Eating in the Light of the Moon: How Women Can Transform Their Relationship with Food Through Myths, Metaphors, and Storytelling Info

Which weight loss plan works best? What are the best books on health and nutrition - What is the best free weight loss app? Discover the best Health, Fitness & Dieting books and ebooks. Check our what others have to say about Johnston PhD.,Anita A. books. Read over #reviewcount# reviews on Eating in the Light of the Moon: How Women Can Transform Their Relationship with Food Through Myths, Metaphors, and Storytelling before downloading. Read&Download Eating in the Light of the Moon: How Women Can Transform Their Relationship with Food Through Myths, Metaphors, and Storytelling by Johnston PhD.,Anita A. Online


By weaving practical insights and exercises through a rich
tapestry of multicultural myths, ancient legends, and folktales, Anita
Johnston helps the millions of women preoccupied with their weight
discover and address the issues behind their negative attitudes toward
food.

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Reviews for Eating in the Light of the Moon: How Women Can Transform Their Relationship with Food Through Myths, Metaphors, and Storytelling:

1

Jun 20, 2016

This is one of the most ridiculous books on eating disorders I have ever read. And by ridiculous I actually mean horrifying that a clinical psychologist who co-founded an eating disorder center can actually believe in the stuff she is spewing.

I am offended at her view that "recovery from disordered eating calls for a deliberate, conscious attempt to reclaim our feminine side so we can bring our masculine side back to balance. (p.15)" She consistently genders human traits and perpetuates the This is one of the most ridiculous books on eating disorders I have ever read. And by ridiculous I actually mean horrifying that a clinical psychologist who co-founded an eating disorder center can actually believe in the stuff she is spewing.

I am offended at her view that "recovery from disordered eating calls for a deliberate, conscious attempt to reclaim our feminine side so we can bring our masculine side back to balance. (p.15)" She consistently genders human traits and perpetuates the ideology that masculinity is the strong, assertive side where femininity is the weak and gentle side. Her views completely disregard men, trans and gender queer/non-comforming people who have eating disorders. While I do have to remember that the book was written in 1996 and that views on gender have changed significantly in the past twenty
years, that is the main point of her book and I am saddened and angry that professionals today would regard it with such esteem.

If this book leads someone into recovery I would not be one to scoff at that. Recovery is deserved by all and the way in which you reach it is a personal journey of self discovery. As a proponent of evidence based treatment this book does bring up a lot of concerns and challenges. I would not recommend it to anyone wishing to get a better look or understanding of eating disorders. Also someone looking for a path into recovery could be very discouraged based on her views and practices, as I mentioned it is very exclusionary of major populations of individuals.

I don't speak for the eating disordered community but in my personal experiences is treatment and connecting on a larger scale with the eating disorder community online, I have yet to meet one person who embodies what she claims is the "typical" female suffer, not say that they aren't out there though.

I feel it is important for people (especially professionals in the field) to understand the problematic nature of this book and that it could have devastating effects for someone starting their journey into recovery. ...more
5

Nov 08, 2007

I loved this book because although it was about eating disorders generally, it was mostly just about being a woman in today's world and we can access our personal power as women to enrich our own lives. It changed the way I look at myself! Very thought provoking. I would recommend it to any woman who feels like she has lost sight of who she is, regardless of her relationship with food.
5

Oct 23, 2008

It is hard for me to articulate what I feel about this book because it made such a deep impression on me. Before reading this book I felt like strong rushing waters from a broken dam, vaguely wanting to go a certain direction but not really being able to harness the energy and power bursting out all over the place. This situation, if left, would either turn destructive, or in to a stagnant lake. When I read this book it taught me how to gather my rushing waters and direct them in to a healthy It is hard for me to articulate what I feel about this book because it made such a deep impression on me. Before reading this book I felt like strong rushing waters from a broken dam, vaguely wanting to go a certain direction but not really being able to harness the energy and power bursting out all over the place. This situation, if left, would either turn destructive, or in to a stagnant lake. When I read this book it taught me how to gather my rushing waters and direct them in to a healthy channel. So I can be ever-flowing, ever-increasing, always a stronger Me. I learned how to be in control (I call it being "one" with myself).

