Jupiter's Travels Info

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A journalist for the London Sunday Times, Simon vividly recounts
his four-year journey, by motorcycle, around the world, offering
incisive observations about the people, places, and customs of four
continents

Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for Jupiter's Travels:

4

May 23, 2014

REVIEW OF 2019 READ
Hmm, I first (and last) read this book in 1979 I think, and it had a big effect on me, not that it made me want to travel the world by motorcycle but it was a book I've never lost through the years and never forgotten. In my never ending task to write reviews for all the books I read pre-GR, I even wrote a review based on a 40 year old memory a few months ago, see below, and now comes the rub, yes I enjoyed this 're-read but it wasn't as good as I expected/remembered/wanted REVIEW OF 2019 READ
Hmm, I first (and last) read this book in 1979 I think, and it had a big effect on me, not that it made me want to travel the world by motorcycle but it was a book I've never lost through the years and never forgotten. In my never ending task to write reviews for all the books I read pre-GR, I even wrote a review based on a 40 year old memory a few months ago, see below, and now comes the rub, yes I enjoyed this 're-read but it wasn't as good as I expected/remembered/wanted it to be.
I'm going to have to seriously think because I don't even think it's 5 stars now, "shock, horror"

And so I have reduced my rating to 4 stars and removed it from my favourites shelf. I do feel very guilty, but I'm sorry but it wasn't as good as I remembered. The first 2/3rds of the book were great, descriptions of people and places, tales of his travel and how the bike was doing or not as the case may be, and then (view spoiler)[ at probably only a third of the way around the world we leave all of those descriptions behind, whole countries are not mentioned or receive only a paragraph, we get hardly anything of Northern India and Nepal. The last 5,00 or so miles through Asia and up to Turkey and then into Europe don't even get a map.
Gone were the interesting anecdotes and interesting people, in its place we get introspection and self analysis and almost self pity. Interesting it was not. (hide spoiler)]
How did I not remember all of that, was I flying with the faeries all those years ago when I first read this, or did I just so admire what he had done that I forgave the last third of the book, or was I less critical 40 years ago. I shall never know. Don't get me wrong I still admire Ted Simon greatly, but pull yourself together man !!

Maybe his sequel all these years later will be more focussed ??


REVIEW OF 1979 READ
Reviewed as part of my ongoing saga to write a review for every book I've read and logged on GR. (Written March 2019)
Well this book was published for the first time during 1979 and covers Ted Simon's epic voyage around the world that commenced in 1973 and lasted for the next 4 years. I remember reading about it in the Motorcycle newspapers and magazines of the day as I was an avid motorcyclist in those days (I still am come to that).

It struck a chord with me that someone had the guts to travel all around the world through countries I had never heard off or that I knew were in the midst of horrendous civil wars on a triumph motorcycle that was going to break down every 10 minutes. In those days Triumph had a bit of a reputation which is why as young lads we all drove Japanese motorbikes. Now of course new triumphs are ultra reliable and amazingly Triumphs from the 70s are highly sought after. Hey ho such is the world.
Anyway this book details Ted's amazing journey, the highs , the lows and the unbelievable adventures on the way. At the time I remember reading of his progress but little else so when this book came out I devoured it in a very short time. I think in the ensuing 40 years I have read it once since. Given that at the age of 69 Ted retraced his steps (Dreaming Of Jupiter) was the result, I think its about time I gave Ted the courtesy of re-reading this original unbelievable travelogue and of his sequel.
A truly great motorcyclist, serious respect. (Chapeau !!) ...more
3

Nov 09, 2008

My father is an adventurer at heart. He rode a motorcycle through South America a decade before Che; he jumped out of airplanes at night and landed in Southeast Asian jungles; he spent 40 years fishing in Alaska, both off Kodiak and in the Bering Sea. Now, he and my mother are retired, and they spend a good deal of their time traveling still - on a motorcycle. They have a great set-up: a trailer packed with a beautiful tent and an air mattress; picnic goodies, bottles of gin. They tool around My father is an adventurer at heart. He rode a motorcycle through South America a decade before Che; he jumped out of airplanes at night and landed in Southeast Asian jungles; he spent 40 years fishing in Alaska, both off Kodiak and in the Bering Sea. Now, he and my mother are retired, and they spend a good deal of their time traveling still - on a motorcycle. They have a great set-up: a trailer packed with a beautiful tent and an air mattress; picnic goodies, bottles of gin. They tool around Mexico and the continental U.S., camping in the back yards of breweries and hanging out for weekends at bluegrass shows. They've definitely got some things figured out.

