Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods: 20 Chilling Tales from the Wilderness Info

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Meet the snoligoster, who feeds on the shadows of its
victims. The whirling whimpus, who once laid low an entire Boy Scout
troop. And the hoop snake, who can chase prey at speeds of up to 60
miles per hour and then, with one sting of its venomous tail, cause it
to turn purple, swell up, and—alas—die.

These
and 17 other fearsome creatures are among the most fantastical beasts in
American folklore. Their stories, as narrated by one of the last
surviving cryptozoologists, are best enjoyed while sitting around a
campfire. If you dare.

 

Average Ratings and Reviews
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4.09

313 Ratings

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Reviews for Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods: 20 Chilling Tales from the Wilderness:

5

Nov 28, 2016

". . . if you eat human flesh in Canada, you become a wendigo, an accursed monster, while if you eat human flesh in Paris, you become President of France, if I understand their electoral process correctly."

If that line makes you giggle as I do, read this book.

The original Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods was a 1910 book with awesome tall tale critters and some really uncomfortable racism. This version leaves out the racism and makes the improbable creatures of old lumberjacks inside a ". . . if you eat human flesh in Canada, you become a wendigo, an accursed monster, while if you eat human flesh in Paris, you become President of France, if I understand their electoral process correctly."

If that line makes you giggle as I do, read this book.

The original Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods was a 1910 book with awesome tall tale critters and some really uncomfortable racism. This version leaves out the racism and makes the improbable creatures of old lumberjacks inside a humorous and sinister world. Seriously, it's what a time traveler for a thousand years in the future would think the time period is like, and I love. We are in the realm of the darkly & joyously ridiculous.

I laughed out loud enough in a public bathroom that the guy at the sink sounded disturbed. I got shivers from the build-up and execution of the ridiculous phrase, "No longer do I hunt squonk." I dearly loved every progressively more ludicrous time Johnson mentions the French.

I don't understand how a book can make a bizarre Teddy Roosevelt joke and then on the next page have a serious Cthulhu Mythos reference and yet still not feel like mood whiplash. Bravo.

And the glow-in-the-dark stuff? Eh. I'm a huge glow-in-the-dark fan, constantly in conflict with my wife over how much of the stuff I want in the bedroom. I dream of having a study painted in glow-in-the-dark paint. The way it's used in this book didn't thrill me, although it didn't take away anything either.

It's like Mark Twain and Edward Gorey had a long drinking session on a train. Brilliant. ...more
4

Dec 28, 2019

The scariest things always dwell underneath...
Leaving nothing behind but a hole in the snow and a few drops of blood.

This book reminded me a lot of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and Tales of the Peculiar. It was creepy and slightly weird and also read like a field guide. It's said to be for fans of Scary Stories: Scary tales to tell in the dark, 9 horror short stories for kids and for all ages but some stories were very gruesome and honestly very scary. I'd definitely only let older The scariest things always dwell underneath...
Leaving nothing behind but a hole in the snow and a few drops of blood.

This book reminded me a lot of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and Tales of the Peculiar. It was creepy and slightly weird and also read like a field guide. It's said to be for fans of Scary Stories: Scary tales to tell in the dark, 9 horror short stories for kids and for all ages but some stories were very gruesome and honestly very scary. I'd definitely only let older kids read it.

I still enjoyed it very much. It was funny at times and very creative.
...more
4

Oct 15, 2015

I'm sure you've heard of lions, tigers, bears, wolves, moose, and wild boars. But have you heard of wapaloosies? Snoligosters? Toteroad Shagamaws? Well, dear reader, it's time you learned about the rarer and more dangerous creatures that inhabit our country. Luckily a famed cryptozoologist (a scientist who studies animals like Bigfoot and chupacabras, among others) has written this book to educate you on the dangers that await you in the less inhabited "lumberwoods" of North America. You'll hear I'm sure you've heard of lions, tigers, bears, wolves, moose, and wild boars. But have you heard of wapaloosies? Snoligosters? Toteroad Shagamaws? Well, dear reader, it's time you learned about the rarer and more dangerous creatures that inhabit our country. Luckily a famed cryptozoologist (a scientist who studies animals like Bigfoot and chupacabras, among others) has written this book to educate you on the dangers that await you in the less inhabited "lumberwoods" of North America. You'll hear about animals which regularly explode from the heat of the sun, creatures with legs ten feet long but no knees, and a snake which bites its own tale in order to roll like a wheel at 60 miles per hour. Some of these creatures will give you nightmares at the very sight of them but others appear to be adorable until you find out their horrible secret. Protect yourself by learning as much as you can about these animals...before it's too late.

I almost hate how much I enjoyed this book. Its humor is so dry but also ridiculous that I just kept groaning at the bonkers jokes it sneaks in there. There is a joke about Gavrilo Princip! Seriously! Some of it will probably go over kids' heads, but I grudgingly admire it all the same. Oh, did I mention that several of the pages (and the cover) have glow-in-the-dark portions?