This book gave me the courage, the hope, and the tools to begin to open my eyes and really see, and accept all of Me. A difficult journey that I will probably be continuing for many years, but Oh so worth it. I really need to buy this book. It is one that I always want to have on-hand.
...more
5

Sep 17, 2008

this is probably one of the best most life altering pieces of non-ficton i've ever read and that includes crimethinc! i know the title sounds a little touchy-feely and i was nervous about it since i don't read a lot of self-help but i don't think there is anyone, man or woman, who could read this book and not walk away a better person. i read it really slowly because it took so much time to really process each chapter. i think even if you have no issues with food/weight/body issues (and if so, this is probably one of the best most life altering pieces of non-ficton i've ever read and that includes crimethinc! i know the title sounds a little touchy-feely and i was nervous about it since i don't read a lot of self-help but i don't think there is anyone, man or woman, who could read this book and not walk away a better person. i read it really slowly because it took so much time to really process each chapter. i think even if you have no issues with food/weight/body issues (and if so, congrats) you could read this book and have new tools to deal with whatever it is that's going on in your life. i give this book 10 million stars ...more
2

Feb 06, 2015

Multiple women had recommended this book to me as an insightful guide for mending broken relationships with food. While there were certain parts of the book I found useful/powerful, I had trouble connecting to much of the advice.

The book is organized around these "myths," which she uses as metaphors for our eating disorders. I would've just skipped the myths and talked more directly about the disordered behavior. I also thought some of the chapters were a leeeettle too new age-y for me. I'm not Multiple women had recommended this book to me as an insightful guide for mending broken relationships with food. While there were certain parts of the book I found useful/powerful, I had trouble connecting to much of the advice.

The book is organized around these "myths," which she uses as metaphors for our eating disorders. I would've just skipped the myths and talked more directly about the disordered behavior. I also thought some of the chapters were a leeeettle too new age-y for me. I'm not big on dream analysis, for example. But I think the overall tone of the book (one of forgiveness and self-awareness) was important. It's also got some great feminine power/embracing your womanhood passages.

For those on the hunt for resources: The book "Intuitive Eating" spoke more accurately to my disordered eating, although at the time I wasn't ready to put into practice its suggestions. ...more
5

Sep 14, 2007

I love the use of myths and stories in this book. The author relates these to real life issues in a way that propelled me forward in my life. I highlighted so much and will reference those sections over and over again. This book made a real difference in my life.
1

May 16, 2017

This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews.

I'm going to start my review with this: If this strategy and/or book helped you in your recovery, that's great! Good for you and I'm so happy that you succeeded. That's a huge step and something to be proud of. Keep using this because it's obviously working for you.

I had some problems with it. Obviously.

I think my biggest problem is the idea that a clinician really thought that eating disorders are caused by a disconnect from their original This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews.

I'm going to start my review with this: If this strategy and/or book helped you in your recovery, that's great! Good for you and I'm so happy that you succeeded. That's a huge step and something to be proud of. Keep using this because it's obviously working for you.

I had some problems with it. Obviously.

I think my biggest problem is the idea that a clinician really thought that eating disorders are caused by a disconnect from their original feminine nature. Modern life is too masculine and it cuts women off. I find modern life pretty feminine, honestly. It's more masculine, sure, but it still has a pretty good balance. If you want the full quote, click here because someone who didn't like the book put it in there. And they point out things I likely won't.

This book only focuses on women who have eating disorders. That's it. There's no way men can get this because, well, men are the problem in the view Johnson has. She constantly talks about gender differences when, by fMRIs and other imaging software, neuroscientists have found there's no such thing as a male or a female brain. There's mostly overlap. Same with society. Most women are masculine in some ways. Most men are feminine in some ways.

