How to Teach Your Baby to Read, 40th Anniversary Edition Info

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This book presents four tenets: Tiny children can learn to

Average Ratings and Reviews
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3.84

535 Ratings

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Reviews for How to Teach Your Baby to Read, 40th Anniversary Edition:

5

Nov 11, 2009

To ANYONE who wants their kids to grow up with super reading skills...this is it. Scientifically created by a brain researcher. The original was published way back in the 60's (or maybe 50's). I used it to teach both my kids to read, starting at 18 months. That's right, months. Both learned to read by 3, and my son had read all the early grade school books by 4. We couldn't find enough with big print. By 5 he was through most of the middle school books.

I measured his reading speed (better than To ANYONE who wants their kids to grow up with super reading skills...this is it. Scientifically created by a brain researcher. The original was published way back in the 60's (or maybe 50's). I used it to teach both my kids to read, starting at 18 months. That's right, months. Both learned to read by 3, and my son had read all the early grade school books by 4. We couldn't find enough with big print. By 5 he was through most of the middle school books.

I measured his reading speed (better than 3000 words per minute for most books). He doesn't remember ever not knowing how to read, and reads WORDS by sight, rather than speaking them in his head the way I do (subvocalizing). He remembers what he reads far better than others.

Many folks are resistant to teaching little ones "too early." I notice they don't hold back on things like talking (although many teach sign language). The author answers this objection well. I CAN tell you that a kid that knows more than many of his teachers in grade school can be a challenge...a wonderful challenge.

It would be malpractice for parents to not read this one and at least see how it works...

BTW, it says it was 1st published in 1975...but there was an earlier edition. We have it in our family, my Mother discovered it, and said: "I wish I'd known about this when raising my family! You all would have had the advantage of speed reading from the earliest times...I just didn't know it was possible!" ...more
4

Jul 08, 2009

Every parent should read all of Doman's books. Even if you don't agree with 100% of his methods, you will learn how important it is to take advantage of the child's early years when their mind is like a sponge.
3

Feb 11, 2008

Interesting idea. The basic premise is that reading is a natural brain function, just like learning to understand spoken language. According to the authors, kids don't learn to read earlier on their own because generally print is too small for their underdeveloped vision. Apparently the method described in the book (using very large, bold flashcards) has worked for thousands of families, and I plan to start trying it with Isobel within the next few months.
That said, the writing was poor, and the Interesting idea. The basic premise is that reading is a natural brain function, just like learning to understand spoken language. According to the authors, kids don't learn to read earlier on their own because generally print is too small for their underdeveloped vision. Apparently the method described in the book (using very large, bold flashcards) has worked for thousands of families, and I plan to start trying it with Isobel within the next few months.
That said, the writing was poor, and the material dated. It was first written in 1963 and there are some things that should be updated. For example, the author spends way too much time harping on the evils of playpens, when I don't think playpens are really popular anymore at all (except as a sleep space). Also, I get annoyed with parenting manuals that are loaded with impassioned calls to action. "Very young children can and SHOULD learn to read!" Oh blah. Obviously I'm already willing to believe that idea if I'm going to the trouble of reading this poorly-written book.
I read this book for the idea and the method, though, not for the writing. So it still gets 3 stars. ...more
5

Nov 11, 2008

Reading this book changed my perception of babies and their potential. They are capable of so much, and I appreciated being able to feel like I was really teaching them rather than just waiting for them to grow out of the cute "blob" stage. I've applied these ideas of teaching babies from all the books the Domans have written, and had my children reading at age 3, learning to speak by reading (my autistic son), recognizing a "giant walkingstick" in a natural history museum (even though he was so Reading this book changed my perception of babies and their potential. They are capable of so much, and I appreciated being able to feel like I was really teaching them rather than just waiting for them to grow out of the cute "blob" stage. I've applied these ideas of teaching babies from all the books the Domans have written, and had my children reading at age 3, learning to speak by reading (my autistic son), recognizing a "giant walkingstick" in a natural history museum (even though he was so young he didn't have a very large vocabulary)--this flashcard system works.

Note that the Domans advise lots of repetitions of the flashcards. I haven't been as consistent as they suggest, I've used white cardstock instead of posterboard, and I have still had the fabulous results they explain as possible. Remember that every little bit you do helps teach your child. I also liked to do the flashcards right before a nap or bed--it seemed to me that their minds worked on it while they were asleep because they seemed to catch on even faster that way.

