I Am Nujood, Age 10 and Divorced Info

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“I’m a simple village girl who has always obeyed
the orders of my father and brothers. Since forever, I have learned to
say yes to everything. Today I have decided to say
no.”

 
Nujood Ali's childhood came to an abrupt end
in 2008 when her father arranged for her to be married to a man three
times her age. With harrowing directness, Nujood tells of abuse at her
husband's hands and of her daring escape. With the help of local
advocates and the press, Nujood obtained her freedom—an
extraordinary achievement in Yemen, where almost half of all girls are
married under the legal age. Nujood's courageous defiance of both Yemeni
customs and her own family has inspired other young girls in the Middle
East to challenge their marriages.
Hers is an unforgettable
story of tragedy, triumph, and courage.

Average Ratings and Reviews
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4.06

19146 Ratings

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Ratings and Reviews From Market


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Reviews for I Am Nujood, Age 10 and Divorced:

4

Aug 16, 2010

Jan 10 2016 Update This is so sad. The royalties from this book didn't go to Nujood but to her father, who used them to purchase two new wives. He also sold Nujood's younger sister to a much older man. Nujood is still in receipt of alimony though - $30 a month. When he pays. Women are just commodities to be fucked, bred from and used as drudges. As Nujood's father said in court, "Women are just a curse" so why not use them for what value you can get?

Nujood's real name is Nujoom. She changed it Jan 10 2016 Update This is so sad. The royalties from this book didn't go to Nujood but to her father, who used them to purchase two new wives. He also sold Nujood's younger sister to a much older man. Nujood is still in receipt of alimony though - $30 a month. When he pays. Women are just commodities to be fucked, bred from and used as drudges. As Nujood's father said in court, "Women are just a curse" so why not use them for what value you can get?

Nujood's real name is Nujoom. She changed it to Nujood because it means stars, and she loved to look up into the vastness and count the twinkling stars.
__________

8 Sept 2013 update: Yemini child bride aged 8 dies of internal injuries on her wedding night to a man of 40 Nujood got the law changed to make 17 the minimum age for marriage. The Muslim religious authorities got the law repealed as they say that it is up to the parents to decide when to sell marry off their daughters.

Pictures of child brides These child brides are Christian, Hindu etc. as well as Muslim and from different countries, albeit not Europe. I hate child abuse and the exploitation of girls and women, but not any religion or nation and I do wish trolls would stop projecting their general hatred on to me.

***

Edit 22 July 2013 Nujood got the minimum age for marriage changed to 17 but this was repealed as it was considered unIslamic to have any minimum age as Mohammed had married a 9 year old girl. The age for marriage and the choice of husband was considered a matter for the parents alone and not the law.

This little 11 year old girl, Nada, was prepared to kill herself if she was married off, and recorded a Youtube video. Her sister who had been married off at 14 committed suicide by burning herself to death. The mother was apparently operating some sort of scam to get money out of suitors.

***

This book was the story of Nujood, aged 10 and living in the Yemen, a Muslim country, who was brave enough to go to the courts in the capital and ask the judges to grant her a divorce. That is such an amazing feat, I am sure I can barely imagine the courage this girl had.

Nujood, who had just one year of schooling, lived in a very poor family that sometimes had to beg for food, and was sold for $750 to a man in his thirties who promised, so the father said, that he wouldn't touch her until she reached puberty. But he did, he raped and beat her repeatedly, and his own mother egged him on. In Islam, because Mohammed, aged 52, married a child of 9, this early marriage and sex is considered perfectly ok.

She found sympathetic judges and a wonderful, feminist lawyer and eventually, her father and husband in prison more so she could be safe than anything else, she got her divorce and world-wide attention. Since women are essentially possessions, a contract signed between the father and the husband transferring the 'property' wasn't so easy to break, but Nujood remained strong through the long legal arguments.

Along with Hillary Clinton, who called her 'the bravest woman I've ever met' and Nicole Kidman she was Glamor's 2008 Woman of the Year. She's 13 now, and going to school. She wears jeans and t-shirts and barettes in her hair, the black robes and niqab (veil) she found so stifling cast off.

Inspired by her, several little girls, forcibly married at 9, have come forward to get divorces themselves. Its a beginning. And she has made a real difference: the age for marriage is now 17 in Yemen, one hopes it is enforced, but I don't have major faith in that. As long as women are possessions, the contract - the bill of sale - between father and husband will remain more important that the actual marriage where there is no real contract as the girl is neither old enough in law to give her consent, nor is even required to do so.

The book is a fast read, a story very simply told, its filled-in reportage, rather than an in-depth story, but that doesn't lessen the message or appeal of the book at all. It doesn't matter if you know the story, its still an unputdownable book - I read it without stopping until I finished it.

Recommended for the whole wide world to rejoice in her courage and to tell ourselves that we will probably never face anything so daunting in our lives, if she could face her fears and do it, so could we.

Reviewed 18 August 2010 ...more
4

Apr 10, 2017

As you can tell from the title, this book focuses on a very disturbing topic - child abuse. Unfortunately, the forced marriage of young girls to older men is an all too common occurrence in many areas of the world. Nujood is only one such victim. This book tells her story.

