Inkspell (Inkheart Trilogy) Info

Book and Ebook Reviews of the Best Kids' Books - Read over 103154 reviews for Inkspell (Inkheart Trilogy) by CORNELIA FUNKE and see what others have to say about this book before you download. Read&Download Inkspell (Inkheart Trilogy) by CORNELIA FUNKE Online Author:CORNELIA FUNKE Formats:Mass Market Paperback,Paperback,Kindle,Audible Audiobook,Audio CD,Library Binding Publication Date:Apr 1, 2007


The captivating sequel to INKHEART, the critically
acclaimed, international bestseller by Cornelia Funke--available for the
first time in a beautifully designed trade paperback!

Although a
year has passed, not a day goes by without Meggie thinking of INKHEART,
the book whose characters became real. But for Dustfinger, the
fire-eater brought into being from words, the need to return to the tale
has become desperate. When he finds a crooked storyteller with the
ability to read him back, Dustfinger leaves behind his young apprentice
Farid and plunges into the medieval world of his past. Distraught, Farid
goes in search of Meggie, and before long, both are caught inside the
book, too. But the story is threatening to evolve in ways neither of
them could ever have imagined.

Average Ratings and Reviews
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103154 Ratings

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Reviews for Inkspell (Inkheart Trilogy):

4

Nov 07, 2017

The Inkworld: Mesmerizing, Deadly, Unforgettable

Maggie and her father (Mo) have a unique gift. They're silvertongues. When they read aloud, things in the book become so entranced by their voices that quite often characters will follow the sound into in the real world. That delight often comes with a price.

Something comes out, something goes in.

That's how Maggie lost her mother, all those years ago, and how Dustfinger was ripped from its pages. Dustfinger spent twenty years in the real world The Inkworld: Mesmerizing, Deadly, Unforgettable

Maggie and her father (Mo) have a unique gift. They're silvertongues. When they read aloud, things in the book become so entranced by their voices that quite often characters will follow the sound into in the real world. That delight often comes with a price.

Something comes out, something goes in.

That's how Maggie lost her mother, all those years ago, and how Dustfinger was ripped from its pages. Dustfinger spent twenty years in the real world with only a burning desire to go home.

Maggie has her mother back but all she can think of is that inky, wondrous world - of the adventures and mayhem, the beauties and the beasties, and the glory and the magic. She has to find a way in, if only so she can look.

Slowly, one-by-one, the characters find ways to disappear into the heart of the Inkworld - will they ever surface? And if they could, would they even want to?

The sequel didn't entrance me in the same way as the first book. It kind of felt a bit too long and there were parts that dragged.

But, the author did such a good job with the Inkheart that I will read anything involving the Inkworld. I love these characters so much,

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Happy Reading! ...more
3

Jan 08, 2009

I really wanted to give this book 4 stars. But my conscience got the better of me…so 3 stars it is. There were some things in this book that genuinely disturbed me, and I’m going to point them out..

Before I do, though, I have to tell you, I loved the book over all. But I’m probably not going to sound like it...

Firstly, there are more language issues with this book. Farid uses the B word twice, and quite a few of the other characters use the D word a lot. The D word was in the first book a bit, I really wanted to give this book 4 stars. But my conscience got the better of me…so 3 stars it is. There were some things in this book that genuinely disturbed me, and I’m going to point them out..

Before I do, though, I have to tell you, I loved the book over all. But I’m probably not going to sound like it...

Firstly, there are more language issues with this book. Farid uses the B word twice, and quite a few of the other characters use the D word a lot. The D word was in the first book a bit, but not nearly so much. And the B word is what really disturbed me. It was completely unnecessary, and brings the novel down a peg because of it. (I regard this as more of a children's book because of the age of the main character, this is why it affects my rating)

Secondly, Meggie is only 13 and the entire romance between her and Farid is really annoying. Not so much that they "love" each other, but that they're so young! If Funke wanted it to be a “romance,” she ought to have made Meggie at least 16 in this book. Of course I think that’s still too young, but it’s better than just 13! I don’t care how grown up she looks. Also I don't think that just because the girls in the Inkworld get married when they’re Meggie’s age means that Meggie would want to get married at 13 or that she should get married at 13. I just really think the whole little romance thing was way overplayed... :/

But here’s a little on the up side…

I liked the over all story in this one better than the last.
The Wayless Wood makes me think of Sherwood Forest. Actually…the entire story kind of has a Robin Hood feel to it. The Bluejay is kind of a copy of Robin Hood. Different? Yes. But it even says that he “steals from the rich to give to the poor.” Now is that original? No. But it’s okay, because Funke manages to make the Bluejay seem less like a copout of Robin, and more intriguing to the story.
...more
1

Dec 28, 2007

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. After enjoying "Inkheart," the first book in this trilogy, "Inkspell" was a huge disappointment. First, I thought Meggie's character suffered a tremendous loss in her falling in love with Farid. She became less independent and less self-reliant. Their relationship struck me as unbelievable, as well, which angered me to think of kids leaving this book with the idea that relationships work like Meggie's and Farid's. Writers of young adult fiction should be more responsible! Furthermore, I felt the After enjoying "Inkheart," the first book in this trilogy, "Inkspell" was a huge disappointment. First, I thought Meggie's character suffered a tremendous loss in her falling in love with Farid. She became less independent and less self-reliant. Their relationship struck me as unbelievable, as well, which angered me to think of kids leaving this book with the idea that relationships work like Meggie's and Farid's. Writers of young adult fiction should be more responsible! Furthermore, I felt the writing dropped in quality; Funke did more telling than showing, and as a result I had a hard time staying present with the characters.

