Be Different: My Adventures with Asperger's and My Advice for Fellow Aspergians, Misfits, Families, and Teachers Info

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In Be Different, New York Times
bestselling author of Look Me in the Eye shares a new batch of
endearing stories about his childhood, adolescence, and young adult
years, giving the reader a rare window into the Autistic
mind.

 
In his bestselling memoir, Look Me in the
Eye
, John Elder Robison described growing up with Autism Spectrum
Disorder at a time when the diagnosis didn’t exist. He was
intelligent but socially isolated; his talents won him jobs with toy
makers and rock bands but did little to endear him to authority figures
and classmates, who were put off by his inclination to blurt out non
sequiturs and avoid eye contact.
By the time he was diagnosed at
age forty, John had already developed a myriad of coping strategies that
helped him achieve a seemingly normal, even highly successful, life.

In each story, he offers practical advice for anyone who feels
“different” on how to improve the weak communication and
social skills that keep so many people from taking full advantage of
their often remarkable gifts. With his trademark honesty and
unapologetic eccentricity, Robison addresses questions
like:
• How to read others and follow their behaviors when
in uncertain social situations
• Why manners matter

How to harness your powers of concentration to master difficult
skills
• How to deal with bullies
• When to make an
effort to fit in, and when to embrace eccentricity
• How to
identify special gifts and use them to your advantage
Every
person has something unique to offer the world, and every person has the
capacity to create strong, loving bonds with their friends and
family. Be Different will help readers and those they
love find their path to success.

Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for Be Different: My Adventures with Asperger's and My Advice for Fellow Aspergians, Misfits, Families, and Teachers:

5

March 23, 2011

Enlightening the nypicals who seek to understand Aspergians
John Elder Robison has spent his life teaching himself to compensate for his own lack of social skills due to living with Asperger's Syndrome. His first book, "Look Me in the Eye" includes stories of hilarity and pain, sometimes at his own expense. The response to these stories has surely far surpassed his expectations, as he quickly becomes looked to as "the guide" to parents' hopes and teachers' dreams. Seeing the need for more information, Robison offers to others the best understanding he has developed about autistic thinking throughout a life span in his new book, "Be Different".

"Be Different" offers deeper explanations of this thinking - at least as Robison has experienced it - as a child and as an adult. He reflects on how much easier his own life might have been if others had been there to guide him rather than punish him for unknown transgressions. In an attempt to enlighten those who are trying to desperately to understand, but who are handicapped by being "nypical" (non-Aspergians), he has answered some of the questions asked of him by the many caregivers and loved ones who now look to him for this guidance plus much more.

Robison has a knack for humor as he describes and analyzes events with explanations for his blank stares and misunderstandings due to differences in language interpretation. He refutes the idea that lack of response means lack of feelings, in fact, he states that the truth is quite the opposite. Some of the issues he discusses are as problematic to "nypicals" as they were to him, and his salient points apply to many children who are misunderstood by those who make assumptions instead of making the effort.

This book is a "must read" for anyone involved with loving or serving these children and who might recognized a hitherto misunderstood adult. It also might serve to enlighten related persons who need to forgive those who are not responsible for their condition. Robison's kind and wise views give heart from the heart.
1

April 25, 2011

Disappointing read
Short on useful, practice advice. Lots of self promotion. Also, disliked how the author made sweeping generalizations. If the purpose of the book is to help society understand that we should not place labels and expectations on those who cannot meet them, I did not understand why he chose to put non-Aspergians and Aspergians alike into boxes. For example, in recounting the car crash scene, he explains that "nypicals" (another label) approach crises emotionally, but due to being Aspergian, he was able to approach the crash "logically" as any Aspergian would. Clearly, people on any part of the spectrum would respond to that type of situation with a range reactions. I found the writing too conclusory, and that it offered little to actually assist in aiding my understanding of how to properly support a person with Aspergers.
5

