Cracking the PM Interview: How to Land a Product Manager Job in Technology Info

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How many pizzas are delivered in Manhattan? How do you design
an alarm clock for the blind? What is your favorite piece of software
and why? How would you launch a video rental service in India? This book
will teach you how to answer these questions and more.

Cracking
the PM Interview is a comprehensive book about landing a product
management role in a startup or bigger tech company. Learn how the
ambiguously-named "PM" (product manager / program manager) role varies
across companies, what experience you need, how to make your existing
experience translate, what a great PM resume and cover letter look like,
and finally, how to master the interview: estimation questions,
behavioral questions, case questions, product questions, technical
questions, and the super important "pitch."

The Product
Manager Role

What is a PM?
Functions of a PM
Top
Myths about Product Management
Project Managers and Program
Managers

Companies
How the PM Role
Varies
Google
Microsoft
Apple
Facebook
Amazon

Yahoo
Twitter
Startups

Getting the Right
Experience

New Grads
Making the Most of Career
Fairs
Do you need an MBA?
Why Technical Experience Matters

Transitioning from Engineer to Product Manager
Transitioning from
Designer to Product Manager
Transitioning from Other Roles
What
Makes a Good Side Project?

Career
Advancement

Tips and Tricks for Career Advancement
Q &
A: Fernando Delgado, Sr. Director, Product Management at Yahoo
Q &
A: Ashley Carroll, Senior Director of Product Management, DocuSign
Q
& A: Brandon Bray, Principal Group Program Manager, Microsoft
Q &
A: Thomas Arend, International Product Lead, Airbnb
Q & A: Johanna
Wright, VP at Google
Q & A: Lisa Kostova Ogata, VP of Product at
Bright.com

Behind the Interview Scenes

Google
Microsoft
Facebook
Apple
Amazon
Yahoo

Twitter
Dropbox

Resumes
The
Second
Rule
The Rules
Attributes of a Good PM Resume
What to
Include

Real Resumes: Before & After


Cover Letters
Elements of a Good PM Cover
Letter
The Cover Letter Template
A Great Cover Letter


Company Research
The Product
The
Strategy
The Culture
The Role
The Questions


Define Yourself
“Tell Me About Yourself” (The
Pitch)
“Why do you want to work here?”
“Why should we hire
you?”
“Why are you leaving your current job?”
“What do you like
to do in your spare time?”
“Where do you see yourself in five
years?”
“What are your strengths and weaknesses?”
Sample
Strengths and Weaknesses

Behavioral
Questions

Why These Questions Are Asked
Preparation

Follow-Up Questions
Types of Behavioral Questions


Estimation Questions
Approach
Numbers Cheat
Sheet
Tips and Tricks
Example Interview
Sample Questions

Product Questions
About the Product
Question
Type 1: Designing a Product
Type 2: Improving a
Product
Type 3: Favorite Product
Preparation
Tips and
Tricks
Sample Questions

Case Questions

The Case Question: Consultants vs. PMs
What Interviewers Look
For
Useful Frameworks
Product Metrics
Interview Questions

Coding Questions
Who Needs To Code
What
You Need To Know
How You Are Evaluated
How To Approach

Developing an Algorithm
Additional Questions & Solutions


Appendix
Top 1% PMs vs. Top 10% PMs
Be a
Great Product Leader
The Inputs to a Great Product Roadmap
How
to Hire a Product Manager


Average Ratings and Reviews
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4.30

2293 Ratings

5

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Ratings and Reviews From Market


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Reviews for Cracking the PM Interview: How to Land a Product Manager Job in Technology:

3

Nov 01, 2014

TL;DR - be a wicked smart generalist because the market is still defining the role

Having just added the title of "Product Manager" at my current employer, I needed to know what I didn't know. This book did a fine job of starting that process, but ultimately left me wanting.

The essential job function is to keep your product moving forward. Because the programming staff is the engine for the machine for any software company, the need to "speak programmer" is first among equals. But you also need TL;DR - be a wicked smart generalist because the market is still defining the role

Having just added the title of "Product Manager" at my current employer, I needed to know what I didn't know. This book did a fine job of starting that process, but ultimately left me wanting.