Essentially sold by her deadbeat father to a man more than three times her age, Nujood's childhood comes to an abrupt end. At ten years old, she is repeatedly beaten and raped by her new husband. She is also moved to a remote As you can tell from the title, this book focuses on a very disturbing topic - child abuse. Unfortunately, the forced marriage of young girls to older men is an all too common occurrence in many areas of the world. Nujood is only one such victim. This book tells her story.

Essentially sold by her deadbeat father to a man more than three times her age, Nujood's childhood comes to an abrupt end. At ten years old, she is repeatedly beaten and raped by her new husband. She is also moved to a remote village where she further isolated from anyone that might be able to help her.

Eventually, she is able to go to visit family in the city. After her own parents fail to help her, she is able to get some guidance from one of her father's other wives. Then, this incredibly brave little girl sets out for the courthouse to ask for a divorce.

I could not get over how courageous this ten year-old little girl had to be. What she did would be intimidating in any country, much less in a country where women are extremely oppressed and viewed as property. Yet, this little girl was brave enough to walk into a courthouse and demand to see a judge and ask for a divorce. I was in awe of this young girl.

Thankfully, the judges decide to take up Nujood's cause. She is given a "safe haven" of sorts while the case is brought before the court. Since Nujood was younger than the legal age for marriage in Yemen, her father and husband were brought up on charges.

From there on out, the court proceedings turned into a bit of a circus. Nujood's case made international news and she became a sort of poster-child for women's rights and child abuse organizations. Meanwhile, her father and husband alternated between placing blame on the other and trying to plead ignorance and innocence on their own part. It was pathetic.

Eventually, the men responsible paid a small fine and Nujood was granted her divorce. While the divorce was unheard of and paved the way for other young girls in the Middle East to speak out, the forced marriage of young girls is still a huge problem. Of course, that is only one manifestation of a much larger problem. Nonetheless, in a place where women and children have virtually no rights, this was a remarkable case.

From start to finish, I was taken in by Nujood's story. My heart broke for this young girl, who was the same age as my oldest daughter. I can't even begin to imagine maltreatment that girls like Nujood are forced to endure. Once again, I am reminded of how lucky I am to have been born in a region of the world where women have rights. As the mother of two young girls, this is something that is never far from my mind.

Although this didn't prove to be the in-depth expose that I had hoped for, it was definitely a worthwhile read. At less than 200 pages, or around 2 hours of listening time, Nujood's story serves to raise awareness of a very important topic. While this isn't the type of story that you read for enjoyment, it is the type that you read for enlightenment. It is painful, but necessary to read stories like Nujood's.

I won't pretend that everything worked out like I would've liked. The granting of her divorce was only one triumph, in a world of defeats for women. Nujood was ultimately returned to the very person that sold her in the first place. Where is the logic in that? I can't help but wonder where Nujood is now, nine years later. I can't help but wonder if her notoriety has turned her into a cash cow for the very father that shared responsibility for her abuse in the first place.

Check out more of my reviews at www.bookaddicthaven.com ...more
2

Apr 16, 2011

I purchased this book on a whim at the book store today. The title was compelling and I have a penchant for survival stories. With that, the content of Nujood's story is unquestionably salient. Her experience is one of courage and extraordinary spirit. For me, this is the strength of the book. It pains me to say that despite all that, I cannot in good conscience give the book a strong rating.

Nujood's voice was drowned out by "co-author's" Delphine Minoui. To the point where I did not see a I purchased this book on a whim at the book store today. The title was compelling and I have a penchant for survival stories. With that, the content of Nujood's story is unquestionably salient. Her experience is one of courage and extraordinary spirit. For me, this is the strength of the book. It pains me to say that despite all that, I cannot in good conscience give the book a strong rating.

Nujood's voice was drowned out by "co-author's" Delphine Minoui. To the point where I did not see a shift in authorial voice from the forward and epilogue written solely by Minoui, to the authorial voice of the actual story "told" by Nujood.

As I read her story, I couldn't help but think that it was being taken from her and shaped into something that would attract the attention of a western reader. Minoui does not trust the gravity of the story to let it tell itself. The colorful language, clearly imported by Minoui, ended up stealing from the authenticity of real events. It read more like a Good Housekeeping story, overwritten with an emphasis on word selection to inflate the dramatic.

The mere idea that girls (let alone women) suffer under this type of oppression is sufficient. This injustice does not need pulping to make it a better "story". I felt like the author did not trust me as a reader to make sense of Nujood's original words. I am dubious that Nujood, a 10 year old, pre-literate, highly impoverished girl told Minoui her story using language like, "notary, tribal protocol, and stifling astonishment."

A more journalistic approach would have served Minou's need to bring in her voice, her sensitivities to the events and her storytelling style. In her attempt to make the narrative more readable, the author inconsistently infuses her adult voice into the child's narrative. This only served to dilute the story and in turn take a little piece of reality from the reader. I don't think that this is the type of story that one should attempt to "make more readable". In the end, it is not the type of tale that should be picked up for entertainment on a cloudy Sunday afternoon.

Despite the need to bring attention to stories like Nujood's, I feel like we lose something as an audience when the story is taken from a victim/survivor and manipulated for public consumption. At the end of the hour, it almost feels like another level of exploitation.

I am left wondering why this young girl should have to pander her story of rape, violence and abuse to get money to attend school? It shames me to think this is the only way wealthy countries will step in and try to bring greater equity to the poor. Is our insatiable need to "get something for the dollar we hand over" pushing us to this extreme? SIGH. I can't help but think that by purchasing this girl's story I have added a whole new level of "commodification" to her life.

