A Theology of Liberation: History, Politics, and Salvation (15th Anniversary Edition with New Introduction by Author) Info

Download Online Bibles, Christian Fiction, Bible Study books and more. Read Reviews and find question & answers about Gustavo Gutierrez,Caridad Inda book: A Theology of Liberation: History, Politics, and Salvation (15th Anniversary Edition with New Introduction by Author). Read&Download A Theology of Liberation: History, Politics, and Salvation (15th Anniversary Edition with New Introduction by Author) by Gustavo Gutierrez,Caridad Inda Online


This is the credo and seminal text of the movement which was
later characterized as liberation theology. The book burst upon the
scene in the early seventies, and was swiftly acknowledged as a
pioneering and prophetic approach to theology which famously made an
option for the poor, placing the exploited, the alienated, and the
economically wretched at the centre of a programme where "the oppressed
and maimed and blind and lame" were prioritized at the expense of those
who either maintained the status quo or who abused the structures of
power for their own ends. This powerful, compassionate and radical book
attracted criticism for daring to mix politics and religion in so
explicit a manner, but was also welcomed by those who had the capacity
to see that its agenda was nothing more nor less than to give "good news
to the poor", and redeem God's people from bondage.

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Reviews for A Theology of Liberation: History, Politics, and Salvation (15th Anniversary Edition with New Introduction by Author):

4

Aug 15, 2017

I've been reading theologians associated with liberation theology for the past six years, and it wasn't until this point that I began to engage with one of the forefathers of it all. Early on, it was striking to me how distinctive Latin American liberation theology was from the predominantly African American strand I've grown much more familiar with. Within Gutiérrez's context, race is almost never mentioned and class is at the core of each argument and point. This obviously makes perfect sense I've been reading theologians associated with liberation theology for the past six years, and it wasn't until this point that I began to engage with one of the forefathers of it all. Early on, it was striking to me how distinctive Latin American liberation theology was from the predominantly African American strand I've grown much more familiar with. Within Gutiérrez's context, race is almost never mentioned and class is at the core of each argument and point. This obviously makes perfect sense for the context this was written from, and doesn't erase the critical reality that Gutiérrez is a Peruvian man himself, but there was still something that felt fresh about reading such a class-focused take on liberation theology for me.

What was also striking early on was the relative orthodoxy Gutiérrez remains rooted within. He does such a compelling and even beautiful job of continually bridging alleged ideological divides to explain that what he's arguing for isn't a break from faithful communion with God but rather a greater fulfillment of that. I've read a number of theologians whose writing comes across brilliant and academically adept yet sterile and detached from the subject at hand -- I was really struck by the way Gutiérrez consistently demonstrated scholarly excellence as well as a deeply moving sense of passion and vitality and adoration for the God he is writing so fervently about. It's just so clear to me that he genuinely believes with his whole heart what he is introducing and advocating for here.

The only thing that kept this from being a five-star read for me was my own biases against historical writing. Although I can absolutely see how necessary it was for him to thoroughly explicate on the context he is writing from and I did learn a lot from the first half of the book that almost entirely focuses on doing that, it wasn't enjoyable for me to read through. He does a good job of using an onslaught of scholars, but his voice gets lost amidst theirs and I found myself wanting to skim through until he was back at the center. With that said, the second half of the book ranges from terrific to downright breathtaking. He has an exceptional mix of relevant hermeneutical exegesis, exploration and expansion of other concepts in his field, and independent theological rumination. What I appreciated most, and what I found to be most central to his writings, was the emphasis on praxis that sits at the heart of everything he is saying. I love that his hope is not to add fodder to the abstract discussions of armchair theologians but rather to open eyes and catalyze hearts towards the enfleshed action of what he's presenting -- something relatively rare, and deeply appreciated. ...more
5

Apr 19, 2009

Only 5 stars? 6 stars! 10 stars!

Finally, FINALLY, a worldview that matches my own. It was indescribably sweet to read a book that blends my views on faith and on society so wonderfully. It took me some time to read this one. I paused frequently just to think and reflect on what the author was saying. I felt like I was savoring the powerful statements sprinkling every page, rolling them around in my mind like some delectable treat. I can't even imagine how amazing it would be to see this book Only 5 stars? 6 stars! 10 stars!