The essential job function is to keep your product moving forward. Because the programming staff is the engine for the machine for any software company, the need to "speak programmer" is first among equals. But you also need to speak management to executives, sales to field reps, artsy to design staff, and so on. You'll advocate for scarce resources to keep your ideas alive, own the accountability for any delays in the timeline, maintain vision for the grand picture during every minor release. And you have to do this with every indirect influencing skill in your arsenal. You don't have a staff who reports to you; you have an assembled team who unite (or not) under the common goal you champion.

My chief complaint about the book is actually a complaint about the field. It's not settled yet. The ideal of "big data scientist" went from obscurity to codification in less than five years. The ideal of "product manager" has been around for more than twice that, but nobody quite knows what to do with this need that is neither fish nor fowl. Even the title changes depending on what company you're talking about. Perhaps that's why the interviews revolve around programming, and why the role is customarily filled by a programmer who wanted to stop programming: when in doubt, be the engine. ...more
4

Feb 03, 2017

Required reading for prepping for PM interviews. Delivers on what it promises. But it perhaps underemphasizes that there are many other good ways to skin the cat. In addition to this book, I recommend also reading "Decode and Conquer", which will give you more example answers and offer different solid approaches/ways to think about the interview questions asked.

Will these books alone make you a good PM? No. Gaining mastery over the concepts mentioned in the books and building good product sense Required reading for prepping for PM interviews. Delivers on what it promises. But it perhaps underemphasizes that there are many other good ways to skin the cat. In addition to this book, I recommend also reading "Decode and Conquer", which will give you more example answers and offer different solid approaches/ways to think about the interview questions asked.

Will these books alone make you a good PM? No. Gaining mastery over the concepts mentioned in the books and building good product sense and industry knowledge will take much more time. Confidence, clear communication and persuasiveness are skills that are required to ace the PM interview (and be a good PM). Having an extroverted personality and business savvy will also go a long way.

Good luck! ...more
4

Jun 21, 2017

This book is the complete package for those who are looking for a job in Product Management. It has information about the role, its challenges, how to apply at different firms based on your background, how to make your resume and cover letter, how each firm is different from other and it even has case preparations and coding questions as well. This book is a complete guide on how to get into product management and how to grow as one. Highly recommended to those who are planning to start their This book is the complete package for those who are looking for a job in Product Management. It has information about the role, its challenges, how to apply at different firms based on your background, how to make your resume and cover letter, how each firm is different from other and it even has case preparations and coding questions as well. This book is a complete guide on how to get into product management and how to grow as one. Highly recommended to those who are planning to start their career in product management. ...more
4

Nov 15, 2016

A great read to prepare for PM interviews but also to
- introspect on one's career
- understand one's motivations to apply to a PM role
- revisit the way one thinks about product
- up one's managements paradigms
Great read and highly recommended
3

Jun 18, 2018

Great book for an extensive overview of how to market yourself, CVs and interview processes. Interesting to peak into the Top Tech (Google, Facebook, Amazon, etc) culture and recruitment process - which is not representative of the tech industry.

Lenghty, and anedoctal, description of what is a PM (everything that is in between ~ that makes a product great)

My notes :

What is a Product Manager
*PM is responsible for making sure that a team ships a great product.

*Prioritize - A 1% PM knows how to Great book for an extensive overview of how to market yourself, CVs and interview processes. Interesting to peak into the Top Tech (Google, Facebook, Amazon, etc) culture and recruitment process - which is not representative of the tech industry.

Lenghty, and anedoctal, description of what is a PM (everything that is in between ~ that makes a product great)

My notes :

What is a Product Manager
*PM is responsible for making sure that a team ships a great product.

*Prioritize - A 1% PM knows how to sequence projects. They balance quick wins vs. platform investments appropriately. They balance offense and defense projects appropriately. Offense projects are ones that grow the business. Defense projects are ones that protect and remove drag on the business (operations, reducing technical debt, fixing bugs, etc.).

*The description of product manager as CEO misses the boat: product managers don’t have direct authority over the people on their team. As a PM, you’ll need to learn to lead your team without authority, influencing them with your vision and research.

*One reason product management is such an appealing career is you get to sit at the intersection of technology, business, and design. You get to wear many hats and learn multiple points of view.
While the product life cycle varies by company (and sometimes even by team), it usually follows a general pattern of Research & Plan, Design, Implement & Test, and Release. Of course, these frequently overlap and feed back into each other.