I wonder if she planned to write a trilogy when she began "Inkheart"... "Inkheart" was just richer and more believable. This book, it seems like there are too many threads and she's having a hard time keeping track of them all. I'm hoping the last book will be better.

Finally, I was disturbed by the trials Funke put her characters through. Prison, death threats, kidnappings--the ways the characters handled these, I felt, was unrealistic. I think my opinion would be different if these situations didn't strike so close to home. Why don't any of the characters show symptoms of PTSD? Fighting bad guys just isn't as easy as she made it seem. ...more
4

Mar 06, 2009

Cornelia, you need a better editor. Your editor would tell you to figure out which characters are essential and kill off the rest. The difficulty with the book is that it's written for younger kids, but it is too complicated, not all of the storylines are as riveting as the rest, and there are too many complicated emotions for young readers to comprehend or enjoy. The characters are a bit static (and thus predictable), as well. This isn't to say that the emotions aren't realistic, or that the Cornelia, you need a better editor. Your editor would tell you to figure out which characters are essential and kill off the rest. The difficulty with the book is that it's written for younger kids, but it is too complicated, not all of the storylines are as riveting as the rest, and there are too many complicated emotions for young readers to comprehend or enjoy. The characters are a bit static (and thus predictable), as well. This isn't to say that the emotions aren't realistic, or that the characters don't act true to form, or that the story isn't well-plotted. There's just too much of it to be enjoyable. In other words, it's too Harry Potter-esque to be fabulous.

On the other hand, this book is about 200% better than Inkheart. It doesn't ramble as badly, it has a relatively straight plotline, and the precipitous drops in suspense suffered by Inkheart are nearly invisible in Funke's second effort. The flat relationship between Mo and Resa is balanced by Meggie and Farid, the plot moves along in a confined space and time, and Dustfinger - the real mover and shaker in the plot - finally gets equal time. It's just a shame that you have to read Inkheart to be able to really understand and enjoy Inkspell.

...more
4

May 16, 2017

Rereading the Ink trilogy by Cornelia Funke reminded me that I should reread my old faves more often. I’m currently toying with the idea of rereading the Hunger Games trilogy next month … like what? :D

The second instalment, Inkspell, is just as good and captivating as the first one. I love the fact that we finally see the inkworld, as Meggie and Farid decide to embark on their journey to go after Dustfinger. It’s a world inhabited by fantastical creatures like fairies, glassmen, giants and Rereading the Ink trilogy by Cornelia Funke reminded me that I should reread my old faves more often. I’m currently toying with the idea of rereading the Hunger Games trilogy next month … like what? :D

The second instalment, Inkspell, is just as good and captivating as the first one. I love the fact that we finally see the inkworld, as Meggie and Farid decide to embark on their journey to go after Dustfinger. It’s a world inhabited by fantastical creatures like fairies, glassmen, giants and speaking trees, but also human beings like the Black Prince, Clouddancer and Cosimo, the Fair.

Meggie knows about all of them, since she has read Inkheart countless of times and her mother Resa, much to the dislike of her father Mo, has told her time and time again about the wonders and miracles of the inkworld.

What I appreciate a lot about this series is that, despite it being YA, Meggie is not its protagonist. Sure, she plays an important role, but so does Mo, Resa, Dustfinger, Farid and Fenoglio. This is not your typical tale of a teenager breaking free and saving the world. The Ink trilogy is much more realistic. When Farid and Meggie decide to take matters into their own hands and go to the inkworld on their own, things soon turn to shit and they are dependent on the help of adults like Dustfinger to navigate through the inkworld without accident.

Dustfinger and Mo feel like the main protagonists of this tale, which I like since they rank amongst my favorite characters in this tale. Dustfinger is the personification of 'weltschmerz' and I love the themes of homegoing and what 'heimat' means to him. (Favorite quote: "Zurückkehren – das war alles, was er erhofft hatte, zehn Jahre lang – nicht ins Paradies, nur nach Hause.")

However, some of the plot points in this instalment are a little forced. With Capricorn out of the way, Cornelia Funke was in need of a new villain for this second instalment, and it almost seems like the Adderhead came as a second thought. Nonetheless, the plot line surrounding his fear of death and his wish to become immortal was still interesting, and certain passages, like Mo binding the Book of Immortality, had me on the edge of my seat. Another plot point that felt rather cheap to me (and functioned as an artificial setup for more drama in book 3) is the fact that they decide to read Orpheus into the inkworld, so that he can bring Dustfinger back, because Fenoglio is no longer capable of writing. That choice was so unnecessary and stupid since it was clear that Orpheus had his own agenda and would turn on them. Nonetheless, I thought Cornelia's character arc for Fenoglio was great. He started out as this loving granddad and turned into the biggest shithead ever, to me, it felt like she was making fun of authors who take themselves too seriously.