Mar 02, 2011

I finished Be Different almost a month ago, but I’ve been thinking about it all this time, trying to decide what to write. Robison’s latest book is as well-written and entertaining as his first book, Look Me In the Eye. I think I’ve hesitated to write about Be Different because I see so much of myself in the anecdotes. I see more of my son, which makes sense, as he’s been diagnosed with Asperger’s, but there’s a lot of me in there, too. Even having acknowledged several months ago that I have I finished Be Different almost a month ago, but I’ve been thinking about it all this time, trying to decide what to write. Robison’s latest book is as well-written and entertaining as his first book, Look Me In the Eye. I think I’ve hesitated to write about Be Different because I see so much of myself in the anecdotes. I see more of my son, which makes sense, as he’s been diagnosed with Asperger’s, but there’s a lot of me in there, too. Even having acknowledged several months ago that I have some Aspie tendencies, it’s still a little weird to see that many similarities. I’m what Robison calls a “Proto-Aspergian”, someone with a few Aspie traits, but isn’t completely Aspergian (Robison’s name for Aspies). Neurotypicals are “Nypicals”.

I don’t usually read other reviews before I write a review (and this isn’t really a review), but as I said before, I was at a loss for what to say. Until I saw a reviewer who had written that he didn’t finish the book because it was written just for Aspergians and their families, and that the advice seemed simplistic.

Honestly, I think everyone should read this book. I guess it’s pretty, well, simplistic, but I think if people would take the time to understand a little about others who aren’t like them, differences wouldn’t seem so scary or bad. If you’re a teacher or in any kind of profession where you’re around a lot of kids, reading this book will help you understand that not all those “bad” kids are bad. (Kids rarely are, but that’s for another post.) For those with friends or family members with Asperger’s, it really does help to read things written by an Aspergian. For Aspie kids, while they may realize that there is something different about them, they don’t really understand all the ways in which they think differently than Nypicals. How can they? It’s all they’ve ever known. That’s just the way things are for them. So hearing it from someone who is able to articulate it is helpful.

On a side note, Robison writes a lot about music, and I’m not a musician, but I think both his books would be enjoyed by musicians. (He used to design exploding guitars for KISS, in case you didn’t know.)

As for the reviewer’s claim that the book’s advice is simplistic, all I can say is that he obviously isn’t close to anyone with Asperger’s. If he were, he would know that, in some situations, Aspies really do need basic advice that sounds intuitive to Nypicals. The example the review gives is, “Manners are important even if they don't make sense. Read Emily Post.” That may sound ridiculous to many, but it makes perfect sense to me in relation to myself and my son. I think if you’re a Nypical reading the book, you can learn something if you keep in mind that the book was written mainly for other Aspergians.

You don’t have to read Look Me In the Eye first to understand Be Different, but I think it adds a perspective to the book that you wouldn’t have otherwise had. And reading in Be Different about John Elder teasing his younger brother wouldn’t be quite as funny without knowing all the tricks John Elder played on him when they were young… and knowing that even after all this time, he’s still falling for it.
...more
3

Nov 21, 2015

I specifically picked this up because it's by the same author as Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's, which was a hilarious, clever and excellently written memoir I stumbled upon earlier this year. But, dudes, this book is not as good. Nopity nope.

For starters, it repeats a lot of the stuff in LMitE. I growl at repetition, I do, so that was instantly dull reading for me.

Secondly, he talks more about the technical side of Aspergers/Autism. So things that define a person with ASD. But, I specifically picked this up because it's by the same author as Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's, which was a hilarious, clever and excellently written memoir I stumbled upon earlier this year. But, dudes, this book is not as good. Nopity nope.

For starters, it repeats a lot of the stuff in LMitE. I growl at repetition, I do, so that was instantly dull reading for me.

Secondly, he talks more about the technical side of Aspergers/Autism. So things that define a person with ASD. But, at the same time he coupled it with life stories that seemed really narrow and specific. He acknowledged that there is a "spectrum" (so no two people with ASD really present the same) but I felt his stories and the way he phrased things contradicted that fact? He also expressly, at one point, says you can get over sensitivities if you work hard at it. That is not true for everyone. Nopity nope again.