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5

Feb 07, 2008

The most WONDERFUL experience in life is teaching your 2-year old how to read, and watching her LOVE to read, really read books, at age 3. Sure, it will make your baby much more intelligent, but just as important, you will have such sweet memories of those special times with your child cuddled on your lap, reading aloud to you.
3

Mar 01, 2010

I'm definitely intrigued by the idea, and I desperately want to try it...and yet I'm hesitant. I agree with the author that young children soak up knowledge with an unfathomable rapidity, so I think my son would love it. I'm just nervous because there is no phonics involved whatsoever...the child is taught solely through sight words, which gets to be a LOT of words on cards! My concern is that he will learn to read and yet be missing some of the most basic tools he needs to continue learning on I'm definitely intrigued by the idea, and I desperately want to try it...and yet I'm hesitant. I agree with the author that young children soak up knowledge with an unfathomable rapidity, so I think my son would love it. I'm just nervous because there is no phonics involved whatsoever...the child is taught solely through sight words, which gets to be a LOT of words on cards! My concern is that he will learn to read and yet be missing some of the most basic tools he needs to continue learning on his own. He can't come to me for the rest of his life and ask, "What word is this?"

The author vaguely addresses this question in the book, but he just makes a blanket statement, basically saying, "Your child will thank you for just teaching him to read and not boring him with phonics." I was frustrated throughout the book with many statements such as this one...lots of generalizations and anecdotal evidence but almost no reputable research.

I did read the updated edition (2002), but the book still seemed dated and definitely had a 1960's flavor to it.

I'm still undecided as to what I will do. It really was an easy and enjoyable read, and I would love to have something structured to do with my son this next year. I would welcome any thoughts anyone has on this or other reading methods. ...more
2

Jan 22, 2015

I was given “How to Teach Your Baby to Read” a while back. It's been lying around, so yesterday I thought I'd give it a read.

I like the idea behind the title. Upon reading the book, I found that Doman's methodology presents a couple ideas that I might try with my kids. But overall, I found this book disappointing and frustrating from a linguistics standpoint.

For the majority of the text, Doman makes claims supported almost entirely through the aid of case-study and testimonial-style examples I was given “How to Teach Your Baby to Read” a while back. It's been lying around, so yesterday I thought I'd give it a read.

I like the idea behind the title. Upon reading the book, I found that Doman's methodology presents a couple ideas that I might try with my kids. But overall, I found this book disappointing and frustrating from a linguistics standpoint.

For the majority of the text, Doman makes claims supported almost entirely through the aid of case-study and testimonial-style examples complemented with homespun wisdom. He does not SPECIFICALLY refer to, comment on, or engage with what others scholars are saying or doing in this area.

Furthermore, Doman's views on language acquisition and language in general are antiquated or just outright incorrect in light of current linguistic study. As Doman's views on language and language acquisition provide part of the foundation for his methodology, I find it troubling that he relies upon outdated information to support a number of points. As such, I couldn't give the book a higher rating.

Nonetheless, if you want to experiment with Doman's method, just read the last 40 pages of the book.

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5

Sep 22, 2008

I love, love, love this book. My 4 year old is reading everything he see's now, and my 1 year old is trying too. This will be my new gift for all new parents.
5

Aug 28, 2019

I haven't actually read this book cover to cover. However, my mother used this method to teach me to read when I was two. She did say that she would never have continued the flash card system with me if I hated it. My grandmother, an experienced school teacher, did not believe that I could read at 2 - until I read her a picture book. It doesn't always teach phonetics - for example, I had a real interest in history and the ancient Egyptians as a child, but had no idea how to pronounce "Pharaoh". I haven't actually read this book cover to cover. However, my mother used this method to teach me to read when I was two. She did say that she would never have continued the flash card system with me if I hated it. My grandmother, an experienced school teacher, did not believe that I could read at 2 - until I read her a picture book. It doesn't always teach phonetics - for example, I had a real interest in history and the ancient Egyptians as a child, but had no idea how to pronounce "Pharaoh".

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4

Aug 12, 2007

According to this book, little children (0-5 years old) are more intelligent and capable of learning than previously imagined. After it is understood that they have a huge amount of curiosity about the world around them, the authors strongly recommend enriching a child’s environment by teaching them to read.

The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential (the group behind this book) was begun to see if it was possible to teach brain-damaged children to read. In this case, "brain-damaged" According to this book, little children (0-5 years old) are more intelligent and capable of learning than previously imagined. After it is understood that they have a huge amount of curiosity about the world around them, the authors strongly recommend enriching a child’s environment by teaching them to read.

