Healthy at 100: The Scientifically Proven Secrets of the World's Healthiest and Longest-Lived Peoples Info

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Why do some people age in failing health and sadness, while
others grow old with vitality and joy?

In this
revolutionary book, bestselling author John Robbins presents us with a
bold new paradigm of aging, showing us how we can increase not only our
lifespan but also our health span. Through the example of four very
different cultures that have the distinction of producing some of the
world’s healthiest, oldest people, Robbins reveals the secrets for
living an extended and fulfilling life in which our later years become a
period of wisdom, vitality, and happiness. From Abkhasia in the
Caucasus south of Russia, where age is beauty, and Vilcabamba in the
Andes of South America, where laughter is the greatest medicine, to
Hunza in Central Asia, where dance is ageless, and finally the southern
Japanese islands of Okinawa, the modern Shangri-la, where people
regularly live beyond a century, Robbins examines how the unique
lifestyles of these peoples can influence and improve our
own.
Bringing the traditions of these ancient and vibrantly
healthy cultures together with the latest breakthroughs in medical
science, Robbins reveals that, remarkably, they both point in the same
direction. The result is an inspirational synthesis of years of research
into healthy aging in which Robbins has isolated the characteristics
that will enable us to live long and–most important–joyous
lives. With an emphasis on simple, wholesome, but satisfying fare, and
the addition of a manageable daily exercise routine, many people can
experience great improvement in the quality of their lives now and for
many years to come. But perhaps more surprising is Robbins’
discovery that it is not diet and exercise alone that helps people to
live well past one hundred. The quality of personal relationships is
enormously important. With startling medical evidence about the effects
of our interactions with others, Robbins asserts that loneliness has
more impact on lifespan than such known vices as smoking. There is
clearly a strong beneficial power to love and
connection.
“We all have the tools to live longer lives,
and to remain active, productive, and resourceful until the very
end,” Robbins writes. Healthy at 100 strives to improve
both the quality and the quantity of our remaining years–no matter
how old or how healthy we might currently be–and to reverse the
social stigma on aging. After reading this book, we will never think
about age–or life–in the same way again.
“John
Robbins has inspired millions of people with his eloquent, clear,
compassionate, and insightful guidance on the path to health and
fulfillment. Healthy at 100 may be his finest work to date. If you are
interested in extending your health span as well as your life span, read
this book! Healthy at 100 is a masterpiece.”
–Dean
Ornish, M.D., president and director of the Preventive Medicine Research
Institute, author of Dr. Dean Ornish’s Program for Reversing
Heart Disease

“This is a remarkably open and heartfelt
book full of wisdom and love by an extraordinary man who has been
teaching us how to live more healthy and compassionate lives for over
twenty years now. John Robbins has created a new vision of aging for
American society.”
–John Mackey, CEO, Whole
Foods

“John Robbins is one of the most important voices
in America today. He cuts through nonsense like no one else does. He
gives hope like no one else does. His words are lifelines for both the
body and soul. This book can literally save our
lives.”
–Marianne Williamson, author of A Return to
Love
and A Woman’s Worth
“Healthy at 100
is a marvelous blend of wisdom, hope, courage, and common sense. John
Robbins gives us caring, science, and inspiration–a beautiful diet
for the heart.”
–Jack Kornfield, co-founder of the
Insight Meditation Society and Spirit Rock, author of A Path with
Heart

“As the low-carb diet craze is gone, John Robbins
proposes a far healthier approach that leads not just to a healthy
weight but also to a joyful and fulfilled life. Healthy at 100 is packed
with informed and heartfelt wisdom.”
–Jorge Cruise,
author of The 3-Hour Diet, creator of
JorgeCruise.com

“John Robbins inspires me on every
page. His unique experiences and viewpoints were the reasons I wanted
him to be in my film Super Size Me. This book only reinforces my
faith in him as a thought-provoking
humanitarian.”
–Morgan Spurlock, producer and director of
Super Size Me

Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for Healthy at 100: The Scientifically Proven Secrets of the World's Healthiest and Longest-Lived Peoples:

