Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care Info

Fan Club Reviews of best titles on art fashion, artists, history, photography. Check out our top reviews and see what others have to say about the best art and photography books of the year. Check out Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care Community Reviews - Find out where to download Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care available in multiple formats:Hardcover,Mass Market Paperback,Paperback Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care Author:Benjamin Spock Formats:Hardcover,Mass Market Paperback,Paperback Publication Date:Mar 18, 1985


Average Ratings and Reviews
review-bg

4.03

1909 Ratings

5

4

3

2

1


Ratings and Reviews From Market


client-img 4.3
17
2
0
0
3
client-img 3.76
729
697
220
1
0

Reviews for Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care:

0

Jul 26, 2010

Another book I am reading for the book I am writing. One of my favorite outtakes thus far from this book updated in 1962:
"[A father:] might make the formula on Sunday. If the baby is on a 2 A.M. bottle in the early weeks, when the mother is still pretty tired, this is a good feeding for the father to take over. It's nice for him, if he can, to go along to the doctor's office for the baby's regular visits. It gives him a chance to bring up those questions that are bothering him and that he Another book I am reading for the book I am writing. One of my favorite outtakes thus far from this book updated in 1962:
"[A father:] might make the formula on Sunday. If the baby is on a 2 A.M. bottle in the early weeks, when the mother is still pretty tired, this is a good feeding for the father to take over. It's nice for him, if he can, to go along to the doctor's office for the baby's regular visits. It gives him a chance to bring up those questions that are bothering him and that he doesn't think his wife understands the importance of. It pleases the doctor too." ...more
5

Mar 18, 2009

Probably the most important book in my library for the first 10 years of my kids' lives. It was the book to turn to when they had spots or fevers or just would not go to sleep.... Dr. Spock always gave common sense advice. The reference guide to symptoms in the back was invaluable more than once in answering the huge question every new parent has -- it is 2:00 in the morning - "should I call the doctor for this, or can it wait until morning?"
5

Mar 13, 2017

I blog about Postwar America and bought a copy of the first edition (1946) on eBay in order to read the version my mother relied on. A classic. A couple of brief comments:

1) The conservative preacher Norman Vincent Peale, in an oft-quoted sermon, blamed Spock's "instant gratification, don't let them cry" approach for the violent demonstrations that occurred during that era. More immoderate commentators went even further, demonizing Spock as being more or less single-handedly responsible for the I blog about Postwar America and bought a copy of the first edition (1946) on eBay in order to read the version my mother relied on. A classic. A couple of brief comments:

1) The conservative preacher Norman Vincent Peale, in an oft-quoted sermon, blamed Spock's "instant gratification, don't let them cry" approach for the violent demonstrations that occurred during that era. More immoderate commentators went even further, demonizing Spock as being more or less single-handedly responsible for the decline and fall of Western Civilization. This accusation (always strongly rejected by Spock himself), is simply not supported by the book, which can be considered permissive only in contrast with the draconian advice then being offered by contemporary experts to adhere to a regular schedule of sleep and feeding, even if it meant leaving an infant sobbing for hours; and to avoid picking up and comforting babies, which would only teach them to cry more. Dr. Spock expects youngsters to be assigned duties, to put things away, to come to the table when dinner is ready, and to be polite to others. He warns against asking “Do you want to...?” or offering too many reasons when requiring the child to do something. The best description is perhaps the one Spock himself chose for the title of the first edition of his book, “common sense.” “Trust yourself,” he told young parents, "you know more than you think you do."

2) His (first) wife, Jane, whom he divorced after 48 years of marriage, was inadequately recognized and poorly rewarded for her extensive contribution to the book. At what point does transcribing, performing background research, fact-checking, recipe-testing, editing, consulting experts, rewriting, and more cross the blurry line from an acknowledgment, even (belatedly) a generous acknowledgment, into full-fledged co-authorship? Jane always felt she'd been shortchanged, and a good case could be made for her claim.