The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential (the group behind this book) was begun to see if it was possible to teach brain-damaged children to read. In this case, "brain-damaged" means children whose brains were normal at conception, but were damaged through injury or disease. After discovering that the answer to their question was a resounding Yes, the same method was tried on well children, with the same result.

For the average child, being able to explore their world, through crawling or walking, is vital to their development, so sticking them in a playpen with a bunch of toys, while understandable, is a bad idea. There is no “wrong” way to teach a child to read; the authors present their method, which involves writing words on flashcards in very large and bold print, and showing them to the child several times a day, for a few seconds at a time. It is never too early to start, even with children less than 1 year old. Do not be concerned if you cannot go "all the way" in teaching your child to read; even partial progress will help your child in the long run. Most importantly, the process should be joyous, and never a chore, for parent and child. If either one is cranky, or having a bad day, save the words for another day.

This is an excellent book. Written for parents, it is very easy to understand, and shows that it is never too early to expose your child to the world of reading. It was also first published in the 1960s, so they must be doing something right. It is very much recommended.

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5

Dec 30, 2014

I just completed how to teach your baby to read by Glenn Doman and Janet Doman.
This is truly an amazing book on the leading edge of thought, to know and believe that our tiny babies can be taught to read from as little as day one is just outstanding.
This book outlines the methods ,procedures to be followed step by step, the do's and dont's , how the babies brain is wired at different stages of development and growth and mostly it's never to late to teach you baby to read from 0-72months is the I just completed how to teach your baby to read by Glenn Doman and Janet Doman.
This is truly an amazing book on the leading edge of thought, to know and believe that our tiny babies can be taught to read from as little as day one is just outstanding.
This book outlines the methods ,procedures to be followed step by step, the do's and dont's , how the babies brain is wired at different stages of development and growth and mostly it's never to late to teach you baby to read from 0-72months is the optimal time.
Give your child the greatest gift to learn and have a magical bond with father and mother.
Parents who have done this course many eons ago have the most amazing stories to share about the kids who are now adults or just completing school and the journeys as kids who had the "advantage" of reading or learning math easily.
For the skeptic or those who think that kids hate learning and that its to much for the child - don't underestimate your child's ability , read with an open mind and heart don't let this treasure pass due to what you think is right or what you know.
I feel blessed to have come across these books the future has never looked brighter for my son.
Lots of work and dedication however from what I have read it becomes a joyous process with dividends that are worth more than gold.
Here here to the Institutes of Achievement of Human potential ...more
4

Aug 01, 2010

A large part of the book is spent explaining whether and why anyone would want to teach their baby to read. Will it HURT them? Will it RETARD their growth? Will it OVER-PRESSURE them? Etc. If you're already convinced that teaching your baby to read isn't going to mortally wound their infant souls then you'll be happy to have your intuition confirmed by data, and you can then proceed to skim the first 100 pages

The rest of the book gives a system for creating cards and starting to expose the baby A large part of the book is spent explaining whether and why anyone would want to teach their baby to read. Will it HURT them? Will it RETARD their growth? Will it OVER-PRESSURE them? Etc. If you're already convinced that teaching your baby to read isn't going to mortally wound their infant souls then you'll be happy to have your intuition confirmed by data, and you can then proceed to skim the first 100 pages

The rest of the book gives a system for creating cards and starting to expose the baby to words until he or she can read. Treating reading like a game and doing it in small doses seems to work, as evidenced by the numerous testimonials towards the end of the book.

In this, the 21st century when we are amazed and privileged to live in the presence of devices such as the iPad and the iPhone there is, naturally, an app for that. Actually there are several. Dozens even. I chose "My First Words" which seems to have been designed by someone familiar with this book. So far, baby likes learning to read. Loves it. Is enthralled by it, and shows no signs of emotional or physical distress.

Check it out. Along with the app it makes teaching the little people the ways of the book easy and, as I mentioned, fun. ...more
3

Jun 20, 2012

Glenn Doman's advice on teaching a baby to read is both refreshingly straightforward and precise (down to the number of inches tall your letters should be and what color of felt tip marker you ought to use to make them). While not all of these injunctions seem proven or perhaps necessary to the working of this plan, they are what worked for Doman and so he relates them. It is nice that he put the pragmatic portions of the book separate from the philosophical because it makes turning back to it Glenn Doman's advice on teaching a baby to read is both refreshingly straightforward and precise (down to the number of inches tall your letters should be and what color of felt tip marker you ought to use to make them). While not all of these injunctions seem proven or perhaps necessary to the working of this plan, they are what worked for Doman and so he relates them. It is nice that he put the pragmatic portions of the book separate from the philosophical because it makes turning back to it while actually trying to implement this plan much easier than searching through chapters of philosophical argument to find the snippets of practical advice like so many other books about child education tend to do. ...more
3