2

Jun 03, 2015

This was fine, but could have been more succinct. Basically do all the things that you probably already know are good for you. Live amongst your extended family. Preferably in a stress free environment. Laugh often. Walk lots. Eat less. Mainly a plant and grain based diet. Done.
2

Feb 02, 2008

I really wanted to like this book. John Robbins 'Diet for a New America' was very influential on my journey towards being Vegan. Healthy at 100 does have its heart in the right place. The problem is that it probably would have made a better magazine article than book. Robbins repeats himself over and over and over again. Sections end with long 'to do lists' which feel like brainstorming notes and the end takeaway is pretty simple: eat veg, connect with the community, get exercise, find purpose I really wanted to like this book. John Robbins 'Diet for a New America' was very influential on my journey towards being Vegan. Healthy at 100 does have its heart in the right place. The problem is that it probably would have made a better magazine article than book. Robbins repeats himself over and over and over again. Sections end with long 'to do lists' which feel like brainstorming notes and the end takeaway is pretty simple: eat veg, connect with the community, get exercise, find purpose and be happy.

I know John had a better book in him and so I really lay blame with the editor of this book. Healthy at 100 is a fantastic first draft, and in the right hands it could have been a very significant book, getting people to look at how we live and how our society deals with aging. Instead we get a bloated and repetitive book that meanders, never quite finding its way.


...more
5

Feb 17, 2011

What sets this book apart from most books on health is that the last third of the book focuses on how strong interpersonal relationships are more of a determiner of health as we age than smoking or poor diets! Here's a favorite..

Four hugs a day are necessary for survival, eight a day for maintenance, twelve for growth!
In the four healthiest cultures, "Instead of going shopping, they go visit one another"

In a heart disease study it was found that men who used the first-person pronouns the most What sets this book apart from most books on health is that the last third of the book focuses on how strong interpersonal relationships are more of a determiner of health as we age than smoking or poor diets! Here's a favorite..

Four hugs a day are necessary for survival, eight a day for maintenance, twelve for growth!
In the four healthiest cultures, "Instead of going shopping, they go visit one another"

In a heart disease study it was found that men who used the first-person pronouns the most often (I, me, mine)...had the highest risk of heart trouble...

Read my full review on my blog....
http://hungrybookwormsunite.blogspot.... ...more
4

Sep 08, 2009

Nothing has inspired me to eat better and live better more than this book.
5

Apr 18, 2008

Enjoyable reading, solid research, good end-notes, great book.

I like how he put Weston Price in perspective. Either people revere him or discredit him. Robbins acknowledges that he made great observations, but had rather limited exposure to the peoples he visited, so it's not completely solid "science." Dr Price's suggestions are great ideas, but should be balanced with other great ideas. Use what works for you.

The chapter that blew me away was "Breaking Free from the Cultural Trance, or the Enjoyable reading, solid research, good end-notes, great book.

I like how he put Weston Price in perspective. Either people revere him or discredit him. Robbins acknowledges that he made great observations, but had rather limited exposure to the peoples he visited, so it's not completely solid "science." Dr Price's suggestions are great ideas, but should be balanced with other great ideas. Use what works for you.

The chapter that blew me away was "Breaking Free from the Cultural Trance, or the real news on this planet." The real news is that love makes all the difference. His information on wealth distribution, what that tells you about a culture's values, and the effects on health were staggering to me. Of course, it makes sense now.

"The larger the gap between rich and poor, the less health will prevail." p. 265

What that means is that in a culture where the rich are *much* richer than the poor, that means that having wealth is a more valued trait than sharing wealth. It also means that the rich hold onto their wealth (generally speaking, I mean we all know of at least one generous rich person), which means that the poor have to work all that harder for the very basics (or give up and try to subsist on welfare), which means they have very little time for relationships (and then all the evils that occur from fragile or falling apart families will follow), which means that health suffers greatly.

No matter how "wealthy" or "poor" a nation, the greater the gap between rich and poor, the poorer health is in general. The smaller the gap between rich and poor, the better the health generally: for rich and poor. Huge implications. (Do I sound like a socialist? I don't think government has the duty to "fix" this; after all, it's a reflection on the people and their values, so government's not gonna change that. It's what we teach and value in our homes that filters up to results like this.)