For a more extensive discussion of these and other issues, please check out my blog post:
http://www.projectdiana-eme.com/to-th... ...more
5

Dec 09, 2012

This is a wonderful book for ALL parents to read. Actually, it's a wonderful book for ANYONE to read, even children. It discusses human development in a way that is useful for those who are guiding a child's development and those interested in their own development - which should be everyone. Most importantly the book is written to educate and encourage, rather than to preach and frighten. It helps the parent approach every situation with the basic knowledge needed. It also gives great resources This is a wonderful book for ALL parents to read. Actually, it's a wonderful book for ANYONE to read, even children. It discusses human development in a way that is useful for those who are guiding a child's development and those interested in their own development - which should be everyone. Most importantly the book is written to educate and encourage, rather than to preach and frighten. It helps the parent approach every situation with the basic knowledge needed. It also gives great resources for further information on specific needs, including children's books that might help at certain moments.

Since the book covers all stages of childhood and all types of children, certain portions may never apply to any one child or family. My strategy was to read the whole book so that I have been exposed to the whole gamut of parenting questions. I certainly won't remember all of the advice, but the general approaches will stick with me and I can go back and understand more quickly as certain situations arise. Besides, I'm sure picking colleges will be here before we know it. And with every question, now I have at least some knowledge so that when questions come, especially when they come from our child, I won't be struck entirely dumb.

...more
2

Jun 10, 2012

My mother gave all her daughters, daughter-in-laws, many nieces, then started with granddaughters as they made her a great-grandma, a copy of Dr. Spock's Baby and Childcare. My copy was a much earlier edition than this one.

I referred back to the book many times as my babies matured into toddlers, and so on. I say it was okay, because I never read it cover to cover ~ it got boring.

Many of my peers felt intimidated by the book's advice, fearing they would do something wrong. I do not recall My mother gave all her daughters, daughter-in-laws, many nieces, then started with granddaughters as they made her a great-grandma, a copy of Dr. Spock's Baby and Childcare. My copy was a much earlier edition than this one.

I referred back to the book many times as my babies matured into toddlers, and so on. I say it was okay, because I never read it cover to cover ~ it got boring.

Many of my peers felt intimidated by the book's advice, fearing they would do something wrong. I do not recall exactly as Dr. Spock said it, but it was what I most remembered and adhered to ~ if we could not remember what to do in an emergency or for illness, to do the first thing we thought of doing ~ which would usually be correct.

That worked for me ~ often I would refer to the book after the fact and learn I had handled things in manner Spock prescribed.

...more
4

May 20, 2010

We've read though the chapters on pregnancy. Now I guess it is almost time for the infant section. Yikes!!
5

Jun 01, 2018

Awesome Book. Learned A Lot of Stuff I Didn't Know. Great Book For Any Mom.
3

Sep 03, 2017

This handbook is meant as a reference so I focused only on a few topics that might help me learn how adult personalities/habits/behaviors are shaped by childhood influences.

Best learning happens when babies are presented with a relaxed, supportive, nurturing environment, not by cold, forced, unwanted, unnatural facts (like flashcards).

Downside of overacademic approach: interferes with play (way they learn, develop social skills, spark creativity).

When they love what they learn, they remember it This handbook is meant as a reference so I focused only on a few topics that might help me learn how adult personalities/habits/behaviors are shaped by childhood influences.

Best learning happens when babies are presented with a relaxed, supportive, nurturing environment, not by cold, forced, unwanted, unnatural facts (like flashcards).

Downside of overacademic approach: interferes with play (way they learn, develop social skills, spark creativity).

When they love what they learn, they remember it longer.

Thinking develops in stages; don't rush the process by skipping phases.

Read to babies. They enjoy the sound and feeling of being held.

Foster love for stories by reading them aloud, and talk about them to spark interest. Pay attention to everyday signs and labels that are interesting and important.

In a good preschool, there are different areas for children to explore different interests.

