Black Privilege: Opportunity Comes to Those Who Create It Info

Fan Club Reviews of best titles on art fashion, artists, history, photography. Check out our top reviews and see what others have to say about the best art and photography books of the year. Check out Black Privilege: Opportunity Comes to Those Who Create It Community Reviews - Find out where to download Black Privilege: Opportunity Comes to Those Who Create It available in multiple formats:Paperback,Hardcover,Kindle,Audible Audiobook,Audio CD Black Privilege: Opportunity Comes to Those Who Create It Author:Tha God,Charlamagne Formats:Paperback,Hardcover,Kindle,Audible Audiobook,Audio CD Publication Date:Apr 24, 2018


An instant New York Times bestseller! Charlamagne Tha
God—the self-proclaimed “Prince of Pissing People
Off,” cohost of Power 105.1’s The Breakfast
Club, and “the most important voice in
hip-hop”—shares his eight principles for unlocking your
God-given privilege.

In Black Privilege, Charlamagne
presents his often controversial and always brutally honest insights on
how living an authentic life is the quickest path to success. This
journey to truth begins in the small town of Moncks Corner, South
Carolina, and leads to New York and headline-grabbing interviews and
insights from celebrities like Kanye West, Kevin Hart, Malcolm Gladwell,
Lena Dunham, Jay Z, and Hillary Clinton.

Black Privilege
lays out all the great wisdom Charlamagne’s been given from
many mentors, and tells the uncensored story of how he turned around his
troubled early life by owning his (many) mistakes and refusing to give
up on his dreams, even after his controversial opinions got him fired
from several on-air jobs. These life-learned principles include:


-There are no losses in life, only lessons
-Give people the
credit they deserve for being stupid—starting with yourself

-It’s not the size of the pond but the hustle in the fish

-When you live your truth, no one can use it against you
-We all
have privilege, we just need to access it

By combining his own
story with bold advice and his signature commitment to honesty no matter
the cost, Charlamagne hopes Black Privilege will empower you to
live your own truth.

Average Ratings and Reviews
review-bg

4.57

5542 Ratings

5

4

3

2

1


Ratings and Reviews From Market


client-img 4.8
951
109
11
11
11
client-img 4.31
1825
1737
538
5
0
client-img 4.6
160
156
48
5
0

Reviews for Black Privilege: Opportunity Comes to Those Who Create It:

3

Apr 14, 2017

The provocative title is obviously designed to maximize exposure. The first question that comes to mind, is what does Black privilege look like? The subtitle, Opportunity Comes To Those Who Create It, is really the foundation of the book. Charlamagne has become a popular radio host through his syndicated The Breakfast Club. His niche has been challenging those in hip-hop, asking the questions that others shy away from. So his book traces his rise from a small town in South Carolina to his The provocative title is obviously designed to maximize exposure. The first question that comes to mind, is what does Black privilege look like? The subtitle, Opportunity Comes To Those Who Create It, is really the foundation of the book. Charlamagne has become a popular radio host through his syndicated The Breakfast Club. His niche has been challenging those in hip-hop, asking the questions that others shy away from. So his book traces his rise from a small town in South Carolina to his current place in media. The book is part memoir, part self help, and part inspiration. The book is divided not by chapters, but by eight principles.

Early in the work, the feel of just belief in yourself and God and you too will be a success felt dominant and a bit fantastical. If those were the only criteria, everyone would be a success. As the book progresses it begins to pick up steam with humor, solid advice that young folks may find helpful and inspirational. The one principle that guides the book is the now popular, "live your truth." Charlamagne makes it sound more like embrace the things about you that are true, to take power away from those who would use your flaws against you. He uses the example of him looking like a teenage mutant ninja turtle. He learned to accept that about himself, or what he called his bookie nose, i.e. big nose. These are more examples of accepting your appearance, rather than living a certain truth. The thing I think is missing is the discussion about having the space wherein one can live their truth. That is not explored. If your truth interferes with what society deems unacceptable and threatening, then what? I think Charlamagne may have become aware of this because in the final principle he states, "Don’t get it twisted: I’m not a having an “All Lives Matter” moment here. Not for a second am I suggesting that racism isn’t real. It’s as real as the air we breathe. And the evidence is everywhere."

