Encyclopedia of Cults and New Religions: Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormonism, Mind Sciences, Baha'i, Zen, Unitarianism (In Defense of the Faith) Info

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This book covers more than 50 cults and religions from A to Z.
Includes an in-depth doctrinal appendix for further study, helpful
charts, and a people/organization index. h-27

Average Ratings and Reviews
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3.71

79 Ratings

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Reviews for Encyclopedia of Cults and New Religions: Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormonism, Mind Sciences, Baha'i, Zen, Unitarianism (In Defense of the Faith):

2

Mar 12, 2011

Well, what can I say. I'm a Christian, and I believe that the teachings of Jesus Christ and the apostles is the basis of a relationship with God. In other words, is true. I also believe that God DID NOT call me to be the arbiter of who gets to believe what, I think He can handle that. In America Freedom of religion is critical. The Christians who have held office here have never tried to turn this country into a theocracy even as (most/many) of them try to live in a Christian manner.

This book Well, what can I say. I'm a Christian, and I believe that the teachings of Jesus Christ and the apostles is the basis of a relationship with God. In other words, is true. I also believe that God DID NOT call me to be the arbiter of who gets to believe what, I think He can handle that. In America Freedom of religion is critical. The Christians who have held office here have never tried to turn this country into a theocracy even as (most/many) of them try to live in a Christian manner.

This book opens with a statement that Biblical Christianity is the only true religion. I agree with this, though I don't try to ram my beliefs down the throats of others. I mean if you're Buddhist you believe it's "the correct way" right? Otherwise why would you be Buddhist? If you're Islamic I assume you believe that Islam is the true religion otherwise you wouldn't be Islamic, correct? The same is true of anyone. if you profess a religion I assume you believe it to be the correct religion. Even if your belief system proclaims that all religious systems lead to God, you believe that to be the correct belief and disagree with those of us who hold to a "single belief system". The key here as I said is that in America we are not only free to believe and practice our beliefs and to disagree with one another, we are guaranteed protection in our beliefs. So as I agree with the opening or introduction of this book, I find their definition of what is "Biblical Christianity" a bit, strained. In the book are listed churches that I disagree with and whose beliefs I find I just can't accept. Unfortunately, if I go with the books views...a couple of my own beliefs put me outside their narrow definition of Christianity.

Some here will of course find themselves in total agreement with the book and it's..."judgments" but many if not most will find the views a bit (as I said) narrow.

Bottom line, I don't believe that what the authors and editors hold to as "Christian" isn't...but in some cases they would hold that beliefs I hold would be "Unchristian". (I would go into what but I doubt many care and most would look at it and see it as a minor disagreement).

I'm reminded here of an illustration a speaker used a a "Promise Keeper's" "convention" a few years ago. I don't remember who the speaker was but he illustrated the Christian Church (as a whole) as a ship. Some Christians are on the deck of the ship enjoying the spray in their face and rejoicing, some are down in the bowels of the ship with a magnifying glass looking at the bolts and welds of the ship...and some think their group are the only ones on the ship.

A book to be read for interest and for an "overview" of some cults, sects, smaller and unusual religions. Note I said "overview". The "overviews" are very surface and should not be taken as "scholarly". I go two stars for the "interest" factor. I would use this only as an entry look at any religion..the obviously cultic and the more mainline alike. ...more
3

Sep 08, 2008

Decent but definitely dated survey and critique of about 55 cults (which Christian heresies are a part of) and new religions. The pastor would benefit having this book in his library but must make sure that additional study on each position is done, especially as it relates to Eastern Religions. Keith Ward's Concepts of God would be a helpful companion and check against creating straw men. But the book is valuable just for the history of each position.

The authors are better equipped, says me, to Decent but definitely dated survey and critique of about 55 cults (which Christian heresies are a part of) and new religions. The pastor would benefit having this book in his library but must make sure that additional study on each position is done, especially as it relates to Eastern Religions. Keith Ward's Concepts of God would be a helpful companion and check against creating straw men. But the book is valuable just for the history of each position.

The authors are better equipped, says me, to deal with Western cults and religions. They're Westerners, after all! Westerners have been notoriously sophomoric in their critiques of the Eastern religions, in their Eastern forms. There are, of course, Western versions of Eastern religions. I call this view "Weasternism." Those are easier to critique, and usually embody the thoughts we attribute to pure Eastern religions, viz., (the) Buddhism(s) and (the) Hinduism(s). Anyway, taking my caveat into account, this book is still useful to have in your library or your church's. I mean, it even critiques Sweedenborgism! You might be tempted to think that the book isn't very practical. I mean, wht the heck is Sweedenborgism? Yeah, that's what I thought too until I ran into a guy a couple of years ago who was a full on supporter of Sweedenborg ideas. Though I had to do a lot of further study, this book still gave me an adequate history of Sweedenborgism and a rough working terminology and intro to Sweedenborg ideas. Thus for the sheer amount of cults and religions this book deals with, and the command to be ready to give every man an reason for the hope within, you should cautiously add this book to your library, knowing that your opponent gets to describe his own beliefs for you, not necessarily Ankerberg and Weldon. ...more
2

Jul 04, 2011

I'm all for exploring other religions, but this had way too much of a Christian slant for it to even feel reliable.
1

Apr 16, 2013

I was expecting a resource book. This is so blatantly biased against any faith not ankerbergist or evangelical christian that it is worthless as a resource.

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