They met Ted Simon, and enjoyed an afternoon of story-swapping; my dad said this book made him want to take off across the world again. Knowing my own taste for travel and the edgy, dangerous, or uncomfortable experience, my dad lent me his signed copy of this book as a way of sharing something he cares about.

____________________________________

Most critics say that this book gave them an uncontrollable attack of Wanderlust. Strange - having spent most of my life in the grips of such restlessness, this book actually made me reflect on the temporary contentment I now enjoy after years of being anywhere but here.

Simon was a journalist prior to becoming a self-styled hero, and we are grateful - his writing is adequate, and often even lucid and beautiful. The Journey is strangely bodiless, for the most part. Simon writes like a pair of traveling eyes with an ego attached; rarely do we get saddle sores, headaches, heat rash, or dysentery on this 4-year odyssey. Perhaps he is a remarkably hardy specimen; perhaps he didn't think it necessary to put us through more than the occasional swarm of mosquitoes. Nonetheless, there is a closely observed richness to his writing, and an immediacy that shows he took good notes, and was able to revisit his experiences in sequence as well as through a greater common narrative.

Despite his occasionally inflated sense of self (he is extremely proud of his accomplishments, throughout), Simon makes for a thoughtful and sensitive tour guide. I chalk his accidental chauvinism up to a lack of insight - few informants for the world of women, as he traces his global story through the men he meets, with the occasional entrance of a woman as a beautiful or admirable thing, though rarely world-shaping or responsible for the building of human history.

I would absolutely recommend this book to anyone with a fondness for things other than the familiar, with a taste for travel, or even for the casual motorcycle fetishist. His trip is worth admiring, and worth using as an example - both of the possibilities that lie before individuals who choose to take the roads less traveled, and of the uncertainty that comes with any spiritual quest. ...more
4

Feb 01, 2009

Ewen McGregor: Hi I'm multi award winning Actor about town Ewan McGregor. I've got a totally original idea for a TV show.
ITV Exec: Oh Yeah...
Ewen: Yeah, Me and my mate Charlie Boorman, the world famous star of stage and screen, are going to ride round the world on our motorbikes. It'll be mega.
ITV Exec: But what about that guy in the 70's called Ted Simon who did all that but without all your money and good looks?
Ewen: WHAT!
ITV Exec: Look i'm sorry but it's all been done before...
Ewen(Pointing Ewen McGregor: Hi I'm multi award winning Actor about town Ewan McGregor. I've got a totally original idea for a TV show.
ITV Exec: Oh Yeah...
Ewen: Yeah, Me and my mate Charlie Boorman, the world famous star of stage and screen, are going to ride round the world on our motorbikes. It'll be mega.
ITV Exec: But what about that guy in the 70's called Ted Simon who did all that but without all your money and good looks?
Ewen: WHAT!
ITV Exec: Look i'm sorry but it's all been done before...
Ewen(Pointing aggresively): YOU'LL NEVER WORK IN TELEVISION AGAIN. We've been rumbled Charlie.
Charlie: Oh No My BEST FRIEND Ewen. What shall we do?
Ewen: There's only one thing for it...BBC!
...more
1

May 01, 2009

Goddamn it!! How did I get tricked into reading another bullshit, transcendental 70's enlightenment novel??!! After Robert Pirsig's puddle of diaper filling, I swore I'd never read one of these things again! This was billed as a travel book...Curses!

*sigh*

On to the book. What a boring, self-indulgent novel. Ol' Ted decides to go slummin' through the third world in some misguided attempt to test himself. Once underway, his special brand of bitter negativity slowly swallows every paragraph. His Goddamn it!! How did I get tricked into reading another bullshit, transcendental 70's enlightenment novel??!! After Robert Pirsig's puddle of diaper filling, I swore I'd never read one of these things again! This was billed as a travel book...Curses!

*sigh*

On to the book. What a boring, self-indulgent novel. Ol' Ted decides to go slummin' through the third world in some misguided attempt to test himself. Once underway, his special brand of bitter negativity slowly swallows every paragraph. His suspicions and mistrust permeate all of his interactions. The countries flow by as little more than overblown customs headaches. The rare happy moments end with a caveat. As much as you'd think the trip should be the focus, it's only ever about the author.