I really enjoyed the last chapter, though, when he went into the psychology side instead of all the stuff about his inventing genius (which I enjoyed reading about in the first book...but I didn't particularly want to read it again). ...more
3

December 29, 2017

Not Really Relevant to Female Aspies
As a female Aspie, I just didn't see myself in this book. Honestly, I didn't relate at all to the symptoms that he related. It was an okay book, but I wound up putting it down before I finished it. The writing was decent, and I'm sure it will be a help to many people who have Asperger's. But I don't think women with Asperger's will find what they're looking for here. The whole reason I purchased it was I was looking for insights into my own condition, but I found it lacking. It's just not for everyone. I understand that he's talking about his own experience, but I felt he excluded women from it completely. For instance, he gives a list of people affected by Asperger's, but not one woman is listed. It's like he wrote this book exclusively for men, which is his right, I just think people should be aware of that before purchasing it.
3

April 26, 2012

If you know one person with Aspergers, you know one person with Aspergers.
If you know one person with Aspergers, you know one person with aspergers. This book does a great job of introducing you to one of us. But the usefulness of this book might be exaggerated. It's hard to write a book on aspergers: we're usually not that handicapped that we don't achieve anything. But sometimes this book leans too much into making expectations maybe too high. Any group has outliers, and I think the unique opportunities the author had in being able to visit the university library and getting a job as a mechanic contributed more to his success than his aspergers.

The author goes into detail explaining the hyper sensitivity aspies experience, but glosses over the hypo sensitivity. It's not just emotional feedback from others we don't pick up, it's also some physical discomforts that we're not all that tuned in to. I've read a case study of an aspie, who wasn't able to do tests because he got distracted from the air base, which wasn't at all near by. Nippicals hardly noticed the vibrations from the plains taking off. A month later the same kid got into the hospital because of severe indigestion. It had gotten worse over time without him noticing. Sensory wiring is off, giving us a strange mix of hyper and hypo sensitivity.

His explanation for aspergers, a lower level of mirror-neurons, isn't the whole story. The problem with linking mirror-neurons to empathy is that they were first discovered in macaques, an ape species not known for its gentile behavior. But I guess this book isn't the place to go into detail on that front. The jury is still out on that one.

When it comes to practical tips it has a few good points. Like trying to focus on something you find interesting when in distress. I guess the author hasn't tried deep pressure therapy. It's one of the few therapies out there for kids who struggle with over sensitivity.

Overall, it is a good read. But I wish there was something better out there more based on research than this single case study.
1

April 16, 2011

Be different: Adventures of a Free-Range Aspergian
I bought the book because of the positive reviews. It turned out to be a major disappointment--poorly written and lacking in substance. The few pieces of practical advice were not particularly insightful. One can expect to find similar messages from popular self help books on how to succeed in life. The fact that I finished the book in a little over an hour says a lot .......there's not much there.
4

October 31, 2016

Not Damaged, Just Different
The follow-up to his debut work 'Look Me in the Eye' helps by giving a more detailed explanation of how Mr. Robison processes the world as a person with high-functioning autism. As I am also someone who is on the spectrum, there are many of his conditions which also apply to me. I am a 56-year-old gentleman who only became aware of my "odd" qualities while raising a son with Asperger's. Similar to the author, I was only diagnosed in my late 40s. While some of Mr. Robison's characteristics such as a heightened sensitivity to textures, a near total absence of friends in school as well as poor grades, and his unique ability to see sound are not in my repertoire, the rest of the material is familiar to me.