Moreover, I find the character dynamics in that series super interesting. Sure, we have a romantic subplot between Meggie and Farid but it doesn’t take up much space, and as the reader soon realizes, Farid is much more preoccupied with Dustfinger, whom he has chosen as a father figure, than with his sweetheart. I also enjoyed the jealousy that Meggie feels when she sees Mo with her mother, the two of them having just recently been reunited, but since Meggie grew up without a mother, it is hard for her to treat Resa like she treats Mo.

Overall, Inkspell is a strong addition to this universe, and I’m glad I finally reread it. ...more
3

Dec 30, 2014

I like that the story got more complex with the second volume. It didn't fall into cliche storylines or plots.

That said, this book felt really *long* to me. And the story felt rather... loose. Like not a lot was happening, given how long I spent listening to it.

I'm willing to admit that a lot of that might have been due to the fact that I was listening to it on Audio. It was 18+ hours long, and while Brendan Fraser did a good job, his reading was a little dramatic for my taste. I prefer a more I like that the story got more complex with the second volume. It didn't fall into cliche storylines or plots.

That said, this book felt really *long* to me. And the story felt rather... loose. Like not a lot was happening, given how long I spent listening to it.

I'm willing to admit that a lot of that might have been due to the fact that I was listening to it on Audio. It was 18+ hours long, and while Brendan Fraser did a good job, his reading was a little dramatic for my taste. I prefer a more understated narrator.

I think part of the problem is that pretty much *everyone* in the book is a POV character. Not only does it mean there's a lot more storylines, but if you know what everyone's thinking and doing *all* the time, it pulls a lot of the tension out of the story....

I want to finish the series to see what happens, but honestly, I'm not looking forward to another 19 hour slog through an audiobook, or reading a 600+ page novel just to satisfy my curiosity. ...more
4

Nov 10, 2007

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Inkspell - one word, one adventure. With a completely original idea, a great plot, and a fantastic overall fantasy, this story's got it made. I absolutely loved it. Inkheart and Inkspell have become some of my favorite books.

Dustfinger - the clear winner for my favorite character, I have to agree with Orpheus there. He can hide his feelings at will, which is very admirable (just ask Farid). He believes himself to be cowardly, but he will go to great heights for the ones he cares about, such as Inkspell - one word, one adventure. With a completely original idea, a great plot, and a fantastic overall fantasy, this story's got it made. I absolutely loved it. Inkheart and Inkspell have become some of my favorite books.

Dustfinger - the clear winner for my favorite character, I have to agree with Orpheus there. He can hide his feelings at will, which is very admirable (just ask Farid). He believes himself to be cowardly, but he will go to great heights for the ones he cares about, such as Farid and Roxane. He truly does have feelings, although you may not be able to tell just from his face.

I loved the ending - it made me want more, made me want to keep on reading. Oddly enough, it reminded me of Star Wars III, when it seemed that all hope was lost and the Dark Side was going to win. The Adderhead is immortal (I see him as the Chancellor in Inkspell), Dustfinger is dead (of which I was so sad!), and Orpheus is in Inkworld acting like a stuck-up egotistical megalomaniac who owns the world.

Hopefully the situation will become better as time goes on...in Inkdeath. ...more
5

Dec 04, 2016

I'm glad that Inkspell kept up the same daring modern fantasy elements as the previous in the series, but also that it brought some new things into the story that were completely unexpected. It was sad about Dustfinger though, so I hope that the third in the series is able to resolve it in some way.
5

May 12, 2019

My heart is still with this trilogy.

I love the characters, how unique they are. I love the old fashioned writing style. I loved the adventures, the romance, the plot and action. To be fair, I did listen to it, and not psychically re-read, but I think I'd feel the same.
3

Jul 31, 2017

Inkspell picks up a year after Inkheart left off. The Folcharts—Mo, Resa, and Meggie—are reunited in Elinor’s house. They have been joined by Darius—another “Silver-tongue” who can read things out of books but isn’t nearly as good as Mo—and a number of fantastical creatures who escaped from Inkheart, the book that Mo read aloud from thirteen years earlier that has dogged his footsteps since.

All should be well, but meanwhile in another part of Italy, Dustfinger has found a sinister Silver-tongue, Inkspell picks up a year after Inkheart left off. The Folcharts—Mo, Resa, and Meggie—are reunited in Elinor’s house. They have been joined by Darius—another “Silver-tongue” who can read things out of books but isn’t nearly as good as Mo—and a number of fantastical creatures who escaped from Inkheart, the book that Mo read aloud from thirteen years earlier that has dogged his footsteps since.

All should be well, but meanwhile in another part of Italy, Dustfinger has found a sinister Silver-tongue, using the prideful stage name of Orpheus, who reads him back into his story. The fire-breather leaves behind Farid and Gwin the marten, believing that Gwin is predestined to bring about his death in the Inkworld. Farid, devastated at being abandoned by the closest thing he’s ever known to a father, turns his steps towards Elinor’s house…

…meanwhile, Meggie is catching up on all the angst and anger she never directed at her secret-keeping father all these years. She’s also rapidly sprouting from a scrawny little girl into a pretty young woman, and when Farid shows up he NOTICES.