*Some companies or teams split the product manager role across two people: the more business-focused person and the more engineering-focused person. When companies make this split, they call the engineering-focused person the technical program manager or technical product manager (TPM), and they call the business-focused person the product manager (PM).

*While most roles on the team are crisply defined, product managers have a more fluid role. When you’re a product manager, your job is anything that isn’t being covered by other people. As a PM, you’re responsible for the success or failure of your product, and no job is beneath you.


On Career
*Find teams where you can pick up new skills “Seniority is all about experience, but there’s a catch,” says Chrix Finne, a senior product manager at Optimizely (and formerly Google). “You can control how fast you accumulate experiences.” If you’ve mostly worked on improving a mature product, consider joining a team building a new, unlaunched product. If you’ve always worked on consumer-facing products, consider trying something business facing. Look at your skillset, decide which skills you need, and then find a place where you can learn those skills.

On Telling stories
*Situation, Action, Result (S.A.R.) The Situation, Action, Result structure can be used on its own or in conjunction with the Nugget First approach. The S.A.R. (also often called S.T.A.R.—Situation, Task, Action, Result) approach

*Nugget First The “nugget first” structure is a simple one. It means to start off your response with the “nugget”—or thesis—of what your story will be about.


On Estimations / Case Questions
*Rule of 72: Here’s a fun and useful tip: if you need to calculate how long until something doubles, divide 72 by the percent increase. That is, an investment, population, salary or other value increasing at x% per year will double after approximately 72/x years. This rule works fairly well (being within 5 or 10% of the true answer) for smaller values of x. However, even up through a 100% annual increase (which is doubling within a year), the result is still within 30% of the actual answer.

*Number of Digits: if you multiplied a and b together to get n, then the sum of the number of digits in the terms should be within one of the number of terms in the result. Or, more precisely: digits(a) + digits(b) = digits(a * b) Or: digits(a) + digits(b) = digits(a * b) + 1 For example, 823 * 1032 will have either 6 or 7 digits. (In actuality, it has 6 digits.) If you wind up with a number like 84936, you’ll know you’ve done something wrong.

*In product design questions, pay attention to the details and be sure to ask probing questions. Microsoft interviewers often enjoy testing how you handle ambiguity. They might, for example, ask you to design a pen and not mention that it’s a pen for astronauts. They want to see that you ask a lot of questions to understand the customer before running down some path.


On Customer Purchase Decision Making Process
*There are many frameworks to model the decision-making process, but two of the most common are AIDA and REAN. AIDA models customer decisions as Attention (or Awareness) -> Interest -> Desire -> Action. Attention: You need to get the customer’s attention somehow. A snappy email heading, perhaps? A snazzy ad? Or maybe a mention from a trusted friend or website? Interest: Now that you have the customer’s attention, you need to get them interested in your offering. What are the advantages or benefits of your product? Desire: With the customer’s interest piqued, you need to convince the customer that they want your product. Action: Finally, with the customer desiring your product, they take action to purchase the product. REAN expands this to add on post-purchase behavior. Reach: The customer is aware of your product. Engage: The customer is engaged and considering your product. Activate: The customer takes action to purchase the product. Nurture: The customer has purchased the product, and it’s now your responsibility to nurture this relationship.


On CVs
*The Rules Every rule has its exception, but they’re called rules for a reason. Proceed carefully if you think one of these rules doesn’t apply to you.
Rule #1: Shorter
Rule #2: Bullets, Not Blobs


On the Companies you interview for
*Knowing the “why” means understanding the following: Mission: Look up the company’s mission statement. How does it live up to this mission? Be specific. Strategy: What do you think is the company’s strategy? Are there any missteps with respect to that? Strengths: What are the product’s selling points? How does the company leverage those? What about the company or its products has enabled its success? Weaknesses: What are the major issues with the company and its products? How should the company address those weaknesses, or should they just accept them? Challenges: What are the biggest challenges for the company right now? How do you see them addressing them.


Assorted Bits
*Personally, I don’t believe linear prioritization is effective in the long term. I’ve written a separate post on product prioritization called The Three Buckets

*This is a good thing to remember: if something continuously divides in half, it is O(log(N)) time. ...more
0

Mar 02, 2015

very detailed research ! the book should have annual sequel !