School teaches skills to kids and how to get along in the world. Various subjects are means to an end.

Mental capacity is one aspect of a person. Balance it with empathy, compassion, common sense, respect for others.

No use in learning a lot if you're not happy, can't get along with people, etc.

One way that children learn independence is by taking risks: fosters skills, self-esteem, and judgment.

Sports: teach sportsmanship, teamwork, tolerance.

Sex awareness starts when children see how parents get along with and take care of each other (how kind/helpful/respectful), attitude about different genders. ...more
3

Jul 30, 2014

Benjamin Spock Robert Needlman – Baby and Childcare

When my baby daughter arrived, advice, much of it unasked for, poured in from friends and relatives. Buy a pillow for her. Put honey on her pacifier to help her through teething. Give her orange juice. Put her to bed with a bottle full of milk so she doesn’t need to get up in the middle of the night to be fed.

All of which, thanks to Dr Spock’s Baby & Childcare (9th Edition, with Dr Robert Needlman), I managed to discover – well in time – to Benjamin Spock Robert Needlman – Baby and Childcare

When my baby daughter arrived, advice, much of it unasked for, poured in from friends and relatives. Buy a pillow for her. Put honey on her pacifier to help her through teething. Give her orange juice. Put her to bed with a bottle full of milk so she doesn’t need to get up in the middle of the night to be fed.

All of which, thanks to Dr Spock’s Baby & Childcare (9th Edition, with Dr Robert Needlman), I managed to discover – well in time – to be bad for baby (the honey on the pacifier and the milk through the night are surefire ways of causing tooth decay, even before baby’s teeth are out; the pillow can be the cause of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome; and orange juice is not recommended for children below a year of age).

This parenting book, first published in 1945, has been the more-or-less definitive baby and childcare book for so many decades, it’s become almost iconic. My mother bought her copy back in 1967 when my sister was born, and swears by it. So, when a friend gifted this to me in preparation for my baby, I read through it, cover to cover. Of course, it’s basically a reference book – you can dip into it at short notice to see what to do if baby suddenly starts hiccupping, or falls from the bed, or doesn’t want to feed… and a million other things.

While people who haven’t read the book may think it’s basically a baby care book, Dr Spock’s Baby & Childcare is actually much, much more. This edition, vastly revised and updated by Dr Robert Needlman, covers everything from pregnancy to starting college – basically, the entire journey from womb to leaving the nest.

The book is divided into six sections: Your Child, Age by Age contains detailed information about how the physical, emotional, and mental development of children, touching on everything from diapering to toilet training, sleep issues to puberty to strategies for dealing with teens. Feeding and Nutrition is the second section. The title is self-explanatory, as is that of section III, Health and Safety, and section IV, Raising Mentally Healthy Children. Section V, Common Developmental and Behavioral Challenges discusses everything from sibling rivalry to depression, tantrums, feeding disorders, and children with special needs. The last section, Learning and School, starts with an explanation of how the brain works and goes all the way to how to go about finding the right college for your offspring.

The book, therefore, covers the gamut of parenting, whether it’s the physical and mental aspects, the emotional, or the social. There’s just about everything here (including a very helpful resource guide with listings of online sources for further guidance and support) you could need to at least get an idea about how to go about being a good parent to your child.

That said, it’s not as if Dr Spock’s Baby & Childcare is the only book you’ll need. I, for instance, ended up finding out how to exercise a baby or massage a baby to relieve constipation from other sources on the net. Also, since the book is very US-centric, some of the contents (the resources listed, for example) are not much use to people in countries very different from the US.

Still, all in all, a dependable book to have on your shelf if you have a kid or are about to have one.