Farid wants to follow Dustfinger. Meggie wants to test her Silver-tongue powers. Unlike her father, the girl has a gift for storytelling, too. First she writes herself and the boy into the story, then she reads them in.

Mo is horrified when he figures out what his daughter has done—and has only himself to blame, as usual, since this all could have been cleared up with a conversation. Soon the Magpie, mother of the late Capricorn, shows up at the bookish house, accompanied by Orpheus, who proceeds to read her and Mo into the book—Resa refuses to let go of her husband’s hand and is dragged back to the world where she spent years as a foreigner.

In the Inkworld—a Renaissance faire fever dream of Boccaccio’s Italy and Chaucer’s England—Dustfinger reunites awkwardly with his wife, Roxane, who has believed him dead for years and reluctantly remarried in his absence (luckily for him, her second husband has also died). She is immediately suspicious of Farid, believing him to be Dustfinger’s son by a woman of our world. Farid fears being separated permanently from his pseudo-father and returns her suspicion with outright hostility.

Also, Fenoglio is somehow pottering about in his own book, both delighted to the point of megalomania and hubris at seeing his creation spring to life, and dismayed that he can’t stop bad things from happening to his favorite characters.

Casualties include Cosimo, the handsome and chivalrous son of the reigning Prince of Lombrica. Cosimo had an arranged marriage with Violante, the ugly but shrewd daughter of the evil Adderhead, who reigns across the mountains in Argenta. Then Cosimo died. According to Fenoglio’s story, none of this was supposed to befall the youth. He writes a resurrection for Cosimo, and forces Meggie to read the passage aloud.

And a doppelganger of Cosimo appears—but he has no memories of anything the real Cosimo did. He shows no interest in his little son with Violante, forbids the poor woman from entering his chambers, and calls upon Brianna, the beautiful and headstrong teenage daughter of Dustfinger and Roxane, to share his bed in his wife’s place. The reader never witnesses an interlude between the young royal and his even younger mistress, but their consummated dalliance is the talk of the kingdom.

Meanwhile, the Magpie fatally wounds Moe with her gun (why did she need to read him there if she was only going to shoot him with a weapon from our world?) but he and Resa are found by the Motley Folk—the class of roving actors, acrobats, jugglers, minstrels, fortune-tellers, and assorted other curiosities that Dustfinger and Roxane belong to. Some of them remember Resa from her time as a slave in Capricorn’s household. They take Mo in, but believe him to be a charismatic highwayman known as the Bluejay, robbing caravans from Argenta in a one-man war against the Adderhead’s tyranny.

Little do they know that Fenoglio, who has apparently learned nothing, has made up this Bluejay, circulated the songs about him, and based him on Mo. What could possibly go wrong?

Some of you may think that I waited too long between finishing this meandering doorstopper and reviewing it. I assure you that the span of time makes no difference. This book made no more sense to me when I first closed it than it does now.

While the first book in this series had no plot but zigzagged between locations, this one has no plot, but follows about two hundred sets of characters each in their own location. At no point do the plotlines intersect—okay, the adults all met up when Roxane arranged for the Barn Owl to tend Mo, and Dustfinger spoke to Resa through the bars of her dungeon cell in total darkness, and Funke implies something weird here, something to the effect of “she had fond memories of him visiting her in the dark” which confirms my suspicion from book one that there was something between these two. Is it really adultery when both believe their spouses to be dead? This is a question for the Aeneid, not a middle-grade novel with Shel Silverstein and Roald Dahl quotes in the chapter headings.

Quick summary of everything that actually happened in this book:

1. Orpheus is bad. Really bad.

2. Also, Orpheus tends to sweat and has bad skin, so it’s funny when Farid, who is fifteen years old, by the way, repeatedly refers to him as “Cheese-face.” Farid, Junie B. Jones just called and she says you sound immature. Grow up, man.

3. Dustfinger is such a horn-dog that Roxane sees a strange kid with him and automatically assumes said kid is his.

4. Mo never tells anyone anything. Mo is an idiot.

5. Also, Mo hates cats. Told you he’s an idiot.

6. Adultery. Lots of adultery. You know, for kids!

7. Fenoglio is a menace to society and must be stopped at all costs.

8. The two kingdoms don’t like each other because reasons.

9. No one cares that Cosimo is cheating on Violante because Brianna is hot and Violante has a pockmark on her face. Seriously.

10. Sometimes we check back in with Elinor and Darius for no discernible reason.

11. On page 420, a wild Mr. Tumnus appears…and is never mentioned again. Orpheus just reads him out of his book and he potters around Elinor’s house looking forlorn. I didn’t care about Tinkerbell in Inkheart—I never cared about Tinkerbell in Peter Pan, either. But Tumnus is my smol son. Protect him.

12. Have I mentioned Fenoglio is a menace? Someone, please, stop that man.

13. Mo is slowly turning into the Bluejay whether he likes it or not.

14. Farid and Meggie like each other because teenagers and hormones.

15. Dustfinger is dead! Dead for real!...Sure, Cornelia, I totally believe that you killed off one of two characters in this whole miserable story who had a pulse. And by the time it happens, it’s too late to care. We’ve been dragged through 635 pages of nothing.