Perfect product .
Addresses all areas and needs refresh cycle like all products do.
This is the first book I ever read on product management.
5

Jan 27, 2015

If you're thinking about starting your career on product management this is a great book to start. It not only helps you to know what an interview would be like, it also helps you to understand the position better and to know if it's for you or not.
5

Dec 14, 2019

Really interesting book that covers a variety of areas that different companies ask when interviewing PMs. There are some really great questions and brainteasers which will make your brain busy overall, It was interesting to see how do most powerful companies interview PM candidates to find the best ones. Really interesting book that covers a variety of areas that different companies ask when interviewing PMs. There are some really great questions and brainteasers which will make your brain busy ???? overall, It was interesting to see how do most powerful companies interview PM candidates to find the best ones. ...more
5

Jan 09, 2019

the chapters on product and problem solving don't only improve your interviewing skills, it helps you think better and become a better product manager. moreover, this book helped me understand how to find a great pm when hiring. highly recommended for aspiring product managers, product managers, and hiring ceos.
3

Feb 21, 2019

There were a lot of spelling errors, many pages were cut during printing so you couldn't read the whole pages properly, and a lot of pages had faded ink. I thought I just had a badly printed book, but a friend of mine also owns the book and said it was the same. So the book was full of information, but poorly presented.
5

Oct 27, 2017

I thought this was a great introduction to what PM is (and is not), the possible paths of career transitions and important frameworks to excel as a PM (or PM candidate during interview).

Clearly written like cracking the coding interview, in-depth industry research (although the valley moves real fast, so it's probably already a little dated), insightful takehome points and thought processes.
3

Nov 20, 2017

For those with a 3 or more years of experience as Product Manager this book may be just a review of a bunch of concepts and tips. However, for those who are starting as Product Manager or are PMs wannabes this book is a must read. But not because of the interview tips - IMHO this is the least important thing on this book - but because the concepts, tips and how to be a better PM.
4

Dec 17, 2018

- This book has some good condensed nuggets in it. Some are specific to Product Managers, but most can be extended to technical roles.
- I really liked the CV examples and commentary. Specifics are great.
- It already baffled me in McDowell's more famous book, but there is no need in my opinion to name and specify concrete company names (big tech companies like Google, Amazon, etc.). The takeaways are general enough to be applied to any company really.
5

Oct 21, 2018

I see this book as the introduction to those wanting to get into PM, but Decode and Conquer has better depth in terms of the types of questions asked. I also found this book's framework for Product Design and Improvement to be inferior to CIRCLES. That said, this book has more breadth in understanding what it's like to be a PM and what it takes.

Read this for an intro to getting a PM job, then grind questions on Decode and Conquer.
5

Aug 29, 2017

Cracking the Coding Interview is a book everyone in tech has heard about (if not already read), but I was surprised that Gayle wrote a PM one too!

Want to land a PM/TPM position at a top company? Read this book.

Great example questions and resume advice, and a detailed breakdown of the interview process for major tech companies (and I can attest to this book's accuracy on that front). This is a book I'll re-read anytime I'm looking for a new role or when I become an interviewer myself.
4

Apr 16, 2018

This is an amazingly thorough analysis of the qualities of good product managers. I think any product manager looking for career growth should make it a project to work through as many of the chapters and sample questions as possible. And where you don't have great/easy answers, you know what to work on.

I would (and will) use this as an interviewer's guide as well, to find great future colleagues.
3

Dec 07, 2016

Things start getting interesting around the 50% mark, where the authors begin to cover the "meatier" PM questions like estimation & algorithm design (though the second isn't useful for many interviews.

The first half was pretty standard interview prep, which would be good for those who have never interviewed before, but is old hat for those who have. (Examples include: what are your strengths/weaknesses, tell me about a difficult problem you solved, where do you see yourself in 5 years, etc.) Things start getting interesting around the 50% mark, where the authors begin to cover the "meatier" PM questions like estimation & algorithm design (though the second isn't useful for many interviews.

The first half was pretty standard interview prep, which would be good for those who have never interviewed before, but is old hat for those who have. (Examples include: what are your strengths/weaknesses, tell me about a difficult problem you solved, where do you see yourself in 5 years, etc.)