Finally, FINALLY, a worldview that matches my own. It was indescribably sweet to read a book that blends my views on faith and on society so wonderfully. It took me some time to read this one. I paused frequently just to think and reflect on what the author was saying. I felt like I was savoring the powerful statements sprinkling every page, rolling them around in my mind like some delectable treat. I can't even imagine how amazing it would be to see this book from an LDS perspective. Maybe that'll be my job. Or maybe I'm supposed to be Catholic? :P ...more
5

Dec 04, 2019

“God has the freshest and keenest memory of the least and most forgotten.”
Bartolomé de los Casas
5

Nov 19, 2012

This is an incredibly scholarly but also radical kick up the backside for Christian ministry and the Church. It was written in the 70s and embedded in latin american politics and religion, but has huge relevance today with the increasing poverty of the poorest in the world, the complete dominance of capitalism, and the necessary Christian response to such oppression and political injustice. It is the church how I wish it to be. It champions the struggles of the oppressed, and urges utmost This is an incredibly scholarly but also radical kick up the backside for Christian ministry and the Church. It was written in the 70s and embedded in latin american politics and religion, but has huge relevance today with the increasing poverty of the poorest in the world, the complete dominance of capitalism, and the necessary Christian response to such oppression and political injustice. It is the church how I wish it to be. It champions the struggles of the oppressed, and urges utmost solidarity with oppressed people as the ONLY way to be fulfilling Gods love on earth (increasing the humanity of all people by hearing their voices and acting on their needs and struggles, and a move towards 'utopia' which is a vision of a just world). It has had a huge effect on Christian theology since it was written, and much more has been written since, but the praxis is sadly still lacking in the Church world over (even if more individuals are nowadays more likely to hold such a theology). It is thick with theory, and biblical stuff that is hard going at times, and I think would be particularly hard for a non-Christian to understand, but it is worth the effort. ...more
3

Aug 04, 2014

I started reading this with basically no knowledge of catholic theology and emerged with a glimmer of understanding and respect for Gutierrez' arguments so I'll count reading this book as time well spent despite the fact that I just could not follow some of Gutierrez' lines of thought. (His lack of clarity? My unfamiliarity? Probably both)
4

Apr 12, 2012

Interesting to pair his thought with Freire's theories of liberation for education.
2

Feb 22, 2018

I agree with the theology here, but there seems no need for this quantity of jargony, abstract sociological blather. Full of impenetrable sentences which, after re-reading, said something obvious and would have been much more forceful if more plain and terse. I found myself looking up Bible passages in the index and reading just the exegetical parts, which were pretty good. I might continue doing that a little longer since I just can't stand this prose. Maybe it's an effect of translation from I agree with the theology here, but there seems no need for this quantity of jargony, abstract sociological blather. Full of impenetrable sentences which, after re-reading, said something obvious and would have been much more forceful if more plain and terse. I found myself looking up Bible passages in the index and reading just the exegetical parts, which were pretty good. I might continue doing that a little longer since I just can't stand this prose. Maybe it's an effect of translation from Spanish, or maybe that I take liberation theology for granted as it's been around for a long time. The section about Utopia was especially exasperating. ...more
5

Jul 28, 2018

My interest in Liberation Theology peaked when I returned to the Catholic church after my mom passed away. I had no idea that this side of catholicism existed when I was young living in the United States. I read this book while I was traveling throughout Latin America. It's academic but a good history lesson.
4

Dec 11, 2018

A book that looks to pave a radical path for the Church to follow very much connected to the Latin American experience but still relevant today. The book provides a strong argument for why Christians should give preference to the poor and work towards establishing justice and the Kingdom of God on earth. Gutiérrez provides a truly unique outlook, combining traditional theology with left wing and Marxist ideas. In this way this book is revolutionary not only because of its proposals for change A book that looks to pave a radical path for the Church to follow very much connected to the Latin American experience but still relevant today. The book provides a strong argument for why Christians should give preference to the poor and work towards establishing justice and the Kingdom of God on earth. Gutiérrez provides a truly unique outlook, combining traditional theology with left wing and Marxist ideas. In this way this book is revolutionary not only because of its proposals for change but also in its ideological impact on politico-religious thought. ...more
5

Sep 04, 2008

I believe that "A Theology of Liberation" by Gustavo Gutierrez is a prophetic call to change for Christians in the 21st century. The systems of injustice and oppression which are sustained by those in industrialized countries is a deeply embedded sin. Gutierrez writes that the love of God can liberate the world from those systems so that a "qualitatively different" society can be constructed based not on the importance of the privileged, but on the precepts of the Kingdom of God.