When he's not being lavished with attention from the little people, he slips into deep self pity. In fact, the entire course of the book is defined by his wallowing. In Brazil, he's confined to the office of a police station for 10 days while they sort out his paperwork. Never chained or threatened, he's taken out to meals and given books to read while being assured that it'll be worked out, which it is completely without incident and he's sent on his way. Unbelievably, he devotes 65 pages of the book to this 'harrowing ordeal' during which he actually becomes convinced he's going to be killed. Conversely, he commits a whopping 35 pages to his months in Australia and another 40 pages to his months in India. Apparently there weren't enough 'poor Ted' stories to make those places worth talking about.

To round out his travelogue, he actually comes to believe that he's a demigod. I'm serious...I couldn't make this stuff up. He thinks he's a god among ants. It's where the book title comes from. Jupiter is him. He even gave himself a god's name.

This was written by a tired man. He's tired of the trip the moment he starts and it's obvious that he got equally tired of writing the book. What could have been a stirring story of landscapes, people, kindnesses and hardships is completely ruined by a guy who's at once arrogant and pathetic. ...more
5

May 19, 2012

This book changed my life (there have been others) but the first page is still the most powerful first page I have ever read. I scanned the first page into my computer so I can pull it up and read when I forget. Very powerful stuff - the book will keep you up at night. I don't believe this trip could be duplicated today. Too many hateful people in the world.
5

Jan 22, 2018

Look, is this guy an incredibly pretentious shit?

Yes, oh, definitely yes. But it was written in the early 1970's so he's a very specific historical form of a shit. Which mean, eh, I forgive him.

Loved this but I have a soft heart for pretentious shits traveling around the world (noted: Paul Theroux).
5

Aug 26, 2012

So I never write reviews on here. And I don't know if I was particularly moved to write one after finishing this book, or whether it just happens to be the first I finish since deciding I should write reviews. Otherwise I tend to forget what I thought and felt whilst reading, and if that's the case, what then, was the point?

It's all in the timing. Something can be profound in a certain instance of life, and banal the next. The view, you see, changes from where you are standing. 'Jupiter' was So I never write reviews on here. And I don't know if I was particularly moved to write one after finishing this book, or whether it just happens to be the first I finish since deciding I should write reviews. Otherwise I tend to forget what I thought and felt whilst reading, and if that's the case, what then, was the point?

It's all in the timing. Something can be profound in a certain instance of life, and banal the next. The view, you see, changes from where you are standing. 'Jupiter' was profound for me, and worthy merely for the sheer scope of his travels. However, it was elevated to something more than that for me because I had been there. In so many of the places he described, I had a vision of my own time there. And generally they lined up. He traveled like the traveler I wished to be. Viewed life in the way I wished to view it.

But I also felt changed in the ways he describes. Sure, my own 'trip' was a much shorter version, and factor in everywhere I've been it's still just a fraction of the ground he covered. But as he's concluding the book, and talking about finding the meaning, and finding even if there is a meaning... Have you ever stopped what you're doing, thrown it all down, and gone to look for that meaning?

Did you find it?

The best we can hope is that it finds us. And we keep testing it. Keep throwing ourselves out there to see what happens. To see what breaks. Hoping that those lessons stick. And maybe out of all of it, we gain a greater appreciation for the little things. For those random acts of kindness that make the world a livable place. Those moments of beauty and inner harmony, when everything is perfectly aligned. Or maybe it's just a greater appreciation for the little comforts, the daily routines that prove to us we belong.

If nothing else, 'Jupiter' reminded me of that. ...more
5

Mar 23, 2015

I’m a sucker for travel books. The thing to remember when reading this memoir is that he goes around the world on a motorcycle. I know that sounds obvious but the motorcycle takes center stage and almost everything else is background. It’s been a long, long time since I cared at all for anything with a motor and even longer since I’ve ridden a motorcycle so this book wasn’t written with me as the target market.

He makes a few wonderful insights but he spends far too many words fussing over his I’m a sucker for travel books. The thing to remember when reading this memoir is that he goes around the world on a motorcycle. I know that sounds obvious but the motorcycle takes center stage and almost everything else is background. It’s been a long, long time since I cared at all for anything with a motor and even longer since I’ve ridden a motorcycle so this book wasn’t written with me as the target market.

He makes a few wonderful insights but he spends far too many words fussing over his bike and his predicament at different stages in his journey.

