Epidemiology, 4th Edition Info

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This popular book is written by the award-winning teacher, Dr.
Leon Gordis of the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins
University. He introduces the basic principles and concepts of
epidemiology in clear, concise writing and his inimitable style. This
book provides an understanding of the key concepts in the following 3
fully updated sections: Section I: The Epidemiologic Approach to Disease
and Intervention; Section II: Using Epidemiology to Identify the Causes
of Disease; Section III: Applying Epidemiology to Evaluation and
Policy. Clear, practical graphs and charts, cartoons, and review
questions with answers reinforce the text and aid in
comprehension.
  • Utilizes new full-color format to enhance
    readability and clarity.
  • Provides new and updated figures,
    references and concept examples to keep you absolutely current - new
    information has been added on Registration of Clinical Trials,
    Case-Cohort Design, Case-Crossover Design, and Sources and Impact of
    Uncertainty ( disease topics include: Obesity, Asthma, Thyroid Cancer,
    Helicobacter Pylori and gastric/duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer,
    Mammography for women in their forties) – expanded topics include
    Person-time.
  • Includes STUDENT CONSULT access, allowing you to: o
    Access the complete contents of the book online, anywhere you
    go…perform quick searches…and add your own notes and bookmarks. o Test
    yourself with the additional TEST BANK including 200 MCQs, plus complete
    rationales for all self-assessment Q and A in the print book. o
    Reference all other STUDENT CONSULT titles you own online, too―all in
    one place!
  • Introduces both the underlying concepts as
    well as the practical uses of epidemiology in public health and in
    clinical practice.
  • Systemizes learning and review with study
    questions in each section and an answer key and index.
  • Illustrates textual information with clear and informative
    full-color illustrations, many created by the author and tested in the
    classroom.

Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for Epidemiology, 4th Edition:

4

Mar 13, 2007

Okay, it's a textbook. But I still bawled my eyes out believe it or not.
5

Sep 20, 2008

When I was studying for the CPH exam I went back and re-read Gordis. Epidemiology is a very short book, packed with information, and I remember finding it frustrating to read when I took my Intro to Epi class in grad school. I would spend upwards of 20 minutes pouring over a single page and feel like I still didn't grasp the concepts.

But now, with that excellent intro course behind me and other perspective gained, I find this book an excellent resource and a great way to review many of the most When I was studying for the CPH exam I went back and re-read Gordis. Epidemiology is a very short book, packed with information, and I remember finding it frustrating to read when I took my Intro to Epi class in grad school. I would spend upwards of 20 minutes pouring over a single page and feel like I still didn't grasp the concepts.

But now, with that excellent intro course behind me and other perspective gained, I find this book an excellent resource and a great way to review many of the most important concepts in public health. I imagine I will turn to this book for years to come and will probably always appreciate the brevity and clarity of the explanations (now that I understand what the heck he's talking about). ...more
2

Sep 12, 2007

It's hard to review a textbook, because barring any extraordinary flaws, it is what it is: a textbook. That said, epidemiology as a subject is a little dry.

A lot of science reminds me of those people who insist on labeling anyone they come across. It's more than just an obsession with categorizing people; it's the disturbing belief that those categories really mean something. How important is it, really, to make sure everything has the proper name? Shouldn't the big ideas be more important than It's hard to review a textbook, because barring any extraordinary flaws, it is what it is: a textbook. That said, epidemiology as a subject is a little dry.

A lot of science reminds me of those people who insist on labeling anyone they come across. It's more than just an obsession with categorizing people; it's the disturbing belief that those categories really mean something. How important is it, really, to make sure everything has the proper name? Shouldn't the big ideas be more important than what they're called?

In more specific terms, the book seems to accomplish all that it sets out to do. It sets out, in relatively clear terms, the various ways in which we can study disease along with the advantages and disadvantages of each. It's far from a compelling read, but it is interesting. As a topic, epidemiology is actually a lot harder to get away from than you might expect; how long can a news report go without talking about some new study linking coffee consumption and libido, or what have you? And that's what this book is all about -- not coffee or my raging libido, but the ways that science tries to make connections between our environment and our bodies. With a little epidemiologic knowledge under one's belt, the tenuousness of those connections becomes a little more apparent, but conversely, one's appreciation for the validity of medical research grows. ...more
4

May 22, 2009

Gordis provides a clear, basic introduction to the methods of epidemiology. He does a particularly good job of explaining how various techniques of quantifying the distribution and determinants of disease should be used and how they can be misused. It is definitely a textbook and isn't exactly entertaining, but surprisingly I found it to be fairly engaging reading. Of course this may be because I am fascinated by research methods in general and epidemiological ones in particular.
4

Jan 21, 2012

This is a textbook, so most of you will most likely not want to read it. For those who may have to for a class, however, prepare to be surprised by the clear tone, understandable examples and overall readable text. I wouldn't have been able to survive epi without it!
5

Oct 12, 2012

The basic book on epidemiology to more than one school, currently in the fourth edition, sadly I just have the third.