He writes in a way that I think will be relatable to his fans, youngsters and his own age group with at times pretty sold advice, like principle five. Put The Weed In The Bag! The reference of putting the weed in the bag comes from the movie Belly, when a character was talking to some young want to be hustlers, who hadn't sold anything but were talking about getting money, his advice to them was "put the weed in the bag." Learn how to do that first and move on from there.That principle basically deals with embracing the process. People often want to start at the top or always look for the shortcut, most times there aren't any. Understanding the things you may have to do in order to achieve your end goal is a valuable lesson to hear. He worked as a co-host on the very popular Wendy Williams show for a year and a half without pay. So that provides a very powerful example of dispensing advice by way of real experience.

"If I’ve had any advantage in this life, it’s that I was encouraged to read." I like the importance he placed on books and the value of acquiring knowledge, constantly being in an inquisitive state. "Books are what provided me with a sense of escape when the tension between my parents made our home feel suffocating. Books helped give me the confidence to dream bigger than I was supposed to as a poor black boy growing up in the rural South. Books are where I got the name Charlamagne (even if I did misspell it). My life is a living testament to the transformative power of books."

Perhaps his book will become one that will be talked about as one to be read and shared. I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
...more
5

Jul 18, 2017

To say Black Privilege:Opportunity Comes to Those Who Create It wasn't compulsively readable, I'd be making the understatement of the century and I'll gladly expound on that matter in this review.

My initial interest in Black Privilege was based on the current racial makeup this country is experiencing where more and more of the systemic "white privilege", the black community has been speaking of, is proving to be true. With video footage of cops being Judge and Jury to people of color, the To say Black Privilege:Opportunity Comes to Those Who Create It wasn't compulsively readable, I'd be making the understatement of the century and I'll gladly expound on that matter in this review.

My initial interest in Black Privilege was based on the current racial makeup this country is experiencing where more and more of the systemic "white privilege", the black community has been speaking of, is proving to be true. With video footage of cops being Judge and Jury to people of color, the racist undertones that the current administration has said against President Obama during his tenure that blatantly ignored or chalked up to fake news... never mind all that. My point is that, I was captivated by the title Black Privilege because I wanted to understand what that meant.

Thankfully Charlamagne tha God doesn't use this platform as a way to further the divide but rather to encourage anyone reading to use their "white privilege", "black privilege", or "gay privilege" to achieve their goals in life.

Now! I don't listen to radio... usually ever and I don't particularly listen to The Breakfast Club, the syndicated hip-hop radio show that Charlamagne co-hosts with Angela Yee and DJ Envy. Since I do listen to hip-hop and R&B, I'd have to be living under a rock not to know what Charlamagne tha God is. Plus, the infamous Birdman interview flooded my timeline for months. There wasn't anyone I didn't know who didn't want "respeck" when you mentioned their name. So yes, Charlamange and company are a big part of hip-hop history and his voice is one of the strongest (and boldest) in the radio community.

Black Privilege: Opportunity Comes to Those Who Create It is a memoir/coming-of-age/cautionary/self-help book all rolled into one. Charlamange in his own words and voice, provides 8 nuggets of information that encourage the reader to live, speak, aspire to their truth. He found early in life that he was going to speak his mind and his opinion no matter what because it was his truth. And because of his often controversial stance and willingness to be heard he's one of the most revered names in radio and the hip-hop community.

Larry Mckelvey, aka Charlamagne, uses his experiences as a youth in an effort to stand behind the nuggets of truth he drops. Charlamange explains that he could have been someone out there lost with no future where he "was caught up in building street cred during my teenage years. But fifteen years later, I can report there is not one major purchase I've even been able to make using it."
I almost feel like that line nugget of truth should be required reading and reflection for the youth in Chicago that are terrorizing the city with unprecedented violence. He learned that thinking that the streets was where it's at was only going to lead him to jail or death, or somewhere drunk under a tree.