He was supposedly a journalist but his writing comes up short on many occasions. Some of his passages are so clumsily written that I didn’t have the faintest idea of what was happening.

After a road mishap:
“the Renault was converted from a rectangle into a lozenge”

About a girl he sees:
“Her provocatively buck-toothed cocktailsipper’s mouth”
On meeting a stranger:
“People talk too much at first, just making publicity.”

His mention of currencies has no meaning whatsoever, especially 40 years later. You should always describe something in the form of value. I learned this from Issac Asimov who wrote that a robot cost two weeks of pay. That will always have meaning.

Simon spends quite a few pages describing his rather tedious confinement by Brazilian authorities while the gorgeous country of Costa Rica sails by carried on a single page, Nicaragua rates a paragraph.

He does hit a few home runs on insights.

“I rode forever on an astounding web of freeways, four or eight lanes wide, laid out like a never-ending concrete waffle over thousands of square miles, looking for somewhere to go, but found nothing.

I wandered through supermarkets and along 'Shopping Malls' disgusted and obsessed by the naked drive to sell and consume frivolities.
When I eventually came to visit Disneyland, I realized that the ultimate aim, the logical conclusion for Los Angeles, was that it should all become another Disney creation, a completely simulated and totally controlled 'fun environment' in which life was just one long, uninterrupted ride.

From the point of view of a Bolivian Indian chewing Coca on the altiplano, I could see that it would already be pretty difficult to distinguish between the two.”

***I give this book five stars because I either give a book 1 or 5 stars. I hate the rating system and what matters here is our opinions. Your star rating isn’t really an opinion, is it? ...more
3

Jul 29, 2011

I was disappointed with this book. I had waited so long to get my hands on a copy, and when the chance came, greedily opened the book, looking forward to the adventure within.

While the adventure was there, and it was intresting to see how the world has changed since the book was originally written, I found it hard at times to get into the story.

I wasn't too keen on Ted Simon's style of writing, and at times I found his opinions rather off putting.

He seemed to gloss over some parts of the I was disappointed with this book. I had waited so long to get my hands on a copy, and when the chance came, greedily opened the book, looking forward to the adventure within.

While the adventure was there, and it was intresting to see how the world has changed since the book was originally written, I found it hard at times to get into the story.

I wasn't too keen on Ted Simon's style of writing, and at times I found his opinions rather off putting.

He seemed to gloss over some parts of the journey, like it was nothing to be intrested in.

I can understand though, how this book would inspire others to take off around the world on a motorbike, and see the world from the seat of a bike, and would be intrested to see what he had to say in some of the books that followed this one.

I just don't think I'll be seeking them out like I did this book. ...more
1

Jul 29, 2010

The writing in the book is as bumpy as the roads the author traveled on, frequently crashing into a jumbled heap. His observations and caricature descriptions of different cultures seemed to be tied more to the weather than his personal interactions. The book's pacing is uneven with excessive detail in the beginning and some countries towards the end getting no more than a one line stereotypical summary. There are some well written vignettes scattered throughout the book but overall I'd give it The writing in the book is as bumpy as the roads the author traveled on, frequently crashing into a jumbled heap. His observations and caricature descriptions of different cultures seemed to be tied more to the weather than his personal interactions. The book's pacing is uneven with excessive detail in the beginning and some countries towards the end getting no more than a one line stereotypical summary. There are some well written vignettes scattered throughout the book but overall I'd give it a pass. ...more
4

Jun 01, 2012

Who wouldn't like to vicariously travel round the world for four years on a motorcycle?

Just like a trip around the world (been there, done that), this book truly reflects the experience. Not every moment of the experience tells a story or is dramatic and engaging and that is reflected in the experience of reading the book. If you are planning to make a large global trip, this is definitely a great read for you!
4

Jul 01, 2019

The fun adventures of a serious British man driving his motorcycle all around the 1970s. (Honestly it's strange that a book published in 1979 can feel so completely like a thing from another age. What was originally a window onto the whole world is now a window onto a little patch of a foreign past.)

You get a little tired of Simon's weird obsession with being a Jungian mythmaker. But that's okay -- he also get's a little tired of writing the book, with each continent getting a shorter The fun adventures of a serious British man driving his motorcycle all around the 1970s. (Honestly it's strange that a book published in 1979 can feel so completely like a thing from another age. What was originally a window onto the whole world is now a window onto a little patch of a foreign past.)