It's a complex world for women. I leave this book wondering about ways to use my own education and place of privilege to bring greater equity to all of us, world-wide. Until that happens, my heart goes out to my sister soldiers who are bearing the brunt of the suffering. ...more
2

Jun 01, 2010

The story should be compelling, but I found this memoir to be remarkably shallow. Nujood is barely literate and the memoir was actually written by the journalist Delphine Minoui. I'm not sure how much of the book is Minoui's and how much is Nujood's dictation, or if ANY of it was her dictation for that matter. Certainly the author is consciously trying to sound like a ten-year-old girl, which is a main part of the problem.

The details that could really enrich this story are lacking. Nujood goes The story should be compelling, but I found this memoir to be remarkably shallow. Nujood is barely literate and the memoir was actually written by the journalist Delphine Minoui. I'm not sure how much of the book is Minoui's and how much is Nujood's dictation, or if ANY of it was her dictation for that matter. Certainly the author is consciously trying to sound like a ten-year-old girl, which is a main part of the problem.

The details that could really enrich this story are lacking. Nujood goes to ask for a divorce and is told this is unprecedented and it will be a difficult case. Then she has a hearing and -- presto! -- gets a divorce. What happened in between times? What efforts did her protectors make to get that divorce for her? It can't have been as easy as she makes it sound. Also, more details about Nujood's relationship with her family after the divorce would have been nice. She had, after all, had her father temporarily put into prison, and I would have liked some information on how the family dynamics changed or didn't change. None of the characters are very well-developed.

I can't escape the feeling that this girl is being used, and I wonder if she regrets this book's publication or will regret it in the future. Certainly it brought unwelcome notoriety to her family in a culture that prizes honor above everything.

This book would, I think, have been better off as a third-person biography of Nujood, perhaps set in the broader context of a study of child marriages in the Middle East. At least, a foreword or afterword describing the divorce case in detail would have helped a lot. As it was the book just left me feeling rather uneasy. ...more
4

Apr 28, 2019

An extremely sad story. How can people not understand that women are half of population and everyone, male or female or whatever, gets born from women... So it's in everyone's best interest to have women literate and strong and happy and, most of all, free... Is this such a difficult concept to understand?
This is child abuse at its rawest. I do kind of hope that Nujood and her sisters and other women in trouble due to some societies' extreme prejudice get forward in their lives, get well, get An extremely sad story. How can people not understand that women are half of population and everyone, male or female or whatever, gets born from women... So it's in everyone's best interest to have women literate and strong and happy and, most of all, free... Is this such a difficult concept to understand?
This is child abuse at its rawest. I do kind of hope that Nujood and her sisters and other women in trouble due to some societies' extreme prejudice get forward in their lives, get well, get educated, become free and stay true and strong. ...more
0

May 15, 2012

I can not rate this book or comment on it, since I think it's purpose is to raise awareness. It's not a book for fun or entertainment and I dont recommend it to you if that's what you seek. It's a book that made me feel so awful, and I can only imagine what Nyjood has been through. It is a real story, with facts, which actually makes it a lot more horrible.
I just looked at the cover and the pictures and thought that she looks so little and beautiful. What kind of monster could do this to her? I can not rate this book or comment on it, since I think it's purpose is to raise awareness. It's not a book for fun or entertainment and I dont recommend it to you if that's what you seek. It's a book that made me feel so awful, and I can only imagine what Nyjood has been through. It is a real story, with facts, which actually makes it a lot more horrible.
I just looked at the cover and the pictures and thought that she looks so little and beautiful. What kind of monster could do this to her? Thank god, she found her way out and inspired many girls to do the same. So bravo Nyjood! I wish that everything goes well in your life. The world will always remember you, as the girl who said no and made a start for a better future for women and girls in Yemen.
The book is very simple and fast-paced, which is good because it keeps us close to the facts. I recommend this so that more people can learn about horrible things that happen in this world, as most have no idea. This way we can all unite and make this world a better place to live. ...more
4

May 04, 2011

If this book doesn't make you stfu about your first world problems like getting the wrong latte at Starbucks or not being able to find the right color of sweater for your chihuahua, nothing will.

Seriously, at the age of 10, when many (American) girls are wearing booty shorts and trying to emulate Miley Curys, Nujood is sold by her family to a 30-year-old man as his wife. She comes from a world where this isn't entirely unusual. It also isn't unusual for men to have multiple wives, and for girls If this book doesn't make you stfu about your first world problems like getting the wrong latte at Starbucks or not being able to find the right color of sweater for your chihuahua, nothing will.