I would recommend this book to grades 4-8, especially fans of stories that are both scary and funny, those who like the ridiculous, and anyone who loves monsters. I think this would also be a great starting point for a creative writing project. ...more
5

Dec 04, 2015

"When the first terrashot exploded, Mr. Thompson-Chang, who was trying to ride the fool thing, was turned to dust more or less. Miss Grundy was far enough away from the blast that she only suffered a ruptured eardrum, but she was, tragically, downwind, which meant she inhaled a vast quantity of terrashot spores (as well as, presumably, much of the remaining mass of her late boyfriend)."

There's a kid you know who is going to get a huge kick out of this bestiary.

All my picks for best books to give "When the first terrashot exploded, Mr. Thompson-Chang, who was trying to ride the fool thing, was turned to dust more or less. Miss Grundy was far enough away from the blast that she only suffered a ruptured eardrum, but she was, tragically, downwind, which meant she inhaled a vast quantity of terrashot spores (as well as, presumably, much of the remaining mass of her late boyfriend)."

There's a kid you know who is going to get a huge kick out of this bestiary.

All my picks for best books to give this holiday are at http://www.unadulterated.us/pink-me/2...
...more
3

Sep 08, 2018

What did I just read?! This wins the prize for most bizarre book. Parts were so ridiculous I was laughing out loud. Others were so strange it was hard to tell that I was reading my English words.
3

Oct 22, 2017

Surprisingly ridiculous.
But I'm willing to overlook the silly stories because the book format is unique. There are some illustrations that are coated with something that can glow in the dark.

After reading this, I wonder if the author has a grudge towards Frenchmen...
4

Feb 06, 2019

The artwork is gorgeous and most of the stories are well done. It reads like a field guide. The only down side is its advertised as a book that glows in the dark but it does not. The artwork is gorgeous and most of the stories are well done. It reads like a field guide. The only down side is it’s advertised as a book that glows in the dark but it does not. ...more
0

Nov 17, 2018

Delightful!!

(And in no way just for kids.) Delightful!!

(And in no way “just for kids.”) ...more
4

Feb 18, 2016

I have a soft spot for cryptozoology, so this was a shoe-in for me.
According to the opening editor's note (and the internet, which I consulted to confirm), this is based on a book which came out in the early 20th century, written by William Cox, a man with the same name as my maternal great grandfather. Each chapter discusses a different cryptozoological creature, and I'm very uncertain as to whether they're purely from Cox's imagination, or derived from actual fable. Either way, I've never I have a soft spot for cryptozoology, so this was a shoe-in for me.
According to the opening editor's note (and the internet, which I consulted to confirm), this is based on a book which came out in the early 20th century, written by William Cox, a man with the same name as my maternal great grandfather. Each chapter discusses a different cryptozoological creature, and I'm very uncertain as to whether they're purely from Cox's imagination, or derived from actual fable. Either way, I've never heard of any of them before.

The narrative voice is particularly notable - stylized, caricatured, and pretty silly, if you pay attention. There's a bias against Frenchmen (which, I understand from other reviews, screens more offensive racism in the source-text).

The graphic design is pretty gorgeous. Each page is a little foggy, smudged, dirty-looking. Some of the text is warped and stylized. And, although the cover is a little busy for my taste, the inside is pretty darn beautiful. Oh yeah, and things GLOW IN THE DARK!!!

I definitely had a moment one night when I looked over at my bedside table, bc this cover was creepily glowing at me.

Anyway, I liked it. So did the kids. :) ...more
3

Oct 23, 2016

Perfect for kids who love R.L. Stine, this book features stories that will keep you up at night! Perfect for scaring your friends around the camp fire, this is a book that will make it's readers question just how much of these stories are real, or made up...... You definitely won't go walking in the woods at night after reading these stories. Not for the faint of heart, this book is almost as good as visiting a haunted house. There's definitely a few scary stories in this one!

Perfect for kids who love R.L. Stine, this book features stories that will keep you up at night! Perfect for scaring your friends around the camp fire, this is a book that will make it's readers question just how much of these stories are real, or made up...... You definitely won't go walking in the woods at night after reading these stories. Not for the faint of heart, this book is almost as good as visiting a haunted house. There's definitely a few scary stories in this one!

http://mundiekids.blogspot.com/2016/1... ...more
5

Jan 13, 2016

Loads of fun. Great read for tween, especially if they enjoy creepy stuff.
3

Nov 09, 2017

Strange collection of short stories about fantastical creatures who are both unusual and deadly. The narrator of the stories purports to be a cryptozoologist and describes in great detail the harrowing experiences of those who encounter the myriad beasts.