You get a little tired of Simon's weird obsession with being a Jungian mythmaker. But that's okay -- he also get's a little tired of writing the book, with each continent getting a shorter description than the previous one. Eventually, he just barrels from India to France in about five pages -- which must be a speed record, motorcycle or otherwise. ...more
5

Jul 15, 2015

Ted's account of his 1973 world tour on a Triumph 500 can now be regarded as a record of history as much as a travelogue.

Ted, in 1973 at least, was a complex character, but he writes candidly with the educated eye of a traveller rather than a tourist. The book opens with "......I let the bike roll off the asphalt onto the grass under a shade tree. I tucked my gloves into my helmet and stood by the bike looking up and down the country road and across the field of green wheat wondering who was Ted's account of his 1973 world tour on a Triumph 500 can now be regarded as a record of history as much as a travelogue.

Ted, in 1973 at least, was a complex character, but he writes candidly with the educated eye of a traveller rather than a tourist. The book opens with "......I let the bike roll off the asphalt onto the grass under a shade tree. I tucked my gloves into my helmet and stood by the bike looking up and down the country road and across the field of green wheat wondering who was going to help me this time, and what it would lead to". And it goes on, Ted relishing chance, master of the art of communication and invoking the sympathy of the secure and settled.

London, France, Italy....Zambia....Brazil....Sri Lanka....Afghanistan and on. You are travelling not with some blue eyed all English super hero of popular fiction but with a person much more real and closer to his reader. Unsure, sometimes ill at ease, occasionally supremely confident as you follow the peaks and troughs of solitary travel. All justified as in 1973, in different ways from today the world was no safe place. The book is an unbiased testament to an age, all the better for being on a triumph of course, whose fortunes came and went en route. And today Ted is back on the road. As he travelled Pinnochet was imprisoned in Weybridge. Back in the 70's Ted faced a firing squad in Chile. How things change. The world population has exploded; there has been mass urbanization, the growth of the global economy and the collapse of communism. Are those green fields of wheat that wafted in the breeze in the opening of the book now an industrial estate? We shall have to wait and see.

Gone are the days of telegrams back to England and probably the feeling of remoteness. Something's haven't changed since the early 70's when Ted's saddlebags were stitched by one Delio Quiroz of Villaguay Argentina. Then his mature face peered up from his craft to be immortalised by a black and white photograph now pressed between the hundreds of thousands of copies of Jupiter's Travels sold worldwide. And who should Ted bump into on his return journey, now in his nineties and still stitching? Ted points out that he didn't make this journey to meet up with Delio all these years later and neither did Delio live his life to await Ted's unscheduled return, but it makes you think.

...more
3

Sep 03, 2009

There is more to this man's journey than riding a motorcycle. This guy is a man of the mind. While riding atop his Triumph, he thinks a lot about the subconscious mind. On his journey on a ship through the Atlantic, from Africa, to Brazil, he mentions he read a book by Jung and his thinking got even more complex and dark as he rode through South and Central America. He shares his thoughts with his readers and takes them through the glories and turmoils of his own mind. I thought this book was There is more to this man's journey than riding a motorcycle. This guy is a man of the mind. While riding atop his Triumph, he thinks a lot about the subconscious mind. On his journey on a ship through the Atlantic, from Africa, to Brazil, he mentions he read a book by Jung and his thinking got even more complex and dark as he rode through South and Central America. He shares his thoughts with his readers and takes them through the glories and turmoils of his own mind. I thought this book was good, he allowed me to get into his head and I thought about this book frequently when I wasn't reading it.
Simon starts to describe his motorcycle as a part of him. At one point in the book, he compares himself a Centaur. Many times along the way, as one would expect, the motorcycle malfunctions and he has to perform maintenance. He goes into great detail of these repairs and I skimmed through those parts; although if I ever end up with a Triumph, I will refer to this book for clues on how to fix a broken belt or replace the back tire.
About 3/4 through the book, he had to go back home for his stepfather's funeral and was there for a few weeks. He came back to the place he "paused" the trip to continue riding around the world. Continuing it was important, but it really changed his mindset and I felt the pace of the book sped up. Just like him and his eagerness to finish his journey, I was eager to finish the book.


...more
3

Dec 12, 2015

I had more trouble staying with this motorcycle narrative than I thought I would. To be fair though, I did read his second book (Jupiter#2; see my review) before this one, his first (Jupiter#1). Some parts of it were quite good and Simon is a good writer. The tale seemed to drag at points and the conclusion seemed forced.