Seriously, at the age of 10, when many (American) girls are wearing booty shorts and trying to emulate Miley Curys, Nujood is sold by her family to a 30-year-old man as his wife. She comes from a world where this isn't entirely unusual. It also isn't unusual for men to have multiple wives, and for girls to be forced to leave school to take care of families. Yes, the story is a downer, especially when you think that she's just one of thousands of girls who live through this kind of horrific experience. ...more
4

Mar 14, 2017

Despite the subject matter, I really liked this book. As the title suggests, Nujood is a 10 year old girl who was married off to a man three times her age. She experienced abuse that no one should, let alone such a young child. Unfortunately her case is not uncommon and reading about the treatment suffered by many Yemeni women just infuriated me! Finally Nujood mustered the courage to travel to court and demand a divorce, which was granted after much publicity. She is a very brave and resilient Despite the subject matter, I really liked this book. As the title suggests, Nujood is a 10 year old girl who was married off to a man three times her age. She experienced abuse that no one should, let alone such a young child. Unfortunately her case is not uncommon and reading about the treatment suffered by many Yemeni women just infuriated me! Finally Nujood mustered the courage to travel to court and demand a divorce, which was granted after much publicity. She is a very brave and resilient girl. Her story was eye-opening and I think Delphine Minoui did a decent job at writing from a 10 year old's perspective. Although dealing with serious themes, it was an easy read (although possibly a little too fast-paced for me). I definitely recommend reading this book! ...more
5

Jun 28, 2018

This book has been on my To-Read forever, so I'm really glad I finally got to read it. I highly suggest this book to everyone! Childhood marriage and rape is something that needs to be addressed way more often. Also, the lack of laws that are created and enforced to prevent this from happening. This is a must read for everyone and it's super short, so I HIGHLY suggest it!

"Nujood Ali's childhood came to an abrupt end in 2008 when her father arranged for her to be married to a man three times her This book has been on my To-Read forever, so I'm really glad I finally got to read it. I highly suggest this book to everyone! Childhood marriage and rape is something that needs to be addressed way more often. Also, the lack of laws that are created and enforced to prevent this from happening. This is a must read for everyone and it's super short, so I HIGHLY suggest it!

"Nujood Ali's childhood came to an abrupt end in 2008 when her father arranged for her to be married to a man three times her age. With harrowing directness, Nujood tells of abuse at her husband's hands and of her daring escape. With the help of local advocates and the press, Nujood obtained her freedom—an extraordinary achievement in Yemen, where almost half of all girls are married under the legal age. Nujood's courageous defiance of both Yemeni customs and her own family has inspired other young girls in the Middle East to challenge their marriages. Hers is an unforgettable story of tragedy, triumph, and courage. " ...more
4

Nov 27, 2016

This story was seriously heart-breaking. It shows what can happen in a community or people group that doesn't have the light of God in any capacity. People behave like animals and treat each other as such. The only true hope for the girl in this story and others in this community is found in Jesus.

The author was born into a poor Muslim family in Yemen. They struggled for their daily food. One of her older siblings ran away to Saudi Arabia. Another married a man whilst still in her teens. This This story was seriously heart-breaking. It shows what can happen in a community or people group that doesn't have the light of God in any capacity. People behave like animals and treat each other as such. The only true hope for the girl in this story and others in this community is found in Jesus.

The author was born into a poor Muslim family in Yemen. They struggled for their daily food. One of her older siblings ran away to Saudi Arabia. Another married a man whilst still in her teens. This man then had an affair with the author's older sister resulting in the sister and the man being thrown into jail and potentially facing the death penalty for adultery.

The family then in crisis financially, the father decides to marry off the author who is aged just 10 years old to a man three times her age. She accompanies this man to his community which is cut off from any outside contact making it impossible for her to run away. He had promised her family not to engage in sexual relations prior to a certain age but immediately breaks his promise and forces himself on her. She finally convinces him to allow her to visit her family and whilst there runs away and does something that has never been done before--she goes directly to a Judge and requests a divorce!

Reading this tragic story made me so grateful that I wasn't born into that situation or that community. I was reminded that it is only by the grace of God that it was not me dealing with this. The desperation of the parents when they fell on hard times comes through and the children carried a lot of the burden. The cultural traditions and norms that we consider abhorrent were practiced widely. It was normal for a child of that age to be married although legally not permitted until the age of 15 (now 17 partly due to this case.) The girls had no choice and were made completely powerless and helpless because their families went along with it. In this case they had even arranged it for money. The people that as children we rely on to protect us were the ones placing this child into the path of danger. How terrible when there is no one to turn to and no one you can trust.

There is no bad language in this book. There is obviously sexual violence which wasn't as graphic as I had feared it might be. This is only suitable for adult readers. This is definitely eye opening. ...more
2

