Exploits of Sherlock Holmes Info

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From the son of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and one of America's
greatest mystery writers, John Dickson Carr, comes twelve riveting tales
based on incidents or elements of the unsolved cases of Sherlock
Holmes. The plots are all new, with painstaking attention to the mood,
tone, and detail of the original stories. Here is a fascinating volume
of mysteries for new Sherlock fans, as well as for those who have read
all the classics and crave more!

Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for Exploits of Sherlock Holmes:

2

Aug 15, 2011

I must confess that when I read this collection of short stories over 30 years ago, I missed out on one tiny little detail. These stories weren’t written by Arthur Conan Doyle they were written by his son Adrian Conan Doyle and John Dickson Carr. This was during the period where I was reading four or five novels a week. So when I read this book, I felt that it was okay, but nothing special. Before the short stories there is a section called “Always Holmes’, if I read that section, this book I must confess that when I read this collection of short stories over 30 years ago, I missed out on one tiny little detail. These stories weren’t written by Arthur Conan Doyle they were written by his son Adrian Conan Doyle and John Dickson Carr. This was during the period where I was reading four or five novels a week. So when I read this book, I felt that it was okay, but nothing special. Before the short stories there is a section called “Always Holmes’, if I read that section, this book would have never lasted as long as it did on my bookshelf. The following quote should be illuminating:
“Adrian Conan Doyle uses the very desk on which his father wrote. He is surrounded by the same objects that his father handled, and he has in every way endeavored to recreate each particle of atmosphere that formed Sir Author’s environment.”

The only thing missing is that he wasn’t a genius like his father. A lot of people can write a novel or short story. Few can make their main character such an icon that over a hundred years later many people swear that he was a live person. If you are like me and hooked on Holmes then you will want to read this book just to see how it compares with the original Holmes’ books. I am not an expert on deconstructing fiction so I can’t explain why I think this collection looks like but doesn’t quite match the original. Maybe another reader will make a comment and explain why I am or am not wrong.
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4

Jan 09, 2012

This collection of apocryphal Sherlockiana has a special status: the stories herein are the first "authorised" pastiches that came out after the demise of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The rarest of rare collection og pastiches & parodies, edited by Ellery Queen, had been ruthlessly suppressed by Adrian Conan Doyle. Perhaps to amend the situation, or more accurately, perhaps to encash upon the public demand for more Holmes stories, he had collaborated with one of the greatest writers of mystery: This collection of apocryphal Sherlockiana has a special status: the stories herein are the first "authorised" pastiches that came out after the demise of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The rarest of rare collection og pastiches & parodies, edited by Ellery Queen, had been ruthlessly suppressed by Adrian Conan Doyle. Perhaps to amend the situation, or more accurately, perhaps to encash upon the public demand for more Holmes stories, he had collaborated with one of the greatest writers of mystery: John Dickson Carr, justly famous for his locked-room mysteries, to come up with these stories. The strong points that shout in the favour of the stories are: Holmes is true to canon, Watson is authentic, the settings and the characters don't create any discord with those of the canon, and the plots are tight (if not somewhat gimmicky, which takes away some of the re-read value. The stories are:

1) The Adventure of The Seven Clocks: Why does a nobleman keeps on smashing clocks?
2) The Adventure of The Gold Hunter: Can Holmes catch a murderer on the basis of his observations of a watch?
3) The Adventure of The Wax Gamblers: Was it a mistake on the part of the old watchmen, or have the two wax statues of gamblers really started playing cards?
4) The Adventure of The Highgate Miracle: What happened to the gentleman who, after rushing back to his house to collect his umbrella, had vanished from the face of earth?
5) The Adventure of The Black Baronet: There lies a dead man, and there is the suspect at hand who has some motive, but where is the knife that had killed the man?
6) The Adventure of The Sealed Room: Doors closed, windows closed, no intruder apparent, two shots fired accounting for the only two persons present in the room; but why is Holmes sure that this is cold-blooded murder and not just suicide?
7) The Adventure of The Foulkes Rath: The person who had qaurreled with the murdered person is found dazed near the body, holding the murder weapon, sleeves soaked in blood; but why is Holmes looking elsewhere for the murderer?
8) The Adventure of The Abbas Ruby: Who stole the ruby, or more importantly, who had got rid of the Camelias first?
9) The Adventure of The Dark Angels: When death sends its messenger, can Holmes save the doomed man?
10) The Adventure of The Two Women: Holmes & Watson risk all their honour & respectability to destroy the web of blackmail spun by a mastermind, but do they succeed?
11) The Adventure of The Deptford Horror: For years the members of the Wilson family are succumbing to heart conditions, then why does Holmes suspect diabolical shrewdness behind these deaths, and what can he do to save the girl who is now living in the shadow?
12) The Adventure of The Red Widow: a murder has taken place, the suspect is also not unknown, but what has the suspect done to the head of the murdered man?