She also ignores the trans community as a whole -- transsexuals, gender non-conforming, non-binary, genderfluid, etc. I'm a transman and, for a while, I had a problem with eating. This was rooted in the idea that if I didn't eat, I'd be small enough to be a dude. No breasts, no period. However, I love food too much and that utterly failed since I'd cave by lunch every single day.

This book just assumes that all women who have eating disorders are disconnected with their femininity. I would say that a lot of women who have EDs are trying to be more feminine, not less. They're not disconnected, really. Just taking the idea and completely changing it, or trying to fit into what we say a woman should be.

All of that pissed me off, but I think the thing that honestly pissed me the most off was her comments about alcoholics and people who have substance abuse disorders in general. She basically says that people who are alcoholics drink because they want to. They aren't trying to hide some sort of problem. There's no underlying cause to their drinking. That is fucking bullshit. Talk to an alcoholic, maybe. Talk with them about why they drink and you know what? You'll find something.

The thing is, with EDs and substance abuse disorders, you have to first treat the problem that they're presenting. Their starvation. Their binging and purging. Their excessive drinking. Their heroin/cocaine/meth habit. Do that first. Get them off what their using and then you can treat the underlying problem that got them to use food or drugs as a crutch.

Anita Johnson, I really feel for the people who you treat at your clinic. I really hope that you don't actually use this treatment or at least use it in conjunction with an empirically based treatment for women (since this "treatment" can only be used on women) who show an interest. ...more
5

Mar 04, 2014

Eating in the Light of the Moon: How Women Can Transform Their Relationships with Food Through Myths, Metaphors, & Storytelling is a book written by Anita Johnston, Ph.D. about disordered eating in women. This book points out that 95% of people diagnosed with eating disorders are female, and therefore focuses on women and the divine feminine qualities that she believes become imbalanced with eating disorders. Johnston uses myths, metaphors and fairy tales to explain how the problem with food Eating in the Light of the Moon: How Women Can Transform Their Relationships with Food Through Myths, Metaphors, & Storytelling is a book written by Anita Johnston, Ph.D. about disordered eating in women. This book points out that 95% of people diagnosed with eating disorders are female, and therefore focuses on women and the divine feminine qualities that she believes become imbalanced with eating disorders. Johnston uses myths, metaphors and fairy tales to explain how the problem with food is really just an illusion; food is a metaphor for a hunger inside of us that is much deeper than physical hunger. In fact, we’re so used to tuning out our bodies’ true signs of hunger that we only know when we are famished or completely stuffed. She explains how it is essential that we learn again to pay attention to the subtle signs that our body is giving us. This book is full of symbolism and is a great journey of self-discovery.

"Storytellers speak in the language of myth and metaphor," the author says. "They tell us a truth that is not literal, but symbolic. If we hear the stories with only the outer ear, they can seem absurd and untrue, but when listened to with the inner ear, they convey a truth that can be understood and absorbed on a deeply personal level. In this way, stories help us connect with our inner world, to the natural rhythms and cycles of the earth, and to the power of our intuitive wisdom." This book utilizes symbolism throughout to shed light onto the dark places of your psyche and explain that feelings are important and meant to be dealt with, not numbed out or covered over.

Johnston focuses on rediscovering the inner feminine, our intuition, and using that to shed light on our disordered eating. Through stories, the author tells of our struggles with food stemming from hidden feelings and an imbalance in our energies, our intuition has been ignored and our light has been extinguished. There is some reason that we turn to food for sustenance. Johnston explains a woman’s recovery as being a journey into a great labyrinth, where we have to wind around and around until we reach the very center of it, our core where all of our demons dwell, and then we have to face them and make the spiraling journey back out of the labyrinth into the world again. A woman must heal her relationships with her femininity, her sexuality, her body and her Self before she can conquer disordered eating.