Simon was not a motorcycle guy at the beginning and he seems overly obsessed about riding conditions, his abilities and danger for much of the book. There are also points during I had more trouble staying with this motorcycle narrative than I thought I would. To be fair though, I did read his second book (Jupiter#2; see my review) before this one, his first (Jupiter#1). Some parts of it were quite good and Simon is a good writer. The tale seemed to drag at points and the conclusion seemed forced.

Simon was not a motorcycle guy at the beginning and he seems overly obsessed about riding conditions, his abilities and danger for much of the book. There are also points during the trek where he seems to be tickled by his ability to attract willing hands to help him out with his many mishaps/spills and breakdowns. He almost expects others to help him out.

Nevertheless, I think the book is worthy 3.5-4 stars. It's not really the "must read" all my motorcycle pals said it is, but it is also not a stinker or even two stars. ...more
5

Feb 02, 2011

I reread this book every few years, normally at a time when I need a pick me up, it reminds me of the first time I read this book, not having any real expectations and finding myself still sitting there hours later having gone on a long journey. This time around I read a edition that had a lot of photographs I'd not seen in the earlier paperback version I read until the pages fell out and it added a new touch to the story.
3

Aug 19, 2012

I love non-fiction travel books and this one's full of adventures but I think I struggled with it a bit because the trip was undertaken with the intent of writing a book, so even though descriptions are wonderful they fit expectations. I'm a bigger fan of books written in hind sight but liked it enough to keep the chain going Jack --> me --> David.
4

Sep 05, 2016

If you're a fan of Long Way Round you'll probably enjoy this book.
4

Feb 03, 2012

As a motorcyclist it was a good, fun book. As a traveler it was even better... the true value of this book lies in the humanity of the tale, after all... the point of the journey, is not to arrive.

Read on my iPad and Android phone via the Kindle app on and in toilets around the world during the 2011 Yellowcard World Tour.
5

Jun 01, 2015

A must read for everyone, especially for those who think a bike trip to Laddakh is a huge deal.

I loved Ted's way of telling the story, we are in his head all the time and seeing the world through it. It's not just a travelogue, it's Ted Simon's, his perspective, his world. A fun read.
4

Jul 26, 2012

He takes four years to get around the world. But he covers a lot of ground and spends time in many different places. I enjoyed the technical aspect of how he did things and what went wrong and how he fixed it.
5

Dec 20, 2012

A true must read for anyone who loves motorcycles, adventure, cultural differences, and travel. Three months after I finished, I missed "riding along" with Ted so much, I had to read it again.
4

March 1, 2013

Ted Simons journey can only be described as epic. Not only did he ride around the world he zig zagged through it visiting places modern journeymen either rush by or don't even consider. It is all the more astonishing considering it was done single handedly with only minimal help from sponsors on a M...Full Review
5

March 14, 2015

Ted Simons journey can only be described as epic. Not only did he ride around the world he zig zagged through it visiting places modern journeymen either rush by or don't even consider. It is all the more astonishing considering it was done single handedly with only minimal help from sponsors on a Meridian triumph-much less well built and reliable than modern machinery. I take my hat off to the bloke. 66,000 miles-4 years. That's dedication for you.
4

Dec 27, 2019

This was quite a long read for me; about 75 hours of reading. The book felt almost as long as the journey itself, but I think that's how it should be.
I would love to do some traveling by motorcycle. I've done a trip around Norway with my dad, but that was only about 1200km so nothing compared to Simon's ~105.000km. I wouldn't do a trip around the world though, that's not for me.
The book is a bit dated in some ways, but in others, it still holds up 100% still now 40 years later.
I borrowed this This was quite a long read for me; about 75 hours of reading. The book felt almost as long as the journey itself, but I think that's how it should be.
I would love to do some traveling by motorcycle. I've done a trip around Norway with my dad, but that was only about 1200km so nothing compared to Simon's ~105.000km. I wouldn't do a trip around the world though, that's not for me.
The book is a bit dated in some ways, but in others, it still holds up 100% still now 40 years later.
I borrowed this book by a fellow motorcycle rider before buying it as an ebook. It made me want to travel, just as I had been warned.
I like how this book isn't just a list of names and places. I don't care too much about that — those things can be found on a map or in an atlas. It is the experiences and the people I will remember.
I can recommend this book if you want to spend the time on it that it takes. This is not a book read in one evening (doing so would be a shame). ...more

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