Amazing book, very clear and easy to understand language, hundreds of real life examples and aplications.

I have read it maybe two times, and currently in the third reading.
4

Feb 03, 2013

Forced to read for class, but gives a pretty clear picture of basic epidemiology.
0

May 08, 2016

Excellent book easy to understand, with lots of practical examples from a developed nations point of view, however some of them were not practical for developing countries. Overall great book
4

Aug 11, 2016

I have the fourth edition and it was a great companion to the other books I used throughout my studies. It is slightly more of a technical view of the basics behind the field of study.
5

Feb 20, 2016

The book was concise and to the point . It covered the basics clearly and has plenty of examples and graphic displays to reinforce the information. Also at the end of each chapter there are exercises with a key at the end of the book.
3

Mar 31, 2009

It took all term, but we read the whole darn thing. I like Epi as a subject and this was one of the better epi books (dense-wise). The questions at the back of each chapter are a great learning tool and definitely helped with understanding the material.
5

Jul 26, 2014

"We owe all the great advances in knowledge to those who endeavor to find out how much there is of anything."

~James Maxwell

"I keep six honest serving men,
(they taught me all I knew).

Their names are what, why, and when
and how and where and who."

~Rudyard Kipling
0

Oct 03, 2012

I skimmed a library copy of this book to get a sense of epidemiological terminology, concepts, etc. It was easy to consume and key concepts in the field seemed highlighted and summarized well. Lots of color graphics, highlighted key terms, etc., like a good introductory text. It's the only epi text I've reviewed, so I don't know how it compares to others, but I might pick up a desk copy for myself, just for reference.
4

Nov 19, 2011

As I'm sure is the experience for most people reading textbooks, I did not read every single page of this book. I did read most of it though. I think the authors did a great job with this textbook, namely be providing a lot of easily understood examples. The one area where I think they could have done better would be putting the relevant tables and graphs closer to the text that discusses those features. It is annoying to be reading and need to turn the page back and forth to see what the text As I'm sure is the experience for most people reading textbooks, I did not read every single page of this book. I did read most of it though. I think the authors did a great job with this textbook, namely be providing a lot of easily understood examples. The one area where I think they could have done better would be putting the relevant tables and graphs closer to the text that discusses those features. It is annoying to be reading and need to turn the page back and forth to see what the text is talking about. Not all of the examples did this, but enough that I was annoyed. ...more
5

Jul 10, 2018

Good examples used throughout the book. Kinda makes me wish I’d gone into public health.
5

Apr 19, 2018

I used this book for my Epidemiology class. Its clear and interesting for my students.
4

Jul 08, 2018

Very easy to understand for the basic learner, for the clinician it is made for an easy understanding. The review in this book is superb and makes epidemiology easy to digest for those who usually can't stand the subject. Awesome book... I'm glad that I came across this title many years ago.
4

Nov 30, 2017

Prior to reading this text, I'd taken 12 credit hours of course work in Epidemiology. This text gave me deeper insight into concepts I was familiar with, but did not explain them in an inaccessible manner. The online companion website is very helpful.
5

Jan 06, 2017

Great primer. Easy to understand for peeps with stat background who want to see its application in clinical health and public policy. Did the questions at the end of each chapter to make sure I understood important concepts! You should too!
3

Aug 13, 2018

A clear precise book that really explains the different basic topics that make up the subject of epidemiology.

My only complaint is that the graphs and the information depicting the graphs were on different pages, so it was sometimes difficult to navigate through the textbook and find which graph the reading was referring to.
3

May 15, 2018

I had to read most of this book for class. Still counts.

The text presents the information in a clear and organized way, which is nice. I was expecting something much more dry and clinical, but there are actual tidbits of humor—like funny things found on death certificates. The figures throughout the book are pretty awful, as though they were put together by someone using Microsoft Word in about 2001.
4

Oct 26, 2017

Pretty good for a textbook. Accessible information, easy to find what you need when referencing it for later. I also felt that it was a good length for a textbook, compared to some of my other monster size ones.

I didn't like the repeat graphs. Gordis will use very similar graphs on the same page to build on a concept, but sometimes it just made it more confusing.

I liked the interesting quotes and references throughout the book, even throwing in a few biblical references here and there (from Pretty good for a textbook. Accessible information, easy to find what you need when referencing it for later. I also felt that it was a good length for a textbook, compared to some of my other monster size ones.

I didn't like the repeat graphs. Gordis will use very similar graphs on the same page to build on a concept, but sometimes it just made it more confusing.

I liked the interesting quotes and references throughout the book, even throwing in a few biblical references here and there (from Ecclesiastes "There is nothing new under the sun", to Benjamin Disraeli's "I hate definitions" to John Donne's "No man is an island"). Glad to have well-read scientists out there, not only for making textbooks more interesting, but also knowing that they have a respect for the humanities.

...more

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