I loved the use of metaphor in this book, it really speaks my language. What I got most out of this book was that food is a metaphor for other forms of sustenance, for a different kind of hunger, not only the physical. The most memorable part of this book for me was the metaphor about the animals that were starving and that couldn’t reach the fruit from the splendid tree because they couldn’t remember its name. They sent 3 different animals back to the lion to learn the name of the tree so they could eat of its fruit. Both the gazelle and the elephant could not make it back from the lion without tripping into a hole and forgetting the name. Finally, they sent the tortoise, whose great-great-great grandmother had told about the tree and how to remember. After getting the name from the lion, the tortoise repeated it to itself over and over again until it reached the other animals, “Ungalli. Ungalli. The name of the tree is Ungalli.” It repeated this over and over again until returning to the tree and announcing the name, and immediately the limbs of the tree extended to the ground and the animals were able to eat of the fruit. This story explains how you need to know the name of your hunger in order to recover and how you must keep it in front of you the entire time of your journey. Johnston says that it is only when your hunger is named that you can be truly fed. She explains the difference between nourishment and Nourishment with a capitol “N”. The woman who suffers from disordered eating must keep the name of her hunger in the forefront of her mind and repeat it to herself whenever she struggles with her own personal food symbolism.

This book focuses on how women who suffer from disordered eating have lost touch with their bodies and have become disconnected from their inner feminine; there is an imbalance between their masculine and feminine selves. It highlights the importance of the symbolism in our dreams and suggests using them for knowledge about our hidden fears and feelings. It also guides you, through insights and practical exercises, toward empowerment, explaining how to regain the power of your intuition and get in touch with your feelings, instead of stuffing them down or numbing them away. It focuses on feeding your “shadow sister” who wishes to be heard instead of starved or stuffed, by recognizing those parts of you that have been hidden or lost. Once you can see through the illusion that food is really the issue, you can dive deeper into your feelings and really begin to feel them again. Remember your hunger; always know what it is that you are truly hungry for, be it acceptance, love, respect, or creative expression. Keep it in front of you at all times and you will be able to give yourself the Nourishment that you TRULY desire. The name of the tree is Ungalli!! ...more
3

Jun 07, 2018

Despite its profound insights and beautiful articulation of the state of the culture and its impact on the feminine spirit, the book has far too much weight stigma for me to recommend it to others or to rate it any higher than 3 stars.

For example:

She insinuates that adherence to our internal hunger and fullness signals will inevitably lead to weight loss for those in larger bodies by claiming: “In their natural habitat, there are no fat zebras, cheetahs, or giraffes.” (pg. 156)

She also says that Despite its profound insights and beautiful articulation of the state of the culture and its impact on the feminine spirit, the book has far too much weight stigma for me to recommend it to others or to rate it any higher than 3 stars.

For example:

She insinuates that adherence to our internal hunger and fullness signals will inevitably lead to weight loss for those in larger bodies by claiming: “In their natural habitat, there are no fat zebras, cheetahs, or giraffes.” (pg. 156)

She also says that if a woman “eats when she is physically hungry and stops when she is full, she can eat what she wants and not get fat.” This is patently untrue and perpetuates diet culture’s damaging messages to women.

Additionally, the book ends with a veiled denunciation of emotional eating and a hidden promise of weight loss for those who quit it altogether. This negates so many of the good things the books has to say.

And also, I didn’t plan to make a big deal of it since the book was published in 1996. But since I’m already slightly ticked, what about men who struggle with eating disorders or disordered eating? What about asexual or non-heterosexual women?

Read this book. It has important things to say. But please, supplement it with other books that have advanced beyond this one in its approach to gender and to people in larger bodies.