Oct 14, 2012

I am really sorry to have to give this only 2 stars. Nujood's story is heartbreaking, and her bravery is inspiring. I remember her case when it broke in the news. Married off by her father to a man 25 years older than she, this Yemeni child who is not even positive of her age was repeatedly abused, beated, and raped by this bastard (who had "promised" not to touch her until after puberty) and was brutally abused by his mother. She had the courage to find her way to a courthouse, find a judge I am really sorry to have to give this only 2 stars. Nujood's story is heartbreaking, and her bravery is inspiring. I remember her case when it broke in the news. Married off by her father to a man 25 years older than she, this Yemeni child who is not even positive of her age was repeatedly abused, beated, and raped by this bastard (who had "promised" not to touch her until after puberty) and was brutally abused by his mother. She had the courage to find her way to a courthouse, find a judge that would listen to her, tell her story, and ask for a divorce. Fortunately, there were caring judges who wanted to help, there was a courageous and excellent woman lawyer, and Nujood made history getting the divorce in 2008. Why 2 stars? The book is presented with Nujood Ali as author with Delphine Minoui. The text makes abundantly clear that at the time of the divorce, Nujood (not surprisingly) had so little education that she was literate enough to write nothing more than her first name. It also makes clear that her lawyer's well-intentioned placement of her in school after her plight made international news did not yield immediate success; the child could not immediately cope with a life of regular school hours. Again, this is not surprising at all. Much of the schooling entailed coloring and memorization of Muslim tenets. I don't believe there was much time for her to have developed intellectually (not to mention recover appreciably from her ordeals) by the time composition of the book had to have commenced. And yet, the book is published in 2010 with her as author? Certainly, it is very simply written, very simple to read, but there was no need to try to present it as her work with a bit of assistance from a second author. Why not let Delphine Minoui, or someone else with professional qualifications, write in authorial voice and tell Nujood's story with abundant interviewing, quoting, etc.? Surely that could have been done well and respectfully for Nujood. There was plenty of news coverage, there were plenty of interviews after her divorce. An excellent journalist with sterling reportial credentials AND an ethical compass (I can think of a few who would fill the bill) could have written a superb book with Nujood as the primary source. Perhaps the goal here was to present her case in simple enough form that young people could be exposed to the plight of young women/children in parts of the Middle East? I don't know. But I found this to be the wrong way to impart this information. Nujood's experience and her courage deserve a better book than this. Again, my criticism is not aimed toward topic/content - there is so much to discuss (and to be sickened by) here, including the extent of the repression of women in Nujood's society, the extent of patriarchy that allows for a man's multiple wives, numerous numbers of children (the number of pregnancies of Nujood's mother is astounding), complete control over women and children, and societal permission to hang about all day chewing khat and getting high (and explain his patriarchal decisions as abiding by his religion), the dire poverty that families like Nujood's live in, the lack of education for women (and not much more for poor men)... the list goes on. ...more
4

Mar 16, 2011

Before I comment on the book, I have to say something about the writer. Ali told her story to Delphine Minoui who is responisble for the actual written word. In some ways, this makes the story read strangely. It is ten year old, but the voice at times is far, far older than ten. In part, this must be so the novel can be read by adults, but it does give it a bit strange feel to the tone. Also, I think that the lack detail, in particular about the legal aspects of the case was done for two reasons Before I comment on the book, I have to say something about the writer. Ali told her story to Delphine Minoui who is responisble for the actual written word. In some ways, this makes the story read strangely. It is ten year old, but the voice at times is far, far older than ten. In part, this must be so the novel can be read by adults, but it does give it a bit strange feel to the tone. Also, I think that the lack detail, in particular about the legal aspects of the case was done for two reasons (1) it is Ali's story from her pov so she would lack that knowledge and (2) so the book can be read by non-adults. I'm not extactly sure if I like this style, though I did find the book compelling.

Unless, you've been living under a rock, and considering what some people don't know, it is entirely possible, you've heard this story on the news. You may not have remembered the girl's name but you heard the story. Nujood was married at age 10 to man in his thirties. Her family is poor and uneducated. The marriage, in part, seems to have been a way to reduce the number of mouths to feed (according to Ali's father it was to stop her from being kidnapped). Supposedly, Nujood's husband swore that he wouldn't touch her until a year after she started her cycle. He lied.

Somehow, Nujood worked up the courage to escape and demand a divorce. This is her story, not just about the marriage, but about her family before and after the divorce. While the focus is on women's issues, there is also a sense that many of these issues are caused by poverty. Mona, Ali's older sister, loeses custody of her daughter. Her mother-in-law takes the child because a child make begging more profitable. This book is a good companion piece to Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide. ...more
2

Jun 25, 2017

I'm both sad and ashamed to give this book only 2 stars .
Don't get me wrong , I've watched the documentary and after reading the book , i can only feel sad and heartbroken for what a young 10 years old girl had to go through !
Her journey is both compelling and inspiring however my rating has nothing to do with her survival story.
I hated how i had to read from the journalist's perspective , as if Noujoud had no opinions or feelings to share , because if she stood up to her husband and family , I'm both sad and ashamed to give this book only 2 stars .
Don't get me wrong , I've watched the documentary and after reading the book , i can only feel sad and heartbroken for what a young 10 years old girl had to go through !
Her journey is both compelling and inspiring however my rating has nothing to do with her survival story.
I hated how i had to read from the journalist's perspective , as if Noujoud had no opinions or feelings to share , because if she stood up to her husband and family , and managed to get herself out of this horrible mess, she's strong enough to deliver her own story and has a say in this matter .
...more
4

Sep 01, 2016

The "I really like it" 4 star rating is for the story, not the writing. The latter one is bland, the former quite uplifting and hopeful. Unfortunately, you don't really do justice to the story of the repeated rape of a 10 year old and her subjection to a deluded culture by writting "hopefully" about it. I believe in the power of cruel writing - where you make the reader so disgusted and scared by what is presented that he fears not only for other, but for himself. I believe writing should also The "I really like it" 4 star rating is for the story, not the writing. The latter one is bland, the former quite uplifting and hopeful. Unfortunately, you don't really do justice to the story of the repeated rape of a 10 year old and her subjection to a deluded culture by writting "hopefully" about it. I believe in the power of cruel writing - where you make the reader so disgusted and scared by what is presented that he fears not only for other, but for himself. I believe writing should also be used as a weapon- and weapons should be dangerous. The story has a happy ending - but it's just this story. And you are left to wonder - ok, but what about the other millions of girls that live a life of slow torture and shame, and have never had the chance to speak up about it? ...more
4