Bhutan, which admittedly has its problems, has actually instituted Gross National Happiness as a measure of national prosperity, rather than Gross Domestic Product. Revolutionary! It may sound fru-fru, idealistic and a little hippy-ish, but it means healthier people. Happiness and love really do make a considerable difference.

A funny image just came to mind. Once science begins to acknowledge the effects of love, can you image a roomful of scientists trying to decide how to "control" for "love" in a study on health? They'll try it, I'm sure.

I won't go on right now. Terrific book. ...more
5

Mar 27, 2011

Live longer and healthier via diet and lifestyle.

Eat vegetables — Dean Ornish, Joel Furhman, Caldwell Esselstyn, T. Colin Campbell, and John McDougall.

Volunteer, maintain strong social ties, act in love and compassion—Mother Teresa, Karen Armstrong, and Dame Cicely Mary Saunders.

Add John Robbins'Healthy at 100 to the cannon of books/voices urging us to eschew the Standard American Diet (SAD) and live longer in great health. In addition, Robbins' makes a case against our society's toxic ageism. Live longer and healthier via diet and lifestyle.

Eat vegetables — Dean Ornish, Joel Furhman, Caldwell Esselstyn, T. Colin Campbell, and John McDougall.

Volunteer, maintain strong social ties, act in love and compassion—Mother Teresa, Karen Armstrong, and Dame Cicely Mary Saunders.

Add John Robbins'Healthy at 100 to the cannon of books/voices urging us to eschew the Standard American Diet (SAD) and live longer in great health. In addition, Robbins' makes a case against our society's toxic ageism. We should be able to look forward to growing old and enjoy our maturity — not fear it. How to dance at 100? The tenets are: eat plants, be active, volunteer, and love and be loved.

Healthy at 100 provides examples: of long-lived, healthy utopian cultures — Abkhasia, Vilacamba, Hunza, Okinama (often in remote, isolated or island locales); many extraordinary people such as triathlete, vegan, cancer survivor Ruth Heidrich; and inspiring stories of the Chicken Soup for the Soul variety (some of them are actually from the Chicken Soup series). Robbins also makes his case with philosophical quotes and hard science.

Sections of the book end with long lists of Steps You Can Take.
Noted:
• When you are interacting with people who don't eat the same way you do, never be ashamed of the steps you are taking toward greater health. Let your enthusiasm and love of life be contagious.
• Give away everything that is cluttering your life. Have nothing in your house that is not useful or beautiful.
• Celebrate your birthday every year by doing something you've never done before.
• Become a hospice volunteer.
• Celebrate death days as well as birthdays.

Quotes

"A society's quality and durability can best be measured by the respect and care given to its elder citizens." — Arnold Toynbee

"Of all the self-fulfilling prophecies in our culture, the assumption that aging means decline and poor health is probably the deadliest." — Marilyn Ferguson

"I want to drink to women all over the world...for them not to work too hard and to be happy with their families." — K. Lasuria

"Food should nourish life — this is the best medicine." — Okinawan proverb

"We cannot live only for ourselves. A thousand fibers connect us with our fellow men; and among those fibers, as sympathetic threads, our actions run as causes, and they come back to us as effects."
— Herman Melville
...more
5

Jan 20, 2012

This is one of the few books I come across that deserves 5 stars. I am happy that Robbins mentioned the village of Vilcabamba in Ecuador. I've known about the longevity of their people for a long time. The differences among cultures is astounding. With regards to stress, (and the fact that so many people in my industrialized culture are overfed, overmedicated, and overstressed) my favorite passage from the book is as follows:

Pages 34-35: ...a mystic from India who was introduced to New York This is one of the few books I come across that deserves 5 stars. I am happy that Robbins mentioned the village of Vilcabamba in Ecuador. I've known about the longevity of their people for a long time. The differences among cultures is astounding. With regards to stress, (and the fact that so many people in my industrialized culture are overfed, overmedicated, and overstressed) my favorite passage from the book is as follows:

Pages 34-35: ...a mystic from India who was introduced to New York City. His guide took him to the Times Square subway station at the peak of morning rush hour. The visitor was appalled at what he saw--people with briefcases pushing hard and driving madly. Not understanding what was causing people to behave so frantically, he asked, "Is there a wolf behind them?" "No," said the guide, "there's a dollar in front of them."