...more
1

Jul 31, 2018

I tried to like this book, and got through more than 3/4 of it, but found that I was becoming more irritated with it the more I read. The author's theories about the cause of women's challenges with food and body image (mainly the patriarchal society we live in) does not resonate with me or my belief system. Furthermore, while I see the value in using metaphor to understand complex ideas, there were too many instances in which this seemed to be taken too far and her resultant theories to be I tried to like this book, and got through more than 3/4 of it, but found that I was becoming more irritated with it the more I read. The author's theories about the cause of women's challenges with food and body image (mainly the patriarchal society we live in) does not resonate with me or my belief system. Furthermore, while I see the value in using metaphor to understand complex ideas, there were too many instances in which this seemed to be taken too far and her resultant theories to be presented as fact rather than a proposed way of understanding something from another perspective. In addition, the book seemed extremely negative about society and men in particular, which I believe is shortsighted. Finally, although I didn't finish the book and there may have been a shift in the last five chapters, the author's ideas did not instill any sense of hope or resolution beyond a woman blaming society, her assumed horrendous upbringing, and connecting with one's inner child. Perhaps this would inspire some, but not in my case. ...more
5

Mar 28, 2019

This book has the best Preface of any Eating Disorder Book I have ever read--maybe the best Preface of any Book. I was ready to give this book 5 stars based on the Preface alone.
(The rest of the book is 4.5 stars.)
Dr. Johnson writes outstandingly clearly and with empathy. She uses stories (fairy tales or folk tales) to illustrate why women are obsessed with food, dieting, binging, purging, over-exercising, why women injure their self-esteem and physical health by pursuing a Dream which is in This book has the best Preface of any Eating Disorder Book I have ever read--maybe the best Preface of any Book. I was ready to give this book 5 stars based on the Preface alone.
(The rest of the book is 4.5 stars.)
Dr. Johnson writes outstandingly clearly and with empathy. She uses stories (fairy tales or folk tales) to illustrate why women are obsessed with food, dieting, binging, purging, over-exercising, why women injure their self-esteem and physical health by pursuing a Dream which is in reality no more than a Will-O-The-Wisp.

Why do I love the Preface so much? It is the first thing I have read (after reading literally every book in the library on weight, fat, eating disorders, compulsive eating, Obesity) that actually explains WHY I had an Eating Disorder from age 16 to 21.
Even after Recovery, I never understood (until someone gave me this book) WHY THE FUCK I WAS SO FUCKED UP in this particular way. It was a TERRIBLE way to live. It was such a WASTE of TIME.
Even after I broke free of disordered eating, I was still plagued by many of the same thought processes and extreme low-self esteem regarding body shape and size for too many years. And tormented by shame.

The Preface answers the question, "Why ME?" Why did it happen, how did it start, how did it get perpetuated.

Aside from the Preface, this is an outstanding (stands out from the crowd of ED Books) Story Book and Exercise Book. She outlines how to recover. I know these techniques work because I used most of them myself during my own recovery.
The stories are interesting and unusual, and I loved Johnson's interpretation of their meaning. She has tremondous empathy and insight. I loved her explanations of why many of us entered puberty and realized we hated being female, because we felt so inferior and ashamed of our changing shapes, while the boys around us were becoming larger and stronger we were becoming larger and weaker.

Highly recommend for any woman: who has ever had an ED, or a Fat Attack (where suddenly you feel HUGE and FAT, when minutes before you felt normal) or anyone who has tried to diet and failed, or has tried to diet and succeeded and then became obsessed and fearful about weight gain.
In fact, if you are a woman, and if you don't happen to Love your female body, just BUY THIS BOOK!!! BUY IT NOW OR CHECK IT OUT! TELL YOUR FRIENDS!!! SERIOUSLY IT IS THAT GOOD!!!

Criticisms: very minor--I thought the stories could have been written/retold better than they were. I didn't like the author's assertion multiple times along the lines of, "if you eat intuitively and listen to your body, you will never have to fear getting fat." Two problems with this statement:
Problem 1. Intuitive Eating will NOT make you thin automatically. Sometimes a woman with ED will lose a little bit of weight once she stops overeating and yo-yo dieting, but not always. It did work for me that way but it definitely doesn't work for everyone. Certainly there is no evidence that Intuitive Eating is the Answer to Obesity and Fat.
You could eat Intuitively and not ever Overeat and exercise every day vigorously and still remain or become "overweight" or "obese" (it isn't fair but studies show this to be the case, unfortunately).