Black Privilege also encourages the reader to find their truth and not everyone telling you a different route is being a hater. Many people need to hear Simon Cowell say their performance was the worse or that they just don't have the skills to be a hoop star. Many people think the only success there is is what the media purports it to be. Not everyone one can be a Jay-Z or Beyonce. Those roles are already taken. But, you could be the person that cures AIDS or cancer if you follow your truth and not someone else's.

Honestly, as I read Black Privilege, I couldn't help but Google some of the interviews he spoke of in this book and I think that's what makes this title even more enjoyable to read. Like I mentioned, I wasn't a fan nor a hater of Charlamagne. I had very limited information of who he is/was in the radio industry so to see that he wasn't blowing steam up my ass was refreshing. There are so many memoir out there that have been proven to be fudged a little, I was more than excited that this wasn't.

Really, I could go on and on about how much I enjoyed reading Black Privilege all day. There are tons of people (myself included) that need credit for the stupid things I've done as well as an overhaul in time management. Maybe I'm reading this book at the right time in my life where I've decided to go back to school (for the 3rd time) in an effort to "put the weed in the bag" and pursue a career. Either way it goes, Charlagmange is a very relevant voice that should be heard and this book, Black Privilege should be read. Yes it is vulgar and extremely jarring at times but really... could we expect anything less from the "Prince of Pissing People off"?

Copy Provided by Touchstone via Netgalley ...more
3

Jun 30, 2017

Part autobiography, part lots of life advice, very American as you may expect from the title and the cover and basically everything

The good:
- There is some seriously good life advice here that is useful to read in your 20s and 30s. You have to start somewhere which is usually small (here called 'putting the weed in the bag', after the movie Belly), it's better to have a foot in the door than having nothing. Lots of good stuff on procrastination and how you should always keep on pursuing your Part autobiography, part lots of life advice, very American as you may expect from the title and the cover and basically everything

The good:
- There is some seriously good life advice here that is useful to read in your 20s and 30s. You have to start somewhere which is usually small (here called 'putting the weed in the bag', after the movie Belly), it's better to have a foot in the door than having nothing. Lots of good stuff on procrastination and how you should always keep on pursuing your goals, perhaps even dropping your dreams if they turn out to actually be someone else's dreams. Nothing happens overnight, opportunity comes to those willing to put in the work etc. pp.
- Read books - always keep on reading, read books that are outside of what you normally read, read books with unfamiliar perspectives, read anything you can get your hands on, I fully agree!
- There is a lot of talk about God and how he believes that God has a plan specifically for him, I found this quote very interesting: 'I have to believe that. Otherwise, I’d never have transcended the circumstances I was born into.' That must be an exhausting kind of belief, one where you constantly have to fight off doubts.

The ugly:
- lots of life detail more for people who are into Charlamagne, I wasn't particularly interested in all of his exploits, more for his fans
- there's something that annoys me with all this 'you got to be an entrepreneur' stuff, something that's also common in science and medicine - a complete ignorance of one's own mental health. Charlamagne writes about how sleep is the most important thing, but then goes into how you technically have 168 hours per week to pursue your passions, you just have to cut back on a lot of stuff, where he describes how most of the time he gets up at 3:45am to work on the morning radio, then has various meetings and other tapings, and goes to sleep at 23:00. That's 4:45 hours of sleep, bit more than half of what I need, I can't see how that's healthy. Scientists and doctors have a similar thing going where they think that they have to pull the most out of the hours allotted to them per week, which never goes well (why do you think burnout is so common in medicine?). Charlamagne does not mention burnout or mental health which I personally think is dangerous to ignore.

The fun:
- It made me realise a parallel between 'nerd culture' and 'hip hop culture' - the dumb, edgy, misspelled 'name' you give yourself when you're 14 have to stick with you for the rest of your life, how else would people recognise who you are? Changing your name would be like replacing your entire body with a different one.
Signed: your reviewer, drsnuggles. ...more
4

Jan 06, 2018

I have to say I was pleasantly surprised by Charlamagne Tha God’s book, Black Privilege.

For anyone unfamiliar with Charlamagne, he’s 1 of the hosts of The Breakfast Club radio show and extremely blunt, honest and unfiltered, regardless of who he’s speaking with or interviewing. I used to listen to the show on my way to work in the mornings for a couple years, and while I didn’t always agree with what he said or how he felt, I did admire his lack of hesitation in asking the questions everyone I have to say I was pleasantly surprised by Charlamagne Tha God’s book, Black Privilege.