...more
2

Jul 15, 2019

1.5 stars**

Knowing this was a classic book on, as the title suggests, caring for and raising a child, I picked this up for a few cents at a sale a year or two ago and finally decided to give this brick of a book a chance. The first thing that came to mind was how dated in its ideas of gender it is. Although is is said that parents shouldn't fret if a boy decides to play with his sisters dolls (which was certainly progressive at the time it was written), the ideas of what a boy or a girl’s ideal 1.5 stars**

Knowing this was a classic book on, as the title suggests, caring for and raising a child, I picked this up for a few cents at a sale a year or two ago and finally decided to give this brick of a book a chance. The first thing that came to mind was how dated in its ideas of gender it is. Although is is said that parents shouldn't fret if a boy decides to play with his sisters dolls (which was certainly progressive at the time it was written), the ideas of what a boy or a girl’s ideal activities should be seems quite clear. We are told about maternal instinct in a little girl several times, while there is more discussions of helping a small boy feel more manly etc.. The idea of what women should be like as mothers is also very present, although concealed in parts. for example, there is a chapter on mothers who work but it is also said that babies should spend about 3 hours a day outside if the weather permits (who in the world has time for 3 hour long walks everyday ? Working mum or not ?) These injonctions are clear to any informed reader, « a father can help vs a mother should do xyz ». In our day and age, this is not something I would recommend to any future parent, especially not a woman, especially a first time mum. I’m not saying that it is all wrong but it is an awfully outdated manual, in both ideas of paedopsychology and healthcare. That is not to mention all the easier techniques and machines we have invented in the last 40 years, and their own set of new created problems that came with it, which of course could not have been discussed back then.
I can see how at the time it came out, this book could have been seen as the holy bible of childcare books as it touches on everything, however I am certain that some much better, ones can now be found in any good libraries. My copy is going straight back to charity. ...more
3

Oct 24, 2008

This is a book that I read the sections I need when I want to know, rather than reading cover to cover. Unlike some guides, it's arranged topically rather than by age, so skipping around is really a necessity. It gives some great advice and gives a lot of the "whys" of childcare - why shouldn't you save the extra food from the baby jar? Body fluids are sterile to the body they came out of... so what if saliva gets into the rest of the food? Turns out that (here's a reminder from 4th grade This is a book that I read the sections I need when I want to know, rather than reading cover to cover. Unlike some guides, it's arranged topically rather than by age, so skipping around is really a necessity. It gives some great advice and gives a lot of the "whys" of childcare - why shouldn't you save the extra food from the baby jar? Body fluids are sterile to the body they came out of... so what if saliva gets into the rest of the food? Turns out that (here's a reminder from 4th grade science) that saliva breaks down some foods, which when not consumed, causes them to decay faster. Oh, okay - I can accept that. Hearing it from other places just makes those people sound paranoid or that they just want you to spend more money on baby food. So far so good. :) And this book doesn't make you feel slow, stupid, or paranoid. I like that in a parenting guide! :D ...more
3

Aug 27, 2011

So with a daughter on the way, I've found myself reading rearing books. I'm getting great information, but only made it as far as the twos.

Where are the dragons? Ninja assassins? Robots and their laws?

There wasn't even one chapter on where in the nursery is best for katana placement. Seriously. I have no idea where to put my swords. Spock was no help for that.

It's funny saying (or rather thinking) that. Usually, most Vulcans are good in a pinch.

I think that joke is too old, but that's the So with a daughter on the way, I've found myself reading rearing books. I'm getting great information, but only made it as far as the twos.

Where are the dragons? Ninja assassins? Robots and their laws?

There wasn't even one chapter on where in the nursery is best for katana placement. Seriously. I have no idea where to put my swords. Spock was no help for that.

It's funny saying (or rather thinking) that. Usually, most Vulcans are good in a pinch.