The stories purloin (or should I say: draw inspiration) from some of the most well-known canonical tricks, or simply re-enginner them to suit the present needs. But many of the themes are distinctly darker and much more disturbing than anything Sir Arthur might have liked. Recommended. ...more
4

May 22, 2019

The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes by Adrian Conan Doyle and John Dickson Carr is collection of Holmesian short stories that felt incredibly authentic. I guess that makes sense with Adrian Conan Doyle on the job since he's the youngest son of Arthur Conan Doyle and everything. I loved their take on the untold adventures - you know, the ones that are only just referenced in the original stories. I would love to read more from Adrian Conan Doyle in the future.

2

Oct 30, 2011

Years ago, I read Adrian Conan Doyle's "Tales of Love and Hate" and I was appalled at the lack of talent of the son of such a gifted writer. I hoped that Dickson Carr, a wonderful mystery writer,would add the necessary talent to these Sherlockian pastiches. I was wrong. The stories are not badly written but they betray the Holmesian spirit in more than one way. Watson is minimized as a vehicle more than as a friend; Holmes' misogyny, which did not despise women but feared and respected them, in Years ago, I read Adrian Conan Doyle's "Tales of Love and Hate" and I was appalled at the lack of talent of the son of such a gifted writer. I hoped that Dickson Carr, a wonderful mystery writer,would add the necessary talent to these Sherlockian pastiches. I was wrong. The stories are not badly written but they betray the Holmesian spirit in more than one way. Watson is minimized as a vehicle more than as a friend; Holmes' misogyny, which did not despise women but feared and respected them, in this case portrays ladies as puppets of their emotions... and the whodunit side (the Agatha Christie side) is favoured against development of characters and atmospheres. There have been better pastiches and there will be. ...more
2

Sep 03, 2013

Adrian Conan Doyle has done nothing to demonstrate that he has inherited his father's intellect.
The stories are unexceptional and quite mediocre. Every single story has the following elements ever present that make reading quite monotonous:
1. Holmes observing people and thus figuring out their profession or there earlier whereabouts followed by Watson and any other person in their company giving a 'start'. Mind you it's always a start. It's never amazement or shock or fascination. It's always a Adrian Conan Doyle has done nothing to demonstrate that he has inherited his father's intellect.
The stories are unexceptional and quite mediocre. Every single story has the following elements ever present that make reading quite monotonous:
1. Holmes observing people and thus figuring out their profession or there earlier whereabouts followed by Watson and any other person in their company giving a 'start'. Mind you it's always a start. It's never amazement or shock or fascination. It's always a start. Watson unlike later in the original stories continues to assume that Holmes is making stuff up until Holmes explains to him, his chain of thought.
2. There's an irritatingly excessive use of the word 'Tut' by Holmes. I don't remember Holmes really 'Tutting' people so much in the original stories.
3. Lestrade keeps going on about Holmes being a theoretical person and he himself being a practical one in every single story he appears in.

There are many other such examples which I grow weary of and hence will not list out any further. Read the book if you simply want to read some new Sherlock Holmes stories but don't expect them to be of the same standard as the original ones or you'll be bitterly disappointed. ...more
3