For anyone unfamiliar with Charlamagne, he’s 1 of the hosts of The Breakfast Club radio show and extremely blunt, honest and unfiltered, regardless of who he’s speaking with or interviewing. I used to listen to the show on my way to work in the mornings for a couple years, and while I didn’t always agree with what he said or how he felt, I did admire his lack of hesitation in asking the questions everyone wants to know. He is legitimately there for the audience, not to appease the radio network.

That said, it’s no surprise the same characteristics of his personality were evident throughout the book, and not censored in the slightest. I’m not surprised by his writing the book - he’s got an interesting story to share, but I am surprised by how much I was able to take away from it.

The book is part memoir, in which Charlamagne is very forthcoming about his many mistakes, and part motivating. How to do what needs to be done, to get where you want to be - Creating Opportunity. I liked that he gave credit to books for shaping his perspectives and keeping him curious to continue learning in life. He also mentions addressing your perceived weaknesses head on, taking them away from someone who’s potentially trying to use them against you. This is not the first time this theory has been suggested by someone but it was again interesting. I liked his honesty too.

”Be miserable. Or motivate yourself. Whatever has to be done, it’s always your choice.” - Wayne Dyer

Black Privilege is a book that everyone can gain at least something from, regardless of industry, race, your background, or where you are today.

”Believe in yourself and all that you are and know that there is something inside you that is greater than any obstacle.” ...more
5

May 9, 2017

I read the foreword, the acknowledgements and all! I can't say I've ever done that to any one book. Seeing the life of a black person putting it so literally and real without sugarcoating his world deepened my awakening of the passion I have for music! It also showed me where I could've done some things differently with opportunities and how to approach life from now on as a woman! Very inspiring! Thanks for sharing your world Charlamagne!!! One Love!
5

May 16, 2017

I needed to read this. I enjoyed this book tremendously. I think it's fairly safe to say, that this book is an instant classic...To read the rest of this review and to see Crissle West interview Charlamagne click here.
5

Apr 26, 2018

Never expected to give this character (didn't like this dude too much, to be honest -- Thanks for letting that be okay, Charlamagne) or his book a 5 star rating, but after reading Black Privilege, being forced to reflect on my own existence, and learning the details of his story, I had little choice! Would have given a '6' if it were possible. Seriously, an impressive read. Kept me engaged even through the acknowledgements!

Full review soon to come. It has to!
5

June 24, 2017

I read the foreword, the acknowledgements and all! I can't say I've ever done that to any one book. Seeing the life of a black person putting it so literally and real without sugarcoating his world deepened my awakening of the passion I have for music! It also showed me where I could've done some th...Full Review
5

Apr 25, 2017

Best memoir I've read hands down. I love the bluntness and brutal honesty he gives. I like that he writes the way he speaks...curse words and all. Although I don't agree with everything he says or what he believes politically, I can really appreciate who he is.
5

Jul 09, 2017

I could NOT put this book done to the point where I literally read close to 200 pages just to finish it because I was teasing myself. CThaGod really hit him with this book. I loved how he never gave up and his story can help anyone. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND EVERYONE to read this book. I'm more of a fan of his because of this book.
3

Jun 12, 2017

Ultimately, I did enjoy the book. As a fan of Charlamagne, I did enjoy his comedic style and reading about how so many people have approached him about his opinion about them, it was funny. With that being said, I'm not a huge fan of how vulgar he was at certain parts of the book. Some of the things he said did make me roll my eyes. Did I LOVE the book? No. Did I like the book? Yes. Would I recommend it to a friend? Maybe one or two who I feel share the same point of view that he does, but Ultimately, I did enjoy the book. As a fan of Charlamagne, I did enjoy his comedic style and reading about how so many people have approached him about his opinion about them, it was funny. With that being said, I'm not a huge fan of how vulgar he was at certain parts of the book. Some of the things he said did make me roll my eyes. Did I LOVE the book? No. Did I like the book? Yes. Would I recommend it to a friend? Maybe one or two who I feel share the same point of view that he does, but definitely wouldn't recommend to every friend I came across. ...more
4