Many will say I believe that "A Theology of Liberation" by Gustavo Gutierrez is a prophetic call to change for Christians in the 21st century. The systems of injustice and oppression which are sustained by those in industrialized countries is a deeply embedded sin. Gutierrez writes that the love of God can liberate the world from those systems so that a "qualitatively different" society can be constructed based not on the importance of the privileged, but on the precepts of the Kingdom of God.

Many will say that this is not proper theology. I believe that this is a misguided understanding of the entire school of liberation theology. True, it is not theology in the classic sense of academic pursuit. Instead, Gutierrez advocates for orthopraxy in place of orthodoxy. He claims that our beliefs should be reflections of what we do in this world. And what we ought to do in this world has been taught to us in the proclamation of the Kingdom of God made by Jesus Christ. ...more
5

Jul 25, 2010

This is an incredible book and, in my opinion, is a necessary book. I think that Liberation Theology is the ultimate expression of where the church needs to go. It seems that with the current pope that Liberation Theology is being placed in a better light than it has been in the past twenty years.

It is impossible to sit at a computer and write a few sentences summing this book up. This is a book that demands to be read with a group, whether that be in a classroom or with folks who are willing This is an incredible book and, in my opinion, is a necessary book. I think that Liberation Theology is the ultimate expression of where the church needs to go. It seems that with the current pope that Liberation Theology is being placed in a better light than it has been in the past twenty years.

It is impossible to sit at a computer and write a few sentences summing this book up. This is a book that demands to be read with a group, whether that be in a classroom or with folks who are willing to launch into an analysis and discussion of the ideas contained in the book.

I strongly recommend reading this book in conjunction with Pedagogy of the Oppressed by PPaulo Freire. Both of these books are difficult reading, but they are vital reading. These books will challenge, provoke, enrage, and change you forever. ...more
4

Feb 07, 2008

While Marx called religion the opiate of the people, the opposite can also be said--it can be the benzedrine of the people. This decidedly leftist take on Christianity shows how faith and activism can take hold of marginalized people and help them find their voice. It is historically important work for anyone interested in the effects of Vatican II, Central America or Christian Movements of the 20th Century.
5

Sep 21, 2013

This is a classic!!! I agree with it and I think our new Pope is also a proponent of this Theology!!! If he would just open up the discussion of Women's Ordination!!! I am hopeful that women deacons may be in our near future!!!
4

Dec 20, 2016

I really enjoyed this. The prose becomes a bit... 1960s-ish throughout the book. But altogether it provides a well thought out argument for a revolutionary and militant Catholic theology.
5

Apr 06, 2019

Yes! Read this book. Whether or not you agree with Gutierrez it will change—for the better—the way you conceive of theology and humanity.

This is the most seminal work in of Liberation Theology—the publication that brought a theology of liberation into rigorous conversation with the academic world, uniting the pastoral and popular theologies of Latin Americans (namely Peruvians in Gutierrez' case) into conversation with "professional" theologians. Some decades after its initial publication, when Yes! Read this book. Whether or not you agree with Gutierrez it will change—for the better—the way you conceive of theology and humanity.

This is the most seminal work in of Liberation Theology—the publication that brought a theology of liberation into rigorous conversation with the academic world, uniting the pastoral and popular theologies of Latin Americans (namely Peruvians in Gutierrez' case) into conversation with "professional" theologians. Some decades after its initial publication, when asked if he should re-write it or if some components of it are "dated" Gutierrez simply described his work as a sort of love letter to his people which contains timeless truth that points to realities we must always face and challenge. This work is at once academic and approachable, historical and sociological, but mostly it is Theological in a way unfettered by the constraints of the academy (i.e. it reaches to hold hands also with the masses of oppressed folk in Latin America and beyond).

If you want a thorough, erudite, lucid, heartfelt and powerful read to understand Liberation Theology this is the best to start.

I have many more things I could say about this title, but I will stop by merely saying I am working on a similar project of far fewer pages and the amount of time, faith, work and love it has taken me has been difficult enough to appreciate that what Gutierrez did as the vanguard of academic writing in this category is ever to be reputed and appreciated.

Depending on who you are you'll like certain chapters more than others, but stop reading reviews now and go ahead and pick up a copy, because this book is worth your time! ...more
5

Aug 10, 2018

This was an incredible book. Since its publication I think the theology has been built upon in positive ways. Gutierrez's piercing insight regarding the church and injustice is helpful in thinking through the relationship between theology, church, and Christian life. Though as I Protestant I might take issue with his representation of aspects of the biblical narrative (and other theological insights that I find to be particular to the 20th century) his groundbreaking work still has much to say This was an incredible book. Since its publication I think the theology has been built upon in positive ways. Gutierrez's piercing insight regarding the church and injustice is helpful in thinking through the relationship between theology, church, and Christian life. Though as I Protestant I might take issue with his representation of aspects of the biblical narrative (and other theological insights that I find to be particular to the 20th century) his groundbreaking work still has much to say to Christians from varying traditions and contexts (though his insights might be more particularly suited for a Latin American context).