Jan 11, 2012

This was probably the first anthology of Sherlock Holmes pastiches that I ever read back in the dim and murky past when dinosaurs walked the Earth in mortal terror of Doug McClure. Basil Rathbone was still my main source of Holmes with most of Conan Doyle senior's stories still not having a place on my bookshelves. So now that all those brilliant works by dear Arthur are all indelible features of my memory, perhaps it's time I revisited his son's attempts to recreate his father's style with the This was probably the first anthology of Sherlock Holmes pastiches that I ever read back in the dim and murky past when dinosaurs walked the Earth in mortal terror of Doug McClure. Basil Rathbone was still my main source of Holmes with most of Conan Doyle senior's stories still not having a place on my bookshelves. So now that all those brilliant works by dear Arthur are all indelible features of my memory, perhaps it's time I revisited his son's attempts to recreate his father's style with the help of his dad's old desk and of collaborator John Dickson Carr. Only the first two are full on collaborations with perhaps one of them, The Seven Clocks, being the best story in the collection. It's got a suitably bizarre fellow in it who goes in for some full on random clock smashing but it's the spot on atmosphere that makes the tale. The other being the rather poor The Gold Hunter. Carr's The Wax Gamblers is like one of those old school friends you bump into every five years or so, turning up in various anthologies. It has a very humorous tone and features boxing, an injured Holmes and Watson getting the butt of the jokes but saving the day anyway. Good story. Unfortunately Carr steps over the line too much in the farcical Highgate Miracle. Carr has almost no involvement in the very forgettable Black Baronet but must surely have loaned Conan Doyle some expertise to craft The Sealed Room. Carr is regarded as one of the greatest to pen the sub-genre of the locked room and one of his stories was voted the all time best by his peers. Conan Doyle's father also penned a story of the same name. What results is also quite a good story and another that pops up from time to time.
From here on in Conan Doyle junior is left to his own devices as illness took a toll on Carr. What follows are six very derivative stories, mostly dull, with many of the right elements but no finished shine. The pick of them is The Debtford Horror, deeply derivative of The Speckled Band, but quite atmospheric with a nice frisson of creepiness to accompany one of the most creative methods of bumping off unwanted family members ever seen. Though thanks to Conan Doyle senior for sewing the seed by first mentioning in Black Peter the arrest of Wilson the notorious canary-trainer. Although Wilson is not arrested in the story Conan Doyle junior lays the blame at Watson's feet calling it 'a typical Watson error.' Holmes quite uncharacteristically spouts proverbs throughout. Fun though.
What always occurs to me after reading a Sherlock Holmes anthology, and the number is legion, is that no matter how closely the writers mimic Conan Doyle senior's style, or how many Holmsian elements are included, none of them come close to performing the alchemy that Arthur Conan Doyle did. In many ways the formula to the literary alchemy of the perfect Victorian Sherlock Holmes story is lost to time because no one has first hand experience of the Victorian era nor the acquaintance of the men the great detective was based upon. ...more
4

Dec 20, 2015

These stories are very authentic in tone and plot, and the characters remain as Doyle created them. I did find it jarring to revisit that world and that style, and as good as they are, I wasn't ready for a journey that far into the past and didn't finish the book. I recommend it for true blue fans.
3

Dec 18, 2016

2.5 Stars
This book is an imitation game. It's written like Sir Doyle's work,but without much of the original's magic. There are some stories which came close to great but is overshadowed by the rest of short stories which are either derivative or poorly executed.

Rather than exploits of sherlock holmes, some stories felt like exploiting of Sherlock Holmes !

Personal Favorite: Adventure of highgate miracle and Adventure of sealed Room
4

Apr 18, 2011

Really based more on the fame of his fathers original stories than on the stories themselves, this collection of twelve new Sherlock Holmes stories featuring a deer-stalker wearing, pipe smoking, and "Elementary" saying Holmes were fun to read.

Each of these new Holmes adventures was based on a one sentence reference to an unwritten case found within Arthur Conan Doyle's Original Holmes stories.

I have to say that Adrian has done a wonderful job of keeping with the voice, Style, and Deductive Really based more on the fame of his fathers original stories than on the stories themselves, this collection of twelve new Sherlock Holmes stories featuring a deer-stalker wearing, pipe smoking, and "Elementary" saying Holmes were fun to read.

Each of these new Holmes adventures was based on a one sentence reference to an unwritten case found within Arthur Conan Doyle's Original Holmes stories.

I have to say that Adrian has done a wonderful job of keeping with the voice, Style, and Deductive reasoning of his father's creative writtings.

A must read for anyone who has devoured the Holmes Canon and still longs for more.
...more
4

Jun 05, 2015

Virtually identical in tone, atmosphere, and character to the original canon. The inclusion of three or four copycat stories (the plots were derived so heavily from canon that they are more or less identical, as in my notes) detract somewhat from an otherwise charming book.
3

May 16, 2013

Adrian Conan Doyle might have been milking his father's legacy for an extra buck, but these non-canonical mysteries are still solid and entertaining. The collection is true to the tone of the original stories, without inappropriate additions or incongruous actions by any of the characters. Good bedtime reading.
4

Feb 09, 2014

Adrian Conan Doyle tries to live up to the expectations created because of his father and I feel that he has done a good job.