Taken from the book:

-Fat in food cause high cholesterol, especially saturated.
-Stay away from tuna! It has lots of mercury.
-Stay away from cheese!
-Eat more whole grains.
-Omega 3 is good
-Flax seed is good
-Wheat germ is good

I couldn't believe that Robbins is the son of the co-founder of the ice cream chain Baskin-Robbins! Robbins reminds me of Thom Hartmann, in both his political views and happiness with his wife and family.

Robbins mention of the increasing gap between the rich and poor was pretty intense and interesting. It's even more so that the book was written in 2006, shortly before the economic crash and Wall Street exposure.
Page 265: "And it's certainly true that worldwide today, those nations whose annual per capita income is below about $5,000 to $10,000 often suffer from poor sanitation and malnutrition and have the poorest health. But studies have consistently found that above that threshold, the health of nations is no longer a matter of absolute income, but is actually more a matter of the gap between the rich and the poor. Above that point, the larger the gap between rich and poor, the less health will prevail." ...more
5

Jan 23, 2009

This is one of the most beautiful and positive books I've ever read. Anybody and everybody should read it - I think there is something in it that will appeal to each person on this planet.

The theme of the book comes down to this: getting old should not be scary, and should nt be treated as something to fear. Each one of us can prevent the mental and physical deterioration that is often associated with getting old by simply eating well, exercising, and surrounding ourselves with people we love This is one of the most beautiful and positive books I've ever read. Anybody and everybody should read it - I think there is something in it that will appeal to each person on this planet.

The theme of the book comes down to this: getting old should not be scary, and should nt be treated as something to fear. Each one of us can prevent the mental and physical deterioration that is often associated with getting old by simply eating well, exercising, and surrounding ourselves with people we love and who love us back.

Robbins examines four cultures who are known for their longevity: the Abkhasians, the Vilcabambans, the people of the Hunza region, and the Okinawans, and then spends the rest of the book laying out exactly what we can do to extend our own longevity AS LONG AS we are healthy in doing so. Who wants to live to be 100, but become a vegetable or suffer from any number of diseases associated with advanced age? The point is not to extend one's life - it's to extend one's health.

Read this book TODAY! It will change your life. Honestly. ...more
5

Aug 28, 2012

The son of Baskin-Robins, wrote a book on health. Yeah, he exposes the dangers of unhealthy eating, and lifestyles. A great read and motivator.

Publisher's Summary
Why do some people age in failing health and sadness, while others grow old with vitality and joy? In this revolutionary audiobook, best-selling author John Robbins presents us with a bold new paradigm of aging, showing us how we can increase not only our lifespan but also our health span.
Through the example of four very different The son of Baskin-Robins, wrote a book on health. Yeah, he exposes the dangers of unhealthy eating, and lifestyles. A great read and motivator.

Publisher's Summary
Why do some people age in failing health and sadness, while others grow old with vitality and joy? In this revolutionary audiobook, best-selling author John Robbins presents us with a bold new paradigm of aging, showing us how we can increase not only our lifespan but also our health span.
Through the example of four very different cultures that have the distinction of producing some of the world's healthiest, oldest people, Robbins reveals the secrets for living an extended and fulfilling life in which our later years become a period of wisdom, vitality, and happiness. Bringing the traditions of these cultures together with the latest breakthroughs in medical science, Robbins reveals that, remarkably, they both point in the same direction. ...more
5

Sep 20, 2008

I fully understand that putting this one out there officially qualifies me as OLD, but this book was fascinating and illuminating, throwing the paradigm of old = lame right out the window. I picked it up at my parents house, thumbed through it and couldn't put it down. Christina, this was the book we talked about at dinner. Worth a read!
0

Aug 21, 2008

fascinating and so simple...really loved the notion that it is as much our cultural paradigm that aging is a bad thing, as anything we eat or do that affects how we age.
4