One issue I might point out is that the translation of this work does leave much to be desired. People I know who have had the opportunity to study with Gutierrez in his native language find the English rendering of his work lacking compared to his eloquence. ...more
3

Jan 06, 2020

This was a tough read. The language is very dense and I found it difficult to focus enough to pull the meaning out. I attribute a lot of that to the author and translation, as my experience is that this is just the way Colombian Spanish is.

The message that I was able to pull from this was important - the central point of salvation is solidarity with the poor, and that Catholicism is meaningless without a goal of social justice. If the reading level was more accessible, I'd make my mom read This was a tough read. The language is very dense and I found it difficult to focus enough to pull the meaning out. I attribute a lot of that to the author and translation, as my experience is that this is just the way Colombian Spanish is.

The message that I was able to pull from this was important - the central point of salvation is solidarity with the poor, and that Catholicism is meaningless without a goal of social justice. If the reading level was more accessible, I'd make my mom read this. It's definitely a message to sit with and reflect on.

On a side note, this was recommended to me by a friend from college. After finishing the book I reached out to her, after losing touch 5 years ago. She's recently moved nearby, and it's sparked a renewed and hopefully lasting friendship! ...more
3

Dec 06, 2017

The book is well written and carefully lays out each point. That being said this is a terrible representation of Christian. It is works like this that make Protestants often call Catholics an apostate church. It is not merely (though a large part of it is abuse of the doctrine of justification.) I read many portions of the book to my roommate and he asked where my heresy stamped is. He reverses the order of faith and charity. He calls for charity towards those impoverished. Liberation theology The book is well written and carefully lays out each point. That being said this is a terrible representation of Christian. It is works like this that make Protestants often call Catholics an apostate church. It is not merely (though a large part of it is abuse of the doctrine of justification.) I read many portions of the book to my roommate and he asked where my heresy stamped is. He reverses the order of faith and charity. He calls for charity towards those impoverished. Liberation theology has its roots in Marxism but he seems to want to create space between what he is proposing and Marxism. I hope this is not an accurate portrayal of what Catholics actually believe. ...more
4

Aug 25, 2019

There is a significant amount of history and context in the first two thirds of the book, which the author probably thought was necessary for the justification of what he included at the end. I was hoping for more specifics, although the latter portion of the book was primarily focused on principles and some defense of his thought against the common criticisms (of the late 20th century). Regardless, the book was easy to follow, well researched, and compelling.
4

Apr 15, 2019

The key text for understanding liberation theology. The author investigates what theology could like if it took into account the needs of the people. Placed in the context of Latin America, it calls for radical social justice that overturns systems that keeps people in poverty. While I'm not a Marxist, I appreciate the relevant nature of the theological reflection.
5

Dec 14, 2018

Well, it took 3 months to read it. There were so many pages that after reading two or three times I thought: 'Maybe I should just memorize this.'

This is going on my small pile of books for me to read again in 2019, right next to Christina Cleveland's 'Disunity in Christ'.

I will say this: No wonder this is a classic. My only regret is waiting until I was 54 to read it.
5

Nov 14, 2018

Challenging on every level--intellectually, spiritually, politically, and practically.

I especially love that, after 300 pages of deep analysis, Gutiérrez ends by saying, "To paraphrase a well-known text of Pascal, we can say that all the political theologies, the theologies of hope, of revolution, and of liberation, are not worth one act of genuine solidarity with exploited social classes."
5

Nov 11, 2017

A classic to build the paradigm

give an easy to resd approach to let me understand what is liberation theology. Believe there is more elaboration on some views by author in this 15th anniversary edition
4

Sep 05, 2019

A key and important book in 20th century theology. Deeply challenging. Offers powerful insight it to what liberation in Jesus means, and what a life following Jesus should look like. A real challenge to those of us here in the western church.
5

Feb 10, 2018

Get ready to plunge into the Latin American religious world if you're not familiar with it. This book is an eye opener and makes a great point and case for all people who appreciates a Christianity that stands up for and gives itself to the poor and needy.

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