My only complaint is that in all the stories he tries to stick with his father's style as much as possible which kind of looks redundant after some time. It would had been nice if he tried to add his own style into it, instead of just trying to imitate his father's style.

Inspite of all of this I still enjoyed the book, since I could never get enough of Sherlock Holmes ;)
3

Mar 14, 2012

The edition I have only contains the stories by Adrian Conan Doyle. They range from squibs in which Holmes seems to breeze in and solve a case in a day or so to more ambitious and exciting stories. The plots are all siblings or close cousins to various canonical stories, but manage to convey the atmosphere of the Baker Street world quite well. While not half the writer his father was, Adrian Doyle is at least not at abysmal a writer as Brian Herbert, another writer who has drawn from the well of The edition I have only contains the stories by Adrian Conan Doyle. They range from squibs in which Holmes seems to breeze in and solve a case in a day or so to more ambitious and exciting stories. The plots are all siblings or close cousins to various canonical stories, but manage to convey the atmosphere of the Baker Street world quite well. While not half the writer his father was, Adrian Doyle is at least not at abysmal a writer as Brian Herbert, another writer who has drawn from the well of a notable father's inspiration time and again. ...more
4

Dec 08, 2014

It is interesting that the Goodreads rating for this is higher than most of the original works. It wonder if it is due to the nostalgia of reliving the joys of reading works of the master.

The writing recaptures the original atmosphere, and the language is very close to Arthur Conan Doyle's. For that, it was a delight reading this collection. The quality of the mysteries, however, fell a little short. I found them shallower than the originals.

Regardless, this is volume worth reading and even It is interesting that the Goodreads rating for this is higher than most of the original works. It wonder if it is due to the nostalgia of reliving the joys of reading works of the master.

The writing recaptures the original atmosphere, and the language is very close to Arthur Conan Doyle's. For that, it was a delight reading this collection. The quality of the mysteries, however, fell a little short. I found them shallower than the originals.

Regardless, this is volume worth reading and even preserving. Unfortunately it doesn't seem to be available (Amazon says it costs Rs 9500 to import!). I was lucky to have borrowed it. I had read it many years back, but had completely forgotten it. I had a great time re-reading it. ...more
4

Jan 08, 2011

If you like the original Sherlock Homes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, then these are a great extension of those stories, written by his son, Adrian Conan Doyle. The style and substance are so similar that it is really hard to tell that they aren't of the original batch. The most fun part about it is that these stories are the ones referenced to in the original stories, but never told--those teaser announcements by Watson where he casually mentioned some other case they had been on--these are If you like the original Sherlock Homes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, then these are a great extension of those stories, written by his son, Adrian Conan Doyle. The style and substance are so similar that it is really hard to tell that they aren't of the original batch. The most fun part about it is that these stories are the ones referenced to in the original stories, but never told--those teaser announcements by Watson where he casually mentioned some other case they had been on--these are those in-between cases. The reference to where the original story concept comes from is notated at the end of each story, and it is interesting to see how the tale was developed from just a simple phrase or sentence. ...more
2

Jan 12, 2016

In some ways this reads like fan-fiction, in that it tries too hard to recall the original stories. At times this is almost direct quoting of the text ("I thought for the moment that you had done something clever"), at others mimicry ("I would draw your attention to the fireplace chair" - "But there is no fireplace chair" - "That is why I draw your attention to it") All this means it does not feel original
The stories themselves are familliar to Doyle's original fans. For example, 'The Deptford In some ways this reads like fan-fiction, in that it tries too hard to recall the original stories. At times this is almost direct quoting of the text ("I thought for the moment that you had done something clever"), at others mimicry ("I would draw your attention to the fireplace chair" - "But there is no fireplace chair" - "That is why I draw your attention to it") All this means it does not feel original
The stories themselves are familliar to Doyle's original fans. For example, 'The Deptford Horror' is 'The Speckled Band' and the introduction to 'The Red Widow' echoes the start of 'The Cardboard Box'. Perhaps most disappointing though is 'Dark Angels' where Holmes reads the solution to the mystery almost entirely from a book on secret societies.
There are also inconsistences within the stories. In one Watson begins by saying "This is a most curious affair", prior to reading the details to Holmes and concluding with "I have seldom read a case in which the culprit is more clearly defined" ...more
3