In all this there are two positives. One is the world-building. The setting was richly realized and felt infinite like a good faerieland should - even though this sort of faux-Italian renaissance faire kingdom was cliché back when Jo March was sending serials to the Weekly Volcano.

The other bright spot is Roxane, who alone among the dramatis personae is stoic, competent, and able to put the needs of others ahead of her own. It’s kind of hilarious that she goes to someone called the Barn Owl for help, considering Jennifer Connelly played her in the movie version—if you get why this is amusing, you remind me of the babe. Connelly so strongly resembles Roxane as described in the book that I wonder if Funke wrote the character with her in mind, the way Mo is patterned on Brendan Frasier.

Roxane’s perspective for more of the book would have helped, since she was the only person around who occasionally showed symptoms of common sense.

The ending was meant to be a cliffhanger, but upon closing the book my only thought was “a) my head hurts and b) Who’s going to get poor Mr. Tumnus back to Narnia?” ...more
2

Jan 05, 2009

So I am going to review the first book Inkheart alongside the second Inkspell since they are part of a trilogy. This book is being heralded as a book to fill the void left by Harry Potter and is marketed to the same target age group. The only difference is after reading the second book my immediate thought was, "That was stupid" I honestly can't remember the last time I felt so let down by a book. The characters are so poorly developed that I found myself not caring in the least when something So I am going to review the first book Inkheart alongside the second Inkspell since they are part of a trilogy. This book is being heralded as a book to fill the void left by Harry Potter and is marketed to the same target age group. The only difference is after reading the second book my immediate thought was, "That was stupid" I honestly can't remember the last time I felt so let down by a book. The characters are so poorly developed that I found myself not caring in the least when something bad happened to them and for that matter I don't really think I could tell you anything descriptive about the characters aside from maybe hair color. I know a lot of people are raving about this series and that is what peaked my interest initially and they are even making a film from the first, but I just don't get it.

The author has made this dream world where words come to life, an interesting concept in itself. However when you take that concept to ridiculous levels where whenever there is a problem they just write themselves some unimaginative way to get out of it, it gets old fast.

I know personally I won't even bother reading the third installment, for me it's too late to save it now and I have much better things on my bookshelf. ...more
4

Jun 04, 2017

Guys. GUYS. G U Y S. I FINALLY READ THIS!! It's been sat on my shelves, next to my beloved Inkheart for the last s e v e n years and I finally read it. ALL 670 pages, I'm literally stunned.
This is something I never thought I'd read, no matter how much I loved the first book, because I was worried I'd be out of step with it, or feel too old to enjoy it, but THIS BOOK is totally outside of genre and age rating. I really liked getting back into this world with such a great range of characters of Guys. GUYS. G U Y S. I FINALLY READ THIS!! It's been sat on my shelves, next to my beloved Inkheart for the last s e v e n years and I finally read it. ALL 670 pages, I'm literally stunned.
This is something I never thought I'd read, no matter how much I loved the first book, because I was worried I'd be out of step with it, or feel too old to enjoy it, but THIS BOOK is totally outside of genre and age rating. I really liked getting back into this world with such a great range of characters of all different ages and walks of life. It's the epitome of a good fairy tale story and I'm beyond stoked to have read it.
Now, I better make sure to read Inkdeath before I turn 30. ...more
5

Sep 27, 2009

Meggi, Mo "et al" continue in the story taking place in two worlds. Not to give spoilers, but Mo is in a bad way Meggi is still "learning" as well as being in a bad way, mom is struggling and worrying and scared, and back to MO....he's binding a very special book.

I liked this YA series, there are good ones and bad ones and (being sure the "youth" is mature enough for the themes) this is a good one.

Again, an addition to my review here...I really like these books, I may even say love them and I'm Meggi, Mo "et al" continue in the story taking place in two worlds. Not to give spoilers, but Mo is in a bad way Meggi is still "learning" as well as being in a bad way, mom is struggling and worrying and scared, and back to MO....he's binding a very special book.

I liked this YA series, there are good ones and bad ones and (being sure the "youth" is mature enough for the themes) this is a good one.

Again, an addition to my review here...I really like these books, I may even say love them and I'm astounded that so many give it/them negative reviews.

A matter of taste I suppose. ...more
3

Jun 07, 2018

Inkspell was an okay kind of book. It was very long for an audio, even longer than Inkheart and it was also kind of boring until the last 25% of the book.

The gang is basically all back in this book. Mo, Resa, Meggie, Elinor, and Dustfinger. However, there are a few more people added into the mix. A lot of action happens in this book and at one point I feel like I missed so much in one chapter when I got so distracted at work. I had to go back to that said part and it felt like the book was even Inkspell was an okay kind of book. It was very long for an audio, even longer than Inkheart and it was also kind of boring until the last 25% of the book.

The gang is basically all back in this book. Mo, Resa, Meggie, Elinor, and Dustfinger. However, there are a few more people added into the mix. A lot of action happens in this book and at one point I feel like I missed so much in one chapter when I got so distracted at work. I had to go back to that said part and it felt like the book was even longer.. and more boring (if that's even possible?). At one point, I stopped caring if I was confused because I assumed at one point everything would make sense to me.