Problem 2. Why should anyone have to "fear Fat" in the first place? The author doesn't ever say, "It is OK to be Fat." Her implication is that the Goal is to be a healthy, "normal weight", rather than the aim of health, self-love and self-acceptance at ANY size.

Take it from Dr. Lenny:
It is OK to be Fat or Thin or whatever your size right NOW. It is OK to love your body just the way it is.
The Goal is for your weight or appearance to STOP defining your self-esteem. That's the Goal.
Not Intuitive Eating, not Insight into the Problem, not Metaphors. Those are only stepping stones in the right direction.

Other than that, I really really appreciate this book and author. I loved the emphasis on what it means to be a Woman in this culture and why we should celebrate that instead of hating it.
THANK YOU Anita Johnson! ...more
5

Sep 07, 2014

I affectionately call this book "The Moon Book," and I plan to read it many more times, and keep it handy. The Moon Book is geared toward anyone with "disordered eating" and I consider anyone who has yo-yo-dieted as having disordered eating, which is me, in addition to the officially diagnosed anorexia/bulimia disorders, which is not me. In the moon book there are a lot of stories and folk tales that help give analogies to what people with disordered eating are going through or to give them I affectionately call this book "The Moon Book," and I plan to read it many more times, and keep it handy. The Moon Book is geared toward anyone with "disordered eating" and I consider anyone who has yo-yo-dieted as having disordered eating, which is me, in addition to the officially diagnosed anorexia/bulimia disorders, which is not me. In the moon book there are a lot of stories and folk tales that help give analogies to what people with disordered eating are going through or to give them tools through stories that easily come to mind to provide guidance or comfort. One of my favorites is about a girl who got swept into the middle of a river, and ends up clinging to a log. There are a lot of people on shore who want to help her, but she is afraid to leave her log because it feels safer than trying to swim to shore. She must gradually get used to leaving her log bit by bit, eventually, perhaps, swimming a few circles around her log, until she feels strong enough to swim to shore. I have a lot of things to work on, but I think I have to do them in small swims from my log. This story can apply to more than just disordered eating. What is your river? What is your log? ...more
4

Sep 19, 2010

The myth parts of the book got on my nerves, and eventually I skipped through those parts.

But I think this is a book worth reading for Johnston's insights, which have stuck with me on almost a cellular level. They go beyond the "fashion magazines are giving us all eating disorders" perspective to a more historical and biological feminist perspective. One that particularly made me think, is this:

"...there is such an emphasis on thin, angular bodies, which very few women come by naturally...why The myth parts of the book got on my nerves, and eventually I skipped through those parts.

But I think this is a book worth reading for Johnston's insights, which have stuck with me on almost a cellular level. They go beyond the "fashion magazines are giving us all eating disorders" perspective to a more historical and biological feminist perspective. One that particularly made me think, is this:

"...there is such an emphasis on thin, angular bodies, which very few women come by naturally...why has a naturally masculine shape (broad shoulders, no waist, narrow hips, flat belly) become the ideal for the female body? Why is it that those aspects of a woman's body that are most closely related to her female power, the capacity of her belly, hips and thighs to carry and sustain life, are diminished in our society's version of a beautiful woman?"

Answer: The replacement of the goddess with a god in male form, the intuitive with the linear, the circle with the line.

Down with the patriarchy! Yeah!