The author explains that these stories were either adapted from or borrowed from other myths, folklore, or legends from around the country and reimagined in a new way. He seems to have a particular fascination with mocking the French, but does Strange collection of short stories about fantastical creatures who are both unusual and deadly. The narrator of the stories purports to be a cryptozoologist and describes in great detail the harrowing experiences of those who encounter the myriad beasts.

The author explains that these stories were either adapted from or borrowed from other myths, folklore, or legends from around the country and reimagined in a new way. He seems to have a particular fascination with mocking the French, but does not explain why.

The black and white pen-and-ink illustrations are gruesome and often intricately detailed. They are also enhanced on many of the pages with glow-in-the-dark designs that dramatically change the image when activated.

But here's the rub. The images have to be exposed to light individually and then, subsequently, to the dark to see the images, and neither I nor the children in our local library's book club had the patience to do it again and again (there are at least eight of them).

And for some reason, the stories just did not engage the readers. The children were excited to read the stories when we first introduced thenbook. We even tested out the glow-in-the-dark designs, with each of us trying a different page.

But when we returned the next month, most were less than enthusiastic about the book. The thrill of the gimmick had faded quickly and the stories were tough to get through.

Even I had to take the tales in small bites. It took me many weeks to finish the stories covering the eighteen creatures, although I admit I would set the book aside for days at a time.

Overall. I applaud the intent of this tome and
I would love to give it more stars, but it just didn't live up to our expectations.

I admit that the cover glowed creepily in the dark and contains a message embedded within the title that I didn't notice right away. So it is quite a creepy book. Just not one that we enjoyed as much as we thought we would.

interesting quote:

"There is precedent for food to have different effects in different regions: For example, if you eat human flesh in Canada, You become a wendigo, an accursed monster; while if you eat human flesh in Paris, you become president of France, if I understand their electoral process correctly." (p. 139) ...more
5

Mar 07, 2019

A hilarious compendium of various North American legendary beasts narrated by an unnamed, yet long-lived cryptozoologist whos clearly gone quite mad and hates Frenchmen for some reason. The creatures contained herein are as absurd as they are fearsome, and I really cant recommend this book enough. A hilarious compendium of various North American legendary beasts narrated by an unnamed, yet long-lived cryptozoologist who’s clearly gone quite mad and hates Frenchmen for some reason. The creatures contained herein are as absurd as they are fearsome, and I really can’t recommend this book enough. ...more
5

Apr 01, 2018

A rare interactive treat. All three of my kids gathered around to hear me read and each have taken it in turn to read themselves. The best part is the integration of the glow paint and the way of changes the page it is on. We all would rush to a closet to get the full experience in full dark laughing and gasping as we did. Just wonderful.
1

Jan 31, 2018

I am disappointed with this book. This did not include 20 "Chilling" takes from the wilderness. All the stories were so tongue-in-cheek that there was nothing really frightening about them. The Wapaloosie's revenge description was also kind of in poor taste.

The blurb at the top was if you liked Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, that you would like this book. That is an incorrect statement. Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark was scary. It doubled down on the creep factor with Gammell's I am disappointed with this book. This did not include 20 "Chilling" takes from the wilderness. All the stories were so tongue-in-cheek that there was nothing really frightening about them. The Wapaloosie's revenge description was also kind of in poor taste.

The blurb at the top was if you liked Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, that you would like this book. That is an incorrect statement. Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark was scary. It doubled down on the creep factor with Gammell's illustrations. Fearsome Creatures is a saccharine mess in comparison.

I wanted more from a book about cryptids. They're supposed to be spooky and scary. They ARE the things that go bump in the night.

If this book is even remotely interesting to you, I would suggest skimming through it first. Maybe you will like the humor but if you don't, save yourself the trouble.

...more
0

Nov 07, 2017

The stories are pretty well written if you like tall tales. The illustrations are first rate, and the glow in the dark pictures, while difficult to get to work, are a nice touch. All in all, it's a solid little book.
4

Mar 21, 2020

The best description of monsters I've ever seen, but heads up some are scarer then others.
5

Jul 08, 2015

I received a digital copy of this title from the publisher via Netgalley.

Ten Second Synopsis:
Reader, find in this tome the true-life stories of fantastical beasts that roam the North American landscape. From the Gumberoo to the Hodag, and the Snoligoster to the Timberdoodle (although this one only gets a passing mention), everyones favourite obscure mythical beasts are given their terrifying due in this not-to-be-missed instructional guide.

This book possesses disarmingly hilarious turns of I received a digital copy of this title from the publisher via Netgalley.

Ten Second Synopsis:
Reader, find in this tome the true-life stories of fantastical beasts that roam the North American landscape. From the Gumberoo to the Hodag, and the Snoligoster to the Timberdoodle (although this one only gets a passing mention), everyone’s favourite obscure mythical beasts are given their terrifying due in this not-to-be-missed instructional guide.