Dec 16, 2010

Really enjoyed this book. Lots of solid references in the back also. How to be healthy at 100? Eat fresh vegetables, sing and dance, and generally be positive. :)
4

Apr 28, 2017

I think everyone should read this book to learn more about the aging process and how the quality of life as you age is completely in your own hands.
5

Dec 01, 2014

I would change the title. It is not a book about how to live to be 100, but how to live well as long as you are alive. How we treat one another is just as important to health and longevity as diet and exercise. There is no fountain of youth, but we can make a difference in ourselves and our world by making wise choices. I wish everyone would read this book. John Robbins' compassionate heart shines through every page. He introduces us to societies that have known how to live well, and as a result I would change the title. It is not a book about how to live to be 100, but how to live well as long as you are alive. How we treat one another is just as important to health and longevity as diet and exercise. There is no fountain of youth, but we can make a difference in ourselves and our world by making wise choices. I wish everyone would read this book. John Robbins' compassionate heart shines through every page. He introduces us to societies that have known how to live well, and as a result have had many members live to old age without disease or senility. He doesn't recommend copying them, but rather learning from their secrets. Fascinating and eye opening book. ...more
5

Jan 07, 2017

It's unfortunate that this book won't be widely read by the young. Within it is a blueprint for how to live life fully. There is no neglecting food, exercise or love and community in the approach offered. I suppose some will criticize it as idealistic and naive but they are missing the point. Amazing book
3

Feb 01, 2008

It was especially interesting to me to learn about some little-known cultures and their simple lifestyles. Robbins can be a little wordy at times, and a tad too "New Agey" for me, but he comes from the heart, and the information is valuable.
4

Feb 24, 2009

Eye opener book for me about nutrition and health. After reading the book, I changed my diet.
4

Mar 14, 2018

The only reason this didn't get my five-star rating is because I knew most of the information due to my health coach emphasis, training, and study. Still, it is an excellent compilation, certainly as a review or for someone knew to eating healthy. Robbins takes an objective view and reports on research as well as story-telling from the people he met as he wrote this book. One chapter I enjoyed was toward the end of the book. It was on consuming epa and dha. As a plant eater, I appreciated his The only reason this didn't get my five-star rating is because I knew most of the information due to my health coach emphasis, training, and study. Still, it is an excellent compilation, certainly as a review or for someone knew to eating healthy. Robbins takes an objective view and reports on research as well as story-telling from the people he met as he wrote this book. One chapter I enjoyed was toward the end of the book. It was on consuming epa and dha. As a plant eater, I appreciated his explanation. Also, relearning about iron absorption and meat's contribution to cancer regarding iron was appreciated. ...more
4

Sep 10, 2018

What can be learned from three different societies who maintained a plant based diet, daily movement/exercise, and not giving to much thought to amassing wealth? How to live past 100. I really enjoyed reading this book because America is clearly operating a faulty system. We have allowed corporations and big pharma rule our lives just so we can make money at jobs we hate to afford stuff we don't need. Get outside, play with your kids, focus on what you shove into your mouth.
4

Sep 20, 2018

Great book if you're interested in the kinds of things that contribute to longevity. And not just longevity, but qualities of life that make life worth living that long. It did seem to go a bit lengthy in parts, which is the only reason I gave it four stars instead of five, but hey, if I'm living to 100, I have a little more time to read the lengthy parts. Definitely worth reading.
5

May 28, 2019

Curious about what is behind the success of the world's longest living peoples? This book (and the "Blue Zones" books) will work to satisfy your curiosity and may even lead you to a healthier, and longer, life. It was a quick but informative and engaging read and I feel it was time well spent.
3

Mar 02, 2018

Better than expected - though it does venerate the various groups somewhat, it's also up front about the biases of some of the researchers and how many numbers are exaggerated. The rest of the information is more of the usual, but there were still useful details.
0

Jul 27, 2019

An interesting read that will make you seriously rethink your current eating habits.
5

May 25, 2017

Loved this book. Proof that we can live great lives, healthy lives, for many many years.
3

Feb 03, 2018

Definitely some good stuff here, but overly long and quite repetitive.

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