Seriously, though, this book melted me a bit around food and body image. Good stuff. ...more
4

Dec 18, 2018

I really liked this book. I use metaphor a lot in my work as an eating disorder therapist and this book is completely FULL of metaphor. I found this book really useful in groups and sessions and often I found myself thinking of certain patients while reading. It’s a great conversation starter and gets you conceptualizing eating disorders in different ways. I would recommend this to people in treatment and recovery and professionals who already have a good amount of knowledge of eating disorders. I really liked this book. I use metaphor a lot in my work as an eating disorder therapist and this book is completely FULL of metaphor. I found this book really useful in groups and sessions and often I found myself thinking of certain patients while reading. It’s a great conversation starter and gets you conceptualizing eating disorders in different ways. I would recommend this to people in treatment and recovery and professionals who already have a good amount of knowledge of eating disorders. It is definitely not what I would consider a primer of EDs and some baseline factual info/clinical experience would be useful prior to reading this. ...more
4

Nov 06, 2009

Johnston's approach -- through myths, metaphors, and storytelling, as the book's subtitle puts it -- bypasses the rational and reaches into that part of the brain that really controls appetite, pleasure, and physical and emotional well-being. She encourages us to treat with seriousness and respect those parts of us most denied by Western society. It is by calling back the child, the feminine, and the intuitive from exile that we can begin to fully inhabit our bodies, enjoy our food, and walk the Johnston's approach -- through myths, metaphors, and storytelling, as the book's subtitle puts it -- bypasses the rational and reaches into that part of the brain that really controls appetite, pleasure, and physical and emotional well-being. She encourages us to treat with seriousness and respect those parts of us most denied by Western society. It is by calling back the child, the feminine, and the intuitive from exile that we can begin to fully inhabit our bodies, enjoy our food, and walk the labyrinth that will release us of our maladaptive eating habits.

...more
5

May 03, 2009

I learned so much about my own identity as a woman and how we are all connected through experiences. imagine if we understood our bodies to be reflections of cycles found in nature ( changing seasons, ebb& flow of of the tides, waning & waxing of the moon) we'd realize the power that we possess!

in order for a woman to heal she must embrace the darkness that precedes renewal. she must recover those parts of herself that she disowned and denied to fit the mold. whatever that mold may be.
5

Mar 02, 2017

This is easily one of the most amazing books I have ever read. Whether you are in recovery for an eating disorder or not, it is truly a book about the beauty of women and our inner strength. My copy is covered in notes and insights, and it has become a key tool of my recovery. I cannot recommend this book highly enough.
4

Jan 25, 2012

Any woman could benefit from reading this book, whether she has an eating disorder or not. I appreciated the use of folktales and myths to understand the inner stories we live. This book reminded me of the wisdom in valuing the intuitive and the feminine, and being curious about the mysteries of one's self.
1

Jul 20, 2019

I do not understand how this helps anyone. I could barely get through it because of its weirdness and I had absolutely no connection to this. I mean I get the metaphors, but so what? All the talk of “femininity” also was very offputting. I mean, you could pick up a book of fairy tales and claim that that helped you too.
4

Apr 13, 2018

This is a must read for anyone dealing with emotional eating. This is not your typical self-help book; it relies on metaphors and storytelling to get its point across. It's a bit on the incense and crystals side of things (the chapter about dreams had me eye-rolling so hard) but overall it's a unique perspective on food issues and I found it helpful.
4

Apr 08, 2019

Though the target audience is probably therapists, a lot of root causes for emotional eating are explored. This could be helpful to anyone contemplating the gallon of ice cream in her fridge after a crappy day.
0

May 28, 2011

I am really enjoying this book. Insightful and interesting. I picked it up as professional literature but I'm loving it just for me. I'd recommend it to any woman interested in thinking about her relationship with food. It requires some interpersonal reflection but it's worth the work.
5

Jun 02, 2014

The first time I read it, it helped me let go of some past issues. The next time helped me see how to forgive. This time I will read it to deal with my weight. Excellent, excellent book!
4

Dec 03, 2009

Shed a whole new light on eating disorders. Some of it was sort of redundant and I didn't completely buy everything the author said, but some of it was very insightful and encouraging.
5

Sep 16, 2019

Feels very new agey. I’m surprised she didn’t refer to women as Goddesses

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