Thankfully, the author's objective was to present the challenges and positive aspects of being an Aspie. The book starts off slow and I had a sinking feeling the thing was going to be like those self-help books written as if the reader has the intelligence of a 4th-grader. Fortunately, once Mr. Robison begins regaling the reader about his personal stories and how his high-functioning autism helped or led to misunderstandings, it becomes very enjoyable. I found myself laughing quite a bit, especially because I have done similar social faux pas. The author covers such areas as the difficulties of negotiating school, understanding social cues, dating, expressing emotions, empathy, the arbitrary nature of manners, staying cool in emergencies, being viewed as egocentric, and sensory issues. The book also explains how he persevered and gives suggestions as well as encouragement to fellow Aspies.

'Be Different' is a quick read and well worth reading for not only people with high-functioning autism but anyone interested in understanding how this influential segment negotiates what normal people consider run-of-mill situations. The chapters are short and the material is presented in a matter-of-fact manner, just like an Aspie. The Appendix is also interesting and includes some helpful descriptions as well as resources. It's the kind of work which entertains while giving you valuable insight and maybe will help you to reflect about someone in your life who you think is a vexing odd bird.
3

Jan 23, 2013

Good overall content, but author fails to acknowledge female readers. I didn't expect him to offer dating advice for girls the way he does for boys because he, after all, had never been a girl. It would be nice, however, if he didn't alienate female readers entirely in those moments he talked about "girls"--and there were a lot of them--especially since this book was purported to function as a "guide" for all Aspergians and misfits, which I presumed to include females as well as males. His son's Good overall content, but author fails to acknowledge female readers. I didn't expect him to offer dating advice for girls the way he does for boys because he, after all, had never been a girl. It would be nice, however, if he didn't alienate female readers entirely in those moments he talked about "girls"--and there were a lot of them--especially since this book was purported to function as a "guide" for all Aspergians and misfits, which I presumed to include females as well as males. His son's Aspergian girlfriend apparently helped him with the female perspective, but I did not see any evidence of that.

Further, author clearly subscribes to the popular definition of success (high income, married life, a degree of popularity), which I'm not sure most Aspergians do. My indifference toward those things, in fact, are the reason I've always been "different," and while it's easy for people to look down on or even feel sorry for me for lacking things they perceive as integral to happiness, I'm fairly content with not having them. Author's personal values, to me, only reinforce the belief that there's something inherently wrong with people who don't care for "nypical" desires and that it's vital that they change. I disagree. ...more
5

February 5, 2014

Aspergians Arise!
"Aspergian," as Robison uses it, indicates a place, (or point of view) that people with Asperger's come from...it's like I'm Italian, you're a Washingtonian, and he's Aspergian. It's a point of view, an outlook that may be different from mine but still has its validity. I like this approach as opposed to talking about Asperger's as if it's a condition, a diagnosis, etc. Robison is very honest in his biography, showing how difficult it was for him to navigate in a world that didn't have patience enough to see where he was coming from. I have friends diagnosed with Asperger's and I love this book for the insight I believe it gives me into what living from this point of view entails. I'm not "diagnosed" with Asperger's, but then again, when I was growing up, there was very little knowledge about autism, much less Asperger's. I am intrigued to find out what others who are "Aspergian" may think...
2

January 2, 2012

not very interesting
BE DIFFERENT was a Christmas gift to myself, mostly because I had so enjoyed Robison's memoir, LOOK ME IN THE EYE. I wish I'd saved my money. This book comes across as repetitious and rather robotic in tone, full of what seems to be mostly common-sense advice, repeated nearly ad nauseam. Perhaps it would be useful to parents, friends or relatives of children or adults with Asperger's, but only if they'd known nothing about it to begin with. The emotionless mechanical feeling the book leaves you with was very much like the memoir Templin Grandin wrote - also not terribly interesting. I couldn't help but feel that Robison only wrote this book to capitalize on the popularity of his earlier - and far superior - book. Perhaps a bit of monetary opportunism at work. Sorry, John, but this combination advice/self-help book simply did not work for me.