Apr 15, 2017

Charlamagne is known to be outspoken and very opinionated. He is a "no holds barred" type of person so I didn't know what I was getting into when I started the book. I didn't know if it would be a bunch of celebrity gossip and behind the scenes dishing or if it would primarily be his story. I was quite impressed that it seemed to be an unfiltered account of his life. It was a little slow (meaning some of the stories could have been shortened) in parts, but overall I was thoroughly impressed with Charlamagne is known to be outspoken and very opinionated. He is a "no holds barred" type of person so I didn't know what I was getting into when I started the book. I didn't know if it would be a bunch of celebrity gossip and behind the scenes dishing or if it would primarily be his story. I was quite impressed that it seemed to be an unfiltered account of his life. It was a little slow (meaning some of the stories could have been shortened) in parts, but overall I was thoroughly impressed with his life story and the gems dropped along the way. ...more
5

April 21, 2017

Entertaining, insightful, dropped a lot of jewels. Most important is believing in yourself and the power of thought. He brings a lot the teachings of greats like James Allen, Napoleon Hill, Joseph Murphy, Claude Bristol, Charles Haanel, etc. to the people in a relatable manner. Some of those books a...Full Review
5

Sep 07, 2018

Okay, so I'm not a big reader when it comes to non fiction book unless I have to read one for a class or I'm writing some sort of research paper. That being said I must say the Black Privilege was a damn good read. Mind you the author of this book is a Rap/Hip-Hop DJ on one of the popular radio stations that is aired across the country. So he's not just a nobody with opinion trying to get his POV across to a particular demographic. No, I would say rather you were White, Black, Asian, Latino, Okay, so I'm not a big reader when it comes to non fiction book unless I have to read one for a class or I'm writing some sort of research paper. That being said I must say the Black Privilege was a damn good read. Mind you the author of this book is a Rap/Hip-Hop DJ on one of the popular radio stations that is aired across the country. So he's not just a nobody with opinion trying to get his POV across to a particular demographic. No, I would say rather you were White, Black, Asian, Latino, young or old, gay or straight, religious or not you would find this book very insightful, fun,crass, crude but 100% real, straight forward without any bull shit!

For this to be Charlemagne first book it was will written, and easy to follow along in the timelines and stories he told of his life and others.

I must say for being a serious asshole that this author is when he conducts interviews with celebrities and or just other people he comes in contact with on a daily basis, this man has shown he is quite intelligent, socially conscious, and really sensitive believe it or not. God, that was a hard pill for me to swallow because he can seriously be brutal to people because he has this thing about being totally honest rather you want to hear it or not or like it or not.

This is a must read. I've learn a lot from the guy.

Overall rating:
5*~ A Damn Good Read ...more
3

Jun 29, 2018

This read is cool. It’s better than I expected I will say that.
4

May 31, 2019

Funny and refreshingly honest. I don't agree with a lot of what Charlamagne wrote but I still think it's a damn good book.
5

Feb 28, 2018

In-your-face, opinionated, inspiring and laughable are just some of the words that best describes Black Privilege: Opportunity Comes to Those Who Create It by Charlamagne Tha God.

Let me start by saying, either you like him, or you don't. There's usually no middle opinion when it comes to this radio personality. Just his name alone screams arrogance. I mean come on, who names himself "Tha God"? Charlamagne does! That's who! (If you want to know how he came up with that name you've got to read In-your-face, opinionated, inspiring and laughable are just some of the words that best describes Black Privilege: Opportunity Comes to Those Who Create It by Charlamagne Tha God.

Let me start by saying, either you like him, or you don't. There's usually no middle opinion when it comes to this radio personality. Just his name alone screams arrogance. I mean come on, who names himself "Tha God"? Charlamagne does! That's who! (If you want to know how he came up with that name you've got to read the book). And in his New York Times best selling memoir, he shares how he became one of the most successfully, outspoken shock jocks on the radio today.