Sep 20, 2010

Such a brave and resilient little girl! At the age of 10, Nujood was married off to a man of thirty. He promised her father that he wouldn't consummate the marriage until she'd reached puberty, but began daily raping her starting on the wedding night. He also beat her black and blue on a regular basis. While on a visit to the city to see her family, Nujood ran away and stumbled into the courthouse asking, "Where's the judge? I want a divorce!" She had no money, no education, and no idea what Such a brave and resilient little girl! At the age of 10, Nujood was married off to a man of thirty. He promised her father that he wouldn't consummate the marriage until she'd reached puberty, but began daily raping her starting on the wedding night. He also beat her black and blue on a regular basis. While on a visit to the city to see her family, Nujood ran away and stumbled into the courthouse asking, "Where's the judge? I want a divorce!" She had no money, no education, and no idea what she'd gotten into, but was lucky enough to find a lady lawyer and three judges who were sympathetic to her cause. She was granted the first divorce given to a child bride in Yemen, and has since served as an inspiration to other child brides who have also been able to get divorces.

The story is very simply told and easily read in a day or two. It's not actually written by Nujood, but told to Delphine Minoui, who kept it in the simple form of a little girl's telling. ...more
5

Apr 08, 2016

A girlfriend handed this book to me saying that even though she did not particularly care for this book, I might. She was right. I care every much. I have a special place in my heart for little women, having been one. That in itself may not have caught my attention. Nujood looks 95% like my niece did at that age. I had to read the book.
I am astounded by how ariculate Nujood was at 10 years old. Formal education is not the only route to becoming articulate. Nujood had to be articulate and A girlfriend handed this book to me saying that even though she did not particularly care for this book, I might. She was right. I care every much. I have a special place in my heart for little women, having been one. That in itself may not have caught my attention. Nujood looks 95% like my niece did at that age. I had to read the book.
I am astounded by how ariculate Nujood was at 10 years old. Formal education is not the only route to becoming articulate. Nujood had to be articulate and succint to get the attention of those who jelped her get her divorcce. Imagime a blubbering, inarticulate litte woman would not have been able to accomplish what Nujood and her legal friends did together. Apparently, an articulate little woman and a gifted ghost writer have created a book that could change how we view how little women. I have never seen ghost writing done so well.
May the Great One bless Nujood, her sisters, and women friends all the days of her life. Amen. ...more
0

Dec 05, 2014

I really liked this book, because it was interesting reading about how tough her life was and what she went through with her husband. At the start she was living a pretty good life until this granger went up to her dad and asked to marry his daughter and her dad accepted it because they needed the money. He also swore not to touch her until she went through her first period. He lied about that. The only thing I would dislike about it is how she can be respecting her family? What was so bad about I really liked this book, because it was interesting reading about how tough her life was and what she went through with her husband. At the start she was living a pretty good life until this granger went up to her dad and asked to marry his daughter and her dad accepted it because they needed the money. He also swore not to touch her until she went through her first period. He lied about that. The only thing I would dislike about it is how she can be respecting her family? What was so bad about her getting help she was getting abused. Overall this book was great with all the tension from the beginning of the marriage until the court case. ...more
4

Apr 07, 2010

This is a very short and, despite the subject matter, easy read. It's disquieting, yes, but also hopeful and occasionally even light.

What I really liked about this book is that, first, it doesn't shy away from the horrors of what happened to Nujood, but it also doesn't go too graphic into them. It's clearly been written with a great deal of input from Nujood because the style, and what she takes enjoyment in, is clearly that of a 10- or 11-year-old. She is such a strong-willed child, and I This is a very short and, despite the subject matter, easy read. It's disquieting, yes, but also hopeful and occasionally even light.

What I really liked about this book is that, first, it doesn't shy away from the horrors of what happened to Nujood, but it also doesn't go too graphic into them. It's clearly been written with a great deal of input from Nujood because the style, and what she takes enjoyment in, is clearly that of a 10- or 11-year-old. She is such a strong-willed child, and I truly grew to respect her throughout the narrative. Respect not just for her concepts of right-and-wrong, but also because she's not perfect, she's occasionally immature, and that's all right because she's just a child.

What I didn't like as much was a comparative lack of background information about Yemen, the historical influence of Islam, more history of the current situation, etc. It was hard for me to feel sympathy for characters outside of Nujood because I was operating almost entirely on my western viewpoint, and that's unacceptable.

But honestly, this is a book that you should just read. And use it to realize the immense cultural barriers that prevent women, and even men, from achieving equality in these societies. ...more
5

Dec 10, 2015

Such a traumatizing and sad story, it really affected my mood, if you are already in a bad mood please avoid reading this because it will make it worse, I wish all the best to this little girl with big dreams.
2

May 31, 2016

Nujood is a brave child. She was married to much older man when she was 9, and she decided to get herself out of there. She was married by her father, which makes things much tougher, and in a world that girls can be kidnapped, and are just one more mouth to feed. And with all of my respect for Nujood, and her brave story, this book is really badly written, and doesn't tell much of a story, except Nujood stepping into a court and demanding to find a judge to grant her a divorce.

Sexist cultures Nujood is a brave child. She was married to much older man when she was 9, and she decided to get herself out of there. She was married by her father, which makes things much tougher, and in a world that girls can be kidnapped, and are just one more mouth to feed. And with all of my respect for Nujood, and her brave story, this book is really badly written, and doesn't tell much of a story, except Nujood stepping into a court and demanding to find a judge to grant her a divorce.