- Tim Bazzett, author of the memoir BOOKLOVER
4

Jun 12, 2012

I'm an Aspie-loving Momma who feels this book must be read by anyone who is personally impacted by Asperger's Syndrome - as the Aspie, as a teacher, or as a family member. It was tremendously insightful to peek into the reasoning of an Aspergian as a tool toward understanding. I have begged my daughter to read it due to the continuing thread throughout the book that an Aspie is truly capable of more than the average individual if depression or discouragement is overcome. Through relating and I'm an Aspie-loving Momma who feels this book must be read by anyone who is personally impacted by Asperger's Syndrome - as the Aspie, as a teacher, or as a family member. It was tremendously insightful to peek into the reasoning of an Aspergian as a tool toward understanding. I have begged my daughter to read it due to the continuing thread throughout the book that an Aspie is truly capable of more than the average individual if depression or discouragement is overcome. Through relating and acknowledging the painful experiences of his own childhood, the author encourages fellow-Aspergians. He also gently introduces the concept that Aspies can modify behavior to the extent needed to do well in the work environment or social settings without altering the core of their own personalities and inclinations. Robison is pro-Aspergian from both sides of the coin - encouraging to embrace the differences and find how to excel in the benefits while also acknowledging that some self-restraint and temporary tweaks of one's behavior will open doors for those benefits to be appreciated by others. I truly enjoyed the author's story-telling approach that literally opened his internal dialogue to the world. Sometimes I have found it difficult to understand why my daughter thinks or acts the way she does, but Robison certainly educated me on the subject and I know my parenting has been and will be changed by that insight. ...more
5

May 17, 2017

Into the mind of an Aspie.
Second book I have read by Robison. He has given me insights into the mind of the man I have been married to for 42 years. And he is so right, we give motives of their actions that they do not mean. Sure has given us new ways to interact with each other after all these years of misunderstanding (on part of both of us).
3

March 31, 2012

Of value
Designed for those with the collection of characteristics quite recently dubbed 'Asperger's,' this book would be handy for youngsters and adults who are different in this way. Maybe the biggest value of the book is that someone like this can read it, and be relieved to know that just because they have no friends, it may not, after all, be because they are bad and worthless people. The most poignant sentence in the book: 'I cried inside fifty years ago, and I still do today.'
It is written as a series of sometimes rather rambling personal anecdotes, but each one does contain a message.
Worth reading for those who think they might be Asperger's or think that someone they know might be so affected.
5

Apr 22, 2011

I felt affirmed by this book, and the highlights I made in the Kindle version are going to be handy bookmarks to remind myself of the author's advice about improving my social awareness. All of us in my family are "Aspergians" to different extents, and the more I read makes me realize that my mother also is on the spectrum, which made it difficult for me to get n-typical feedback about how to get by when I was growing up. Books like these from the "autism speaks" community (including Temple I felt affirmed by this book, and the highlights I made in the Kindle version are going to be handy bookmarks to remind myself of the author's advice about improving my social awareness. All of us in my family are "Aspergians" to different extents, and the more I read makes me realize that my mother also is on the spectrum, which made it difficult for me to get n-typical feedback about how to get by when I was growing up. Books like these from the "autism speaks" community (including Temple Grandin's Unwritten Rules of Social Discourse) take away a lot of the stigma I've felt over the years at my unease and conflicts in social situations, and my sense of being from another planet. The most comforting things Robison says are "our brains are complete; it's just the interconnections that are different," and "Delayed isn't never." As the mom of two Aspie girls and with an engineer husband, this book has helped clarify how I can give them a nudge into better connectivity with the neurotypical world, as well as allowing me to step back and assess how can use strengths to compensate for social weaknesses. ...more
5

July 12, 2014

An engineer with Aspergers
As an engineer with Aspergers I really enjoyed Look Me in the Eye. I am now reading Raising Cubby.

Be Different is an excellent resource for an Aspie. Some of the examples are as if taken from my life. Here is a trivial one. I am sitting next to my boss at a corporate lunch and having a soup. I am almost done. Then I pick up a bowl and drink the rest of my soup. Why? Because (a) it would be wasteful to leave some of the soup in a bowl; (b) because it is more efficient than fighting it with a spoon. Then a sudden realization: no one else does what I do! This should be a clue.

