author draws from her experience as a teacher of children and adults that were having difficulty reading. The book is easy to read and provides a lot of helpful information in the appendices. I definatley would recommend it to educators and anyone trying to help children become successful readers. ...more
5

Jun 01, 2016

This book changed my perspective on phonics instruction! I particularly appreciated two things: the summary of relevant research followed by easy-to-implement classroom activities, and (what I interpreted as) a reconciliation between phonics versus whole-language reading instruction. The authors emphasize the importance of phonics instruction, but they also highlight the importance of providing students with opportunities to apply their skills to connected text.
3

Feb 27, 2009

So this book is obviously not a gripping thriller, but it did lay out a progression of skills and lessons. I found the book the be very helpful, and was able to use some of the mini-lessons with great success! If you want to know about phonics this is a great book with which to practice methods.
5

Mar 18, 2014

Use this book all the time! The lessons and activities are simple and can be implemented right away without much prep work. I love the game Syllasearch - targets blending multisyllabic words. Engaging and effective!
4

Nov 10, 2012

Great background info on how we learn how to read. Practical activities to try with struggling readers.
5

Feb 27, 2008

I use this book to help teach phonics to my son. I really like her method.

Best Books from your Favorite Authors & Publishers

compare-icon compare-icon
Thousands of books

Take your time and choose the perfect book.

review-icon review-icon
Read Reviews

Read ratings and reviews to make sure you are on the right path.

vendor-icon vendor-icon
Multiple Stores

Check price from multiple stores for a better shopping experience.

gift-icon

Enjoy Result