Sexist cultures are terrible. Women suffer terrible things in the name of honor Nujood's rebellion, honorable in our eyes, is moreover considered by conservatives as an outrageous affront, punishable, according to extremists, by a murderous "honor crime." Here is the part from her own father: "If you divorce your husband, my brothers and cousins will kill me! Sharaf, honor, comes first. Honor! Do you understand?"

And here lies the biggest problem, in creating a submissive women's culture: I'm a simple village girl whose family had to move to the capital, and I have always obeyed the orders of my father and brothers. Since forever, I have learned to say yes to everything.

Nujood's story helps others, now more girls go after her, and there is a little bit more awareness of the problem. But there is still a long way to go.
The book gets less than 2 stars, because it doesn't add much to the knowledge, is really badly written, and doesn't even gets the suffering that Nujood went through in any way. It is flat, unlike other books of women's suffering. I preferred
Daring to Drive: A Saudi Woman’s Awakening by Manal Al-Sharif, The Pearl That Broke Its Shell by Nadia Hashimi and Escape by Carolyn Jessop. ...more
2

Dec 14, 2010

Firstly, this low rating isn't due what to happened to Ali. It's terrible, jaw-dropping and gut wrenching. No child should be sold off- no human being should be sold off, period- and no child should be raped. Given Ali's bravery at being able to even think of getting a divorce despite being repressed, and actually following through with it, it's not wonder she was voted woman of the year.

But I can't help and feel that this memoir drags her story down. Someone on here suggested it would have been Firstly, this low rating isn't due what to happened to Ali. It's terrible, jaw-dropping and gut wrenching. No child should be sold off- no human being should be sold off, period- and no child should be raped. Given Ali's bravery at being able to even think of getting a divorce despite being repressed, and actually following through with it, it's not wonder she was voted woman of the year.

But I can't help and feel that this memoir drags her story down. Someone on here suggested it would have been better as a third person narrative, and I agree. The childish tone of voice made the whole situation feel flat, and, well, childish. Which is fine in some cases, but I felt the legal aspect of the events could have been done differently. I would have liked to know more of how Ali's case was represented, and what happened afterwards. Furthermore, what was really going on with the sisters? Did one of the have a consensual affair, or was she raped and still had to go to prison due to the Qur'an law? Unfortunately, Ali's ten-year-old perspective can't handle all the facts that come with being an adult.

I hope to see in the future another biography of Ali, or the events that took place. The legal aspect is perhaps the most interesting part of this whole story- which is why I wanted to read it in the first place. When Ali has time to process what has happened to her, and when she's old enough, perhaps she'll release another book, this time written entirely on her own. Or, perhaps someone else will. Shada (and heaven forbid what's being said about Shada is true).

An inspiring young woman; an unfortunate event; a rather average memoir. ...more
5

Dec 05, 2014

This book is inspiring and heart breaking because you learn so much from this book. It's about a young girl named Nujood who loves going to school and loves being with her family, she lives in a country called Yemen where you are forced to get married before 15 . One day she comes home from school and her dad tells she will soon get married. She is heart broken because her wedding will be coming soon. After her wedding Nujood struggled with her new " husband" she now lives with and his family . This book is inspiring and heart breaking because you learn so much from this book. It's about a young girl named Nujood who loves going to school and loves being with her family, she lives in a country called Yemen where you are forced to get married before 15 . One day she comes home from school and her dad tells she will soon get married. She is heart broken because her wedding will be coming soon. After her wedding Nujood struggled with her new " husband" she now lives with and his family . Later during their marriage her husband let her go see her parents and visit them for awhile and that's when she gets the courage to go to court and demand a divorce. I love how Nujood toke courage to get what she wanted and also worked hard for it. I would recommend this book to my friends or others. ...more
0

Jul 23, 2013

I'm not going to rate this book I just can't, it is one of these books that you have mixed feelings after reading it.. feeling of compassion and sadness for poor little Nujood and feelings of rage and anger towards stupid tribal traditions that spread out in the name of Islam while Islam has nothing to deal with it. And when all what a child want is to get back to be a child, play, draw, go to school and being seen by the others eyes as just a child no words in the world could ever express these I'm not going to rate this book I just can't, it is one of these books that you have mixed feelings after reading it.. feeling of compassion and sadness for poor little Nujood and feelings of rage and anger towards stupid tribal traditions that spread out in the name of Islam while Islam has nothing to deal with it. And when all what a child want is to get back to be a child, play, draw, go to school and being seen by the others eyes as just a child no words in the world could ever express these feelings.

Nujood, this poor little Yemeni girl who was forced to marry at the age of 9 to a man in his thirties because of poverty and the fear of Sharaf (grace). Reading these words, I couldn’t myself in my age accept the idea of thinking about getting married by force to a man, what about a child who is still watching Tom and Jerry the cartoons, dreaming of candies and wishing to have colored pencils and drawing papers to draw!! Unfortunately, this tradition has spread out in the outskirts and the villages of the poor Yemen where many girls just like Nujood were forced to marry at young ages, before even turning into women!!

Sometimes, we can extract courage out of fear… out of suffering… out of rage… Nujood, who had finally fed up with the brutality of her husband and the mean treatment of her mother-in-law finally had the courage to break through and go ahead to the court yard to call the judge asking for divorce! The dazzled judge who didn’t believe at first that this little girl is married and now asking for divorce!!