Raised in Moncks Corner, South Carolina Lenard McKelvey aka Charlamagne Tha God was a pretty low key child. Raised in a double-wide trailer with his five silbings, in his early years this self proclaimed "nerd" was an avid reader and heavily influenced by books. However, in middle school that influence would change as a new force entered his life changing his perspective of the world forever. That force was hip-hop. After hearing the song Paid In Full by Eric B and Rakim that teenage boy slowly began his transformation from Lenard the nerd, to brutally honest Charlamagne.

The book opens with Charlamagne sharing the story of how he first started living his truth. In this unquestionably hilarious account, he details how he almost got strangled to death as a result of talking trash about someone behind their back. I'm telling you...this story was so funny, I had to share it with others. And as I did, just thinking about what he had written, made me laugh so hard I cried 😂. Sharing that story first was perfect for setting the tone of the book.

Black Privilege is the perfect combination of humor and knowledge. It combines all the elements required for a great memoir. The author digs up his own dirt and uncovers his own mistakes and disappointments in a way that lets us know it's ok to be beautifully flawed creatures. This book contain's no empty boasting, or arrogant pretension like we often read in other celebrity memoirs.

Black Privilege is both motivating and inspiring in a very relatable way. This is the story of a man who was kicked out of multiple high schools, went to jail multiple times, has no college or trade school education, and came from a trailer park in South Carolina, who went on to move to New York, work with Wendy Williams, and eventually become host of one of the top rated radio talk shows in America. If you are unable to find inspiration in this story...Houston there's a problem.

I highly recommend this book. It is simply a really good read. It sat on my bookshelf for six months before I cracked it open. And I can honestly say I was not disappointed. After reading Charlamagne's many laugh-out-loud narratives, I walked away from this book with a much better understanding of the mind that has formulated some of media's most controversial opinions in the world of hip hop.





...more
4

Jun 27, 2017

I liked this book enough that I would have read it a few more times if I hadn't had to return it to the library. Charlamagne has a lot of good insights and advice and no nonsense straight talk. I want some people I know to read this.

The only thing that threw me off was the section about white devils right after the two sections about how everyone should be loving and accepting of everyone including women and gays. He goes on to say that 80% of white people are bad and out to get you and I'm I liked this book enough that I would have read it a few more times if I hadn't had to return it to the library. Charlamagne has a lot of good insights and advice and no nonsense straight talk. I want some people I know to read this.

The only thing that threw me off was the section about white devils right after the two sections about how everyone should be loving and accepting of everyone including women and gays. He goes on to say that 80% of white people are bad and out to get you and I'm gonna call his bs on this. Maybe that's his truth (which is I'm sure is what he'd say) but out of the 7+billion people int he world, almost 2 billion are white, so for simplicity's sake, ~800,000,000+ are white devils? I don't think we would have made it past slavery and civil rights if that were the case.

Other than that, a great book. ...more
5

Nov 24, 2017

I knew I wanted to read this book from the day I found out Charlamagne was publishing one. I am the first to admit I am not always a fan of biographies of any kind, I love what Charlamagne has to say on the radio so I knew I would love his book. This book was both insightful and entertaining. Although some of his motivational quotes were cliche and overused, they were great anchors for his stories and still served the purpose intended.
Unsurprisingly, I never knew most of the things I found out I knew I wanted to read this book from the day I found out Charlamagne was publishing one. I am the first to admit I am not always a fan of biographies of any kind, I love what Charlamagne has to say on the radio so I knew I would love his book. This book was both insightful and entertaining. Although some of his motivational quotes were cliche and overused, they were great anchors for his stories and still served the purpose intended.
Unsurprisingly, I never knew most of the things I found out reading this book. This was a majority of why I found this story so great and the book does not become repetitive because Charlamagne continues to hold the interest of his reader with an anecdote while teaching something new from those experiences. I loved the format of the book and the thought that went into it. I am looking forward to reading more books from him. ...more
4

Mar 27, 2018

This was awesome. Funny, profound, and deeply encouraging. Some of his revelations were wild and baffling, but nothing was unnecessary. Even the most gruesome details portrayed the fullness of the man we all have interesting feelings about.
4