Overall, there were some great content gems, but this is a book that's probably best skimmed than read cover to cover. ...more
4

Dec 08, 2018

This book is a standard for a quality interview prep book. It's well organized to give the reader an idea of what the Product Manager role is in tech companies, tips to get an interview, and approaches to doing well in the interview (with copious practice questions). I especially enjoyed the clear, easily adaptable approach to answering product design questions. The business strategy section throws too much information at the reader without giving them a good way to incorporate it, but reading This book is a standard for a quality interview prep book. It's well organized to give the reader an idea of what the Product Manager role is in tech companies, tips to get an interview, and approaches to doing well in the interview (with copious practice questions). I especially enjoyed the clear, easily adaptable approach to answering product design questions. The business strategy section throws too much information at the reader without giving them a good way to incorporate it, but reading about the different frameworks was interesting. If you are preparing for a PM interview or are interesting in transitioning to the role, definitely give this book a read. It's a little too long, but easy to skim the sections that aren't as relevant to you. ...more
5

Dec 30, 2019

If you ever end up going through PM interviews, check out this book. It provides structure, example questions, and explains PM interview process from the other person's perspective. E.g. think like your interviewer – how would you interview another person for a similar position?

Another good idea of this book is the structure on how to prepare for general interview questions. Sometimes, especially when you're deep into the daily routine tasks, you forget about ways to present yourself and your If you ever end up going through PM interviews, check out this book. It provides structure, example questions, and explains PM interview process from the other person's perspective. E.g. think like your interviewer – how would you interview another person for a similar position?

Another good idea of this book is the structure on how to prepare for general interview questions. Sometimes, especially when you're deep into the daily routine tasks, you forget about ways to present yourself and your skills. Basically you just read through the book, structure your knowledge, and prepare for the next challenge in your life.

Bottom line: 5, especially if you're going through PM interviews.

...more
3

Oct 07, 2017

The main reason why I read this book was to learn more about data driven products from a product manager’s perspective; to have a different point of view in the way a products are conceived, implemented and launched in the context of tech companies.

This book is an eye opener as to the diverse and complex tasks that product managers take responsibility for. This book also gives you great insights on what the working culture is like at big technology companies, and what background these companies The main reason why I read this book was to learn more about data driven products from a product manager’s perspective; to have a different point of view in the way a products are conceived, implemented and launched in the context of tech companies.

This book is an eye opener as to the diverse and complex tasks that product managers take responsibility for. This book also gives you great insights on what the working culture is like at big technology companies, and what background these companies prefer in their PMs.

At the same time, the authors go through good tips for interviews, which are helpful to not only PMs but anybody applying to tech companies, in my opinion. At times, these tips may come across as plainly obvious, but some of them are certainly new to me. For instance, I found the examples and tips on estimation questions to be original and very helpful.
...more
5

Jul 25, 2017

This book is bread and butter if you want a job in product management. Interviewers practically expect you to have read this (and many use this book to shape their interviews!), and it's the first book in product management that any PM would recommend to you.

In essence, the book gives structure to the largely generalist role of PM and the daunting, multi-faceted interview process. It's a great book to reference for areas that YOU need, rather than memorize tactics from. The book is best used as This book is bread and butter if you want a job in product management. Interviewers practically expect you to have read this (and many use this book to shape their interviews!), and it's the first book in product management that any PM would recommend to you.

In essence, the book gives structure to the largely generalist role of PM and the daunting, multi-faceted interview process. It's a great book to reference for areas that YOU need, rather than memorize tactics from. The book is best used as a guide - to assess your strengths and weaknesses and then sharpen your clarity on the PM role and the interview process to land a new one.

Highly recommend if you are transitioning from an adjacent role into a PM position, or even if you are re-interviewing as a PM and need a refresher on how to do well in various types of interviews. ...more
3

Jul 21, 2019

I primarily read this book to get more insights on *being* a good product manager rather than attempting to become one, and in that this book is of some assistance, but not a lot. Thus, I am somewhat biased in my opinion of it.

Introductory part of the book was decent, went into product and program management philosophies and practices among several large tech companies as well as startups. These were somewhat valuable from my perspective as comparisons and potential best practices for how I primarily read this book to get more insights on *being* a good product manager rather than attempting to become one, and in that this book is of some assistance, but not a lot. Thus, I am somewhat biased in my opinion of it.

Introductory part of the book was decent, went into product and program management philosophies and practices among several large tech companies as well as startups. These were somewhat valuable from my perspective as comparisons and potential best practices for how product interacts with engineering teams. Like many product management books, this one focuses quite a bit on anecdotes, but the summaries of product and program management styles and integration were quite objective and helpful.