I think that joke is too old, but that's the most I got from that book. ...more
5

Jun 10, 2008

Except we're reading the 1954 edition. The "in place of a crib, you can place your baby in a bureau drawer or a clothes basket" edition. His take on post-partum depression is pretty good, too. Honestly, it is. Gotta love it. Mostly reading it for fun and because Mom gave it to me. Worked for her. I don't think any of us turned out that horribly. Can't find the chapter where he says it's ok to put netting on top of a play pen (poor Edie!), but I"m sure it's in there.
5

Jun 01, 2018

Along with the wpnderful and patient advice my wife and I got from our mothers, this book offered the best practical advice on raising our children, who turned out to be smart, polite, talented, and sociable adults.
5

Feb 28, 2019

I have this book - it was the one my mother used when I was a baby. Fascinating!
4

Dec 09, 2019

Q: The Common Sense Book of Child and Baby Care was first published in 1946, and sold 500,000 copies in the six months after its publication. Who wrote The Common Sense Book of Child and Baby Care?
4

Nov 05, 2019

My go to book for years with our four children back in the 70's and early 80's. It helped to reduce a lot of doctors' visits.
2

Jul 22, 2013

This book has entered our cultural legacy as one of the most important ones published within the last century. I've been able to appreciate it for that fact, but it hasn't stopped my overall disillusionment with the book and its premise. Part of it may stem from the fact that the book is constantly being updated. (I much prefer the older, original versions, even if solely for its value as an historical document rather than a must-have for parenting advice). Naturally I understand why, as the This book has entered our cultural legacy as one of the most important ones published within the last century. I've been able to appreciate it for that fact, but it hasn't stopped my overall disillusionment with the book and its premise. Part of it may stem from the fact that the book is constantly being updated. (I much prefer the older, original versions, even if solely for its value as an historical document rather than a must-have for parenting advice). Naturally I understand why, as the world is constantly changing and parents need to know what's going on. But there are some things about parenting, nurturing, and love that are constant, regardless of what happens.
A lot of the advice given here is very generic, and in an attempt to cover everything, the book gets bogged down with too much information. Although it advocates treating children as individuals, and supposedly puts control in the hands of the parents, one still senses a veneer of self-righteousness throughout: "You are the parent, but this really is the best way to go about the problem if you want a happy baby. But again, it's all up to you." (No one said this, I'm just giving an example of the tone). I can't speak for everyone, as this book may have been the best thing to happen for some parents. But I still say that if someone relies so heavily on a book to tell them what one hopes is instinctual, then all was not well in the state of Denmark to begin with. Although the premise of the book is that parents know more than they think they do, and that common sense is key, having an entire book to tell them what they apparently already know defeats the premise.
Furthermore, at least for me, the text doesn't provide enough room to discuss cultural differences in child-rearing and interaction, which may not fit into mainstream parenting ideas. These methods may seem different or unusual, but that doesn't mean that they're bad for children. For example, using a scarf or long strip of cloth to carry a baby around on one's back, versus a Snuggli carrier; not buying a high chair because a child is always on someone's lap, or letting children eat and drink certain foods when they're young. (I won't even get started on the whole spanking issue). I can't speak for everyone, but I would imagine that different groups might not see their own parental experiences/impressions expressed and validated throughout the text.
To sum up this review, I'd like to recount a conversation that I had with my mother. I asked her once whether she went to Lamaze classes or read books about different aspects of parenthood, such as breastfeeding, bathing, etc. She replied: "I didn't need a class to tell me how to breathe, or someone to show me how to feed my child." When the time comes for me to have children, I'm just going to ask my mother for advice. She's the best wellspring of knowledge I know. I realize that everyone's situation is different. But I wonder how better off we'd all be if others did the same, and just let nature take its course. ...more
4