Eventually it did.

Besides the confusion and the action, I loved Meggie in this book. She didn't annoy me as much as she did in the first book - but that's probably because I kept shipping the heck out of her and Farid. They were so cute together.

Other than loving Meggie's character, I despised her dad in this book. Mo was such an idiot! God that man frustrated the HELL out of me. I hated how he wouldn't tell anyone anything! Plus his decisions were just weird and annoyed me.

Remember how I mentioned that I was confused at one point? Yeah, it probably happened more than once but trust me.. it get's confusing. I didn't get the little glimpses into what Elinor or Darius were doing with their lives. It did nothing for me except make this book feel a lot longer than it needed to be.

The villains in this book were good and entertaining but other than that I was mostly bored while listening. I'll probably end up listening to the next book because it's the last one. Usually I would want to dive into the last book because of the cliffhanger.. but yeah, that's not the case for this one.

Overall, it was meh. ...more
5

May 14, 2017

I love this series and my 5 star rating reflects that. This won't be to everyone's taste.

Darker and grittier than the first in the series, it's hard to imagine that this is a middle grade book. Great story filled with pain and death and malice and sacrifice and love and hearts breaking and evil rulers and nasty mean bad guys (and women).

This tale is filled with thorough world building and an abundance of distinct characters. I shed lots of tears with this book and there wasn't many feel good I love this series and my 5 star rating reflects that. This won't be to everyone's taste.

Darker and grittier than the first in the series, it's hard to imagine that this is a middle grade book. Great story filled with pain and death and malice and sacrifice and love and hearts breaking and evil rulers and nasty mean bad guys (and women).

This tale is filled with thorough world building and an abundance of distinct characters. I shed lots of tears with this book and there wasn't many feel good times; it's a great dark fairy tale. ...more
5

Sep 13, 2015

5/5 stars (obviously)

Bright hope arises from the dark
And makes the mighty tremble
Princes can't fail to see his mark
Nor can they now dissemble

With hair like moleskin, smooth and black
And mask of bluejay feathers
He vows wrongdoers to attack
Strikes princes in all weathers

He hunts their game, he robs their gold
And him they would have slain
But he's away, he will not stay
They seek the Jay in vain

There's a reason I like big books (and I cannot lie). They may sometimes seem intimidating but 5/5 stars (obviously)

Bright hope arises from the dark
And makes the mighty tremble
Princes can't fail to see his mark
Nor can they now dissemble

With hair like moleskin, smooth and black
And mask of bluejay feathers
He vows wrongdoers to attack
Strikes princes in all weathers

He hunts their game, he robs their gold
And him they would have slain
But he's away, he will not stay
They seek the Jay in vain

There's a reason I like big books (and I cannot lie). They may sometimes seem intimidating but there's no better way to get attached to the characters, feel their struggles, live and breathe with them like you were exactly there. And there's obviously a reason I love the Inkworld books so much. Because they are literally a mixture of fun, heartbreak, quotes and trivia about books and book binding and a beautiful, beautiful world.

In this book, Meggie annoyed me a little when I started reading it. Her obsession with her Inkworld, despite what her parents had been through, made me worry a lot about her motives but at the same time reminded me of myself and my (and every bookworm's) longing to feel a new, magical world, different from our real one on my skin. She later fixed it, though, as she became this adorable hero we all know and love *claps hands*

This book taught me, once and for all, how easy it is to escape this world with the help of books

This book was kind of dark for the middle grade category, and that's why I probably loved it even more than Inkheart. Huge character development, a beautifully spun story and a new setting, full of life and secrets to uncover. I also have to confess my slight crush on Mo Folchart.



I MEAN LOOK AT THIS RAY OF SUNSHINE!!!

Anyways. I was so glad to find more about Dustfinger and Resa's past and I am so glad I did. Also, Fenoglio in this book crossed the line with his stupid ideas and arrogance.



A wide cast of new characters was introduced in this book, since it is set in the Inkworld. The way Cornelia Funke describes the Inkworld has me at the edge of my seat. All these original monsters and creatures, that she invented make me smile or blink with surprise. Fire elves? Night-Mares? Silvertongues? (obviously). She's just awesome, nothing more to say. Also, this book had tons of plot twists and surprises that I fell in love with.

Overall thoughts? Excited for Inkdeath. End of story.

~TOTALLY recommended
Mary ...more
5

Apr 12, 2016

So it took me forever to escape the Inkworld. I was so enveloped within this world along with these characters that I found it hard to escape. I'm a huge fan of InkHeart and this was just a wonderful edition to the original story. It brought back all the characters I love, ripped out my heart, kept me on the edge of my seat, put my heart back in my chest and then broke it into a million pieces again. Cornelia Funke is a great writer and I loved this story almost as much as the first book. I'm So it took me forever to escape the Inkworld. I was so enveloped within this world along with these characters that I found it hard to escape. I'm a huge fan of InkHeart and this was just a wonderful edition to the original story. It brought back all the characters I love, ripped out my heart, kept me on the edge of my seat, put my heart back in my chest and then broke it into a million pieces again. Cornelia Funke is a great writer and I loved this story almost as much as the first book. I'm excited to read the next book and see where this story ends but I'm going to read a few books in between now and then. If you love InkHeart and want to learn more about the Inkworld I highly suggest you delve deep into this amazing book. A wonderful read!