May 25, 2017

A basic overview of Charlamagne's career, interspersed with tips on how you too can become the co-host of a morning drive-time urban radio show, as if you needed such advice, Black Privilege is about as candid and irreverent as it could possibly be in 2017 without engendering calls for Charlamagne's job (if not his head, nullus), which I really do appreciate. It's likely that at least a few people, including Funkmaster Flex and Wendy Williams' husband, will be upset by this book. The story of A basic overview of Charlamagne's career, interspersed with tips on how you too can become the co-host of a morning drive-time urban radio show, as if you needed such advice, Black Privilege is about as candid and irreverent as it could possibly be in 2017 without engendering calls for Charlamagne's job (if not his head, nullus), which I really do appreciate. It's likely that at least a few people, including Funkmaster Flex and Wendy Williams' husband, will be upset by this book. The story of Charlamagne's career isn't particularly interesting, but I found it occasionally amusing in the telling. The self-help aspect of the book was useless to me personally, both because I have no interest in self-help (though I do need help) and because I don't know that Charlamagne is qualified to give such advice, his successful career making fun of Lil Mama and Ray J notwithstanding. ...more
2

Nov 03, 2017

I saw Charlamagne on an episode of Ridiculousness and was surprised by his candor. So I figured I'd read his book. It was a letdown. He finally got to the "privilege" part at the very end of the book, which is how the book should have opened. The message is on target - no matter what color you are, no matter what you were born into, you can make a good life for yourself. But the layout is all wrong and I suspect no publishing company wanted a complete book on this subject (lest we acknowledge I saw Charlamagne on an episode of Ridiculousness and was surprised by his candor. So I figured I'd read his book. It was a letdown. He finally got to the "privilege" part at the very end of the book, which is how the book should have opened. The message is on target - no matter what color you are, no matter what you were born into, you can make a good life for yourself. But the layout is all wrong and I suspect no publishing company wanted a complete book on this subject (lest we acknowledge the complete lack of white privilege in this world, simply social engineering by Soros et al), they just wanted to sell books by yet another a famous person. The stories in the book are only mildly entertaining. ...more
4

Jan 22, 2018

Real and raw as only Charlamagne can be. I'm glad he narrated his own story. It was very interesting to hear of his childhood and leading into how he got his start and of course where he is today. He is crass and blunt but seems pretty well rounded and obviously well spoken. I enjoyed listening to him tell about his life as well as drop life jewels.
5

Dec 16, 2018

I wasn't expecting much from this book. It's not written for me, I don't enjoy rap (or hip-hop I'm not sure about the difference), I hate radio, I'm not black. I've decided to give it a shot just to say "yeah exactly what I was thinking, another garbage book".

After a few minutes (the audiobook is the only viable option trust me) I was sure I'll read the whole book. There is no bullshit, no ghostwriter or crazy editor changing every single word and sentence.

Charlamagne Tha God talks about his I wasn't expecting much from this book. It's not written for me, I don't enjoy rap (or hip-hop I'm not sure about the difference), I hate radio, I'm not black. I've decided to give it a shot just to say "yeah exactly what I was thinking, another garbage book".

After a few minutes (the audiobook is the only viable option trust me) I was sure I'll read the whole book. There is no bullshit, no ghostwriter or crazy editor changing every single word and sentence.

Charlamagne Tha God talks about his life, approach to career and family life, and about ugly stuff he would do differently. He gives a lot of good advice, with real examples.

I'd recommend it to every high school/college kid seeking success.
This book is in top3 on my career list for sure. ...more
5

July 13, 2017

Entertaining, insightful, dropped a lot of jewels. Most important is believing in yourself and the power of thought. He brings a lot the teachings of greats like James Allen, Napoleon Hill, Joseph Murphy, Claude Bristol, Charles Haanel, etc. to the people in a relatable manner. Some of those books are a little to new-age for people to accept, but he breaks it down in a way that everyone can incorporate into their lives.

Best Books from your Favorite Authors & Publishers

compare-icon compare-icon
Thousands of books

Take your time and choose the perfect book.

review-icon review-icon
Read Reviews

Read ratings and reviews to make sure you are on the right path.

vendor-icon vendor-icon
Multiple Stores

Check price from multiple stores for a better shopping experience.

gift-icon

Enjoy Result