Jun 10, 2019

I didn't notice that this wasn't written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. But that'd explain a lot of things. This book is pretty mediocre and there is not much brilliance in it. I might re-read it but only in far future when I've re-read all the other Sherlock Holmes books.
3

Oct 24, 2017

The apple not only fell far from the tree, but it rolled down the hill and pretty much out of sight. While Adrian, Arthur's son, perfectly captures the period--the hansom cabs, the dottles of tobacco in the numerous pipes, the reliable wonderment of Dr. Watson, and the cool, analytical intellect of Sherlock Holmes, the exciting climaxes of Holmes's deductions kind of left me with an "oh, I guess I sort of get it" feeling rather than the "amazing! How did he do it?" feeling that I have always The apple not only fell far from the tree, but it rolled down the hill and pretty much out of sight. While Adrian, Arthur's son, perfectly captures the period--the hansom cabs, the dottles of tobacco in the numerous pipes, the reliable wonderment of Dr. Watson, and the cool, analytical intellect of Sherlock Holmes, the exciting climaxes of Holmes's deductions kind of left me with an "oh, I guess I sort of get it" feeling rather than the "amazing! How did he do it?" feeling that I have always gotten from reading Arthur's original stories. When the curtain is pulled away, Oz is a tiny logician desperately putting clues (or clews) together to see if he can get them to stand up under scrutiny. For me, most of them didn't. ...more
4

Jun 01, 2018

This is a series of 12 short stories written by Adrian Doyle (Sir Arthur's son) and published in the 1950s. He had help from successful mystery author John Dickson Carr in the writing, and each story is fairly well crafted in terms of a mystery.

Overall they are pretty good. At their best, these stories are almost like lost Doyle stories rather than something written by his son. Overall, they are better than the final Sherlock Holmes tales Doyle wrote, and I'd be fine with them being added to the This is a series of 12 short stories written by Adrian Doyle (Sir Arthur's son) and published in the 1950s. He had help from successful mystery author John Dickson Carr in the writing, and each story is fairly well crafted in terms of a mystery.

Overall they are pretty good. At their best, these stories are almost like lost Doyle stories rather than something written by his son. Overall, they are better than the final Sherlock Holmes tales Doyle wrote, and I'd be fine with them being added to the canon.

Each tale takes a case mentioned in an established Holmes case but never described, and tells the story behind that mention. Sometimes the connection is tenuous, but overall they are a reasonable and intriguing handling of the missing cases. At the end of each case is a small quote from a Holmes tale describing the missing case.

Adrian doesn't have quite the gift of characterization that his father had, and at times he doesn't quite get Holmes or Watson right. Sherlock Holmes in these stories is somewhat less weighty and profound a character, and Watson's wife is a lot less understanding.

And, there are bits that make the stories seem much more informed by Sherlock Holmes movies than the books: the deerstalker cap never mentioned in the books is repeatedly referred to. Holmes actually says "the game is afoot" at one point, famous in the movies; only used once in the books and not with that exact wording.

Overall they are pretty solid tales though, and any Holmes aficionado really ought to read them. ...more
4

Mar 11, 2018

'The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes' is the earliest Holmes pastiche written jointly by Adrian Conan Doyle (the youngest son of Arthur Conan Doyle) and John Dickson Carr, a celebrated mystery writer. The first 6 stories are written by Adrian and the other 6 by Carr. All the stories expand upon passing references of certain cases (without any specified plot) mentioned by Doyle senior in his Sherlock short stories and novels (These references are mentioned with each story). The stories written by 'The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes' is the earliest Holmes pastiche written jointly by Adrian Conan Doyle (the youngest son of Arthur Conan Doyle) and John Dickson Carr, a celebrated mystery writer. The first 6 stories are written by Adrian and the other 6 by Carr. All the stories expand upon passing references of certain cases (without any specified plot) mentioned by Doyle senior in his Sherlock short stories and novels (These references are mentioned with each story). The stories written by Doyle junior have more resemblance to the actual Holmes stories. Notable among them are 'The Adventure of the Highgate Miracle' and 'The Adventure of the Sealed Room'. Carr's stories have a slightly different style, but owing to the author's prowess, manages to retain the spirit of the original Holmes mysteries. Notable among these are 'The Adventure of the Deptford Horror' and 'The Adventure of the Red Widow'. The latter being the last story in the collection is special in another way as well. It gives a very pleasant and nostalgic closure to the Sherlock Holmes saga. ...more
3