Xo,
Rach ...more
5

Apr 24, 2016

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Inkspell Review

Book Rating: 5 stars out of 5.

Story Line: 5 stars out of 5. Wow...this book killed my soul at moments. I really didn't expect any of the events that occurred to occur. It was just as strong as the first one. It had been a year since the events of the first one. Resa, Meggie's mother, Mo, Meggie, and Elinor are all living in her house now as well as Capricorn's old reader. Dustfinger was finally read back home. He was read into the book by Orpheus. I was happy for him. Farid was Inkspell Review

Book Rating: 5 stars out of 5.

Story Line: 5 stars out of 5. Wow...this book killed my soul at moments. I really didn't expect any of the events that occurred to occur. It was just as strong as the first one. It had been a year since the events of the first one. Resa, Meggie's mother, Mo, Meggie, and Elinor are all living in her house now as well as Capricorn's old reader. Dustfinger was finally read back home. He was read into the book by Orpheus. I was happy for him. Farid was not with him. Farid followed Dustfinger like a puppy. Meggie really wanted to know what was going on in the world of Inkheart. She decides to read herself and Farid into the book. The only reason is because Dustfinger was in danger. After that Mo, Resa, Mortala, and Basta were read into the book. Mo got shot by modern weapons. Weapons that the Inkworld had no knowledge of. My heart broke into pieces. There were so many more events. This one really made me want to see what happened in the last one. The ending killed me...I just wanted to die...my heart broke completely. It made me question if they were ever going to leave the Inkworld. This book was honestly great. I enjoyed every single moment I was reading it like the first one.

Characters: 5 stars out of 5. Meggie is still very annoying. Ugh. I really wish she was different. It's only because of her age. If she was older. I probably would like her more. I also felt she didn't know what true love was since she had feelings for Farid.

Mo is still one of my favorites. I also loved his wife.

Dustfinger is still my favorite throughout this one. What he did at the end made me want to cry and scream...why would he do this too me? I don't understand.

Farid I did like him at certain points.

Orpheus I really hated him. I wanted him to get killed. He is a horrible human being. He is really stuck up. I couldn't stand his attitude. I will talk more about him in the review for the third book. My hate for him is very strong.

Favorite Quotes: “Stories never really end...even if the books like to pretend they do. Stories always go on. They don't end on the last page, any more than they begin on the first page.”

“So what? All writers are lunatics!”

“Fire and water," he said, "don't really mix. You could say they're incompatible. But when they do love each other, they love passionately.”

“What are stories for if we don't learn from them?”

“Isn't it odd how much fatter a book gets when you've read it several times?" Mo had said..."As if something were left between the pages every time you read it. Feelings, thoughts, sounds, smells...and then, when you look at the book again many years later, you find yourself there, too, a slightly younger self, slightly different, as if the book had preserved you like a pressed flower...both strange and familiar.”

Writing Style: 5 stars out of 5. ...more
5

Jun 09, 2017

“Isn't it odd how much fatter a book gets when you've read it several times?" Mo had said..."As if something were left between the pages every time you read it. Feelings, thoughts, sounds, smells...and then, when you look at the book again many years later, you find yourself there, too, a slightly younger self, slightly different, as if the book had preserved you like a pressed flower...both strange and familiar.”

4

Apr 25, 2017

Real Rating: 4.5 stars

Simply put: WOW

The whole Inkworld is such a great setting to read about. And while the first was amazing as well, this one is even better. I think the best from the series to be honest, although I read this quite a long time ago so Idk if that opinion is still valid. A superb series and book, I loved the introduction to the beautiful yet deadly Inkworld.

My least favorite part about this was Mo. He was utterly annoying, I just don't really like Mo and definitely preferred Real Rating: 4.5 stars

Simply put: WOW

The whole Inkworld is such a great setting to read about. And while the first was amazing as well, this one is even better. I think the best from the series to be honest, although I read this quite a long time ago so Idk if that opinion is still valid. A superb series and book, I loved the introduction to the beautiful yet deadly Inkworld.

My least favorite part about this was Mo. He was utterly annoying, I just don't really like Mo and definitely preferred him in number one. But I love all the other characters: Meggie, Farid, Dustfinger and Rosa are all brilliant. ...more
3

Apr 18, 2009

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I actually enjoyed this book sooo much better than the first one. It's actually a 3.5, maybe even a four. I thought it flowed much better, the plot and suspense were much better as well. I was glad to finally get to hear more about Dustfinger and his life. He is one of my favorite characters and I had to admire the author for actually killing him off, since he is such a favorite character (although I think he will be back in the third book).
There were a couple things that I didn't like in the I actually enjoyed this book sooo much better than the first one. It's actually a 3.5, maybe even a four. I thought it flowed much better, the plot and suspense were much better as well. I was glad to finally get to hear more about Dustfinger and his life. He is one of my favorite characters and I had to admire the author for actually killing him off, since he is such a favorite character (although I think he will be back in the third book).
There were a couple things that I didn't like in the book. First, she threw in a bit more language in this book. Language in books doesn't really bother me, but when you are targeting children to read the book, I don't think swear words are appropriate.
It also threw me to find out that Meggie was only 13. I had imagined her older, especially when she gets into a very grown-up relationship with Farid. Maybe having never had a boyfriend until college I don't understand kid love, but to consider staying in a dream world, leaving your family and loved ones, to stay with a boy, all when you're 13 is a little bit crazy to me. She should have made Meggie older.
I did think her writing was much better. I didn't feel quite the translation gap like I did in the first book. I also thought the plot was a lot more stimulating. I really didn't want to put it down at a few parts. So all in all, much better than the first and it actually made me want to read the third. ...more
4