Aug 01, 2014

Sometimes there's reviewing a single book on its own (like with a novel), but other times you have to review a book in the context of other books out there (like with a parenting advice book). Dr Spock's classic baby and child care book is definitely a case of the latter category. Reading it now, after having read many more detailed books, I can't help but wish that this was the only book on the subject I ever read. I like to imagine myself as a low-stress mother who only felt the need to Sometimes there's reviewing a single book on its own (like with a novel), but other times you have to review a book in the context of other books out there (like with a parenting advice book). Dr Spock's classic baby and child care book is definitely a case of the latter category. Reading it now, after having read many more detailed books, I can't help but wish that this was the only book on the subject I ever read. I like to imagine myself as a low-stress mother who only felt the need to consult an expert guide for the occasional difficulty. If that was truly me, this book would have provided everything I need. Having read several million books, I can say that too much information is definitely too much. I like that half a page on, for example, apparent low milk supply is all that there is here. Why dwell on it obsessively? On the other hand, advice like "plan to sleep more during the day" when dealing with endless night feedings would NOT have done the job for me when I was dealing with that problem. In retrospect though... why make life difficult? If something isn't working, change it (etc). (That said, if you are dealing with low milk supply Diane West's Breasting Mother's Guide to Making More Milk is a useful book, if you want to read a book and then try different, sometimes labour intensive, solutions at exactly at the moment when you are most overwhelmed.)

Breastfeeding is just one thing covered in Dr Spock's book. This is a great, easy reference when for situations when you are are wondering about, for example, ear infections, eczema or constipation. There's also information about more serious problems (such as fractures). Lucky for us, we haven't had to consult those sections so far. I've done some reading ahead to issues that pertain to older children, and I like the moderate, matter of fact advice -- but I haven't had to put it in to practice yet.

One example of practical advice that worked well for us -- Dr. Spock says that it's often good for young babies to be kept nearby their parents without being the centre of attention. In my son's case, from an early age he was happy being laid on a soft blanket on the floor where he could practice kicking his legs and wiggling. At the time, I worried that I should be doing something more labor intensive and interactive (reading to him? playing games?). In retrospect, I think that all that time helped him develop some independence and gave him the chance to work on his muscle strength and coordination. This low-stress, low-demand parenting advice ended up working out best for us, at least in that case -- which was a major relief. ...more
0

Oct 11, 2013

I never read this book and don't plan to because I don't like books about baby and child care. But I want to warn you people that Dr. Benjamin Spock was a really nice guy. I met him in 1970 during a anti-war rally. He was very approachable and loved to chat. I found out that his proudest moment was not when he wrote his book and it became a huge bestseller but when he won a gold medal in the Olympics in 1924. (that is a fact!) He swore a little when he talked about President Johnson (He called I never read this book and don't plan to because I don't like books about baby and child care. But I want to warn you people that Dr. Benjamin Spock was a really nice guy. I met him in 1970 during a anti-war rally. He was very approachable and loved to chat. I found out that his proudest moment was not when he wrote his book and it became a huge bestseller but when he won a gold medal in the Olympics in 1924. (that is a fact!) He swore a little when he talked about President Johnson (He called him a BBQ eating son-of-a-bitch) but it was funny swearing. He is one of the nicest guys I ever met.

But don't read his book. It won't tell you how nice he is.

So here's the question: Am I going to get deleted by Goodreads because I talked about the author but never read the book...even if it was positive? It seems to me that if they are going to keep their silly policy on reviewing the book not the author, I'm in violation. We'll see.

...more
3

Sep 28, 2013

terrifying. could not finish.

This passage: "Even when feelings during pregnancy are primarily positive, there may be a letdown when the baby actually arrives. Parents may expect to recognize the baby immediately as their own flesh and blood, to respond with an overwhelming rush of maternal and paternal feelings, and to bond like epoxy. But in many cases, this doesn't happen on the first day or even in the first week. Completely normal negative feelings often pop up. A good and loving parent may terrifying. could not finish.

This passage: "Even when feelings during pregnancy are primarily positive, there may be a letdown when the baby actually arrives. Parents may expect to recognize the baby immediately as their own flesh and blood, to respond with an overwhelming rush of maternal and paternal feelings, and to bond like epoxy. But in many cases, this doesn't happen on the first day or even in the first week. Completely normal negative feelings often pop up. A good and loving parent may have the sudden though that having a baby has been a terrible mistake -- and then feel instantly guilty for having felt that way."