For those interested how Aspie’s mind works, here is my own book on Amazon, How to Improve America: Education, Immigration, Health Care, and more: Immigrant's Perspective:
http://www.amazon.com/How-Improve-America-Immigration-Perspective/dp/1495269884
5

June 18, 2012

Love J.E.Robison's books!
I read "Look Me In the Eye" before "Be Different" and found it riveting. There are so many parallels between John's life experience and my own it is mind-boggling. It is too bad I didn't have more 'fire' in me as John's life is surely more interesting than mine.

Anyways, Be Different was just as riveting. I am not a diagnosed aspie but have always felt different. Every sentence I read confirms my aspie suspicions and makes me feel more 'whole'.

This book brings up so many mixed emotions in me. A deep sadness regarding the way different people are treated and the laziness that used to be so pervasive in the mental health and educational systems. A sense of relief to finally realize I was far from alone, even though technically, I was alone.
A profound joy that the world is turning around and often accepting of and even celebratory of 'weird' people.
There is far too much to write here and it would only become more difficult to follow, so: Thank you John Elder Robison. Thank you for spreading the word to aspies and neurotypicals alike. Your story is the most inspirational one I've ever had the pleasure to read. I look forward to your next book!
3

November 1, 2012

BE DIFFERENT
This is an interesting read and a great insight into Asperger's syndrome.
The author has a form of Asperger's that allowed him to become wealthy by creating things, which audiences and bands all over the world, including KISS, have benefited from.
It also shows there's a little bit of Asperger's in many of us.
Not what you'd call 'a great read' but I'm definitely glad I read it coz it was an enjoyable and interesting way to learn about Asperger's from a man who has done very well for himself with a previously unrecognized 'condition'.
4

Apr 22, 2012

Having an aspergers son, I found it very helpful in pointing out lots of things too small and detaled to go into here, but it gave me a further insight into how aspie kids view the world and its social rules. The author, Being an undiagnosed aspie until he grew up, realised he was different and learned to copy and follow and cope. More than that he listened to the things that attracted him and made a career for himself. Descriptive, and matter of fact, it's well written and takes you inside the Having an aspergers son, I found it very helpful in pointing out lots of things too small and detaled to go into here, but it gave me a further insight into how aspie kids view the world and its social rules. The author, Being an undiagnosed aspie until he grew up, realised he was different and learned to copy and follow and cope. More than that he listened to the things that attracted him and made a career for himself. Descriptive, and matter of fact, it's well written and takes you inside the mind of someone on the inside looking out at what we call "normal" and at the things that we take for granted that "make sense" because we've been taught it does. When he describes how he sees so much of our customs and habits, a lot of them actually don't make sense. (to me anyway) Would recommend it to anyone trying to learn more about this condition. ...more
2

Apr 26, 2014

Eh. I wasn't impressed by either the advice given or the writer's description of his life with autism spectrum disorder. Granted, he grew up in the 1970s, but his problems with girls seemed to be based in objectifying girls rather than Aspbergers (seriously, why do guys, no matter how geeky, neuro-atypical, awkward or socially inept, only want to approach the PRETTY girls? Why do they all feel they deserve cheerleaders and never look for the girls who are themselves geeky or awkward? It's really Eh. I wasn't impressed by either the advice given or the writer's description of his life with autism spectrum disorder. Granted, he grew up in the 1970s, but his problems with girls seemed to be based in objectifying girls rather than Aspbergers (seriously, why do guys, no matter how geeky, neuro-atypical, awkward or socially inept, only want to approach the PRETTY girls? Why do they all feel they deserve cheerleaders and never look for the girls who are themselves geeky or awkward? It's really annoying). I also found that much of this book was just too individual to be interesting or useful to someone who is trying to relate to those who are neuro-atypical ...more
5