The latter half of the book focused primarily on interview skills, estimation skills and practice questions for the above, which didn't provide a lot of value for me. If you're interviewing or thinking to interview for a product management job, this will probably be quite helpful, though I do think they tend to neglect the importance of actual market interaction and the questions that should surround it. ...more
5

Jun 14, 2018

Packed with useful information but not overwhelming, McDowell does it again with another MUST READ book for any individual in tech. The most useful components of the book were 1) the sample questions and 2) the example responses. As someone who learns best by seeing concrete examples, I felt that this book really helped solidify my confidence and knowledge about the PM role. For those who aren't the same kind of learner as me, McDowell accommodates through other methods of relaying the same Packed with useful information but not overwhelming, McDowell does it again with another MUST READ book for any individual in tech. The most useful components of the book were 1) the sample questions and 2) the example responses. As someone who learns best by seeing concrete examples, I felt that this book really helped solidify my confidence and knowledge about the PM role. For those who aren't the same kind of learner as me, McDowell accommodates through other methods of relaying the same skills. For example, she includes frameworks (with useful acronyms), as well as DO's and DON'Ts.
I would advise annotating or taking notes simultaneously, though, if you are seriously hoping to absorb all of the information presented. Simply skimming sections won't help you, and some chapters might even be most effective if you DO the questions or activities presented on a separate sheet of paper.
But overall, thank you, McDowell, for another career-boosting piece of literature!! ...more
4

Apr 18, 2018

A good resource, covers the gamut of what is a PM, what makes a good PM, what experience to gain, how to interview, and how to transition from adjacent roles like development of design.
The format is quite choppy and goes from lists of companies to Q and A sections to example interviews. Though not the best for flow, it is mostly clear why a chosen style was selected, and it is generally with the most efficient way to present the information in mind. This style though off putting on a first A good resource, covers the gamut of what is a PM, what makes a good PM, what experience to gain, how to interview, and how to transition from adjacent roles like development of design.
The format is quite choppy and goes from lists of companies to Q and A sections to example interviews. Though not the best for flow, it is mostly clear why a chosen style was selected, and it is generally with the most efficient way to present the information in mind. This style though off putting on a first read, will likely lend itself for use as a reference book.
My biggest complaint is grammatical errors throughout, that though not an impediment to comprehension should have been fixed in editing and mar the overall professionalism. A substantial portion of the book is devoted to big tech companies and their specific cultures/workflows surrounding PMs. Though helpful for those interviewing at those companies, it might have been better suited for the website.
Overall I would recommend this book to anyone interested in Product Management. It does a thorough job, and is one of the only books I know of that so directly addresses the core of product management.
Some short articles collected in the Appendix were both informative and motivating. ...more
5

Jul 21, 2019

One year ago, without any idea of what I'm getting myself in, I said yes to what may turn out to be a very important decision in my life: a product management job. Being the curious kind, I gave my boss to be a good, throrough interview to make sure I knew where the wind would be blowing from and afterward I simply dove right into it, head first.

What followed was a roller coaster of highs and lows with stuff I felt great for achieving and others that would hit me like a ton of bricks. However, One year ago, without any idea of what I'm getting myself in, I said yes to what may turn out to be a very important decision in my life: a product management job. Being the curious kind, I gave my boss to be a good, throrough interview to make sure I knew where the wind would be blowing from and afterward I simply dove right into it, head first.

What followed was a roller coaster of highs and lows with stuff I felt great for achieving and others that would hit me like a ton of bricks. However, resources on the internet are not very abundant for fresh corporate PMs trying to find their way.

That's why I was really glad when I found this book. If you want to get in, whether its a corporate or a startup PM job, this book is your bible. Give yourself one year with it under rigurous study and you will be able to know how many degrees of separation you are away from your dream job.

You'll find advice in here from some of the top PMs in the world, hiring resources such as model questions and thinking patterns specific to a PM job.

You may have a disconcerting feeling when reading it. But that's because you probably you dont have the role's full picture yet. Or, it might be coming from the fact that the authors of this book thought of all of the many angles to approach the PM interview from. Which they have. :)

Follow their lead closely and you'll dramatically increase the chances to be in the books for most of the interviews you'll have. I know I will. ...more

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