...more
4

Mar 27, 2018

This book is helpful -- I will allow that -- but I wouldn't use it at a 'baby care bible'. It is a reference, but it is no replacement for a parent's instincts. Also, please, please, please, do not compare your child to another child of the same age. Children do learn at different rates. For example, my son tried to walk just before he turned one. He fell. He did not try again for another four months. Then when he walked, he never fell down. He learns like that with everything. He might be This book is helpful -- I will allow that -- but I wouldn't use it at a 'baby care bible'. It is a reference, but it is no replacement for a parent's instincts. Also, please, please, please, do not compare your child to another child of the same age. Children do learn at different rates. For example, my son tried to walk just before he turned one. He fell. He did not try again for another four months. Then when he walked, he never fell down. He learns like that with everything. He might be slower to grasp a concept, but once he does, he masters it. So make this book a guide, not a 'bible'.
...more
4

Oct 13, 2018

A good general overview without much depth. For example, there is a page on soothing a newborn, whereas The Happiest Baby on the Block is an entire book about soothing a newborn. There's also a few paragraphs about sleep at the various ages, whereas entire other books are written about the nuances of helping your children sleep well.

This book covers so many topics that it can only say a few words on each. That's okay. However, many of the more challenging and intriguing nuances of parenting A good general overview without much depth. For example, there is a page on soothing a newborn, whereas The Happiest Baby on the Block is an entire book about soothing a newborn. There's also a few paragraphs about sleep at the various ages, whereas entire other books are written about the nuances of helping your children sleep well.

This book covers so many topics that it can only say a few words on each. That's okay. However, many of the more challenging and intriguing nuances of parenting aren't in here. ...more
5

Mar 16, 2013

my mother read this when my brother was born, and i assume she read it when i was born, too. as far as i can tell, i grew up in tip-top shape, so i think i have dr. spock to thank for that, (THANK YOU FOR KEEPING ME ALIVE), since mothers, understandably, cannot even begin to comprehend the 24,243,259,964,395 needs of babies. truthfully, i still have that well-worn copy my mother toted around when my brother was little, and sometimes i like to look at it and reconcile its message with the my mother read this when my brother was born, and i assume she read it when i was born, too. as far as i can tell, i grew up in tip-top shape, so i think i have dr. spock to thank for that, (THANK YOU FOR KEEPING ME ALIVE), since mothers, understandably, cannot even begin to comprehend the 24,243,259,964,395 needs of babies. truthfully, i still have that well-worn copy my mother toted around when my brother was little, and sometimes i like to look at it and reconcile its message with the feminist voices of the time. it's a worthwhile endeavor. best, ...more
3

Jan 15, 2012

Intended as a resource for parents who have children of all ages, I would only this book as a supplement to a more detailed book. Spock's aim is for breadth, not depth. Although what it written seems sound ( I highlighted and dog-eared relevant pages), I stopped about 20% in, since I only have a two year old and am expecting our second child. This book contains up to date information and resources, but by the time I will need to use the adolescent section, this book will be outdated. Still, I Intended as a resource for parents who have children of all ages, I would only this book as a supplement to a more detailed book. Spock's aim is for breadth, not depth. Although what it written seems sound ( I highlighted and dog-eared relevant pages), I stopped about 20% in, since I only have a two year old and am expecting our second child. This book contains up to date information and resources, but by the time I will need to use the adolescent section, this book will be outdated. Still, I maintain that the pages relevant to me were helpful. ...more

Best Books from your Favorite Authors & Publishers

compare-icon compare-icon
Thousands of books

Take your time and choose the perfect book.

review-icon review-icon
Read Reviews

Read ratings and reviews to make sure you are on the right path.

vendor-icon vendor-icon
Multiple Stores

Check price from multiple stores for a better shopping experience.

gift-icon

Enjoy Result