Sep 21, 2015

I read this book as a buddy read with a friend here on Good Reads, and since I enjoyed the first book, Inkheart, and it's world building so much I thought I should get to this one as soon as I could. I am glad that I decided to get into this series, but I must say it is a pretty complex story and is definitely not light reading.

In Inkheart we learn that Mo, Meggie's father, can read characters out of the books that he reads aloud. Well this one continues on with all those great characters and I read this book as a buddy read with a friend here on Good Reads, and since I enjoyed the first book, Inkheart, and it's world building so much I thought I should get to this one as soon as I could. I am glad that I decided to get into this series, but I must say it is a pretty complex story and is definitely not light reading.

In Inkheart we learn that Mo, Meggie's father, can read characters out of the books that he reads aloud. Well this one continues on with all those great characters and several new characters for readers to enjoy as well. You have to pay attention to what you are reading in this book though because the story and the characters both are very complex. It really is not a light read, but it has a beautiful world with a lot of great imagery.

The characters in this story are very well developed, vibrant and complex. There are plenty of characters to hate as well. I really enjoy Meggie and Dustfinger the most I think. They are both very likable. I think they just get better with each of the books in this trilogy and I certainly look forward to spending some more time with them.

I recommend this to anyone who likes fantasy. It has great world building with a pretty complex plot line and characters. I do look forward to the last book in the series Inkdeath. I am sure it will have an amazing conclusion. ...more
2

Apr 11, 2012

I'll put it bluntly: It made me miserable.

Again, I am impressed by the choice of words; the luster of the settings described and; the variety in the characters' personalities. It really wasn't that bad, but the story took a dive from 20 feet to 50 feet deeper. I mean, the story got a little bit more serious than it had been first. The idea of making the story a little more serious on the second book wasn't exactly a bad idea, but the change was as subtle as a gun!

I know, the part of many I'll put it bluntly: It made me miserable.

Again, I am impressed by the choice of words; the luster of the settings described and; the variety in the characters' personalities. It really wasn't that bad, but the story took a dive from 20 feet to 50 feet deeper. I mean, the story got a little bit more serious than it had been first. The idea of making the story a little more serious on the second book wasn't exactly a bad idea, but the change was as subtle as a gun!

I know, the part of many people's lives were killed by Capricorn before and after him and his men got out of the book in the first volume -- but at least it wasn't too disturbing to bear. And having laws that unjust and cruel -- that REALLY screws me up...

BUT, on the bright side: There is a development taking place in Meggie's life. It was cute and exciting -- Yes. But thrilling -- No.

The ending in the story was kinda "ouch". But the book did, did a great success on making me feel what the Motley folks felt with their... island/country[?]. I felt sympathy and pity for their unjust situations and their tragedies. Especially Dustfinger's and Farid's!








Um, anyway, that's my opinion. But to those who think/feels otherwise, you're welcome to state yours. ...more
3

Jan 29, 2016

This book was a solid 3 stars for me. I think I liked the first book in this trilogy better. This one is the second one. I have the 3rd book as well and will read it tomorrow. I find it interesting that the powers that be chose to have 3 separate narrators....one for each book. I'm not sure I like that. The narrator for this one was Brendan Fraser. At first I kept thinking "George of the Jungle" but I admit he did a fantastic job on all the different voices. Sometimes I felt the lines were This book was a solid 3 stars for me. I think I liked the first book in this trilogy better. This one is the second one. I have the 3rd book as well and will read it tomorrow. I find it interesting that the powers that be chose to have 3 separate narrators....one for each book. I'm not sure I like that. The narrator for this one was Brendan Fraser. At first I kept thinking "George of the Jungle" but I admit he did a fantastic job on all the different voices. Sometimes I felt the lines were over-acted, but he still did a great job.

I liked the story. It was in constant motion for the most part. There were some slow spots but then it was soon moving again. I also liked that the characters continued on in this book. This book focused on character building which was much appreciated. ...more
3

Jul 05, 2018

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Okay, so for most of the book I thought this was going to be a solid 4 stars, but then that ending happened and JUST NO. Like WHY? YOU CANNOT KILL BOTH MY FAVORITE CHARACTERS OFF LIKE THAT!!!!! YOU JUST CAN'T! ARGH! *screams forever* So...it gets 3.5 stars. That may be unfair of me, but WHATEVER. I'M ANGRY.

(although Resa and Mo are my ultimate OTP and agghhhhh I love them too much. plus the whole thing with the bluejay i loved it k?)

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