Sep 17, 2017

The first half of the book are stories by Adrian Conan Doyle WITH John Dickson Carr. These stories I really didn't like. The deductions employed by Holmes in these stories were so ridiculous as to invoke images of pulling a white rabbit out of a hat. I wondered *why* I had ever liked Sherlock Holmes stories as they seemed so far-fetched, so manipulated, so deus ex machine. I considered quitting the book -something I rarely ever do!

But, the second half of the book contains stories written solely The first half of the book are stories by Adrian Conan Doyle WITH John Dickson Carr. These stories I really didn't like. The deductions employed by Holmes in these stories were so ridiculous as to invoke images of pulling a white rabbit out of a hat. I wondered *why* I had ever liked Sherlock Holmes stories as they seemed so far-fetched, so manipulated, so deus ex machine. I considered quitting the book -something I rarely ever do!

But, the second half of the book contains stories written solely by Adrian Conan Doyle and *these* were stories so reminiscent of the original Arthur Conan Doyle stories that I immediately felt the connection. I remembered *why* I loved the original stories, the warmth between Holmes and Watson, the connection Holmes had to others - his gentleness, his frailties, his humanity. The Holmes in the first half was a caricature, the Holmes in the second half was a beloved and well-known character.

The second half of this book is definitely worth the time! ...more
5

Feb 05, 2019

Was super impressed by the 12 short stories, based on referenced cases in the original Sherlock Holmes stories. 6 by Carr and 6 by the original author’s son. The ones by Carr were crisp and really moved well. The ones by Adrian had more the emotional feel of Watson’s storytelling and some of the eccentric and obtuse modes of killing involved that made some of the original stories so memorable. Together it was a wonderful walk through the world of Holmes and Watson- felt true to the original Was super impressed by the 12 short stories, based on referenced cases in the original Sherlock Holmes stories. 6 by Carr and 6 by the original author’s son. The ones by Carr were crisp and really moved well. The ones by Adrian had more the emotional feel of Watson’s storytelling and some of the eccentric and obtuse modes of killing involved that made some of the original stories so memorable. Together it was a wonderful walk through the world of Holmes and Watson- felt true to the original writer’s style - an economy of words, very evocative places and people, and mysteries that had their own special twist that only Holmes and Watson could bring closure too.

If you are a Holmes fan, this would be worth your read. The referenced cases are given at the end of the short story, with a quote from the book and name of the story.

...more
4

Aug 19, 2018

A very well written Holmes pastiche. The language is admirably similar to the senior Doyle and the descriptions are equally detailed and succeeds in creating the atmosphere.The quality of the stories are closer to the late originals .In other words they are not in the same bracket as the stories from first 3 Holmes compilations .
However,the atmosphere and period details are immaculate and the stories are enjoyable if not very remarkable except a couple. They do not touch the lofty standards of A very well written Holmes pastiche. The language is admirably similar to the senior Doyle and the descriptions are equally detailed and succeeds in creating the atmosphere.The quality of the stories are closer to the late originals .In other words they are not in the same bracket as the stories from first 3 Holmes compilations .
However,the atmosphere and period details are immaculate and the stories are enjoyable if not very remarkable except a couple. They do not touch the lofty standards of late Arthur but Adrian is no slouch either . ...more
4

Nov 04, 2018

The initial stories are delightfully true to the original series by Sir Arthur. They are original, with attention to small details and are most satisfying. As with the standard works, we are transported to victorian England being illuminated by the master sleuth's brilliance. The chemistry between Holmes and Watson is untouched and nostalgia warms the reader back to his first childhood 'Sherlock' reading pleasures.
5

Oct 25, 2018

Excellent collection of short mysteries written by John Dickson Carr in collaboration with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s youngest son. Taking references to cases from Sir Doyle’s original canon of stories, Carr and Doyle are creative and true to the style of the original stories. Of interest to Holmes fans but also just those who enjoy mystery short stories.

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