June 6, 2017

I have bought several copies of this wonderful book. The story is well told and worth ...
I have bought several copies of this wonderful book. The story is well told and worth reading, but my takeaway has been so valuable for working with people with an Aspberger's/Autism diagnosis: Build on strengths. Build social interaction around topics and skills that are strengths for the individual. Yes we all have to talk about someone else's topic frequently, but when it comes to trying to build friendships or find a viable work situation, spend less time trying to remedy deficits and more time celebrating what a person enjoys and is able to do well.
5

January 31, 2014

Great book for understanding the way some people see the world (asperger's types,"Nerds",etc.)
There is great suffering from misunderstanding that some people (actually many of our most creative and innovative) experience which could be a thing of the past if we were more tolerant of different brain styles. As an ER doctor I see the troubles down the road for many people that could have been avoided with understanding and tolerance. I read the criticisms of this book being too personal and so forth and I nearly didn't buy it, but I found his writing style to be perfect for the topic and vastly interesting. And I love the title! Buy this book for yourself or for your teenager! You will feel great and laugh a lot reading it. Then you can pass it on to more neurotypical/socially acceptable relative! If you love popular culture that reduces prejudice (look at the excellent films,television,comics,books in our culture today) you will love this book too!
1

April 6, 2017

Too Superficial, Wordy
Author Robison grew up to be a master musical technician, business owner, author, and functioning adult. His Asperger's limited Robison's ability to make friends as a youngster. He learned from watching others, reading a lot, and experimentation, and didn't learn he was an Asperger until age 40. Most kids are diagnosed with Asperger's (about 1%) after failing at some aspect of school, and most struggle with school, relationships, and jobs because their social skills are poor. Another 5% or so are geeks/nerds - with lots of Asperger-like traits, sometimes diagnosed as ADHD.

Robison loves routine - going to the same restaurant, ordering the same food, sitting in the same seat. He also separated everything on his plate so different dishes didn't touch, finished one food before starting another,

In high school Robison sort of bounced around, ending up cutting classes, acting up, and repeating the tenth grade. Dropping out he made a name for himself as an electronics wizard for local musicians. Eventually he met a girl interested in him - she'd graduated with honors and gone on to college. She then wandered off to someone else.

Some researchers wonder if the Autism-spectrum keeps people from forming strong bonds with their parents.

On and on. It didn't take to long to realize I know far more about Asperger's than Robison (I have it, my youngest son died as a result of it), both the good and the bad. And no, I'm not going to rewrite his dumb book for him - the critique would run on and on and on.
4

September 14, 2016

I did enjoy this book but his first book was better
I did enjoy this book but his first book was better. This book did cover some things not in his first book. It was a good read and I did learn more about Asperger,s.
4

Oct 08, 2011

Be Different: Adventures of a Free-Range Aspergian by John Elder Robison is a treasure-for people on the autism spectrum, their friends, families, teachers, and, maybe, for everyone interested in the different ways people are wired in this world and how that feels from the inside. It is also, I suspect, a useful self-help book, a sharing from one person on the spectrum to others who might want to figure out how better to live in a neurotypical world with some degree of comfort and happiness.

Be Different: Adventures of a Free-Range Aspergian by John Elder Robison is a treasure-for people on the autism spectrum, their friends, families, teachers, and, maybe, for everyone interested in the different ways people are wired in this world and how that feels from the inside. It is also, I suspect, a useful self-help book, a sharing from one person on the spectrum to others who might want to figure out how better to live in a neurotypical world with some degree of comfort and happiness.

Relationship advice: being the chosen not the chooser-There are millions of people in the world, & if I present myself properly, plenty of them will choose to connect with me.

Amazement at the different clothes makes-discovered late but embraced.

Studying others: watch first, to fit in.

Lots of helpful tips: use "over-focusing" aspergerian strategy to cope with sensitivity issues; find a safe place to relax in; find, enjoy, & develop personal strengths while at the same time always being open to learning & changing: life can get better.
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