Jan 28, 2010

An easy read and a great concept with convincing arguments and testimonials. I sent away for my reading cards immediately! Just started teaching him last week and already my 2.5-year-old is reading a couple of words. I was most intrigued by the chicken and egg question presented by the authors about so many early readers entering gifted programs. Did they read early because they were gifted or did they excel (and thereby acquire the gifted label becuase they read early????)
5

Jun 03, 2009

I read this book 6 year ago and teach my son right away. It worked! My son can read since he was 2.5 y o, and since that day he loves to read and write stories and poems.
3

Sep 18, 2019

Teaches baby to read words by sight with very tall thick letters. Short activity to do with the baby each day. May take quite a bit of work to make all the sight cards.
It explains process well.
Seems fine, but doesn't teach baby phonics. Will have to memorise every word it comes across.
3

Oct 10, 2017

I will apply Glen Doman when I have a child. It's amazing work.
5

Aug 11, 2018

The brain is so fascinating. Whether or not you have an interest in actually teaching your baby or young child to read, the research behind it is a very interesting read.
5

Dec 17, 2019

A must read book for parents who wants to apply early childhood education at home.
5

Jul 10, 2019

Very in depth. I rented it from the library, but I have to buy this one. Really good.
5

Dec 16, 2016

A perspective-changer on brain growth, how language is learnt and how much children can take in during the early years. Inspiring.
4

Sep 30, 2016

The writing leaves something to be desired, but the information is helpful. Can't wait to try it with Andrew.
4

Mar 29, 2011

This book was far more interesting than I had thought it would be going into it. I thought it would be more of a how-to book, but it surprised me--quite pleasantly, I might add--that it spends more of the time telling you WHY you should teach your child to read young and HOW they actually learn.

I also now feel bad about not starting to teach my son German already.

Parental guilt aside, it was really interesting to me to read about the studies that have led up to the book's initial goal of This book was far more interesting than I had thought it would be going into it. I thought it would be more of a how-to book, but it surprised me--quite pleasantly, I might add--that it spends more of the time telling you WHY you should teach your child to read young and HOW they actually learn.

I also now feel bad about not starting to teach my son German already.

Parental guilt aside, it was really interesting to me to read about the studies that have led up to the book's initial goal of teaching young children to read. I'm actually kind of anxious to get my hands on other books in the same series, and buy many of the materials from the Gentle Revolution's website (which are WAY cheaper than that Your Baby Can Read thing you see on television, by the way).

And yes, I read it in only 2.5 hours. The entire book. ...more
5

Apr 20, 2010

I love this book for many reasons. I love that it opened my eyes to what our children are capable of - absolutely amazing things. I love that it inspired me to be a more dedicated mother. I love that it teaches us how to teach our children. It emphasizes making learning fun to keep the kids interested. Make learning a game. That may seem common sense, but I definitely wasn't raised to learn that way. I have used this on my children as infants and toddlers and I strongly believe it is one reason I love this book for many reasons. I love that it opened my eyes to what our children are capable of - absolutely amazing things. I love that it inspired me to be a more dedicated mother. I love that it teaches us how to teach our children. It emphasizes making learning fun to keep the kids interested. Make learning a game. That may seem common sense, but I definitely wasn't raised to learn that way. I have used this on my children as infants and toddlers and I strongly believe it is one reason my children are too smart for their own good. :) I was inconsistant with it however, and so I haven't seen the full benefit and outcome with a child that gets this process consistently. But a couple of my children are still very young so I can still try! ...more
5

Apr 08, 2016

I used this book as a guide to teach my girls to read back in the '80s, and read the Spanish version now as I plan to teach my granddaughter to read in Spanish. I will modify the method a great deal, as I did with my girls. I don't think much of the 5-seconds approach. I tried it with his "How to Teach Your Baby Math" and she lost interest after only 6 days. I plan to let her touch and study the cards rather than flash five cards for one second each and not let her look at them. My girls learned I used this book as a guide to teach my girls to read back in the '80s, and read the Spanish version now as I plan to teach my granddaughter to read in Spanish. I will modify the method a great deal, as I did with my girls. I don't think much of the 5-seconds approach. I tried it with his "How to Teach Your Baby Math" and she lost interest after only 6 days. I plan to let her touch and study the cards rather than flash five cards for one second each and not let her look at them. My girls learned really well by letting them study two cards until they could tell the difference, then adding cards one at a time as they learned them. ...more

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