The story of Nujood had spread all over the world, inspiring more and more young girls who were forced to marry elderly men just because of poverty or the fear of grace to say no… to seek for their freedom. I have a great respect and gratitude to Shada Nasser, Nujood’s lawyer who stood by her and got her the divorce, Judge Mohammad Al-Ghazi, Judge Abdo and Judge Abdel Wahed who stood by her as well and managed to get her to a safe place among their families after Nujood escaped her husband and family to the court.

When I started reading this book, I didn’t search the Internet or read anything before listening to Nujood story. All the way long of the book, I had this feeling that this can’t be the words of a ten years old girl, the story were well formed that I was not convinced that this is her words being told and then after finishing the book I found out that this story was written by the co-author Delphine Minoui who tried to sound like a child but it was a grown up child instead!! I wished that more details of the trial and what happened with Nujood and her family after the divorce in order to have a complete pricture of what happened with her.

Thank God, after what happened with her and the global attention and recognition she had, Nujood and her family were granted a two story house were they used the ground floor as a grocery store that helped her and her sister to get back to school and get out of poverty.
...more
0

Jan 24, 2019

I read the book during my train commute - it's rather short and feels like an overview of the situation. Which is fine, we don't need every horrible detail of this girl's experience, and I don't particularly relish reading about marital rape of a young girl. BUT. Yemen is full of girls like Nujood and I feel this book does not emphasize the point enough.

Yemen is a country with the highest numbers of teenage pregnancies. Girls as young as 11 are dying during childbirth every day. In fact, some I read the book during my train commute - it's rather short and feels like an overview of the situation. Which is fine, we don't need every horrible detail of this girl's experience, and I don't particularly relish reading about marital rape of a young girl. BUT. Yemen is full of girls like Nujood and I feel this book does not emphasize the point enough.

Yemen is a country with the highest numbers of teenage pregnancies. Girls as young as 11 are dying during childbirth every day. In fact, some of their more 'progressive' hospitals now have specialized staff and more incubators for children of these children. Which is appalling to a tenth degree! It just gives all these men who rape young girls in the name of 'tradition' an excuse - the 11-year old won't die now, so all's good. NO! This is not ok!

Why not rather enforce a marriage age limit and prevent stillbirths, infant mortality, death in childbed, underweight and premature babies, and give these girls and their future children a chance. Why not wait untill girls finish school and their bodies mature so they can carry a pregnancy safely? WHY DON'T THEY DO THAT? What is wrong with these people?

Nujood is a saint and a hero for speaking up, for daring to step out of the line. I'm also glad she found people (lawyers, judges, and journalist) who decided to do something to help her and other girls. But that is not nearly enough - the perpetrators still walk free, rapist still marry their victims, and girls are still killed in the name of honour, or sold on to much older men. This is far from over - Nujood is still a symptom of a larger problem; namely, Islam. It is the traditions and historical precedents set by their prophet that are the underlying cause and excuse for the practice and the lack of real punishment. The man raped a young girl, repeatedly. Why isn't he locked up in prison with no parole? WHY? Why is it ok to beat your wife and children?

As a woman this enrages me so much. There are so many girls in Yemen, Afghanistan, Egypt, and other countries that go through the same hell as Nujood. This book does not do nearly enough to stir people into action, not nearly enough to highlight the problems. And that is why I can't even rate it - it would be a 2, but I feel Nujood deserves a 10 for her courage. So I'd rather leave it blank. The co-author could raise awarness for so many issues tied in with child marriage, but she drops the ball, hard. I know this is a story about Nujood, but it should also be a story about her sisters - we learn so little about the hell they went through, or her father's second wife. This could be so much more. ...more
2

Nov 16, 2012

An important book for anyone who would like a first-hand account of the horror and cruelty of child marriage. My quibble - as always - is in the telling: written at a basic level pretending to be out of the mouth of 10-yr-old Nujood, the prose was stilted and the horror somewhat dulled (although, what was unsaid was a powerful statement in itself) - and, above all, the pacing was too fast. We needed to dwell a little longer on the lead-up to the marriage selling of the 10-yr-old to a 30+-yr-old An important book for anyone who would like a first-hand account of the horror and cruelty of child marriage. My quibble - as always - is in the telling: written at a basic level pretending to be out of the mouth of 10-yr-old Nujood, the prose was stilted and the horror somewhat dulled (although, what was unsaid was a powerful statement in itself) - and, above all, the pacing was too fast. We needed to dwell a little longer on the lead-up to the marriage selling of the 10-yr-old to a 30+-yr-old neighbour; and more on the machinations of the court and motivations and actions of those (the female lawyer, Shada Nasser; the two judges; the journalist who broke the story) who helped Nujood gain her divorce.

The epilogue was, ironically, where I became engaged, and I would have preferred: a) the book to start there; b) it to be longer.

The book I want to read is the one Ms Nasser, will - I hope but doubt - write. This New Yorker article provides additional details that start to answer just some of the questions I was left with at the end of I Am Nujood, and raises many others that deserve to be answered in a more in-depth way, in particular: what are some ways forward to address the poverty that leads to such cultural brutality? How can we recognize and respect the complexity of these situations while also advancing in a meaningful way dialogue and practical action to prevent them? ...more

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