This book possesses disarmingly hilarious turns of phrase, dry humour that creeps up and forces a chuckle and a running joke about the French that will have you giggling unexpectedly and furrowing your brow by turns in equal measure. This illustrated collection of tall tales is like Monty Python for nine-year-olds.

The book is beautifully presented (although I did have MAJOR issues reading this on both Adobe Digital Editions and Bluefire Reader – perhaps due to the large file size) and deserves to be read in print. The individual stories are short enough to dip into before bedtime but long enough to leave a lasting imprint on the individual’s psyche.

I’m certain the image of one hunter, returning to civilisation “brokenhearted, with only a timberdoodle in his sack” will be one I cherish for some time to come. Same goes for the killing technique of the deadly Snoligoster, the effect of which, according to the author, is “quite delightful to watch, but also tragic and disgusting”.

I heartily recommend this new imagining of an old work to intrepid, confident young readers in about grades 4 to 7, and to adults with a sense of humour of around the same age.
...more
5

Jun 06, 2016

I picked this book up at wizard world in philly and I'm very glad I did! I was pulled in because it reminded me of the Scary Story compilations I read as a kid and the artwork was so unique and creepy. I was even more happy with it as I started to read it. The stories aren't just scary, they're darkly funny and even though a lot of the jokes will go over my kids heads, I certainly appreciate it. I tried reading a few stories to my youngest (5) but then quickly realized it was just a tad too dark I picked this book up at wizard world in philly and I'm very glad I did! I was pulled in because it reminded me of the Scary Story compilations I read as a kid and the artwork was so unique and creepy. I was even more happy with it as I started to read it. The stories aren't just scary, they're darkly funny and even though a lot of the jokes will go over my kids heads, I certainly appreciate it. I tried reading a few stories to my youngest (5) but then quickly realized it was just a tad too dark and sorta skated over the more gruesome aspects. He loves the glow in the dark drawings though and he's fascinated by the names of the monsters, likes saying them over and over. And when he's old enough, it'll certainly be a great addition to his library! Until then, I'll be enjoying it. :) ...more
4

Jan 02, 2017

Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods was an delightfully eerie little book that was funny. I laughed out loud several times reading this book - two or three times per entry, even. The humour is dark. Very dark. The creatures are wonderfully imaginative. The illustrations are creepy but endearing. What's not to love about this book?

My only concern is that this book is shelved in the "Early Readers" (ages 6-8) and this is likely beyond them. It's not that it will be too scary, though it very well Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods was an delightfully eerie little book that was funny. I laughed out loud several times reading this book - two or three times per entry, even. The humour is dark. Very dark. The creatures are wonderfully imaginative. The illustrations are creepy but endearing. What's not to love about this book?

My only concern is that this book is shelved in the "Early Readers" (ages 6-8) and this is likely beyond them. It's not that it will be too scary, though it very well might be, but rather that the language is far beyond that of your average child. I'd argue that the vocabulary is suited to a strong reader aged 11 or 12; maybe even older.

That said, it's a great way for a child to learn some new words, and some really delicious words at that.

A charming and hideously delightful collection. ...more
4

Jun 29, 2016

Hilarious and horrifying, both in amounts I'm frankly shocked by. I knew it would be both, but I didn't expect to laugh so much - and then to have the stories haunting in the back of my mind for days after I read them. The way I've been describing it to people as I read it is, "It's like if Lemony Snicket wrote Welcome To Night Vale". Some of the stories are better than others of course, but the collection as a whole begins and ends solidly either way. Very fun!
5

Jan 29, 2015

I laughed loud and hard enough while waiting at the mechanic for someone to comment that this must be a good book. While the creatures might be the most fearsome, the humans are at least as terrifying (Gavrillo Princip makes an appearance). There is good humor, and the material can talk to its target age bracket without talking down to them, which is not an easily pulled off feat. The back-matter is a very nice touch as well (death fears the hodag!).
4

Dec 13, 2015

This retelling of twenty beasts from American folklore reads like a field guide. The pen and ink illustrations are amped up with some glow-in-the dark monsters. A creepy fantastical book that would be perfect around the campfire. This will appeal to readers ages ten to 14 who like the weird and scary.
5

Jan 17, 2018

I got this book to read to my 6 year old. But I really l really like it as well. Very funny & dry & tongue-in-cheek.
5

May 05, 2016

Slightly chilling and absolutely funny, these tales tell of the strangest creatures youve never seen and hope you never encounter, including the shadow-eating Snoligoster, the noose-nosed Roperite and the cute but deadly Wapaloosie. Reviewer 23 Slightly chilling and absolutely funny, these tales tell of the strangest creatures you’ve never seen and hope you never encounter, including the shadow-eating Snoligoster, the noose-nosed Roperite and the cute but deadly Wapaloosie. Reviewer 23 ...more

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